Tag Archives: Raytheon

DARPA’s interceptor

Raytheon Company successfully tested a hot fire rocket motor for DARPA’s Multi-Azimuth Defense Fast Intercept Round Engagement System, or MAD-FIRES.

Raytheon tests rocket motor for DARPA's MAD-FIRES interceptor
Raytheon tests rocket motor for DARPA’s MAD-FIRES interceptor

The MAD-FIRES interceptor is designed to provide a robust and affordable self-defense capability that defeats multiple waves of anti-ship missiles, unmanned aerial vehicles, as well as other threats.

«The Navy is asking for leading-edge capabilities that can take out rapidly approaching targets, and Raytheon’s interceptor for the MAD-FIRES program will deliver», said Doctor Thomas Bussing, Raytheon Advanced Missile Systems vice president. «This test shows Raytheon is right on track to provide an affordable, advanced technology to the fleet».

If fielded, this capability will combine the speed, rapid fire and depth of a gun weapon system with the precision and accuracy of guided missiles.

The HEL system

Raytheon Company’s advanced high power microwave and mobile high energy laser systems engaged and defeated multiple unmanned aerial system targets during a U.S. Air Force demonstration. The mature High Power Microwave (HPM) and High Energy Laser (HEL) technologies offer an affordable solution to the growing Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) threat.

Raytheon directed energy systems down multiple drones in US Air Force exercise
Raytheon directed energy systems down multiple drones in US Air Force exercise

The HEL system, paired with Raytheon’s Multi-spectral Targeting System, uses invisible beams of light to defeat hostile UASs. Mounted on a Polaris MRZR all-terrain vehicle, the system detects, identifies, tracks and engages drones.

«Countering the drone threat requires diverse solutions», said Stefan Baur, Raytheon Electronic Warfare Systems vice president. «HEL and HPM give frontline operators options for protecting critical infrastructure, convoys and personnel».

Raytheon’s HPM uses microwave energy to disrupt drone guidance systems. High power microwave operators can focus the beam to target and instantly defeat drone swarms. With a consistent power supply, an HPM system can provide virtually unlimited protection.

«After decades of research and investment, we believe these advanced directed energy applications will soon be ready for the battlefield to help protect people, assets and infrastructure», said Doctor Thomas Bussing, Raytheon Advanced Missile Systems vice president.

Raytheon’s HEL and HPM were the only directed energy systems that participated in this Air Force experimentation demonstration. The event expanded on previous directed energy demonstrations such as a U.S. Army directed energy exercise held in 2017.

Critical test

Raytheon Company completed a successful static test of the new DeepStrike missile rocket motor, which moved the advanced, surface-to-surface weapon closer to its maiden flight test later this year.

Raytheon's new DeepStrike missile rocket motor passes critical test
Raytheon’s new DeepStrike missile rocket motor passes critical test

Raytheon’s new DeepStrike missile rocket motor passed a recent static test conducted at the Allegany Ballistics Laboratory in West Virginia, which moved the weapon a step closer to its first flight. The company is on a fast track to deliver an advanced, surface-to-surface missile that exceeds the U.S. Army’s requirements by doubling the firepower while reducing the cost.

The company is offering the DeepStrike missile for the U.S. Army’s Precision Strike Missile, or PrSM, program to replace the aging Army Tactical Missile System that is approaching the end of its service life.

«Testing shows us how initial data assessments line up and validates them for the next phase in development», said Doctor Thomas Bussing, Raytheon Advanced Missile Systems vice president. «This test confirms our design for the DeepStrike propulsion system is solid and moves us one step closer to extending the Army’s reach and doubling the load-out of long-range fires».

The rocket motor test at Allegany Ballistics Laboratory in West Virginia is the latest in a series of milestones for the DeepStrike missile. Raytheon recently concluded a successful preliminary design review for the weapon.

Raytheon’s new, long-range precision strike missile features an innovative, two-in-the-pod design and will fly farther, faster, and give the Army twice the firepower at half the cost per missile. It is also more maneuverable and has a modular, open architecture to simplify system upgrades.

«With our expertise in advanced weapon systems, Raytheon is best positioned to provide an affordable, low-risk solution that gives the Army an overwhelming advantage over our nation’s adversaries», Bussing said.

The DeepStrike missile will defeat fixed land targets 60-499 kilometers/37-310 miles away, and get there faster than current systems.

Raytheon’s next-generation DeepStrike missile is the U.S. Army’s affordable solution that offers double the firepower, greater range and precision accuracy

Operations Center

The U.S. Air Force Life Cycle Management Center (AFLCMC) and a consortium of tech firms led by Raytheon are modernizing and simplifying the legacy Space Defense Operations Center (SPADOC), a 1990s-era system that tracks and monitors space debris.

U.S. Air Force and Raytheon collaborate to modernize space command and control system
U.S. Air Force and Raytheon collaborate to modernize space command and control system

Dave Fuino, program director for Raytheon Intelligence, Information and Services, said: «Within just a few months we brought together a team, developed the technology to modernize it, got it on contract and held a series of demos to prove it worked. We went from concept to proving the solution in less than a year, which is really remarkable».

The SPADOC system reached the end of its planned service life. The U.S. Air Force is planning to replace it with modern systems that will simplify operations and provide greater space situational awareness and collision avoidance capabilities. However, the new system won’t come online for several years.

«SPADOC provides critical space-tracking capabilities that we must sustain and maintain while we wait for new systems to come online», said Bob Taylor, U.S. Air Force Legacy Space Branch chief. «At the same time, it’s critical that we address the obsolescence risk of an aging SPADOC system. So, we came up with a really innovative, modern solution to this problem».

Raytheon and AFLCMC decided to emulate SPADOC’s capabilities with modern computer hardware. The new emulated environment, SPADOC Emulation Analysis Risk Reduction, known as SPEARR, is designed to provide a more sustainable system that requires less maintenance. The new hardware will provide the same functionality as today’s system, making it easy to learn and operate.

Additional benefits are significant reductions in power and cooling consumption. Most of these reductions are because all of SPADOC’s capabilities are now integrated into two small server racks instead of spread over 1,000 square feet/93 square meters of an aging, analog computer system.

«We used proven emulation technology to help solve our challenge, significantly reducing obsolescence risk», said Taylor. «Innovations in programmatic and technical approaches drove a smarter, better and faster solution. The next step is to evaluate options for fielding SPEARR».

«Between the experience of our North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) teammates, a.i. solutions, Zivaro and E&M Technologies, and leading emulation companies Fundamental Software and M2 Technologies, we addressed the aging SPADOC system. It’s a game changer», said Fuino.

LAND 19 Phase 7B

On March 15, 2019, Raytheon Australia and Kongsberg Defence & Aerospace (KONGSBERG) joined Defence Minister, the Hon. Christopher Pyne and South Australian Premier, the Hon. Steven Marshall, to announce that the National Advanced Surface to Air Missile System, NASAMS, was selected for the Australian Government’s Short Range Ground Based Air Defence program known as LAND19 Phase 7B. KONGSBERG is a subcontractor to Raytheon Australia.

NASAMS has been selected by the Australian Goverment for their LAND 19 Phase 7B
NASAMS has been selected by the Australian Goverment for their LAND 19 Phase 7B

NASAMS was in 2017 chosen for a Single Supplier Limited Tender process and has gone through a Risk Mitigation Activity, and subsequently passed Government approval marked at today’s event in Adelaide. NASAMS is a fully networked and distributed system allowing the Australian Army to counter complex air threats beyond visual range and, considerably increase protection of Australian soldiers.

«This announcement lays the foundation for further expansion in Australia and the region. KONGSBERG sees more significant opportunities in Australia and have been a partner to the Australian Defence Force for 30 years starting with the Penguin anti-ship missile program. We opened an office in Canberra last year and is increasing our staff in the country», says Eirik Lie, President Kongsberg Defence & Aerospace AS.

«NASAMS is the most sold air defence system in its class in the last 10 years. Its continuous evolution enables new capabilities to be implemented in the system», says Kjetil Reiten Myhra, Executive Vice President Kongsberg Defence & Aerospace AS.

Initial production

Raytheon Co., Integrated Defense Systems, Marlborough, Massachusetts, is awarded a $402,658,015 fixed-price-incentive (firm target) modification to previously-awarded contract N00024-14-C-5315 to exercise options for Air and Missile Defense Radar Program (AMDR) Low-Rate Initial Production (LRIP). This modification will provide for three AMDR LRIP units. The LRIP units will be deployed on DDG-51 Flight III-class ships. Work will be performed in Marlborough, Massachusetts, and is expected to be completed by March 2023. Fiscal 2019 shipbuilding and conversion (U.S. Navy) funding in the amount of $402,658,015 will be obligated at time of award and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, District of Columbia, is the contracting activity.

Robots and engineers work together in Raytheon's new radar development facility to assemble an array for the U.S. Navy's AN/SPY-6(V) radar
Robots and engineers work together in Raytheon’s new radar development facility to assemble an array for the U.S. Navy’s AN/SPY-6(V) radar

AN/SPY-6(V) is the U.S. Navy’s next generation integrated air and missile defense radar. Currently in production, and on track for the DDG-51 Flight III destroyer, SPY-6 provides the Navy with unmatched protection against air, surface, and ballistic missile threats.

The radar is built with individual ‘building blocks’ called Radar Modular Assemblies (RMA). Each RMA is a self-contained radar in a 2’×2’×2’ box. These RMAs can stack together to form any size array to fit the mission requirements of any ship. This technology makes SPY-6 the Navy’s first truly scalable radar.

SPY-6 Advantages:

  • Scalable – can be configured for other ships based on mission requirements;
  • Capable – designed to counter large and complex raids;
  • Digital beamforming – provides exceptional capability in high-clutter and jamming environments;
  • Reprogrammable – able to adapt to new mission or emerging threats;
  • Gallium Nitride-based AESA – semiconductor technology enables 360 degree Active Electronically Scanned Array capability.

AN/SPY-6(V) Radar Build

Tactical Boost Glide

Raytheon Company won a $63.3 million DARPA contract to further develop the Tactical Boost Glide hypersonic weapons program. The joint DARPA and U.S. Air Force effort includes a critical design review, a key step in fielding the technology.

Raytheon wins $63.3 million DARPA contract for hypersonic weapons work
Raytheon wins $63.3 million DARPA contract for hypersonic weapons work

«This latest contract adds to Raytheon’s growing number of hypersonic weapons programs», said Doctor Thomas Bussing, Raytheon Advanced Missile Systems vice president. «Raytheon is working closely with our customers to quickly field these advanced weapon systems and provide our nation’s military with the tools they need to stay ahead of the escalating threat».

Hypersonic weapons will enable the U.S. military to engage from longer ranges with shorter response times and enhanced effectiveness compared to current weapon systems.

Systems that operate at hypersonic speeds – five times the speed of sound (Mach 5) and beyond – offer the potential for military operations from longer ranges with shorter response times and enhanced effectiveness compared to current military systems. Such systems could provide significant payoff for future U.S. offensive strike operations, particularly as adversaries’ capabilities advance.

The Tactical Boost Glide (TBG) program is a joint DARPA/U.S. Air Force (USAF) effort that aims to develop and demonstrate technologies to enable future air-launched, tactical-range hypersonic boost glide systems. In a boost glide system, a rocket accelerates its payload to high speeds. The payload then separates from the rocket and glides unpowered to its destination.

The TBG program plans to focus on three primary objectives:

  • Vehicle Feasibility – Vehicle concepts possessing the required aerodynamic and aerothermal performance, controllability and robustness for a wide operational envelope;
  • Effectiveness – System attributes and subsystems required to be effective in relevant operational environments;
  • Affordability – Approaches to reducing cost and increasing value for both the demonstration system and future operational systems.

TBG is a two-phase effort that plans to include ground and flight testing to mature critical technologies, and aims to demonstrate the system performance achievable through the integration of those technologies. The program is using a disciplined systems engineering approach to define demonstration system objectives and identify enabling technologies needed for future systems. The TBG program is exploiting the technical knowledge and lessons derived from development and flight testing of previous boost glide systems, including the Hypersonic Technology Vehicle 2 (HTV-2).

Wind tunnel tests

Raytheon Company successfully completed more than 1,700 rigorous wind tunnel tests on the newest, extended-range variant of the combat-proven Advanced Medium-Range Air-to-Air Missile (AMRAAM). Testing is a major step in the missile’s qualification for integration with the National Advanced Surface-to-Air Missile System (NASAMS).

Raytheon engineers recently completed wind tunnel testing on a new, extended-range variant of the AMRAAM air-to-air missile. Testing is a key step in qualifying the missile for the NASAMS launch system
Raytheon engineers recently completed wind tunnel testing on a new, extended-range variant of the AMRAAM air-to-air missile. Testing is a key step in qualifying the missile for the NASAMS launch system

The AMRAAM-Extended Range (AMRAAM-ER) missile is a ground-launched weapon that will intercept targets at longer distances and higher altitudes. The missile’s bigger rocket motor and smarter flight control algorithms give it a boost in range.

«During these tests, we put AMRAAM-ER through a full range of potential flight conditions to validate the missile’s future performance on the battlefield», said Kim Ernzen, Raytheon Air Warfare Systems vice president. «Raytheon is developing this missile to enhance ground-based air defense for our customers worldwide».

Raytheon engineers will now analyze data from the wind tunnel test runs to verify and update the AMRAAM-ER missile’s aerodynamic models to maximize its performance.

Raytheon AMRAAM-ER Missile Goes Long and Flies High

 

About NASAMS

Manufactured by Raytheon and Norway’s Kongsberg Defence & Aerospace, NASAMS is the most widely used short- and medium-range air defense system in NATO. NASAMS provides a high-firepower, networked and distributed state-of-the-art air defense system that can quickly identify, engage and destroy current and evolving threat aircraft, unmanned aerial vehicles and emerging cruise missile threats.

 

About Raytheon

Raytheon Company, with 2018 sales of $27 billion and 67,000 employees, is a technology and innovation leader specializing in defense, civil government and cybersecurity solutions. With a history of innovation spanning 97 years, Raytheon provides state-of-the-art electronics, mission systems integration, Command, Control, Communications, Computers, Cyber and Intelligence (C5I) products and services, sensing, effects and mission support for customers in more than 80 countries.

Ballistic Missile Test

Raytheon Company’s AN/SPY-6(V)1 air and missile defense radar completed its latest test, exceeding all performance requirements. In the most stressing test to date, the radar searched for, detected, and maintained track on the target as predicted.

Raytheon's SPY-6 aces most complex test yet
Raytheon’s SPY-6 aces most complex test yet

«Now in production, AN/SPY-6(V)1 continues to stack up test successes and milestones, proving the maturity of its design and its exceptional capabilities», said U.S. Navy Captain Seiko Okano, Major Program Manager for Above Water Sensors, Program Executive Office Integrated Warfare Systems. «The radar is on track to deliver game-changing integrated air and missile defense technology to the surface fleet through its ability to simultaneously address air and missile defense targets. This will provide an unprecedented level of comprehensive protection to naval forces and assets».

Since its inception in January 2014, the program has met 20 of 20 milestones, ahead of or on schedule. The radar has progressed well through the U.S. Navy’s dedicated AN/SPY-6(V)1 testing program. Currently in production, the radar is on schedule for delivery to the Navy’s first modernized DDG-51 Flight III, the future USS Jack H Lucas (DDG-125), in 2020.

Throughout testing at the Navy’s Pacific Missile Range Facility, Kauai, Hawaii, AN/SPY-6(V)1 has consistently proved its multi-mission capability to extend the battlespace and safeguard the fleet from multiple, simultaneous threats. The radar has now demonstrated its performance against an array of singular and multiple targets of increasing complexity. This includes integrated air and missile defense targets, as well as targets of opportunity, satellites and aircraft.

AN/SPY-6(V)1 provides greater range, increased accuracy, greater resistance to environmental and man-made electronic clutter, higher reliability and sustainability than currently deployed radars. The radar’s demonstrated sensitivity – significantly more than current radars in the U.S. Navy – provides greater coverage for early and accurate detection.

Swiss army knife

The U.S. Army awarded Raytheon Company a $191 million contract for Ku-band radio frequency radars. KuRFS, an advanced electronically scanned array system, fills an immediate U.S. Army operational need for a counter-unmanned aerial vehicle radar.

Raytheon's KuRFS radar is a multi-mission radar providing detection of rocket, artillery, mortar and UAS threats by providing a critical sense and warn capability
Raytheon’s KuRFS radar is a multi-mission radar providing detection of rocket, artillery, mortar and UAS threats by providing a critical sense and warn capability

Already deployed, KuRFS delivers precision fire control as well as «sense and warn» capability for multiple missions including detection of rocket, artillery, mortar and swarming Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) threats.

«Seeing threats – like swarming drones – as soon as possible on the battlefield is essential to protecting critical assets and saving soldiers’ lives», said Andrew Hajek, senior director of tactical radars at Raytheon Integrated Defense Systems. «KuRFS makes this possible by delivering a unique combination 360-degree situational awareness, precision and mobility».

KuRFS enables defense against multiple threat types through integration with the Land-Based Phalanx Weapon System (LPWS), .50-caliber/12.7-mm guns and 30-mm cannons. The radar also supports high-energy laser and the Coyote weapon system in both a ground mounted or vehicle mounted configuration.

Raytheon’ KuRFS is able to quickly address the urgent needs of the Army through a model of rapid-turn development and deployment. This reduces time to fielding, while providing enhanced flexibility to adapt to a quickly-changing threat environment in the drone space.