Tag Archives: USS Tripoli (LHA-7)

Christening of Tripoli

The U.S. Navy christened its newest America-class amphibious assault ship, the future USS Tripoli (LHA-7), during a 10 a.m. CDT ceremony Saturday, September 16, in Pascagoula, Mississippi.

Lynne Mabus, wife of former Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus, is the ship’s sponsor and officially christened Tripoli after successfully breaking a bottle of sparkling wine across its bow
Lynne Mabus, wife of former Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus, is the ship’s sponsor and officially christened Tripoli after successfully breaking a bottle of sparkling wine across its bow

Mr. Thomas Dee, performing the duties of the Under Secretary of the U.S. Navy, delivered the ceremony’s principal address. Lynne Mabus, the wife of the 75th Secretary of the U.S. Navy, the Honorable Ray Mabus, served as the ship’s sponsor. The ceremony was highlighted by Mrs. Mabus breaking a bottle of sparkling wine across the bow to formally christen the ship, a time-honored Navy tradition.

«When USS Tripoli, the newest America-class amphibious assault ship, joins the fleet, we’ll be a stronger, more flexible, and better Navy and Marine Corps team», Dee said. «The ship will be a force multiplier, and her crew will proudly serve our country for decades to come. I am grateful to the men and women of Ingalls Shipbuilding for their dedication and to the citizens of Pascagoula for their unwavering support as we continue to make our Navy stronger».

USS Tripoli (LHA-7) will incorporate key components to provide the fleet with a more aviation centric platform. The design of the future USS Tripoli (LHA-7) will feature an enlarged hangar deck, realignment and expansion of the aviation maintenance facilities, a significant increase in available stowage for parts and support equipment, and increased aviation fuel capacity. The ship will also be the first LHA replacement ship to depart the shipyard fully ready to integrate the entire future air combat element of the Marine Corps to include the Joint Strike Fighter (JSF).

Along with its pioneering aviation element, USS Tripoli (LHA-7) will incorporate a gas turbine propulsion plant, zonal electrical distribution, and fuel efficient electric auxiliary propulsion systems first installed on USS Makin Island (LHD-8). USS Tripoli (LHA-7) will be 844 feet/257.3 m in length, have a displacement of approximately 43,745 long tons/44,449 metric tons and be capable of operating at speeds of over 20+ knots/23+ mph/37+ km/h.

USS Tripoli (LHA-7) will be the third U.S. Navy ship to be named Tripoli. The name honors and commemorates the force of U.S. Marines and approximately 370 soldiers from 11 other nationalities who captured the city of Derna, Libya during the 1805 Battle of Derna. The battle resulted in a subsequent peace treaty and the successful conclusion of the combined operations of the First Barbary War, and was later memorialized in the Marines’ Hymn with the line, «to the shores of Tripoli».

Huntington Ingalls Industries Launches Amphibious Assault Ship USS Tripoli (LHA-7)
Huntington Ingalls Industries Launches Amphibious Assault Ship USS Tripoli (LHA-7)

 

General Characteristics

Builder Huntington Ingalls Industries Inc., Ingalls Operations, Pascagoula, Mississippi
Date Deployed Delivered to the fleet in on April 10, 2014
Propulsion Two marine gas turbines, two shafts, 70,000 total brake horsepower/52,199 kW, two 5,000 horsepower/3,728 kW auxiliary propulsion motors
Length 844 feet/257.3 m
Beam 106 feet/32.3 m
Displacement Approximately 43,745 long tons full load/44,449 metric tons
Speed 20+ knots/23+ mph/37+ km/h
Crew 1,059 (65 officers)
Load 1,687 troops (plus 184 surge)
Armament 2 RAM (Rolling Airframe Missile) launchers
2 NATO Sea Sparrow launchers with ESSM (Evolved Sea Sparrow Missile)
2 20-mm Phalanx CIWS (Close-In Weapon System) mounts
7 twin 12,7-mm/.50 cal. machine guns
Aircraft 9 F-35B Lightning II Joint Strike Fighters (JSF) STOVL (Short Take-Off and Vertical Landing) aircraft
4 AH-1Z Viper attack helicopters
4 CH-53E Super Stallion helicopters
12 MV-22B Osprey VTOL (Vertical Take-Off and Landing) tiltrotors
2 MH-60S Sea Hawk Search and Rescue (SAR) helicopters
UH-1Y Huey helicopters

 

Ships

Ship Laid down Launched Commissioned Homeport
USS America (LHA-6) 07-17-2009 06-04-2012 10-11-2014 San Diego, California
USS Tripoli (LHA-7) 06-22-2014 05-01-2017
USS Bougainville (LHA-8)

 

Ahead of Schedule

Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division launched the amphibious assault ship USS Tripoli (LHA-7) from its floating dry dock on Monday, May 1. The launch was accomplished 13 weeks ahead of the original construction schedule.

Huntington Ingalls Industries Launches Amphibious Assault Ship USS Tripoli (LHA-7)
Huntington Ingalls Industries Launches Amphibious Assault Ship USS Tripoli (LHA-7)

«Ingalls has been the Navy’s large-deck amphibia builder since the early 1970s», said Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias. «Our vast knowledge and experience in the design and construction of these great ships is paying dividends – not only for the American taxpayer, but also for the Navy-Marine Corps team and the sailors and Marines who will be operating these important warships in defense of our country».

Tripoli, the second of the America-class amphibious assault ships, was translated to the company’s floating dry dock on April 8 and, after some prep work on the ship’s hull, was launched on Saturday, April 29. The next ship in the class, USS Bougainville (LHA-8), is scheduled to start construction in late 2018.

Ingalls is currently the sole builder of large-deck amphibious ships for the U.S. Navy. The shipyard delivered its first amphibious assault ship, the Iwo Jima-class USS Tripoli (LPH-10), in 1966. Ingalls has since built five Tarawa-class (LHA-1) ships, eight Wasp-class (LHD-1) ships and the first in a new class of ships, USS America (LHA-6).

 

General Characteristics

Builder Huntington Ingalls Industries Inc., Ingalls Operations, Pascagoula, Mississippi
Date Deployed Delivered to the fleet in on April 10, 2014
Propulsion Two marine gas turbines, two shafts, 70,000 total brake horsepower/52,199 kW, two 5,000 horsepower/3,728 kW auxiliary propulsion motors
Length 844 feet/257.3 m
Beam 106 feet/32.3 m
Displacement Approximately 43,745 long tons full load/44,449 metric tons
Speed 20+ knots/23+ mph/37+ km/h
Crew 1,059 (65 officers)
Load 1,687 troops (plus 184 surge)
Armament 2 RAM (Rolling Airframe Missile) launchers
2 NATO Sea Sparrow launchers with ESSM (Evolved Sea Sparrow Missile)
2 20-mm Phalanx CIWS (Close-In Weapon System) mounts
7 twin 12,7-mm/.50 cal. machine guns
Aircraft 9 F-35B Lightning II Joint Strike Fighters (JSF) STOVL (Short Take-Off and Vertical Landing) aircraft
4 AH-1Z Viper attack helicopters
4 CH-53E Super Stallion helicopters
12 MV-22B Osprey VTOL (Vertical Take-Off and Landing) tiltrotors
2 MH-60S Sea Hawk Search and Rescue (SAR) helicopters
UH-1Y Huey helicopters

 

Ships

Ship Laid down Launched Commissioned Homeport
USS America (LHA-6) 07-17-2009 06-04-2012 10-11-2014 San Diego, California
USS Tripoli (LHA-7) 06-22-2014 05-01-2017
USS Bougainville (LHA-8)

USS Tripoli (LHA-7) Launched at Ingalls Shipbuilding

700-Ton Deckhouse

Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division has successfully installed the deckhouse on the amphibious assault ship USS Tripoli (LHA-7). The lifting of the deckhouse is a major event in the ship’s construction schedule and begins the integration of the three largest sections of the ship. The deckhouse was installed on Saturday, on July 9 – three weeks ahead of schedule.

Ingalls Shipbuilding lands the 700-ton deckhouse on the amphibious assault ship USS Tripoli (LHA-7) on July 9 (Photo by Lance Davis/HII)
Ingalls Shipbuilding lands the 700-ton deckhouse on the amphibious assault ship USS Tripoli (LHA-7) on July 9 (Photo by Lance Davis/HII)

«Ingalls Shipbuilding continues to be the builder of choice when it comes to the construction of amphibious warships for the U.S. Navy», said Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias. «We are benefitting from serial production, including our process of rolling over the same shipbuilding crews to work on the large-deck amphibious ships. It’s a busy time on LHA-7, and our construction milestones continue to clock in ahead of schedule. We look forward to delivering another quality amphibious ship to our customer in 2018».

Like USS America (LHA-6), which was delivered in 2014, Tripoli will have an increased aviation capacity to include an enlarged hangar deck, realignment and expansion of the aviation maintenance facilities, a significant increase in available stowage for parts and support equipment, and increased aviation fuel capacity. Similar to its predecessors, the ship will be able to operate as the flagship for an Expeditionary Strike Group (ESG). Ingalls Shipbuilding has built five Tarawa-class (LHA-1) ships as well as eight Wasp-class (LHD-1) ships. Ingalls was recently awarded a contract for LHA-8.

This deckhouse installation on Tripoli was no small feat, according to Premo Sabbatini, LHA-7 program director. «The deckhouse is comprised of five deck levels and includes radio and radar spaces, the primary flight control station, and the pilot house», he said. «The estimated lift weight for the deckhouse is 701 short tons and required three cranes to complete this task. Performing this milestone ahead of schedule is a testament to the hard work and dedication of our shipbuilders».

Tripoli will be the third ship to bear the name that commemorates the capture of Derna in 1805 by a small force of U.S. Marines and approximately 370 soldiers from 11 other nations. The battle, memorialized in the Marines’ Hymn with the line «to the shores of Tripoli», brought about a successful conclusion to the combined operations of the First Barbary War.

America has an extended hangar bay and additional aviation support spaces and fuel capacity to accommodate the MAGTF's entire Air Combat Element (ACE) comprising the USMC's larger successor aircraft to the AV-8B Harrier II jet and CH-46E Chinook helicopter – the F-35B and MV-22 Osprey tiltrotor respectively – as well as the CH-53E/K Sea Stallion heavylift helicopter, the UH-1Y Huey utility helicopter, the AH-1Z Super Cobra attack helicopter, and the MH-60S Seahawk multimission helicopter
America has an extended hangar bay and additional aviation support spaces and fuel capacity to accommodate the MAGTF’s entire Air Combat Element (ACE) comprising the USMC’s larger successor aircraft to the AV-8B Harrier II jet and CH-46E Chinook helicopter – the F-35B and MV-22 Osprey tiltrotor respectively – as well as the CH-53E/K Sea Stallion heavylift helicopter, the UH-1Y Huey utility helicopter, the AH-1Z Super Cobra attack helicopter, and the MH-60S Seahawk multimission helicopter

 

General Characteristics

Builder Huntington Ingalls Industries Inc., Ingalls Operations, Pascagoula, Mississippi
Date Deployed Delivered to the fleet in on April 10, 2014
Propulsion Two marine gas turbines, two shafts, 70,000 total brake horsepower/52,199 kW, two 5,000 horsepower/3,728 kW auxiliary propulsion motors
Length 844 feet/257.3 m
Beam 106 feet/32.3 m
Displacement Approximately 43,745 long tons full load/44,449 metric tons
Speed 20+ knots/23+ mph/37+ km/h
Crew 1,059 (65 officers)
Load 1,687 troops (plus 184 surge)
Armament 2 RAM (Rolling Airframe Missile) launchers
2 NATO Sea Sparrow launchers with ESSM (Evolved Sea Sparrow Missile)
2 20-mm Phalanx CIWS (Close-In Weapon System) mounts
7 twin 12,7-mm/.50 cal. machine guns
Aircraft 9 F-35B Lightning II Joint Strike Fighters (JSF) STOVL (Short Take-Off and Vertical Landing) aircraft
4 AH-1Z Viper attack helicopters
4 CH-53E Super Stallion helicopters
12 MV-22B Osprey VTOL (Vertical Take-Off and Landing) tiltrotors
2 MH-60S Sea Hawk Search and Rescue (SAR) helicopters
UH-1Y Huey helicopters

 

Ships

Ship Laid down Launched Commissioned Homeport
USS America (LHA-6) 07-17-2009 06-04-2012 10-11-2014 San Diego, California
USS Tripoli (LHA-7) 06-22-2014
LHA-8

 

The lifting of the deckhouse is a major event in the ship’s construction schedule and begins the integration of the three largest sections of the ship