Tag Archives: USS Omaha (LCS-12)

Omaha Commissioned

The U.S. Navy commissioned its newest Independence-variant Littoral Combat Ship (LCS), the future USS Omaha (LCS-12), during a noon PST ceremony Saturday, February 3, at the Broadway pier in San Diego.

The future littoral combat ship USS Omaha (LCS-12) returns to the Austal USA shipyard after successfully conducting acceptance trials. The trials consisted of a series of graded in-port and underway demonstrations for the Navy's Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of Austal USA/Released)
The future littoral combat ship USS Omaha (LCS-12) returns to the Austal USA shipyard after successfully conducting acceptance trials. The trials consisted of a series of graded in-port and underway demonstrations for the Navy’s Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of Austal USA/Released)

The future USS Omaha, designated LCS-12, is the 11th littoral combat ship to enter the fleet and the sixth of the Independence-variant design. It is the fourth warship named for the Nebraska city. The first ship was a propeller-driven sloop-of-war. The second ship was a light cruiser and the third Omaha was an attack submarine.

Former U.S. Senator from Nebraska, 35th Governor of Nebraska and Medal of Honor recipient, the Honorable Bob Kerrey delivered the ceremony’s principal address. Mrs. Susie Buffett, an Omaha philanthropist and daughter of Warren Buffett, chairman and chief executive of Berkshire Hathaway Inc., served as the ship’s sponsor. In a time-honored Navy tradition, she gave the order to, «man our ship and bring her to life»!

«Omaha and her sister ships represent an investment in our nation, the result of the partnership between the Department of the U.S. Navy and our shipbuilding industry. American craftsmen in Mississippi, Alabama, around the country have made USS Omaha possible», said Secretary of the Navy Richard V. Spencer. «The LCS fills a unique mission for the United States Navy and as these remarkable ships continue to be produced out of our shipyards, they represent an increase in our readiness and lethality».

LCS is a modular, reconfigurable ship, designed to meet validated fleet requirements for SUrface Warfare (SUW), Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) and Mine CounterMeasures (MCM) missions in the littoral region. An interchangeable mission package is embarked on each LCS and provides the primary mission systems in one of these warfare areas. Using an open architecture design, modular weapons, sensor systems and a variety of manned and unmanned vehicles to gain, sustain and exploit littoral maritime supremacy, LCS provides U.S. joint force access to critical areas in multiple theaters.

The LCS-class consists of the Freedom-variant and Independence-variant, designed and built by two industry teams. The Freedom-variant team is led by Lockheed Martin (for the odd-numbered ships, e.g. LCS-1). The Independence-variant team is led by Austal USA (for LCS-6 and follow-on even-numbered ships). Twenty-nine LCS ships have been awarded to date: 11 have been delivered to the U.S. Navy, 15 are in various stages of construction and three are in pre-production states.

Navy commissioned Littoral Combat Ship Omaha
Navy commissioned Littoral Combat Ship Omaha

 

The Independence Variant of the LCS Class

PRINCIPAL DIMENSIONS
Construction Hull and superstructure – aluminium alloy
Length overall 421 feet/128.3 m
Beam overall 103 feet/31.4 m
Hull draft (maximum) 14.8 feet/4.5 m
PAYLOAD AND CAPACITIES
Complement Core Crew – 40
Mission crew – 36
Berthing 76 in a mix of single, double & quad berthing compartments
Maximum mission load 210 tonnes
Mission Bay Volume 118,403 feet3/11,000 m3
Mission packages Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW)
Surface Warfare (SUW)
Mine Warfare (MIW)
PROPULSION
Main engines 2 × GE LM2500
2 × MTU 20V 8000
Waterjets 4 × Wartsila steerable
Bow thruster Retractable azimuthing
PERFORMANCE
Speed 40 knots/46 mph/74 km/h
Range 3,500 NM/4,028 miles/6,482 km
Operational limitation Survival in Sea State 8
MISSION/LOGISTICS DECK
Deck area >21,527.8 feet2/2,000 m2
Launch and recovery Twin boom extending crane
Loading Side ramp
Internal elevator to hanger
Launch/Recover Watercraft Sea State 4
FLIGHT DECK AND HANGER
Flight deck dimensions 2 × SH-60 or 1 × CH-53 or multiple Unmanned Aerial Vehicles/Vertical Take-off and Land Tactical Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs/VTUAVs)
Hanger Aircraft stowage & maintenance for 2 × SH-60
Launch/Recover Aircraft Sea State 5
WEAPONS AND SENSORS
Standard 1 × 57-mm gun
4 × 12.7-mm/.50 caliber guns
1 × Surface-to-Air Missile (SAM) launcher
3 × weapons modules

 

Independence-class

Ship Laid down Launched Commissioned Homeport
USS Independence (LCS-2) 01-19-2006 04-26-2008 01-16-2010 San Diego, California
USS Coronado (LCS-4) 12-17-2009 01-14-2012 04-05-2014 San Diego, California
USS Jackson (LCS-6) 08-01-2011 12-14-2013 12-05-2015 San Diego, California
USS Montgomery (LCS-8) 06-25-2013 08-06-2014 09-10-2016 San Diego, California
USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS-10) 04-16-2014 02-25-2015 06-10-2017 San Diego, California
USS Omaha (LCS-12) 02-18-2015 11-20-2015 02-03-2018 San Diego, California
USS Manchester (LCS-14) 06-29-2015 05-12-2016
USS Tulsa (LCS-16) 01-11-2016
USS Charleston (LCS-18) 06-28-2016
USS Cincinnati (LCS-20) 04-10-2017
USS Kansas City (LCS-22) 11-15-2017
USS Oakland (LCS-24)
USS Mobile (LCS-26)
USS Savannah (LCS-28)
LCS-30

 

Acceptance Trials

The Navy’s future USS Omaha (LCS-12) successfully conducted its acceptance trials, May 12, after completing a series of graded in-port and underway demonstrations for the Navy’s Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV).

An artist rendering of the littoral combat ship USS Omaha (LCS-12). LCS-12 is the fourth Navy vessel to bear the name (U.S. Navy photo illustration by Stan Bailey)
An artist rendering of the littoral combat ship USS Omaha (LCS-12). LCS-12 is the fourth Navy vessel to bear the name (U.S. Navy photo illustration by Stan Bailey)

Acceptance trials are the last significant milestone before delivery of the ship to the U.S. Navy. During the trial, the U.S. Navy conducted comprehensive tests of the USS Omaha (LCS-12) intended to demonstrate the performance of the propulsion plant, ship handling, and auxiliary systems. While underway, Omaha successfully performed launch and recovery operations of the 36-foot/11-meter Rigid-Hull Inflatable Boat (RHIB), completed surface and air self-defense detect-to-engage exercises, and demonstrated the ship’s maneuverability through high-speed steering, crash backs, and four-hour full power run.

«The Navy/industry trials team in Mobile has found their stride and, with stability in the serial production line, are bringing ships to trial with consistently improved performance at decreasing cost», said Captain Tom Anderson, LCS program manager. «Omaha will be an exceptional addition to the rapidly growing in-service fleet».

Following delivery, a post-delivery maintenance availability and crew training and familiarization exercises in Mobile, Alabama, Omaha will sail to California for commissioning. Omaha will be homeported in San Diego with sister ships USS Independence (LCS-2), USS Coronado (LCS-4), USS Jackson (LCS-6), USS Montgomery (LCS-8) and USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS-10), which departed Mobile earlier this month.

Several more Independence-variant hulls are under construction at Austal USA in Mobile, Alabama. USS Manchester (LCS-14) is preparing for builders trial this summer, USS Tulsa (LCS-16) was christened and launched earlier this year, and USS Charleston (LCS-18) is scheduled to be christened and launched this fall. Other sister ships, including USS Cincinnati (LCS-20), USS Kansas City (LCS-22), USS Oakland (LCS-24) and USS Mobile (LCS-26), are in varying stages of construction.

The LCS (Littoral Combat Ship) class consists of two variants, the Freedom variant and the Independence variant, designed and built by two industry teams. The Freedom variant team is led by Lockheed Martin (for the odd-numbered hulls, e.g. LCS-1). The Independence variant team is led by Austal USA (for LCS-6 and the subsequent even-numbered hulls).

Each LCS will be outfitted with a mission package made up of mission modules containing warfighting systems and support equipment. A dedicated ship crew will combine with aviation assets to deploy manned and unmanned vehicles and sensors in support of mine countermeasures, anti-submarine warfare or surface warfare missions.

 

The Independence Variant of the LCS Class

PRINCIPAL DIMENSIONS
Construction Hull and superstructure – aluminium alloy
Length overall 417 feet/127.1 m
Beam overall 103 feet/31.4 m
Hull draft (maximum) 14.8 feet/4.5 m
PAYLOAD AND CAPACITIES
Complement Core Crew – 40
Mission crew – 36
Berthing 76 in a mix of single, double & quad berthing compartments
Maximum mission load 210 tonnes
Mission Bay Volume 118,403 feet3/11,000 m3
Mission packages Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW)
Surface Warfare (SUW)
Mine Warfare (MIW)
PROPULSION
Main engines 2 × GE LM2500
2 × MTU 20V 8000
Waterjets 4 × Wartsila steerable
Bow thruster Retractable azimuthing
PERFORMANCE
Speed 40 knots/46 mph/74 km/h
Range 3,500 NM/4,028 miles/6,482 km
Operational limitation Survival in Sea State 8
MISSION/LOGISTICS DECK
Deck area >21,527.8 feet2/2,000 m2
Launch and recovery Twin boom extending crane
Loading Side ramp
Internal elevator to hanger
Launch/Recover Watercraft Sea State 4
FLIGHT DECK AND HANGER
Flight deck dimensions 2 × SH-60 or 1 × CH-53 or multiple Unmanned Aerial Vehicles/Vertical Take-off and Land Tactical Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs/VTUAVs)
Hanger Aircraft stowage & maintenance for 2 × SH-60
Launch/Recover Aircraft Sea State 5
WEAPONS AND SENSORS
Standard 1 × 57-mm gun
4 × 12.7-mm/.50 caliber guns
1 × Surface-to-Air Missile (SAM) launcher
3 × weapons modules

 

Independence-class

Ship Laid down Launched Commissioned Homeport
USS Independence (LCS-2) 01-19-2006 04-26-2008 01-16-2010 San Diego, California
USS Coronado (LCS-4) 12-17-2009 01-14-2012 04-05-2014 San Diego, California
USS Jackson (LCS-6) 08-01-2011 12-14-2013 12-05-2015 San Diego, California
USS Montgomery (LCS-8) 06-25-2013 08-06-2014 09-10-2016 San Diego, California
USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS-10) 04-16-2014 02-25-2015
USS Omaha (LCS-12) 02-18-2015 11-20-2015
USS Manchester (LCS-14) 06-29-2015 05-12-2016
USS Tulsa (LCS-16) 01-11-2016
USS Charleston (LCS-18) 06-28-2016
USS Cincinnati (LCS-20) 04-10-2017
USS Kansas City (LCS-22)
USS Oakland (LCS-24)

 

Christening of Omaha

Austal is pleased to announce that Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) 12 was christened at Austal USA’s Mobile, Alabama shipyard on Saturday 19th December 2015.

The Independence Variant of the LCS Class is a high speed, agile, shallow draft and networked surface ship
The Independence Variant of the LCS Class is a high speed, agile, shallow draft and networked surface ship

Austal USA officials joined Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus and the ship sponsor of the future USS Omaha, Susan Buffett, in celebrating the christening of the nation’s 12th Littoral Combat Ship.

The Omaha is the fourth LCS in Austal’s 10-ship, $3.5 billion block-buy contract. With its shallow draft of 14.8 feet/4.5 m, the Austal designed and built Independence-variant LCS is an advanced high-speed and agile 417 feet/127.1 m combat ship designed to operate in near-shore environments, yet capable of open-ocean operation.

«On behalf of Austal’s entire shipbuilding team, we are proud to design and build a ship that will carry the great name of Omaha as she defends our nation», said Austal USA President Craig Perciavalle. «We’re equally proud to honour a tremendous American in Susan Buffett who has given so much to so many people through her philanthropic work, and now gives her spirit as the sponsor to this amazing ship».

Buffett, a philanthropist and current resident and native of Omaha, will serve as the sponsor to the ship. She chairs of The Sherwood Foundation, The Buffett Early Childhood Fund, and the Susan Thompson Buffett Foundation. She also serves on several national non-profit boards, including ONE, Girls Inc., and the Fulfillment Fund.

According to the Society of Sponsors of the United States Navy, «The sponsor will participate in all or some of the milestones in the life of her ship … far beyond participation in ceremonial milestones, sponsorship represents a lifelong relationship with the ship and her crew».

The aluminium hulled trimaran was officially named after Nebraska’s largest city during an announcement by Secretary Mabus, February 15, 2012. He said the name was «to honour the patriotic, hard-working citizens of Omaha and the state of Nebraska for their support of and contributions to the military». She will be the fourth U.S. Navy ship named «Omaha».

The future USS Omaha (LCS-12), launched in November 20 and scheduled for delivery in 2016, has a maximum speed of more than 40 knots/46 mph/74 km/h. The Independence-variant combines superior seakeeping, endurance, and speed with the volume and payload capacity needed to support emerging missions – today and in the future.

«I’m also proud to honour Austal’s workforce today – a group of some of the most dedicated and hard-working professionals I have ever worked with», said Perciavalle. «Their expertise and commitment to excellence is evident in the construction of these incredible warships».

Austal’s LCS program is in full swing with three ships delivered and six ships under construction at this time. USS Jackson (LCS-6) was delivered this past summer and was recently commissioned in Gulfport, Mississippi. USS Montgomery (LCS-8) and USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS-10) are preparing for trials and delivery in 2016.

Final assembly is well underway on USS Manchester (LCS-14) and recently began on USS Tulsa (LCS-16). Modules for USS Charleston (LCS-18) are under construction in Austal’s Module Manufacturing Facility.

The ships are open ocean capable but are designed to defeat growing littoral threats and provide access and dominance in the coastal water battlespace
The ships are open ocean capable but are designed to defeat growing littoral threats and provide access and dominance in the coastal water battlespace

 

The Independence Variant of the LCS Class

PRINCIPAL DIMENSIONS
Construction Hull and superstructure – aluminium alloy
Length overall 417 feet/127.1 m
Beam overall 103 feet/31.4 m
Hull draft (maximum) 14.8 feet/4.5 m
PAYLOAD AND CAPACITIES
Complement Core Crew – 40
Mission crew – 36
Berthing 76 in a mix of single, double & quad berthing compartments
Maximum mission load 210 tonnes
Mission Bay Volume 118,403 feet3/11,000 m3
Mission packages Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW)
Surface Warfare (SUW)
Mine Warfare (MIW)
PROPULSION
Main engines 2 × GE LM2500
2 × MTU 20V 8000
Waterjets 4 × Wartsila steerable
Bow thruster Retractable azimuthing
PERFORMANCE
Speed 40 knots/46 mph/74 km/h
Range 3,500 NM/4,028 miles/6,482 km
Operational limitation Survival in Sea State 8
MISSION/LOGISTICS DECK
Deck area >21,527.8 feet2/2,000 m2
Launch and recovery Twin boom extending crane
Loading Side ramp
Internal elevator to hanger
Launch/Recover Watercraft Sea State 4
FLIGHT DECK AND HANGER
Flight deck dimensions 2 × SH-60 or 1 × CH-53 or multiple Unmanned Aerial Vehicles/Vertical Take-off and Land Tactical Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs/VTUAVs)
Hanger Aircraft stowage & maintenance for 2 × SH-60
Launch/Recover Aircraft Sea State 5
WEAPONS AND SENSORS
Standard 1 × 57-mm gun
4 × 12.7-mm/.50 caliber guns
1 × Surface-to-Air Missile (SAM) launcher
3 × weapons modules
LCS delivers combat capability from core self-defense systems in concert with rapidly interchangeable, modular mission packages and an open architecture command and control system
LCS delivers combat capability from core self-defense systems in concert with rapidly interchangeable, modular mission packages and an open architecture command and control system

 

Ship list

USS Independence (LCS-2)

USS Coronado (LCS-4)

USS Jackson (LCS-6)

USS Montgomery (LCS-8)

USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS-10)

USS Omaha (LCS-12)

USS Manchester (LCS-14)

USS Tulsa (LCS-16)

USS Charleston (LCS-18)

USS Cincinnati (LCS-20)

USS Kansas City (LCS-22)

Modularity maximizes the flexibility of LCS and enables commanders to meet changing warfare needs, while also supporting faster, easier technological updates
Modularity maximizes the flexibility of LCS and enables commanders to meet changing warfare needs, while also supporting faster, easier technological updates

Omaha Launches

The future USS Omaha (LCS-12) launched November 20, marking another important production milestone for the Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) program. «That this precisely choreographed launch event has become commonplace in Mobile is a sign of the maturity and stability of the LCS serial production line», said Captain Tom Anderson, LCS program manager. «I look forward to the future USS Omaha (LCS-12) completing the test and trial process en route to delivery to the fleet».

Littoral Combat Ship is being put in the water
Littoral Combat Ship is being put in the water

Omaha was rolled out of her assembly bay at the Austal USA Shipyard onto a barge for transfer down the Mobile River to a floating drydock at BAE Shipyard on November 19. The ship entered the water on November 20 when the drydock was flooded and the ship floated off the blocks. The ship will return to Austal’s final assembly pier to continue outfitting, system activation and testing. She is scheduled to be christened on December 19.

Omaha is the fourth ship in a block buy contract with Austal to build Independence- variant ships. USS Montgomery (LCS-8) is preparing for builders trials and USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS-10) was christened in June 2015 and is currently completing system testing in preparation for trials. USS Manchester (LCS-14) is under construction preparing for an early 2016 launch. USS Tulsa (LCS-16) will have her keel laid later this year.

Launch of USS Omaha (LCS 12) at Austal USA facility - Mobile, Alabama
Launch of USS Omaha (LCS 12) at Austal USA facility – Mobile, Alabama

The LCS class consists of the Freedom variant and Independence variant, designed and built by two industry teams. The Freedom variant team is led by Lockheed Martin (for the odd-numbered hulls, e.g. LCS-1). The Independence variant team is led by Austal USA (for LCS-6 and follow-on even-numbered hulls) and was led by General Dynamics, Bath Iron Works for LCS-2 and LCS-4. Purchased under the innovative block-buy acquisition strategy, there are 12 ships currently under construction.

LCS is a modular, reconfigurable ship, with three types of mission packages including surface warfare, mine countermeasures, and anti-submarine warfare. The Program Executive Office Littoral Combat Ships (PEO LCS) is responsible for delivering and sustaining littoral mission capabilities to the fleet. Delivering high-quality warfighting assets while balancing affordability and capability is key to supporting the nation’s maritime strategy.

Defence vessels designed and built by Austal include focused-mission combatants, such as the Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) for the United States Navy
Defence vessels designed and built by Austal include focused-mission combatants, such as the Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) for the United States Navy

 

The Independence Variant of the LCS Class

PRINCIPAL DIMENSIONS
Construction Hull and superstructure – aluminium alloy
Length overall 417 feet/127.1 m
Beam overall 103 feet/31.4 m
Hull draft (maximum) 14.8 feet/4.5 m
PAYLOAD AND CAPACITIES
Complement Core Crew – 40
Mission crew – 36
Berthing 76 in a mix of single, double & quad berthing compartments
Maximum mission load 210 tonnes
Mission Bay Volume 118,403 feet3/11,000 m3
Mission packages Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW)
Surface Warfare (SUW)
Mine Warfare (MIW)
PROPULSION
Main engines 2 × GE LM2500
2 × MTU 20V 8000
Waterjets 4 × Wartsila steerable
Bow thruster Retractable azimuthing
PERFORMANCE
Speed 40 knots/46 mph/74 km/h
Range 3,500 NM/4,028 miles/6,482 km
Operational limitation Survival in Sea State 8
MISSION/LOGISTICS DECK
Deck area >21,527.8 feet2/2,000 m2
Launch and recovery Twin boom extending crane
Loading Side ramp
Internal elevator to hanger
Launch/Recover Watercraft Sea State 4
FLIGHT DECK AND HANGER
Flight deck dimensions 2 × SH-60 or 1 × CH-53 or multiple Unmanned Aerial Vehicles/Vertical Take-off and Land Tactical Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs/VTUAVs)
Hanger Aircraft stowage & maintenance for 2 × SH-60
Launch/Recover Aircraft Sea State 5
WEAPONS AND SENSORS
Standard 1 × 57-mm gun
4 × 12.7-mm/.50 caliber guns
1 × Surface-to-Air Missile (SAM) launcher
3 × weapons modules
The littoral combat ship Independence (LCS 2) underway during builder's trials
The littoral combat ship Independence (LCS 2) underway during builder’s trials

 

Ship list

USS Independence (LCS-2)

USS Coronado (LCS-4)

USS Jackson (LCS-6)

USS Montgomery (LCS-8)

USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS-10)

USS Omaha (LCS-12)

USS Manchester (LCS-14)

USS Tulsa (LCS-16)

USS Charleston (LCS-18)

USS Cincinnati (LCS-20)

USS Kansas City (LCS-22)

SUW Configured Independence
SUW Configured Independence