Tag Archives: USS Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG-1002)

The third ship

The U.S. Navy christened its newest Zumwalt-class guided missile destroyer, the future USS Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG-1002), during a 10 a.m. EST ceremony Saturday, April 27, at General Dynamics-Bath Iron Works shipyard in Bath, Maine.

BATH, Maine (December 9, 2018) – Following a multi-day process that includes moving the ship from the land level facility to the dry dock, the future USS Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG-1002) is made ready before flooding of the dry dock at General Dynamic-Bath Iron Works shipyard, and subsequent launching of the third Zumwalt-class destroyer (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of General Dynamics-Bath Iron Works)
BATH, Maine (December 9, 2018) – Following a multi-day process that includes moving the ship from the land level facility to the dry dock, the future USS Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG-1002) is made ready before flooding of the dry dock at General Dynamic-Bath Iron Works shipyard, and subsequent launching of the third Zumwalt-class destroyer (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of General Dynamics-Bath Iron Works)

The third ship in the Zumwalt-class, DDG-1002 is named in honor of late President Lyndon B. Johnson, who served in office from 1963-1969, and will be the first ship to bear his name.

Lynda Johnson Robb and Luci Johnson, the two daughters of the former president, served as the ship’s sponsors. In a time-honored Navy tradition, the sisters christened the ship by breaking a bottle of sparkling wine across the bow. Robb also served as the principal speaker.

«The future USS Lyndon B. Johnson will serve for decades as a reminder of President Johnson’s service to our nation and support of a strong Navy and Marine Corps team», said Secretary of the Navy Richard V. Spencer. «This ship honors not only President Johnson’s service, but also the service of our industry partners who are vital in making the Navy the nation needs».

Johnson served as a U.S. Navy Reserve officer before being called to active duty after the attack on Pearl Harbor. He requested a combat assignment and served in the Pacific theater. After returning from active duty, Johnson reported to Navy leaders and Congress what he believed were deplorable living conditions for the warfighters. He continued to fight for better standards for all military members.

Johnson’s time as president was marked by the passage of programs that greatly influenced and affected education, healthcare and civil rights for generations to come. He signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964 into law, enacting comprehensive provisions protecting the right to vote and prohibiting racial discrimination by employers. His work on civil rights continued with the passage of the Voting Rights Act, which guaranteed voting rights for all people, regardless of race.

The multi-mission Zumwalt-class destroyers will be capable of performing a range of deterrence, power projection, sea control, and command and control missions while allowing the Navy to evolve with new systems and missions. Zumwalt ships are 610 feet/186 meters long, have a beam of 80.7 feet/24.6 meter, displace almost 16,000 tons, and are capable of making 30 knots/34.5 mph/55.5 km/h speed.

The third and final

The future USSLyndon B. Johnson (DDG-1002) was launched December 9 at General Dynamics-BathIron Works shipyard.

BATH, Maine (December 9, 2018) Following a multi-day process that includes moving the ship from the land level facility to the dry dock, the future USS Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG-1002) is made ready before flooding of the dry dock at General Dynamic-Bath Iron Works shipyard, and subsequent launching of the third Zumwalt-class destroyer (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of General Dynamics-Bath Iron Works/Released)
BATH, Maine (December 9, 2018) Following a multi-day process that includes moving the ship from the land level facility to the dry dock, the future USS Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG-1002) is made ready before flooding of the dry dock at General Dynamic-Bath Iron Works shipyard, and subsequent launching of the third Zumwalt-class destroyer (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of General Dynamics-Bath Iron Works/Released)

The process of launching a ship is a multi-day process that includes moving the ship from the land level facility to the dry dock which is then slowly flooded until the ship is afloat. With the ship in the water, final outfitting and production can commence.

«It’s important for the DDG-1000 program and shipyard to reach this major milestone», said Captain Kevin Smith, DDG-1000 program manager, Program Executive Office (PEO) Ships. «With the first two ships of the class underway, we are excited to continue the next phase of construction of the future USS Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG-1002)».

Zumwalt-class destroyers feature a state-of-the-art electric propulsion system, wave-piercing tumblehome hull, stealth design and are equipped with the most advanced warfighting technology and weaponry. These ships will be capable of performing a range of deterrence, power projection, sea control, and command and control missions while allowing the Navy to evolve with new systems and missions.

«The crew of Lyndon B. Johnson looks forward to bringing this great warship honoring our 36th President to life, and we’re proud to have the opportunity to be present for this important step in the ship’s construction», said Captain Jeremy Gray, prospective commanding officer, USS Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG-1002). «It is truly impressive to see the ship afloat in the Kennebec River for the first time and we look forward to taking her to sea».

The future USS Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG-1002) is the third and final DDG-1000 Zumwalt-class ship, and is scheduled to be christened in the spring of 2019.

As one of the Defense Department’s largest acquisition organizations, PEO Ships is responsible for executing the development and procurement of all destroyers, amphibious ships, special mission and support ships, and special warfare craft.

Keel Laid for DDG-1002

A keel laying and authentication ceremony for the future USS Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG-1002) was held January 30 at General Dynamics-Bath Iron Works shipyard in Bath, Maine.

Luci Baines Johnson applauds Timothy Trask, a Bath Iron Works welder, after he helped her authenticate the keel plate of DDG-1002, the future USS Lyndon B. Johnson, by striking an arc to her initials engraved in the plate. She was at BIW with her sister, Lynda Johnson Robb, as the two participated in the keel laying ceremony for the third destroyer in the Zumwalt class
Luci Baines Johnson applauds Timothy Trask, a Bath Iron Works welder, after he helped her authenticate the keel plate of DDG-1002, the future USS Lyndon B. Johnson, by striking an arc to her initials engraved in the plate. She was at BIW with her sister, Lynda Johnson Robb, as the two participated in the keel laying ceremony for the third destroyer in the Zumwalt class

The keel was authenticated by President Johnson’s daughters and ship co-sponsors, Ms. Lynda Johnson Robb and Ms. Luci Baines Johnson, by welding their initials into the keel plate.

«We’ve made tremendous progress on this ship and although we’re celebrating an early production milestone, we’re nearing 60 percent completion on the future Lyndon B. Johnson», said Captain Kevin Smith, DDG-1000 program manager, Program Executive Office (PEO), Ships. «We’re honored to be celebrating this milestone with our 36th President’s daughters and look forward to continued progress on the final ship of the Zumwalt class».

While the keel laying has traditionally represented the formal start of a ship’s construction, advanced modular shipbuilding allows fabrication of the ship to begin months in advance. Today, the keel laying continues to symbolically recognize the joining of the ship’s components and the ceremonial beginning of the ship.

Zumwalt-class destroyers feature a state-of-the-art electric propulsion system, wave-piercing tumblehome hull, stealth design and are equipped with the most advanced warfighting technology and weaponry. These ships will be capable of performing a range of deterrence, power projection, sea control, and command and control missions while allowing the Navy to evolve with new systems and missions.

Bath Iron Works is currently in production on the future USS Michael Monsoor (DDG-1001) as well Arleigh Burke-class destroyers USS Rafael Peralta (DDG-115), USS Thomas Hudner (DDG-116), USS Daniel Inouye (DDG-118) and USS Carl M. Levin (DDG-120).

As one of the Defense Department’s largest acquisition organizations, PEO Ships is responsible for executing the development and procurement of all destroyers, amphibious ships, special mission and support ships, boats and craft.

 

Features unique to DDG 1000:

  • Eighty peripheral Vertical Launch System (VLS) cells, two Advanced Gun System (AGS) 155-mm guns, and two 30-mm Close In Guns (CIGs);
  • A stern boat ramp for two 7-meter Rigid Hull Inflatable Boats (RHIBs), designed with room for two 11-meter RHIBs;
  • Aviation capacity for two MH-60R or one MH-60R and 3 VT Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs);
  • It will be powered by an Integrated Power System (IPS) with an Integrated Fight Through Power (IFTP). This is created by an Advanced Induction Motor (AIM);
  • A superstructure with integrated apertures and low signature profile;
  • Advanced sensors including a SPY-3 Multi-Function Radar;
  • A wave-piercing «Tumblehome» hull form.

 

Ship Characteristics

Length 610 feet/186 m
Beam 80.7 feet/24.6 m
Draft 27.6 feet/8.4 m
Displacement 15,761 long tonnes/16,014 metric tonnes
Speed 30 knots/34.5 mph/55.5 km/h
Installed Power 104,600 hp/78 MW
Crew Size 158 – Includes Aviation Detachment

 

Next-generation destroyer Zumwalt (DDG-1000) underway for the first time conducting at-sea tests and trials in the Atlantic Ocean on December 7, 2015

 

Ships

Ship Laid down Launched Commissioned Homeport
USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000) 11-17-2011 10-28-2013 10-15-2016 San Diego, California
USS Michael Monsoor (DDG-1001) 05-23-2013 06-21-2016
USS Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG-1002) 01-30-2017