Tag Archives: Raytheon

WISŁA air and missile defense

The Polish Minister of National Defense, Mariusz Błaszczak, approved a Letter of Acceptance with the U.S. Army to expand its WISŁA air and missile defense capabilities with the introduction of 12 Lower-Tier Air and Missile Defense Sensors, or LTAMDS, and the addition of 48 Patriot launchers. The agreement sets the Foreign Military Sale into motion and makes Poland the first international customer to add the advanced 360-degree LTAMDS radar being built by Raytheon, an RTX business, to their air and missile defense architecture.

LTAMDS
LTAMDS is the next generation air and missile defense radar, providing dramatically more performance against the range of threats, from manned and unmanned aircraft to cruise missiles, ballistic missiles and hypersonics

The acquisition supports the Polish Government’s WISŁA Phase 2 program, building on the nearly completed first phase which culminated with the delivery and testing of four Patriot fire units. Raytheon completed its delivery of the last two fire units to Poland earlier this year and the systems will complete System Integration and Check-Out, or SICO, in October.

«Poland’s expansion of its WISŁA program will fortify the country’s security and defense against a range of air and missile threats», said Tom Laliberty, president of Land & Air Defense Systems at Raytheon. «With the introduction of LTAMDS, Poland will become the first country after the U.S. to complement the combat-proven Patriot with LTAMDS which provides extended range and full, 360-degree coverage to detect and defend against complex, highly coordinated, multi-threat attack scenarios».

Raytheon’s successful deliveries for WISŁA Phase 1 were due in large part to the collaborative partnerships with Polish industry. Nine Polish suppliers contributed various system elements and components to the Patriot system and are now part of Raytheon’s Global Supply Chain. Participation will continue and expand with an offset program for Phase 2, including opportunities to support LTAMDS. Five Polish industry partners, all members of the PGZ group, will receive technology, equipment, and training to enable them to produce and maintain components of LTAMDS. It is envisioned they will become part of the LTAMDS global supply chain.

Patriot is the only combat-proven ground-based air defense capability available in the world today to defeat advanced long-range cruise missiles, tactical ballistic missiles, and a full spectrum of air-breathing threats. It is the backbone of air defense for 19 countries.

LTAMDS is the next generation air and missile defense radar for the U.S. Army. A 360-degree, Active Electronically Scanned Array radar, powered by Raytheon-manufactured Gallium Nitride, LTAMDS provides dramatically more performance against the range of threats, from manned and unmanned aircraft to cruise missiles, ballistic missiles and hypersonics. Raytheon is advancing the development of LTAMDS for the U.S. Army, with all six radars under contract having completed production and are undergoing simultaneous testing at various government and Raytheon test sites, conducting integration and test activities in parallel.

First flight test of AIM-120C-8

The U.S. Air Force and Raytheon, an RTX business, successfully completed the first flight test of the AIM-120C-8 – the latest international variant of AMRAAM developed under the Form, Fit, Function (F3R) refresh. The AIM-120C-8 was fired from an F-15C Eagle and downed the aerial target, meeting all primary objectives for the flight test.

AIM-120C-8 AMRAAM
US Air Force, RTX complete first flight test of AIM-120C-8

«AMRAAM is a combat-proven missile trusted by more than 40 international partners for both air-to-air and surface-to-air missions», said Paul Ferraro, president of Air Power at Raytheon, an RTX business. «With the advancements from F3R, which updates both the missile’s hardware and allows for future Agile software upgrades, we are maximizing the capabilities of this munition for allies around the world».

Under the F3R program, engineers used model-based systems engineering initiatives and other digital technologies to upgrade multiple circuit cards and advanced processors in the guidance section of the missile and to re-host legacy software in the AIM-120D-3 and AIM-120C-8 AMRAAMs.

This AIM-120C-8 flight test follows the completion of flight testing of the AIM-120D-3. Flight testing on the AIM-120D-3 was completed in just 11 months after the initial flight test and concluded with showcasing the success of the missile in a highly contested environment.

Recently, the U.S. Air Force awarded Raytheon a $1.15 billion AMRAAM contract to produce AIM-120D-3 and AIM-120C-8 missiles for 19 countries.

GhostEye MR radar

Raytheon, an RTX business, has been awarded $7 million to advance development and assessment of the company’s GhostEye MR radar, an advanced medium-range sensor for the National Advanced Surface-to-Air Missile System, or NASAMS.

GhostEye MR
GhostEye MR is an advanced 360-degree surveillance and fire control sensor designed for NASAMS that can detect, track, and identify a wide variety of threats

These are the first government contracts for GhostEye MR, a multi-mission radar designed and developed by Raytheon via internal research and development investments. Funding will support continued radar development and then an operational assessment at White Sands Missile Range later this year.

«This government support confirms the growing relevance and demand for the capabilities of GhostEye MR, as nations around the globe look to bolster their air defense», said Tom Laliberty, president of Land & Air Defense Systems at Raytheon. «Partnering with DoD, Air Force, and Kongsberg, we will showcase the sensor’s range of capabilities against a multitude of emerging threats».

The experiment at White Sands will assess the operational performance of GhostEye MR, with the radar providing effective surveillance cues and integrating with the combat-proven NASAMS air defense system. This follows the Strategic Developmental Planning & Experimentation (SDPE) office’s successful air base air defense experiment in Andøya, Norway, last September, which showcased NASAMS’ ability to engage and intercept various advanced aerial threats using multiple Raytheon missile types and Kongsberg Defence & Aerospace’s Fire Distribution Center, or FDC. The operational assessment in September will build upon the capabilities demonstrated in Andøya by utilizing the U.S. Air Force’s relevant command and control to link GhostEye MR with NASAMS’ FDC.

Funding consists of a contract from the U.S. Air Force Research Lab’s SDPE office and the Office of the Secretary of Defense’s Rapid Prototyping Program (RPP).

A member of Raytheon’s GhostEye family of sensors, GhostEye MR is an advanced medium-range multi-mission radar for NASAMS. The radar, introduced in 2021, provides increased range and altitude coverage to expand the defended-area capabilities of NASAMS. Additionally, GhostEye MR leverages commonality with the Lower Tier Air and Missile Defense Sensor (LTAMDS) that Raytheon is building for the U.S. Army.

OXYGEN

RTX’s BBN division will lead a team to create multi-hop mobile ad hoc networks, or MANETs, for the Department of Defense. The technology will allow forward-deployed service members with 5G equipment to communicate directly without the need for a complex 5G infrastructure.

OXYGEN
RTX to deliver 5G mobile ad hoc networks to the tactical edge

The Opportunistic eXtemporarY 5G Encrypted Network (OXYGEN) capability is being developed under a contract with the Office of the Undersecretary of Defense for Research and Engineering’s (OUSD (R&E)’s) FutureG and 5G Office with a potential value of $6.6 million over two years. It aims to connect a minimum of 20 pieces of user equipment by taking advantage of 5G’s sidelink technology, while securely enabling the transmission of data at 100 Mbps.

«Our warfighters use existing infrastructure like roads and bridges when they’re forward deployed now», said Doctor Daniel Massey, program lead for the FutureG & 5G Office’s Operate Through team. «Why shouldn’t we use existing communications infrastructure as well? Access to a 5G MANET allows us to move from single-digit megabit per second individual data sharing, for ground soldiers to 100 times more throughput, which will enable sharing more high-resolution video and imagery».

Piggybacking sensitive information over commercial infrastructure requires additional layers of security and mesh networking on top of relay links. This allows for multicast traffic instead of simple peer-to-peer communication.

«OXYGEN will enhance commercial cellular equipment to ensure a fully trusted and secure tactical MANET capability», said Chris Vander Valk, research engineer at Raytheon BBN. «We’re using techniques like cryptographic scrambling, encryption of control and data traffic and secure memory compartmentalization to achieve this».

The Raytheon BBN-led team includes Kryptowire LLC, Novowi LLC and Curated Networks, Inc. Work on the program is being performed in Cambridge, Massachusetts; McLean, Virginia; Brookline, Massachusetts; and Santa Cruz, California.

HAWC flight vehicles

Raytheon, an RTX business, in partnership with Northrop Grumman Corporation, was awarded a follow-on contract from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to reduce risk for future air breathing hypersonic systems. Under the agreement, the Raytheon-led team will build and fly additional Hypersonic Air-breathing Weapon Concept (HAWC) flight vehicles.

Hypersonic Air-breathing Weapon Concept
This artist’s rendering shows the Hypersonic Air-breathing Weapon Concept, which will integrate Raytheon’s air-breathing hypersonic weapons with scramjet combustors from Northrop Grumman

«We applied learnings from each successful HAWC flight test to ensure that it is the most sophisticated system of its kind», said Colin Whelan, president of Advanced Technology for Raytheon. «Continuing this important program will expand our knowledge of hypersonic flight and allow us to deliver the critical capability our warfighters need».

The team will continue to apply data and lessons learned from earlier stages of the program to mature the operationally relevant weapon concept design. Mainly, the effort focuses on incorporating manufacturing improvements into the existing HAWC design and flight tests to expand its operating envelope while validating system performance models. The airframe and engine designs are closely aligned to the U.S. Air Force’s Hypersonic Attack Cruise Missile (HACM) which will directly benefit from the continued advancements.

«The HAWC follow-on contract serves as an engine pathfinder program in our new production-ready Hypersonics Capability Center in Elkton, Maryland», said Dan Olson, general manager and vice president, weapons systems, Northrop Grumman. «Our factory of the future will seamlessly transition our validated propulsion system design into an operationally ready system to support further flight testing».

Raytheon and Northrop Grumman have been partners since 2013 and signed a teaming agreement in 2019 to develop, produce and integrate Northrop Grumman’s scramjet engines onto Raytheon’s air-breathing hypersonic weapons. In September 2022, the team was selected to develop HACM, a first-of-its-kind weapon. Additionally, the team has successfully completed multiple HAWC operational prototype system flight tests where digital engineering concepts, grounded in real-world flight data, have accurately predicted and increased system performance. Their combined efforts enable the production of air-breathing hypersonic weapons, the next generation of tactical missile systems.

Scramjet-powered missile

DARPA, in partnership with the U.S. Air Force, completed a free flight test of its Hypersonic Air-breathing Weapon Concept (HAWC) last week. The missile, built by Raytheon Technologies, was released from an aircraft seconds before its Northrop Grumman scramjet (supersonic combustion ramjet) engine kicked on. The engine compressed incoming air mixed with its hydrocarbon fuel and began igniting that fast-moving airflow mixture, propelling the cruiser at a speed greater than Mach 5/3,836 mph/6174 km/h (five times the speed of sound).

Hypersonic Air-breathing Weapon Concept (HAWC)
Artist’s concept of Hypersonic Air-breathing Weapons Concept (HAWC) missile (Courtesy: Raytheon Missiles & Defense)

The HAWC vehicle operates best in oxygen-rich atmosphere, where speed and maneuverability make it difficult to detect in a timely way. It could strike targets much more quickly than subsonic missiles and has significant kinetic energy even without high explosives.

«The HAWC free flight test was a successful demonstration of the capabilities that will make hypersonic cruise missiles a highly effective tool for our warfighters», said Andrew «Tippy» Knoedler, HAWC program manager in DARPA’s Tactical Technology Office. «This brings us one step closer to transitioning HAWC to a program of record that offers next generation capability to the U.S military».

Goals of the mission were: vehicle integration and release sequence, safe separation from the launch aircraft, booster ignition and boost, booster separation and engine ignition, and cruise. All primary test objectives were met.

The achievement builds on pioneering scramjet projects, including work on the X-30 National Aero-Space Plane as well as unmanned flights of NASA’s X-43 vehicles and the U.S. Air Force’s X-51 Waverider.

«HAWC’s successful free flight test is the culmination of years of successful government and industry partnership, where a single, purpose-driven team accomplished an extremely challenging goal through intense collaboration», Knoedler added. «This historic flight would not have been possible without the dedication of industry, U.S. Air Force, and U.S. Navy flight test personnel who persevered through the pandemic to make the magic happen».

The HAWC flight test data will help validate affordable system designs and manufacturing approaches that will field air-breathing hypersonic missiles to our warfighters in the near future.

Block V Tomahawk

The Navy received its first Block V configured Tomahawk missile from Raytheon March 25, paving the way to provide the fleet with an upgraded warfighting capability.

Block V Tomahawk Missile
A Block V Tomahawk off the recertification production line at Raytheon’s Camden, Arkansas facility in March 2021 (Photo courtesy of Raytheon)

These first Block V missiles are from the existing Tomahawk Block IV inventory, and have been recertified and modernized for fleet use.

«This is the next big advancement in Tomahawk capability, and a major achievement for the program», said Captain Red, program manager for the Tomahawk Weapons System program (PMA-280). «We’re focused now on delivering advanced capability to the fleet by recertifying and modernizing our Block IV inventory, and by contracting production Block V missiles».

Red spoke at a virtual ceremony March 25 to commemorate the event along with industry leaders. He noted over the last four decades the program has continued to upgrade Tomahawk’s capability and this marked the collaboration between Raytheon, supply chains, field activities and the program office.

Raytheon is conducting the mid-life recertification process at its Camden, Arkansas facility. The process replaces life-limited components in Block IV missiles to enable their remaining 15 years of service life, and provides the opportunity for the missiles to receive Block V modernizations. All Block IV missiles will undergo recertification and modernization.

Block V Tomahawk missiles feature a NAV/COMMs upgrade that maintains the capability for In-Flight Target Updates and Improved Navigation. Future Block V capabilities will add to the NAV/COMMs upgrade and include the Maritime Strike Tomahawk (MST) variant, designated as Block Va; and the Joint Multiple Effects Warhead System (JMEWS), designated as Block Vb.

Naval Strike Missile

The State Department has made a determination approving a possible Foreign Military Sale to the Government of Romania of Naval Strike Missile (NSM) Coastal Defense Systems (CDS) and related equipment for an estimated cost of $300 million. The Defense Security Cooperation Agency delivered the required certification notifying Congress of this possible sale today.

Naval Strike Missile (NSM)
The Naval Strike Missile was developed by Norway’s Kongsberg, and is now being marketed internationally by Raytheon. Romania has been cleared to buy two coastal defense versions with four mobile launchers (Kongsberg photo)

The Government of Romania has requested to buy two (2) Coastal Defense Systems (CDS) consisting of up to ten (10) Link-16 Multifunctional Information Distribution System – Joint Tactical Radio Systems (MIDS-JTRS).

Also included are two Coastal Defense System Fire Distribution Centers; four Mobile Launch Vehicles; Transport Loading Vehicles; Naval Strike Missiles; non-operational Inert Handling/Loading Missile (IHM) to support missile handling and loading/unloading; training missile and equipment spares; associated containers; training and training equipment; publications and technical documentation; spares parts; loading and mobile maintenance support; U.S. Government and contractor engineering, technical, and logistics support services; and other related elements of logistical and program support.

The estimated total cost is $300 million.

This proposed sale will support the foreign policy and national security of the United States by helping to improve the security of a NATO Ally in developing and maintaining a strong and ready self-defense capability. This proposed sale will enhance U.S. national security objectives in the region.

The proposed sale will improve Romania’s capability to meet current and future threats by improving Romania’s maritime defense capabilities in the Black Sea and increasing interoperability with the United States. Romania will use this long-range, precision strike weapon to enhance mission effectiveness, survivability, and NATO interoperability in current and future missions and operations. Romania will have no difficulty absorbing this equipment and support into its armed forces.

The proposed sale of this equipment and support will not alter the basic military balance in the region.

The principal U.S. contractor will be Raytheon Missile and Defense, Tucson, AZ. There are no known offset agreements proposed in connection with this potential sale.

Implementation of the proposed sale will require U.S. Government and contractor personnel to visit Romania on a temporary basis in conjunction with program technical oversight and support requirements, including program and technical reviews, as well as to provide training and maintenance support in country.

There will be no adverse impact on U.S. defense readiness as a result of this proposed sale.

This notice of a potential sale is required by law. The description and dollar value is for the highest estimated quantity and dollar value based on initial requirements. Actual dollar value will be lower depending on final requirements, budget authority, and signed sales agreement(s), if and when concluded.

$2.1 billion contract

Raytheon Company will produce and deliver Standard Missile 3 (SM-3) Block IB interceptors under a $2.1 billion, multi-year U.S. Missile Defense Agency contract. It is the first multi-year contract for the SM-3 program, and covers fiscal years 2019-2023.

Raytheon, Missile Defense Agency sign landmark $2 billion Standard Missile-3 contract

SM-3 is the only ballistic missile interceptor that can be launched on land and at sea. It is deployed worldwide and has achieved more than 30 exoatmospheric intercepts against ballistic missile targets.

«This procurement deal is a win-win for government and industry», said Doctor Mitch Stevison, Raytheon Strategic and Naval Systems vice president. «Efficiencies gained from this contract will allow us to reduce costs, continue to improve the SM-3 and deliver an important capability to our military».

The Block IB variant achieved full-rate production in 2017. The company has delivered more than 400 SM-3 rounds over the lifetime of the program.

Standard Missile

Raytheon Company’s Missile Systems business has reached a $1 billion, five-year strategic agreement to purchase propulsion systems from Aerojet Rocketdyne for Standard Missile products. The deal represents a supply chain centerpiece of multi-year Standard Missiles contracts that Raytheon recently received.

Raytheon, Aerojet Rocketdyne strike $1 billion strategic sourcing deal for Standard Missile programs

«Moving to multi-year, rather than annual-year contracting enables Raytheon and its supply chain to deliver even more value to our Missile Defense Agency and U.S. Navy customers, and the taxpayer», said Eugene Jaramillo, Raytheon Missile Systems vice president of Global Supply Chain Management. «These multi-year agreements also allow our suppliers to transform the way they do business with Raytheon».

Aerojet Rocketdyne provides propulsion systems spanning Raytheon’s Standard Missile family. For the SM-2 missile, SM-3 interceptor and SM-6 missile, Aerojet Rocketdyne supplies the majority of the solid rocket motors for these systems. Also, for SM-3, the company produces the Divert and Attitude Control System, a high-precision, quick-reaction propulsion system that positions the interceptor to defeat incoming ballistic missiles.

«Aerojet Rocketdyne has supported one or more variants of the Standard Missile program for more than three decades; we are proud of our contributions to these vital defense products», said Eileen Drake, Aerojet Rocketdyne CEO and president. «This significant agreement on multi-year contracts strengthens our current relationship and positions Aerojet Rocketdyne favorably for future business opportunities and continued growth».

Work on the programs will be spread across Aerojet Rocketdyne sites in Orange County, Virginia, the Solid Rocket Motor Center of Excellence in Camden, Arkansas, and at its Advanced Manufacturing Facility in Huntsville, Alabama. Raytheon produces SM-2 in Tucson, and SM-3 and SM-6 in Huntsville.