Tag Archives: Zumwalt-class

The third ship

The U.S. Navy christened its newest Zumwalt-class guided missile destroyer, the future USS Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG-1002), during a 10 a.m. EST ceremony Saturday, April 27, at General Dynamics-Bath Iron Works shipyard in Bath, Maine.

BATH, Maine (December 9, 2018) – Following a multi-day process that includes moving the ship from the land level facility to the dry dock, the future USS Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG-1002) is made ready before flooding of the dry dock at General Dynamic-Bath Iron Works shipyard, and subsequent launching of the third Zumwalt-class destroyer (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of General Dynamics-Bath Iron Works)
BATH, Maine (December 9, 2018) – Following a multi-day process that includes moving the ship from the land level facility to the dry dock, the future USS Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG-1002) is made ready before flooding of the dry dock at General Dynamic-Bath Iron Works shipyard, and subsequent launching of the third Zumwalt-class destroyer (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of General Dynamics-Bath Iron Works)

The third ship in the Zumwalt-class, DDG-1002 is named in honor of late President Lyndon B. Johnson, who served in office from 1963-1969, and will be the first ship to bear his name.

Lynda Johnson Robb and Luci Johnson, the two daughters of the former president, served as the ship’s sponsors. In a time-honored Navy tradition, the sisters christened the ship by breaking a bottle of sparkling wine across the bow. Robb also served as the principal speaker.

«The future USS Lyndon B. Johnson will serve for decades as a reminder of President Johnson’s service to our nation and support of a strong Navy and Marine Corps team», said Secretary of the Navy Richard V. Spencer. «This ship honors not only President Johnson’s service, but also the service of our industry partners who are vital in making the Navy the nation needs».

Johnson served as a U.S. Navy Reserve officer before being called to active duty after the attack on Pearl Harbor. He requested a combat assignment and served in the Pacific theater. After returning from active duty, Johnson reported to Navy leaders and Congress what he believed were deplorable living conditions for the warfighters. He continued to fight for better standards for all military members.

Johnson’s time as president was marked by the passage of programs that greatly influenced and affected education, healthcare and civil rights for generations to come. He signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964 into law, enacting comprehensive provisions protecting the right to vote and prohibiting racial discrimination by employers. His work on civil rights continued with the passage of the Voting Rights Act, which guaranteed voting rights for all people, regardless of race.

The multi-mission Zumwalt-class destroyers will be capable of performing a range of deterrence, power projection, sea control, and command and control missions while allowing the Navy to evolve with new systems and missions. Zumwalt ships are 610 feet/186 meters long, have a beam of 80.7 feet/24.6 meter, displace almost 16,000 tons, and are capable of making 30 knots/34.5 mph/55.5 km/h speed.

Michael Monsoor

The U.S. Navy commissioned its newest destroyer, USS Michael Monsoor (DDG-1001), Saturday, January 26 during a 10 a.m. (PST) ceremony at Naval Air Station (NAS) North Island, San Diego, California, where the ship will be homeported.

USS Michael Monsoor (DDG-1001) commissioning ceremony
USS Michael Monsoor (DDG-1001) commissioning ceremony

The second ship in the Zumwalt-class of destroyers, DDG-1001 is named in honor of Medal of Honor recipient Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class (SEAL) Michael A. Monsoor, who was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for his heroic actions in Ramadi, Iraq, September 29, 2006.

Scott Peters, U.S. Representative from California’s 52nd District, delivered the commissioning ceremony’s principal address. Sally Monsoor, Petty Officer Monsoor’s mother, served as the ship’s sponsor. The ceremony was highlighted by a time-honored Navy tradition when Mrs. Monsoor gives the first order to «man our ship and bring her to life»!

«USS Michael Monsoor is one of the most capable warfighting assets our nation has to offer», said Secretary of the Navy Richard V. Spencer. «This ship will provide independent forward presence and deterrence for decades to come and I am confident the crew will operate this vessel with the level of expertise, courage, and strength needed to overcome any challenge».

On September 29, 2006, in Ar Ramadi, Iraq, Monsoor was part of a sniper overwatch security position with two other SEALs and several Iraqi Army soldiers when an insurgent closed in and threw a fragmentation grenade into the position. The grenade hit Monsoor in the chest before falling to the ground. Positioned next to the single exit, Monsoor was the only one who could have escaped harm. Instead he dropped onto the grenade, smothering it to protect his teammates. The grenade detonated as he came down on top of it, inflicting a mortal wound. Monsoor’s actions saved the lives of his two teammates and the accompanying Iraqi soldiers. His Medal of Honor citation reads, «by his undaunted courage, fighting spirit and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of certain death, Petty Officer Monsoor gallantly gave his life for his country, thereby reflecting great credit upon himself and upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service».

The future USS Michael Monsoor (DDG-1001) includes new technologies and will serve as a multi-mission platform capable of operating as an integral part of naval, joint or combined maritime forces. The Zumwalt-class fields a considerably larger flight deck and has capacity for two MH-60R and three Vertical Take-off and landing tactical Unmanned Air Vehicles (VTUAVs) to execute a wider array of surface, aviation, and undersea missions that deliver more manpower, firepower, and computing power to the fight. The future USS Michael Monsoor’s Vertical Launch System (VLS) features cells physically larger than similar cells on today’s ships, allowing this class to fire larger and more advanced land and anti-ship missiles in the future.

The Navy's next generation destroyer, the future USS Michael Monsoor (DDG-1001), successfully completed acceptance. The U.S. Navy's Board of Inspection and Survey reviewed the ship and its crew during a series of demonstrations both pier side and underway, evaluating the ship's construction and compliance with Navy specifications (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of Bath Iron Works/Released)
The Navy’s next generation destroyer, the future USS Michael Monsoor (DDG-1001), successfully completed acceptance. The U.S. Navy’s Board of Inspection and Survey reviewed the ship and its crew during a series of demonstrations both pier side and underway, evaluating the ship’s construction and compliance with Navy specifications (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of Bath Iron Works/Released)