Tag Archives: San Antonio Class

Navy Accepts Portland

Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division delivered the amphibious transport dock USS Portland (LPD-27) to the U.S. Navy on September 18.

(Left to right) Captain J.R. Hill, Commander Jon Letourneau and Mike Pruitt sign the DD 250 document officially transferring custody of the amphibious transport dock USS Portland (LPD-27) from HII to the U.S. Navy. Hill is Portland’s prospective commanding officer; Letourneau is the Navy’s LPD 17-class program manager, and Pruitt is Ingalls’ LPD 27 program manager (Photo by Michael Duhe/HII)
(Left to right) Captain J.R. Hill, Commander Jon Letourneau and Mike Pruitt sign the DD 250 document officially transferring custody of the amphibious transport dock USS Portland (LPD-27) from HII to the U.S. Navy. Hill is Portland’s prospective commanding officer; Letourneau is the Navy’s LPD 17-class program manager, and Pruitt is Ingalls’ LPD 27 program manager (Photo by Michael Duhe/HII)

«Today is a great day for this collective industry and customer team», said Kari Wilkinson, Ingalls’ vice president, program management. «For many of the shipbuilders, Supervisor of Shipbuilding representatives and members of the U.S. Navy program office, this is the 11th ship they have built and delivered together. Their personal commitment to excellence has become the hallmark of the LPD program, and we are positioned to continue that tradition on future ships».

USS Portland (LPD-27) was delivered during an afternoon ceremony with shipbuilders, ship’s force and representatives of Supervisor of Shipbuilding Gulf Coast together in attendance. The signing of the DD 250 document officially transfers custody of the ship from HII to the U.S. Navy.

«I am amazed with the shipbuilders here at Ingalls», said Captain J.R. Hill, Portland’s prospective commanding officer. «There are thousands of them who have been working to build this ship and put it into service, and they’ve really done a great job. I’m very impressed with the team Ingalls has put together as well as the 370 crew members present today who are ecstatic about taking control of this ship. We look forward to what she can do in the future».

USS Portland (LPD-27) is named for the largest city in the state of Oregon. The state has a long history with the U.S. Navy, going back to the construction of hundreds of World War II Liberty and Victory ships at three Portland-area shipyards.

Ingalls has delivered 11 San Antonio-class ships to the U.S. Navy and currently has one more, USS Fort Lauderdale (LPD-28), under construction. In June, Ingalls received an advance procurement contract from the Navy to provide long-lead-time material and advance construction activities for LPD-29, the 13th ship of the San Antonio class.

The San Antonio class is the latest addition to the U.S. Navy’s 21st century amphibious assault force. The 684-foot-long, 105-foot-wide ships are used to embark and land Marines, their equipment and supplies ashore via air cushion or conventional landing craft and amphibious assault vehicles, augmented by helicopters or vertical takeoff and landing aircraft such as the MV-22 Osprey. The ships support a Marine Air Ground Task Force across the spectrum of operations, conducting amphibious and expeditionary missions of sea control and power projection to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief missions throughout the first half of the 21st century.

USS Portland (LPD-27), sails through the Gulf of Mexico during her acceptance sea trials (Photo by Lance Davis/HII)
USS Portland (LPD-27), sails through the Gulf of Mexico during her acceptance sea trials (Photo by Lance Davis/HII)

 

General Characteristics

Builder Huntington Ingalls Industries
Propulsion Four sequentially turbocharged marine Colt-Pielstick Diesels, two shafts, 41,600 shaft horsepower
Length 684 feet/208 m
Beam 105 feet/32 m
Displacement Approximately 24,900 long tons (25,300 metric tons) full load
Draft 23 feet/7 m
Speed In excess of 22 knots/24.2 mph/38.7 km/h
Crew Ship’s Company: 374 Sailors (28 officers, 346 enlisted) and 3 Marines. Embarked Landing Force: 699 (66 officers, 633 enlisted); surge capacity to 800
Armament Two Bushmaster II 30-mm Close in Guns, fore and aft; two Rolling Airframe Missile (RAM) launchers, fore and aft: ten .50 calibre/12.7-mm machine guns
Aircraft Launch or land two CH-53E Super Stallion helicopters or two MV-22 Osprey tilt rotor aircraft or up to four CH-46 Sea Knight helicopters, AH-1 or UH-1 helicopters
Landing/Attack Craft Two LCACs or one LCU; and 14 Expeditionary Fighting Vehicles/Amphibious Assault Vehicles

 

San Antonio-class

Ship Builder Launched Commissioned Homeport
USS San Antonio (LPD-17) Avondale 07-12-2003 01-14-2006 Norfolk, Virginia
USS New Orleans (LPD-18) Avondale 12-11-2004 03-10-2007 San Diego, California
USS Mesa Verde (LPD-19) Ingalls 11-19-2004 12-15-2007 Norfolk, Virginia
USS Green Bay (LPD-20) Avondale 08-11-2006 01-24-2009 San Diego, California
USS New York (LPD-21) Avondale 12-19-2007 11-07-2009 Norfolk, Virginia
USS San Diego (LPD-22) Ingalls 05-07-2010 05-19-2012 San Diego, California
USS Anchorage (LPD-23) Avondale 02-12-2011 05-04-2013 San Diego, California
USS Arlington (LPD-24) Ingalls 11-23-2010 02-08-2013 Norfolk, Virginia
USS Somerset (LPD-25) Avondale 04-14-2012 05-01-2014 San Diego, California
USS John P. Murtha (LPD-26) Ingalls 11-02-2014 10-08-2016 San Diego, California
USS Portland (LPD-27) Ingalls 02-13-2016
USS Fort Lauderdale (LPD-28) Ingalls
LPD-29

 

Acceptance Sea Trials

Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) announced on August 21 the successful completion of acceptance sea trials for the amphibious transport dock USS Portland (LPD-27). The San Antonio-class ship, built at HII’s Ingalls Shipbuilding division, spent last week with the U.S. Navy’s Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV), performing more than 200 trial events that included both in-port and underway portions.

USS Portland (LPD-27), sails through the Gulf of Mexico during her acceptance sea trials (Photo by Lance Davis/HII)
USS Portland (LPD-27), sails through the Gulf of Mexico during her acceptance sea trials (Photo by Lance Davis/HII)

«These sea trials provide an opportunity to showcase the ship’s tremendous capabilities and the build and test skills of our shipbuilders», Ingalls President Brian Cuccias said. «The success of these milestones is important as we continue to remain competitive and keep our supplier base and production lines active in the construction of these quality amphibious warships».

Key demonstrations performed during acceptance trials for INSURV by the Ingalls’ test and trials team included: the anchor-handling demonstration, ballast/de-ballast demonstration, detect-to-engage exercise, running the ship at full power and steering. Now Ingalls’ shipbuilders will put their final touches on the ship in preparation for delivery this year.

«Our team puts in a lot of hard work and effort to make these sea trials successful», said George Jones, Ingalls’ vice president of operations. «We get better with every LPD we build, and we look forward to delivering a very complex and capable ship to our sailors and Marines. As always, this success was a joint effort between our shipbuilders, test and trials team and our partners at Supervisor of Shipbuilding, Gulf Coast».

USS Portland (LPD-27) is named for the largest city in the state of Oregon. The state has a long history with the U.S. Navy, going back to the construction of hundreds of World War II Liberty and Victory ships at three Portland-area shipyards.

Ingalls has delivered 11 San Antonio-class ships to the U.S. Navy, including USS John P. Murtha (LPD-26) in 2016. In June, Ingalls received an advance procurement contract from the U.S. Navy to provide long-lead-time material and advance construction activities for LPD-29, the 13th amphibious transport dock of the San Antonio class. Ingalls will lay the keel of the 12th San Antonio-class ship, USS Fort Lauderdale (LPD-28), this fall.

«Portland’s successful sea trial proves the dedication and quality of work our shipbuilders continue to provide to the LPD program», said Steve Sloan, Ingalls’ LPD program manager. «I’m proud of the performance of the shipbuilders and the ship during acceptance trials, and now we will continue to work the final fit-and-finish touches before LPD 27’s delivery this fall».

The San Antonio class is a major part of the U.S. Navy’s 21st century amphibious assault force. The 684-foot-long/208-meter-long, 105-foot-wide/32-meter-wide ships are used to embark and land Marines, their equipment and supplies ashore via air cushion or conventional landing craft and amphibious assault vehicles, augmented by helicopters or vertical takeoff and landing aircraft such as the MV-22 Osprey. The ships support a Marine Air Ground Task Force across the spectrum of operations, conducting amphibious and expeditionary missions of sea control and power projection to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief missions throughout the first half of the 21st century.

 

General Characteristics

Builder Huntington Ingalls Industries
Propulsion Four sequentially turbocharged marine Colt-Pielstick Diesels, two shafts, 41,600 shaft horsepower
Length 684 feet/208 m
Beam 105 feet/32 m
Displacement Approximately 24,900 long tons (25,300 metric tons) full load
Draft 23 feet/7 m
Speed In excess of 22 knots/24.2 mph/38.7 km/h
Crew Ship’s Company: 374 Sailors (28 officers, 346 enlisted) and 3 Marines. Embarked Landing Force: 699 (66 officers, 633 enlisted); surge capacity to 800
Armament Two Bushmaster II 30-mm Close in Guns, fore and aft; two Rolling Airframe Missile (RAM) launchers, fore and aft: ten .50 calibre/12.7-mm machine guns
Aircraft Launch or land two CH-53E Super Stallion helicopters or two MV-22 Osprey tilt rotor aircraft or up to four CH-46 Sea Knight helicopters, AH-1 or UH-1 helicopters
Landing/Attack Craft Two LCACs or one LCU; and 14 Expeditionary Fighting Vehicles/Amphibious Assault Vehicles

 

San Antonio-class

Ship Builder Launched Commissioned Homeport
USS San Antonio (LPD-17) Avondale 07-12-2003 01-14-2006 Norfolk, Virginia
USS New Orleans (LPD-18) Avondale 12-11-2004 03-10-2007 San Diego, California
USS Mesa Verde (LPD-19) Ingalls 11-19-2004 12-15-2007 Norfolk, Virginia
USS Green Bay (LPD-20) Avondale 08-11-2006 01-24-2009 San Diego, California
USS New York (LPD-21) Avondale 12-19-2007 11-07-2009 Norfolk, Virginia
USS San Diego (LPD-22) Ingalls 05-07-2010 05-19-2012 San Diego, California
USS Anchorage (LPD-23) Avondale 02-12-2011 05-04-2013 San Diego, California
USS Arlington (LPD-24) Ingalls 11-23-2010 02-08-2013 Norfolk, Virginia
USS Somerset (LPD-25) Avondale 04-14-2012 05-01-2014 San Diego, California
USS John P. Murtha (LPD-26) Ingalls 11-02-2014 10-08-2016 San Diego, California
USS Portland (LPD-27) Ingalls 02-13-2016
USS Fort Lauderdale (LPD-28) Ingalls
LPD-29

 

Portland Completes Acceptance Sea Trials

Builder’s trials

Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division announced on July 3, that the amphibious transport dock USS Portland (LPD-27) has completed her first set of sea trials. Ingalls’ test and trials team spent four days in the Gulf of Mexico operating the 11th San Antonio-class ship and demonstrating its systems.

The amphibious transport dock USS Portland (LPD-27) has completed her first set of sea trials. The test and trials team at Ingalls Shipbuilding spent four days in the Gulf of Mexico operating the 11th San Antonio-class ship and demonstrating its systems (Photo by Lance Davis/HII)
The amphibious transport dock USS Portland (LPD-27) has completed her first set of sea trials. The test and trials team at Ingalls Shipbuilding spent four days in the Gulf of Mexico operating the 11th San Antonio-class ship and demonstrating its systems (Photo by Lance Davis/HII)

«This successful sea trial is another testament to the quality work our shipbuilders continue to provide in the LPD program», said Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias. «These are complex vessels, and I’m proud of our workforce, who have the skills and knowledge it takes to design, build and test these American warships».

Major testing conducted during builder’s trials include anchor-handling, ballast/de-ballast of the ship’s well deck, detect-to-engage, full power ahead and astern and steering demonstrations.

«We place great importance on our relationships with our customers and the responsibility we have to the sailors and Marines who will own this ship», said Kari Wilkinson, Ingalls’ vice president of program management. «The LPD team is strong and very prepared to continue providing these capable assets to our country».

Ingalls’ shipbuilders are now preparing Portland for acceptance trials in August, when the U.S. Navy’s Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) will conduct inspections and witness final demonstrations before the ship is delivered to the U.S. Navy.

«Our shipbuilders continue to work in concert with one another, and this ship is another example of their successes», said George Jones, Ingalls’ vice president of operations. «We have the best construction team in our industry today, and this team, along with the nationwide supplier base, will continue to see more successes with their winning behaviors and team spirit».

LPD-27 will be the third U.S. Navy ship named Portland, honoring both the Oregon seaport and Maine’s largest city.

Ingalls has delivered 10 San Antonio-class ships to the Navy, including USS John P. Murtha (LPD-26) in 2016. Ingalls will lay the keel of the 12th San Antonio-class ship, USS Fort Lauderdale (LPD-28), this fall. Last Friday, Ingalls was awarded an advance procurement contract for LPD-29.

The San Antonio class is a major part of the Navy’s 21st century amphibious assault force. The 684-foot-long/208-meter-long, 105-foot-wide/32-meter-wide ships are used to embark and land Marines, their equipment and supplies ashore via air cushion or conventional landing craft and amphibious assault vehicles, augmented by helicopters or vertical takeoff and landing aircraft such as the MV-22 Osprey. The ships support a Marine Air Ground Task Force across the spectrum of operations, conducting amphibious and expeditionary missions of sea control and power projection to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief missions throughout the first half of the 21st century.

USS Portland (LPD-27) completes builder’s sea trials

 

General Characteristics

Builder Huntington Ingalls Industries
Propulsion Four sequentially turbocharged marine Colt-Pielstick Diesels, two shafts, 41,600 shaft horsepower
Length 684 feet/208 m
Beam 105 feet/32 m
Displacement Approximately 24,900 long tons (25,300 metric tons) full load
Draft 23 feet/7 m
Speed In excess of 22 knots/24.2 mph/38.7 km/h
Crew Ship’s Company: 374 Sailors (28 officers, 346 enlisted) and 3 Marines. Embarked Landing Force: 699 (66 officers, 633 enlisted); surge capacity to 800
Armament Two Bushmaster II 30-mm Close in Guns, fore and aft; two Rolling Airframe Missile (RAM) launchers, fore and aft: ten .50 calibre/12.7-mm machine guns
Aircraft Launch or land two CH-53E Super Stallion helicopters or two MV-22 Osprey tilt rotor aircraft or up to four CH-46 Sea Knight helicopters, AH-1 or UH-1 helicopters
Landing/Attack Craft Two LCACs or one LCU; and 14 Expeditionary Fighting Vehicles/Amphibious Assault Vehicles

 

San Antonio-class

Ship Builder Launched Commissioned Homeport
USS San Antonio (LPD-17) Avondale 07-12-2003 01-14-2006 Norfolk, Virginia
USS New Orleans (LPD-18) Avondale 12-11-2004 03-10-2007 San Diego, California
USS Mesa Verde (LPD-19) Ingalls 11-19-2004 12-15-2007 Norfolk, Virginia
USS Green Bay (LPD-20) Avondale 08-11-2006 01-24-2009 San Diego, California
USS New York (LPD-21) Avondale 12-19-2007 11-07-2009 Norfolk, Virginia
USS San Diego (LPD-22) Ingalls 05-07-2010 05-19-2012 San Diego, California
USS Anchorage (LPD-23) Avondale 02-12-2011 05-04-2013 San Diego, California
USS Arlington (LPD-24) Ingalls 11-23-2010 02-08-2013 Norfolk, Virginia
USS Somerset (LPD-25) Avondale 04-14-2012 05-01-2014 San Diego, California
USS John P. Murtha (LPD-26) Ingalls 11-02-2014 San Diego, California
USS Portland (LPD-27) Ingalls 02-13-2016
USS Fort Lauderdale (LPD-28) Ingalls
LPD-28

 

Acceptance Trials

Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) announced on April 19 the successful completion of acceptance sea trials for the company’s 10th San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock, USS John P. Murtha (LPD-26). The ship, built at HII’s Ingalls Shipbuilding division, spent six days with the test and trials team performing more than 200 trial events that included both an in-port and underway portion.

Ingalls Shipbuilding's 10th San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock, USS John P. Murtha (LPD-26), successfully completed acceptance sea trials. The ship spent six days in the Gulf of Mexico with the test and trials team, performing more than 200 trial events that included both an in-port and underway portion (Photo by Lance Davis/HII)
Ingalls Shipbuilding’s 10th San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock, USS John P. Murtha (LPD-26), successfully completed acceptance sea trials. The ship spent six days in the Gulf of Mexico with the test and trials team, performing more than 200 trial events that included both an in-port and underway portion (Photo by Lance Davis/HII)

«This was a significant test at sea for LPD-26, and the ship performed well», said Kari Wilkinson, Ingalls’ USS John P. Murtha (LPD-26) program manager. «The logistical performance it takes for our test and trials team to execute all of these events while underway is nothing short of phenomenal. Once again the Navy will be receiving a quality Ingalls-built ship that will be mission-ready and able to achieve whatever tasks the sailors and Marines require».

The U.S. Navy’s Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) spent time onboard evaluating the ship’s performance. Now shipbuilders will put the final fit-and-finish touches on the ship in preparation for delivery in May.

Major evolutions during acceptance trials include the anchor-handling demonstration, ballast/deballast demonstration, detect-to-engage exercise, running the ship at full power and steering.

«It took a lot of work for the folks to complete these sea trial evolutions, and the ship answered every task and performed well», said George S. Jones, Ingalls’ vice president of operations. «Every single skill needed to build this amphibious ship was on display for the INSURV board to see. Our people and this ship did not disappoint. I would also like to thank our partners at Supervisor of Shipbuilding, Gulf Coast for this joint effort».

LPD-26 is named in honor of the late John P. Murtha, who represented Pennsylvania’s 12th Congressional District from 1974 to 2010. In addition to his tenured history in the House of Representatives, Murtha was also a veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps and Reserves. He served for 37 years and received the Bronze Star with Combat «V», two Purple Hearts and the Vietnamese Cross of Gallantry for his service in the Vietnam War. He retired as a colonel in 1990.

Ingalls has built and delivered nine ships in the San Antonio-class. In addition to USS John P. Murtha (LPD-26), Ingalls has the 11th LPD, USS Portland (LPD-27), under construction. Portland launched on February 13 and will be christened on May 21. Ingalls has received advance procurement funding for long-lead-time material for the 12th ship in the class, USS Fort Lauderdale (LPD-28).

The San Antonio-class is the latest addition to the U.S. Navy’s 21st century amphibious assault force. The 684-foot-long/208 meter-long, 105-foot-wide/32-meter-wide ships are used to embark and land Marines, their equipment and supplies ashore via air cushion or conventional landing craft and amphibious assault vehicles, augmented by helicopters or vertical takeoff and landing aircraft such as the MV-22 Osprey. The ships support a Marine Air Ground Task Force across the spectrum of operations, conducting amphibious and expeditionary missions of sea control and power projection to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief missions throughout the first half of the 21st century.

 

General Characteristics

Builder Huntington Ingalls Industries
Propulsion Four sequentially turbocharged marine Colt-Pielstick Diesels, two shafts, 41,600 shaft horsepower
Length 684 feet/208 m
Beam 105 feet/32 m
Displacement Approximately 24,900 long tons (25,300 metric tons) full load
Draft 23 feet/7 m
Speed In excess of 22 knots/24.2 mph/38.7 km/h
Crew Ship’s Company: 374 Sailors (28 officers, 346 enlisted) and 3 Marines. Embarked Landing Force: 699 (66 officers, 633 enlisted); surge capacity to 800
Armament Two Bushmaster II 30-mm Close in Guns, fore and aft; two Rolling Airframe Missile (RAM) launchers, fore and aft: ten .50 calibre/12.7-mm machine guns
Aircraft Launch or land two CH-53E Super Stallion helicopters or two MV-22 Osprey tilt rotor aircraft or up to four CH-46 Sea Knight helicopters, AH-1 or UH-1 helicopters
Landing/Attack Craft Two LCACs or one LCU; and 14 Expeditionary Fighting Vehicles/Amphibious Assault Vehicles

 

San Antonio-class

Ship Builder Launched Commissioned Homeport
USS San Antonio (LPD-17) Avondale 07-12-2003 01-14-2006 Norfolk, Virginia
USS New Orleans (LPD-18) Avondale 12-11-2004 03-10-2007 San Diego, California
USS Mesa Verde (LPD-19) Ingalls 11-19-2004 12-15-2007 Norfolk, Virginia
USS Green Bay (LPD-20) Avondale 08-11-2006 01-24-2009 San Diego, California
USS New York (LPD-21) Avondale 12-19-2007 11-07-2009 Norfolk, Virginia
USS San Diego (LPD-22) Ingalls 05-07-2010 05-19-2012 San Diego, California
USS Anchorage (LPD-23) Avondale 02-12-2011 05-04-2013 San Diego, California
USS Arlington (LPD-24) Ingalls 11-23-2010 02-08-2013 Norfolk, Virginia
USS Somerset (LPD-25) Avondale 04-14-2012 05-01-2014 San Diego, California
USS John P. Murtha (LPD-26) Ingalls 11-02-2014 San Diego, California
USS Portland (LPD-27) Ingalls 02-13-2016
USS Fort Lauderdale (LPD-28) Ingalls

 

Murtha’s Sea Trials

Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) announced on March 7 the successful sea trials of the company’s 10th San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock, USS John P. Murtha (LPD-26). The ship, built at HII’s Ingalls Shipbuilding division, spent four days in the Gulf of Mexico last week with Ingalls’ test and trials team operating the ship and performing more than 200 test events.

Ingalls Shipbuilding’s 10th amphibious transport dock USS John P. Murtha (LPD-26) sails the Gulf of Mexico for Builder’s Trial (Photo by Lance Davis/HII)
Ingalls Shipbuilding’s 10th amphibious transport dock USS John P. Murtha (LPD-26) sails the Gulf of Mexico for Builder’s Trial (Photo by Lance Davis/HII)

«Overall the builder’s trial was successful, and the ship performed well», said Kari Wilkinson, Ingalls’ LPD-26 program manager. «This shipbuilding milestone is another accomplishment for a seasoned LPD production and test team that is ready to continue the learning on future LPD platforms. This team understands the important mission LPDs provide to our nation, and we look forward to delivering another fine, much-needed asset to our sailors and Marines».

Major evolutions during builder’s trials include the anchor-handling demonstration, ballast/deballast demonstration, detect-to-engage exercise, running the ship at full power and steering.

Shipbuilders will now prepare USS John P. Murtha (LPD-26) for acceptance trials in April to demonstrate the same tests and operational success to the U.S. Navy’s Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV). The ship is scheduled to be delivered to the U.S. Navy in the second quarter of 2016.

«LPD-26 experienced an excellent builders trials», said George S. Jones, Ingalls’ vice president of operations. «This is another fine testament to the dedicated men and women of Ingalls shipbuilding and their shipbuilding talents. The USS John P. Murtha (LPD-26) is a quality ship, and the ability to deliver her on schedule later this year is a result of great craftsmen and the outstanding Navy partnership we have with the Supervisor of Shipbuilding, Gulf Coast».

LPD-26 is named in honor of the late John P. Murtha, who represented Pennsylvania’s 12th Congressional District from 1974 to 2010. In addition to his tenured history in the House of Representatives, Murtha was also a veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps and Reserves. He served for 37 years and received the Bronze Star with Combat «V», two Purple Hearts and the Vietnamese Cross of Gallantry for his service in the Vietnam War. He retired as a colonel in 1990.

Ingalls has built and delivered nine ships in the San Antonio-class. In addition to USS John P. Murtha (LPD-26), Ingalls has the 11th LPD, USS Portland (LPD-27), under construction. USS Portland (LPD-27) launched on February 13 and will be christened on May 21. Ingalls received a $200 million advance procurement contract for the 12th ship in the class, LPD-28, in December 2015.

The San Antonio-class is the latest addition to the U.S. Navy’s 21st century amphibious assault force. The 684-foot-long/208-meter-long, 105-foot-wide/32-meter-wide ships are used to embark and land Marines, their equipment and supplies ashore via air cushion or conventional landing craft and amphibious assault vehicles, augmented by helicopters or vertical takeoff and landing aircraft such as the MV-22 Osprey. The ships support a Marine Air Ground Task Force across the spectrum of operations, conducting amphibious and expeditionary missions of sea control and power projection to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief missions throughout the first half of the 21st century.

Ingalls Shipbuilding conducted Builder Sea Trials for USS John P. Murtha (LPD-26) in the Gulf of Mexico

 

General Characteristics

Builder Huntington Ingalls Industries
Propulsion Four sequentially turbocharged marine Colt-Pielstick Diesels, two shafts, 41,600 shaft horsepower
Length 684 feet/208 m
Beam 105 feet/32 m
Displacement Approximately 24,900 long tons (25,300 metric tons) full load
Draft 23 feet/7 m
Speed In excess of 22 knots/24.2 mph/38.7 km/h
Crew Ship’s Company: 374 Sailors (28 officers, 346 enlisted) and 3 Marines. Embarked Landing Force: 699 (66 officers, 633 enlisted); surge capacity to 800
Armament Two Bushmaster II 30-mm Close in Guns, fore and aft; two Rolling Airframe Missile (RAM) launchers, fore and aft: ten .50 calibre/12.7-mm machine guns
Aircraft Launch or land two CH-53E Super Stallion helicopters or two MV-22 Osprey tilt rotor aircraft or up to four CH-46 Sea Knight helicopters, AH-1 or UH-1 helicopters
Landing/Attack Craft Two LCACs or one LCU; and 14 Expeditionary Fighting Vehicles/Amphibious Assault Vehicles
USS Portland (LPD-27) is seen here in the middle of launch early Saturday morning at Ingalls Shipbuilding in Pascagoula. Portland is the 11th San Antonio-class landing platform dock (Photo by Andrew Young/HII)
USS Portland (LPD-27) is seen here in the middle of launch early Saturday morning at Ingalls Shipbuilding in Pascagoula. Portland is the 11th San Antonio-class landing platform dock (Photo by Andrew Young/HII)

 

San Antonio-class

Ship Builder Launched Commissioned Homeport
USS San Antonio (LPD-17) Avondale 07-12-2003 01-14-2006 Norfolk, Virginia
USS New Orleans (LPD-18) Avondale 12-11-2004 03-10-2007 San Diego, California
USS Mesa Verde (LPD-19) Ingalls 11-19-2004 12-15-2007 Norfolk, Virginia
USS Green Bay (LPD-20) Avondale 08-11-2006 01-24-2009 San Diego, California
USS New York (LPD-21) Avondale 12-19-2007 11-07-2009 Norfolk, Virginia
USS San Diego (LPD-22) Ingalls 05-07-2010 05-19-2012 San Diego, California
USS Anchorage (LPD-23) Avondale 02-12-2011 05-04-2013 San Diego, California
USS Arlington (LPD-24) Ingalls 11-23-2010 02-08-2013 Norfolk, Virginia
USS Somerset (LPD-25) Avondale 04-14-2012 05-01-2014 San Diego, California
USS John P. Murtha (LPD-26) Ingalls 11-02-2014 San Diego, California
USS Portland (LPD-27) Ingalls 02-13-2016
USS Fort Lauderdale (LPD-28) Ingalls

 

HII Launches Portland

On February 13, Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division has launched the company’s 11th amphibious transport dock, USS Portland (LPD-27). The ship, named for Oregon’s largest city, is scheduled to be christened on May 21.

USS Portland (LPD-27) is seen here in the middle of launch early Saturday morning at Ingalls Shipbuilding in Pascagoula. Portland is the 11th San Antonio-class landing platform dock (Photo by Andrew Young/HII)
USS Portland (LPD-27) is seen here in the middle of launch early Saturday morning at Ingalls Shipbuilding in Pascagoula. Portland is the 11th San Antonio-class landing platform dock (Photo by Andrew Young/HII)

«It takes a tremendous effort by all of our crafts personnel to accomplish this big milestone», said Bruce Knowles, Ingalls’ LPD-27 program manager. «The LPD program continues to improve with each ship, and LPD-27 falls into that same line of success proven by a hot production line. Our shipbuilders continue to build these ships more efficiently and affordably».

USS Portland (LPD-27) was translated via Ingalls’ rail car system to the floating dry dock prior to launch. The dock was moved away from the pier and then flooded to float the ship. With the assistance of tugs, Portland came off the dock on Saturday morning.

Ingalls has built and delivered nine ships in the San Antonio class of ships, with USS John P. Murtha (LPD-26) and USS Portland (LPD-27) remaining. Ingalls received a $200 million advance procurement contract for LPD-28, the 12th ship in the class, in December, 2015.

The San Antonio class is the latest addition to the U.S. Navy’s 21st century amphibious assault force. The 684-foot-long/208-meter-long, 105-foot-wide/32-meter-wide ships are used to embark and land Marines, their equipment and supplies ashore via air cushion or conventional landing craft and amphibious assault vehicles, augmented by helicopters or vertical takeoff and landing aircraft such as the MV-22 Osprey. The ships support a Marine Air Ground Task Force across the spectrum of operations, conducting amphibious and expeditionary missions of sea control and power projection to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief missions throughout the first half of the 21st century.

John P. Murtha (LPD-26) is the tenth ship in the San Antonio Class
John P. Murtha (LPD-26) is the tenth ship in the San Antonio Class

 

General Characteristics

Builder Huntington Ingalls Industries
Propulsion Four sequentially turbocharged marine Colt-Pielstick Diesels, two shafts, 41,600 shaft horsepower
Length 684 feet/208 m
Beam 105 feet/32 m
Displacement Approximately 24,900 long tons (25,300 metric tons) full load
Draft 23 feet/7 m
Speed In excess of 22 knots/24.2 mph/38.7 km/h
Crew Ship’s Company: 374 Sailors (28 officers, 346 enlisted) and 3 Marines. Embarked Landing Force: 699 (66 officers, 633 enlisted); surge capacity to 800
Armament Two Bushmaster II 30-mm Close in Guns, fore and aft; two Rolling Airframe Missile (RAM) launchers, fore and aft: ten .50 calibre/12.7-mm machine guns
Aircraft Launch or land two CH-53E Super Stallion helicopters or two MV-22 Osprey tilt rotor aircraft or up to four CH-46 Sea Knight helicopters, AH-1 or UH-1 helicopters
Landing/Attack Craft Two LCACs or one LCU; and 14 Expeditionary Fighting Vehicles/Amphibious Assault Vehicles

 

Ships:

USS San Antonio (LPD-17), Norfolk, VA

USS New Orleans (LPD-18), San Diego, CA

USS Mesa Verde (LPD-19), Norfolk, VA

USS Green Bay (LPD-20), San Diego, CA

USS New York (LPD-21), Norfolk, VA

USS San Diego (LPD-22), San Diego, CA

USS Anchorage (LPD-23), San Diego, CA

USS Arlington (LPD-24), Norfolk, VA

USS Somerset (LPD-25), San Diego, CA

USS John P. Murtha (LPD-26), San Diego, CA

USS Portland (LPD-27), launched

LPD-28, procurement contract

 

Here’s a time lapse video of the amphibious warship USS Portland (LPD-27) being translated and launched at Ingalls Shipbuilding in Pascagoula. This ship first hit water on Saturday, February 13. Portland is the 11th San Antonio-class Landing Platform Dock to be built

 

Procurement Contract

Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) announced today that its Ingalls Shipbuilding division has received a $200 million, cost-plus-fixed-fee advance procurement contract from the U.S. Navy for LPD-28, the 12th amphibious transport dock of the USS San Antonio (LPD-17) class. The funds will be used to purchase long-lead-time material and major equipment, including main engines, diesel generators, deck equipment, shafting, propellers, valves and other long-lead systems.

The Ingalls-built amphibious transport dock USS Somerset (LPD-25) sails through the Gulf of Mexico during builder's sea trials (Photo by Steve Blount)
The Ingalls-built amphibious transport dock USS Somerset (LPD-25) sails through the Gulf of Mexico during builder’s sea trials (Photo by Steve Blount)

«This funding demonstrates the priority the Navy places on Ingalls getting started on this important ship», said Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias. «Our shipbuilders have made great strides in the LPD program, and we are performing well. Building LPD-28 is key to maintaining a reliable supplier base and leverages our hot production line, enabling our team of shipbuilders to build this ship and future amphibious warships as efficiently and as affordably as possible».

Ingalls’ 10th San Antonio-class LPD, USS John P. Murtha (LPD-26), was the most complete and lowest-cost LPD when launched, with many key systems finished months ahead of the shipyard’s historic best in the program.

The San Antonio class is the latest addition to the Navy’s 21st century amphibious assault force. The 684-foot-long/208-meter-long, 105-foot-wide/32-meter-wide ships are used to embark and land Marines, their equipment and supplies ashore via air cushion or conventional landing craft and amphibious assault vehicles, augmented by helicopters or vertical takeoff and landing aircraft such as the MV-22 Osprey. The ships support a Marine Air Ground Task Force across the spectrum of operations, conducting amphibious and expeditionary missions of sea control and power projection to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief missions throughout the first half of the 21st century.

The ships will support amphibious assault, special operations, expeditionary warfare or humanitarian missions throughout the first half of this century
The ships will support amphibious assault, special operations, expeditionary warfare or humanitarian missions throughout the first half of this century

 

General Characteristics

Builder Huntington Ingalls Industries
Propulsion Four sequentially turbocharged marine Colt-Pielstick Diesels, two shafts, 41,600 shaft horsepower
Length 684 feet/208 m
Beam 105 feet/32 m
Displacement Approximately 24,900 long tons (25,300 metric tons) full load
Draft 23 feet/7 m
Speed In excess of 22 knots/24.2 mph/38.7 km/h
Crew Ship’s Company: 374 Sailors (28 officers, 346 enlisted) and 3 Marines. Embarked Landing Force: 699 (66 officers, 633 enlisted); surge capacity to 800
Armament Two Bushmaster II 30-mm Close in Guns, fore and aft; two Rolling Airframe Missile (RAM) launchers, fore and aft: ten .50 calibre/12.7-mm machine guns
Aircraft Launch or land two CH-53E Super Stallion helicopters or two MV-22 Osprey tilt rotor aircraft or up to four CH-46 Sea Knight helicopters, AH-1 or UH-1 helicopters
Landing/Attack Craft Two LCACs or one LCU; and 14 Expeditionary Fighting Vehicles/Amphibious Assault Vehicles

 

Ships:

USS San Antonio (LPD-17), Norfolk, VA

USS New Orleans (LPD-18), San Diego, CA

USS Mesa Verde (LPD-19), Norfolk, VA

USS Green Bay (LPD-20), San Diego, CA

USS New York (LPD-21), Norfolk, VA

USS San Diego (LPD-22), San Diego, CA

USS Anchorage (LPD-23), San Diego, CA

USS Arlington (LPD-24), Norfolk, VA

USS Somerset (LPD-25), San Diego, CA

USS John P. Murtha (LPD-26), San Diego, CA

USS Portland (LPD-27), Authorized for U.S. Navy construction

 

While on U.S. Navy acceptance sea trials, the Ingalls-built amphibious landing platform dock, USS Arlington (LPD-24), met its sister ship, USS Anchorage (LPD-23) in the Gulf of Mexico

 

Christening of John

The USS John P. Murtha (LPD-26) was christened at Ingalls Shipbuilding on Saturday, March 21. The vessel is named after the late U.S. Rep. John Murtha, a Democrat from the 12th district, who was the longest-serving congressman in Pennsylvania history. His daughter, Donna Murtha, sponsored the ship and performed the traditional breaking of a bottle of American sparkling wine across the ship’s bow.

For safety reasons, the bottle of sparkling wine is encased in sheetmetal in the Ingalls shops and wrapped by a shipbuilder in decorative ribbons of red, white and blue
For safety reasons, the bottle of sparkling wine is encased in sheetmetal in the Ingalls shops and wrapped by a shipbuilder in decorative ribbons of red, white and blue

House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-California, was the featured speaker at the ceremony. «Jack Murtha poured everything – everything he was, everything he had – into the service of our country and the lives of the American people», she said of her colleague, who represented Pennsylvania’s 12th Congressional District for 36 years until his death in 2010. «To watch Chairman Murtha legislate was to see a master at work, but more indicative of his character was to watch him communicate with our men and women in uniform, whether on the battlefield or at their bedside. He knew how serious a responsibility it is to send our men and women into harm’s way, and he was unwavering in his conviction that we must honor their sacrifice not only with our words but our deeds. Like its namesake, the John P. Murtha will provide our servicemen and women the means to enter the battle and to make their way back home», Pelosi continued. «Congratulations to Ingalls Shipbuilding and all of the hard-working men and women who have put their skill and determination into this ship and this special day».

Murtha’s daughter, Donna S. Murtha, is the ship sponsor. At the culmination of the ceremony, she smashed a bottle of sparkling wine across the bow of the ship, officially christening LPD 26 as the John P. Murtha. «May God bless this ship and all who sail in her», she said.

HII President and CEO Mike Petters also spoke at the ceremony. «Ingalls is building each ship better than the last, and the team’s performance – and the performance of the delivered LPDs – has strengthened the nation’s confidence in the LPD program», he said. «This was most recently demonstrated by the Navy’s request and the Congressional investment in the 12th San Antonio-class warship – and the Navy’s selection of this proven hull-form for its new LX(R) class of amphibious ships. Ingalls is making a difference».

«The ship we christen today honors Congressman John P. Murtha, who proudly served his country as both a Marine and a statesman for almost 40 years», said Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias. «I can’t imagine a more fitting namesake to represent the marvel of American technology, craftsmanship and strength that is LPD-26. Ingalls shipbuilders know that quality matters. We build our warships as though our own sons and daughters will take them into harm’s way – because they may. And because we owe our warfighters our very best. Our shipbuilders put their hearts and souls into every ship we build – as we have for generations. LPD-26 is no exception. Murtha was the most complete and lowest-cost LPD when she was launched, with many key systems finished months ahead of our historical best. So I’m extremely proud of our LPD-26 shipbuilders».

«Deep in the hull or on scaffolding hundreds of feet in the air – in the Deep South heat – these Mississippians are welding, painting and assembling the living quarters, galley, hospital and the command centers for those who serve», said Mississippi Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves. «You can see their commitment to a job well done – because they know the invaluable role they play in America’s national security».

Ingalls Shipbuilding Christens Amphibious Transport Dock John P. Murtha
Ingalls Shipbuilding Christens Amphibious Transport Dock John P. Murtha

 

John P. Murtha (LPD-26)

The amphibious transport dock ship John P. Murtha (LPD-26) is the tenth ship in the San Antonio Class. LPD-26 is named in honor of Congressman John P. Murtha, who represented Pennsylvania’s 12th Congressional District for 36 years – from 1974 until his death in 2010. In addition to his tenured history in the House of Representatives, Murtha was also a veteran of the United States Marine Corps and Reserves. He served a distinguished 37 years, receiving the Bronze Star with Combat «V», two Purple Hearts and the Vietnamese Cross of Gallantry for his service in the Vietnam War. He retired as a colonel in 1990.

Amphibious transport dock ships (LPD) are warships that embark, transport, and land elements of a landing force for a variety of expeditionary warfare missions. LPDs are used to transport and land Marines, their equipment and supplies by embarked Landing Craft Air Cushion (LCAC) or conventional landing craft (Landing Craft Utility, LCU) and Expeditionary Fighting Vehicles (EFV) or Amphibious Assault Vehicles (AAV) augmented by helicopters or vertical take-off and landing aircraft (MV-22). These ships support amphibious assault, special operations or expeditionary warfare missions and can serve as secondary aviation platforms for amphibious ready groups.

Collectively, the San Antonio LPD-17 class ships will functionally replace more than 41 amphibious ships (LPD-4, LSD-36, LKA-113 and LST-1179 classes of amphibious ships) providing the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps with modern, seabased platforms that are networked, survivable, and built to operate with 21st century transformational platforms, such as the MV-22 Osprey aircraft, the Expeditionary Fighting Vehicle (EFV), and future means by which Marines are delivered ashore.

A contract for final design and construction of San Antonio (LPD-17), the lead ship in the class, was awarded in December 1996; actual construction commenced in June 2000. USS San Antonio was delivered to the Navy in July 2005. LPDs 18-25 have also been delivered to the U.S. Navy. New York (LPD-21) is the first of three LPD 17-class ships built in honor of the victims of the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

The ships bow stem was constructed using 7.5 tons of steel salvaged from the World Trade Center. The Navy named the 8th and 9th ships of the class – Arlington and Somerset – in honor of the victims of the attacks on the Pentagon and United Flight 93, respectively. Materials from those sites were also incorporated into Arlington and Somerset.

LPDs 26-27 are currently under construction at Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) on the Gulf Coast, and will deliver over the next few years. The keel of LPD-27 was laid in August 2013, LPD-26 was launched in October 2014. In fiscal year 2015, the purchase of long lead-time materials for LPD-28 was approved.

John P. Murtha (LPD-26) is the tenth ship in the San Antonio Class
John P. Murtha (LPD-26) is the tenth ship in the San Antonio Class

 

General Characteristics

Builder Huntington Ingalls Industries
Displacement Approximately 24,900 long tons/25,300 metric tons full load
Length 208.5 m/684 feet overall
Beam 31.9 m/105 feet extreme
Draft 7 m/23 feet
Propulsion 4 sequentially turbocharged marine Colt-Pielstick Diesels, 2 shafts, 41,600 shaft horsepower/31,021 kW
Speed In excess of 22 knots/25 mph/41 km/h
Crew 374 Sailors (28 officers, 346 enlisted Sailors) and 3 Marines
Embarked Marine Expeditionary Force of 699 (66 officers, 633 enlisted), surge capacity to 800
Armament 2 × Bushmaster II 30-mm Close in Guns, fore and aft
2 × Rolling Airframe Missile (RAM) launchers for air defense, fore and aft
10 × 12.7-mm .50 calibre machine guns
Aircraft Launch or land two CH53E Super Stallion helicopters or
Two MV-22 Osprey tilt rotor aircraft or
Up to four CH-46E Sea Knight helicopters, AH-1 or UH-1 helicopters
Landing/Attack Craft Two LCACs or one LCU
14 EFV/AAV
Ships USS San Antonio (LPD-17)
USS New Orleans (LPD-18)
USS Mesa Verde (LPD-19)
USS Green Bay (LPD-20)
USS New York (LPD-21)
USS San Diego (LPD-22)
USS Anchorage (LPD-23)
USS Arlington (LPD-24)
USS Somerset (LPD-25)
USS John P. Murtha (LPD-26)
USS Portland (LPD-27)
(LPD-28)

 

Ingalls Shipbuilding Launches John P. Murtha (LPD-26) on October 30, 2014