Tag Archives: Raytheon

GaN Upgrade

Ballistic missiles will soon be easier to detect and defeat. The U.S. Missile Defense Agency has awarded Raytheon Company a $10 million contract modification to continue the development of hardware and software that will add Gallium Nitride, or GaN semiconductor technology to the AN/TPY-2 ballistic missile defense radar.

A critical element in the Ballistic Missile Defense System, AN/TPY-2 continually searches the sky for ballistic missiles
A critical element in the Ballistic Missile Defense System, AN/TPY-2 continually searches the sky for ballistic missiles

GaN increases the radar’s range, search capabilities and enables the system to better discriminate between threats and non-threats. Gallium nitride technology also increases the system’s overall reliability while maintaining production and operational costs.

«AN/TPY-2 is already the world’s most capable land-based, X-band, ballistic missile defense radar», said Raytheon’s Dave Gulla, vice president of the Integrated Defense Systems Mission Systems and Sensors business area. «Adding GaN technology modernizes the system so it can defeat all classes of ballistic missiles in extreme operational environments».

The AN/TPY-2 is on pace to be the world’s first transportable, land-based ballistic missile defense radar to use GaN technology.

 

The AN/TPY-2 radar operates in two modes:

In forward-based mode, the radar is positioned near hostile territory, and detects, tracks and discriminates ballistic missiles shortly after they are launched.

In terminal mode, the radar detects, acquires, tracks and discriminates ballistic missiles as they descend to their target. The terminal mode AN/TPY-2 is the fire control radar for the Terminal High Altitude Area Defense ballistic missile defense system, by guiding the THAAD missile to intercept a threat.

 

About GaN

Raytheon has led development and innovative use of GaN for 19 years and has invested more than $200 million to get this latest technology into the hands of military members faster and at lower cost and risk. Raytheon has demonstrated the maturity of the technology in a number of ways, including exceeding the reliability requirement for insertion into the production of military systems.

Ballistic Missile test

The U.S. Navy successfully conducted a flight test March 15 with the AN/SPY-6(V) Air and Missile Defense Radar (AMDR) off the west coast of Hawaii.

The Air and Missile Defense Radar is expected to meet the Navy's current and future mission requirements
The Air and Missile Defense Radar is expected to meet the Navy’s current and future mission requirements

During a flight test designated Vigilant Hunter, the AN/SPY-6(V) AMDR searched for, detected and maintained track on a short-range ballistic missile target launched from the Pacific Missile Range Facility at Kauai, Hawaii. This is the first in a series of ballistic missile defense flight tests planned for the AN/SPY-6(V) AMDR.

«This marked a historic moment for the Navy. It’s the first time a ballistic missile target was tracked by a wideband digital beamforming radar», said U.S. Navy Captain Seiko Okano, Major Program Manager for Above Water Sensors, Program Executive Office Integrated Warfare Systems. «This radar will revolutionize the future of the U.S. Navy and is bringing a capability our Nation needs today».

Based on preliminary data, the test met its primary objectives. Program officials will continue to evaluate system performance based upon telemetry and other data obtained during the test.

The culmination of over a decade of rigorous engineering and testing effort in advanced radar technology, AN/SPY-6(V) AMDR is being designed for the DDG 51 Flight III destroyer to provide the U.S. Navy with state-of-the-art technology for Integrated Air and Missile Defense.

Program Executive Office (PEO) Integrated Warfare Systems, an affiliated PEO of the Naval Sea Systems Command, manages surface ship and submarine combat technologies and systems and coordinates Navy enterprise solutions across ship platforms.

AN/SPY-6(V) provides greater capability – in range, sensitivity and discrimination accuracy – than currently deployed radars, increasing battlespace, situational awareness and reaction time to effectively counter current and future threats. It is the first scalable radar, built with Radar Modular Assemblies (RMA) – radar building blocks. Each RMA, roughly 2′ x 2′ x 2′ in size, is a standalone radar that can be grouped to build any size radar aperture, from a single RMA to configurations larger than currently fielded radars. The U.S. Navy’s new Enterprise Air Surveillance Radar leverages the highly-scalable design and mature technologies of AN/SPY-6 in a scaled nine-RMA configuration to meet the mission requirements of carriers and amphibious ships. The commonality – in both hardware and software – with AN/SPY-6 offers a host of advantages, including maintenance; training; logistics; and lifecycle support.

The Air and Missile Defense Radar is the U.S. Navy’s next generation integrated air and missile defense radar. It enhances ships’ abilities to detect air, surface and ballistic missile targets

Sea Acceptance Trials

06 March 2017, the Air Warfare Destroyer Alliance celebrated the successful completion of Sea Acceptance Trials by the first destroyer HMAS Hobart (DDGH-39) following 21 days at sea off the coast of South Australia.

Hobart Sea Acceptance Trials
Hobart Sea Acceptance Trials

AWD Alliance General Manager Paul Evans remarked that sea trials were a significant achievement for the Air Warfare Destroyer project in proving the advanced platform and combat systems on-board the ship. «Over the past five weeks, the AWD Alliance has conducted some 20 platform system tests and 45 combat system tests, to successfully validate Hobart’s complete Mission System. Combined, these systems will deliver a world leading capability for the Royal Australian Navy», said Evans. «Completing Acceptance Sea Trials on a first of class ship is a momentous occasion for the Alliance as we move closer to delivering Hobart to Defence. It has been achieved through the extraordinary efforts of the on-board crew and support team, whose dedication and commitment has been instrumental in ensuring the success of Hobart’s sea trials».

The Alliance is on track to deliver HMAS Hobart (DDGH-39) to Defence in June 2017 representing more than decade of dedication and effort by the AWD shipbuilding and combat system workforce on one of the most complex defence projects in Australia’s history.

Significant progress has been made on the AWD project and destroyer HMAS Hobart (DDGH-39) to reach this milestone with work commencing in January 2010, hull consolidation in March 2014, official launch in May 2015 and Builder’s Sea Trials in September 2016.

Shipbuilder ASC, shipbuilder manager Navantia, and combat systems integrator Raytheon Australia, offered their congratulations on the successful completion of Sea Acceptance Trials.

ASC Shipbuilding CEO, Mark Lamarre, expressed his pride in the shipbuilding workforce and the broader naval shipbuilding industry in Australia. «Successful completion of Sea Acceptance Trials is a great moment for the thousands of shipbuilders who have been working on this project, bringing the ship to life», Lamarre said. «This proves the highly skilled and professional naval shipbuilding capability that exists right here in South Australia. It is a testament to the collaborative nature of the project, which has seen industry working together to deliver to the RAN a new and potent air warfare capability. This achievement shows the way forward for future shipbuilding in Australia».

Navantia Australian Operations Director, Jorge Filgueira, echoed these sentiments: «Navantia acknowledges this significant achievement as being the result of a team effort, where Navantia’s experience as designer and shipbuilder has contributed significantly to the success of the Program», Filgueira said. «Navantia’s highly skilled team is well integrated within the AWD Alliance and is committed to having the Program achieve its delivery schedule. The results of the sea trials are very encouraging and provide the necessary confidence that we are on track to build up the capability that will be necessary to undertake the future naval continuous shipbuilding programs in Australia».

Managing Director of Raytheon Australia, Michael Ward, said that this is a momentous day for Raytheon Australia, its dedicated workforce and our nation’s sovereign defence industry. «The successful testing of the AWD combat system highlights the strength of Raytheon Australia’s capabilities in combat systems integration and the company’s ability to deliver to budget and schedule», Ward said. «As the combat systems integrator for the project, Raytheon Australia has applied its highly skilled AWD workforce of 350 people including architects, systems engineers and project managers to the project over the last decade. The combat system is what gives the AWDs their lethality. The work that Raytheon Australia has successfully undertaken is critical to the deterrent nature of the naval surface fleet and its ability to interoperate with the United States».

AWD Alliance Program Manager, Commodore Craig Bourke commented that the successful completion of Sea Acceptance Trials was achieved through the combined efforts of the 200+ crew on-board, with assistance from the Royal Australian Navy, Royal Australian Air Force, and Defence industry. «Hobart’s sensors, weapons and communications systems have been put to the test by Royal Australian Air Force and civilian aircraft, Royal Australian Navy ships and helicopters through a complex series of simulated scenarios and battle space management», Commodore Bourke said. «This achievement demonstrates and proves the capacity of Australia’s sovereign defence industry to successfully build and integrate ships for our specific defence needs. It also speaks volumes about the AWD Alliance’s close level of customer involvement and collaboration on every aspect of the project, laying the foundations for future defence projects in Australia».

Further progress on the AWD Project is expected to be achieved in 2017 with the second destroyer, Brisbane undertaking Builder’s Sea Trials and third destroyer, Sydney, achieving hull consolidation later this year.

 

Characteristics

Length 481.3 feet/146.7 m
Beam 61 feet/18.6 m
Draft 23.6 feet/7.2 m
Full load displacement 7,000 tonnes
Main Engine 36 MW/48,276 hp
Top speed 28+ knots/32 mph/52 km/h
Range at 18+ knots/21 mph/33 km/h 5,000+ NM/5,779 miles/9,300 km
Crew 186
Accommodation 234
Combat System Aegis Weapon System Baseline 7.1
AN/SPY-1D(V) Phased Array Radar (81 NM/93 miles/150 km)
AN/SPQ-9B Horizon Search Radar
Mk-41 Vertical Launch System (48 VLS cells: RIM-162 Evolved SeaSparrow Missile (ESSM)/Standard Missile-2 (SM-2)/SM-6)
Mk-45 Mod.4 5” (127-mm) 62 Calibre Gun (Range: 20 NM/23 miles/37 km)
Advanced Harpoon Weapon Control (2 × 4 launchers)
Electronic Warfare (EW) Suite
Very Short Range Air and Surface Defence
Nulka Active Missile Decoy system
Integrated Sonar System incorporating a hull mounted and towed array sonar
Communications Suite
Aviation Flightdeck and hangar for one helicopter
Boats Two Rigid Hulled Inflatable Boats (RHIBs)

 

Combat-proven AMRAAM

Raytheon Company has successfully flight-tested the newest variant of the combat-proven Advanced Medium-Range Air-to-Air Missile (AMRAAM) missile from the National Advanced Surface-to-Air Missile System, or NASAMS, surface-based system. Featuring an enlarged rocket motor and other enhancements, AMRAAM-Extended Range (ER) will greatly expand the NASAMS engagement envelope with a 50 percent increase in maximum range and 70 percent increase in maximum altitude.

An AMRAAM-Extended Range missile is fired from a NASAMS launcher, successfully engaging and destroying a target drone during a flight test at the Andoya Space Center in Norway (PRNewsFoto/Raytheon Company)
An AMRAAM-Extended Range missile is fired from a NASAMS launcher, successfully engaging and destroying a target drone during a flight test at the Andoya Space Center in Norway (PRNewsFoto/Raytheon Company)

The live-fire shot verified that the complete system – including the AMRAAM-ER missile, NASAMS missile launcher, Sentinel Radar and the Fire Distribution Center, or FDC – worked seamlessly together to engage and destroy a target drone with a live-warhead-equipped missile.

«AMRAAM-ER combines the guidance section and warhead from AMRAAM with the rocket motor from the Evolved Sea Sparrow Missile to affordably boost the NASAMS capability», said Dr. Taylor W. Lawrence, president of Raytheon Missiles Systems. «We believe it’s an ideal solution for ground-based air defense customers worldwide».

Norwegian military NASAMS operators conducted the test. They controlled and employed the AMRAAM-ER missile from an upgraded FDC, proving the effectiveness of the missile when matched with the NASAMS launcher.

Designed specifically for ground-based air defense, NASAMS is owned by seven countries and has been used by the U.S. National Capital Region’s air defense system since 2005. Manufactured by Raytheon and Kongsberg, NASAMS is the most widely used short-and medium-range air defense system in NATO. In addition to the U.S., it is in service in Norway, Finland, Spain, The Netherlands and one undisclosed country. It is also currently in production for Oman.

«NASAMS with AMRAAM-ER gives lower-tier defenses additional capability against threats such as cruise missiles, aircraft and drones», said Wes Kremer, president of Raytheon Integrated Defense Systems.

Raytheon completed extensive lab testing on the AMRAAM-ER in 2015, enabling the company to move forward with launcher and system integration.

 

About NASAMS

NASAMS is a highly adaptable, medium-range solution for any operational air defense requirement. The system provides the air defender with a high-firepower, networked and distributed state-of-the-art air defense system that can maximize the ability to quickly identify, engage and destroy current and evolving threat aircraft, unmanned aerial vehicle and emerging cruise missile threats.

 

About AMRAAM

AMRAAM is a combat-proven missile that demonstrates operational flexibility in both air-to-air and surface-launch scenarios and provides today’s military forces with enhanced operational capability, cost-effectiveness and future growth options/solutions. Procured by 36 countries, the combat-proven AMRAAM has been integrated on the F-15 Eagle, F-16 Fighting Falcon, F/A-18 Hornet, F-22 Raptor, Typhoon, Gripen, Tornado, Harrier, F-4 Phantom II and the Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) aircraft. It is also the baseline missile for the NATO-approved National Advanced Surface-to-Air Missile System.

 

About Sentinel

The Sentinel radar is the premier air surveillance and target acquisition/tracking sensor for the U.S. Army Cruise Missile Defense Systems program. It is a highly mobile, three-dimensional, phased-array, ground-based air defense radar system that operates in the X-band. It automatically detects, tracks, identifies, classifies and reports airborne threats, including helicopters, high-speed attack aircraft, cruise missiles and unmanned aerial vehicles.

 

About Raytheon

Raytheon Company, with 2015 sales of $23 billion and 61,000 employees, is a technology and innovation leader specializing in defense, civil government and cybersecurity solutions. With a history of innovation spanning 94 years, Raytheon provides state-of-the-art electronics, mission systems integration, Command, Control, Communications, Computers, Cyber and Intelligence (C5ITM) products and services, sensing, effects, and mission support for customers in more than 80 countries. Raytheon is headquartered in Waltham, Massachusetts.

Like A Hawk

The U.S. Missile Defense Agency has awarded Raytheon Company a contract modification to develop a transition to production process to incorporate Gallium Nitride, or GaN, components into existing and future AN/TPY-2 radars. This initial effort will support the transition from Gallium Arsenide to GaN technology, which would further modernize the ballistic missile defense radar and drive down system obsolescence.

A critical element in the ballistic missile defense system, Raytheon's AN/TPY-2 continually searches the sky for ballistic missiles (PRNewsFoto/Raytheon Company)
A critical element in the ballistic missile defense system, Raytheon’s AN/TPY-2 continually searches the sky for ballistic missiles (PRNewsFoto/Raytheon Company)

As demonstrated in other Raytheon-developed military radar applications, Gallium Nitride has the capability to enhance range, increase detection and discrimination performance and lower production costs.

Currently fielded AN/TPY-2 radars use Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) based transmit/receive modules to emit high power radiation. Raytheon and MDA are pursuing a retrofit approach to leverage Gallium Nitride elements.

«GaN components have significant, proven advantages when compared to the previous generation GaAs technology», said Raytheon’s Dave Gulla, vice president of the Integrated Defense Systems Mission Systems and Sensors business area. «Through this effort, Raytheon will develop a clear modernization upgrade path for the AN/TPY-2 radar, enabling the system to better defend people and critical assets against ballistic missile threats at home and abroad».

The AN/TPY-2 is a transportable X-band radar that protects civilians and infrastructure in the U.S., deployed military personnel, and allied nations and security partners from the growing ballistic missile threat. According to recent Congressional testimony by the director of the U.S. Missile Defense Agency, the threat is growing as potential adversaries acquire a greater number of ballistic missiles, increase their range, incorporate countermeasures and make them more complex, survivable, reliable and accurate.

An AN/TPY-2 radar can track a home run hit out of ball park from several hundred miles away. That’s just one of the features that have made this bus-sized radar the go-to radar for missile defense

A look into the future

Raytheon Company has given the U.S. Army a look into the future of missile defense technology, as the company provided its comprehensive vision for the next generation of air and missile defense radar. The information was supplied to the U.S. Army as part of its process to define the requirements for a future Lower Tier Air and Missile Defense Sensor (LTAMDS).

Raytheon's re-engineered Patriot radar prototype uses two key technologies – active electronically scanned array, which changes the way the radar searches the sky; and gallium nitride circuitry, which uses energy efficiently to amplify the radar's high-power radio frequencies
Raytheon’s re-engineered Patriot radar prototype uses two key technologies – active electronically scanned array, which changes the way the radar searches the sky; and gallium nitride circuitry, which uses energy efficiently to amplify the radar’s high-power radio frequencies

«Raytheon’s solution for the LTAMDS is based on the more than $200 million that the company has invested in Gallium Nitride (GaN) powered Active Electronically Scanned Array (AESA) technology», said Ralph Acaba, vice president of Integrated Air and Missile Defense at Raytheon’s Integrated Defense Systems business. «Raytheon showed it can quickly and affordably design, build, test and field a GaN-based AESA radar capable of defeating all threats when we exhibited a potential LTAMDS solution at the winter AUSA tradeshow this past March».

Raytheon’s GaN-based AESA LTAMDS radar is designed to serve as a sensor on the Integrated Air and Missile Defense Battle Command System (IBCS) network. It will be fully interoperable with NATO, and also retains backwards compatibility with both the current Patriot system and any future system upgrades fielded by any of the 13-nations that currently own Patriot.

«Others may draw on lesson learned from the terminated Medium Extended Air Defense System (MEADS) air and missile defense project or repeatedly re-baselined naval radars; Raytheon’s LTAMDS solution builds on successful programs such as the U.S. Navy’s Next Generation Jammer (NGJ) and the Air and Missile Defense Radar (AMDR)», said Doug Burgess, director of Integrated Air and Missile defense AESA programs. «Our response, and our AESA GaN radar rollout at AUSA show there doesn’t need to be a wait of a decade or longer to get the sensor of the future. It will be available much, much sooner».

 

About GaN

Raytheon has been leading the innovation and development of GaN for 17 years and has invested more than $200 million to get this latest technology into the hands of the military faster and at lower cost and risk. Raytheon has demonstrated the maturity of the technology in a number of ways, including exceeding the reliability requirement for insertion into the production of military systems.

Superior strike capability

Raytheon Company and Norway’s Kongsberg Defence Systems are finalizing plans to assemble, integrate and test the Naval Strike Missile (NSM) in the United States. The two companies also plan to produce NSM launchers in the U.S.

A Naval Strike Missile (NSM) is launched from the Littoral Combat Ship USS Coronado (LCS-4) during a September 23, 2014, test off the coast of Southern California (US Navy photo)
A Naval Strike Missile (NSM) is launched from the Littoral Combat Ship USS Coronado (LCS-4) during a September 23, 2014, test off the coast of Southern California (US Navy photo)

«NSM production in America is the latest evolution of our decades-long relationship with Kongsberg», said Doctor Taylor W. Lawrence, Raytheon Missile Systems president. «We will assemble the missile and launchers in the same Raytheon factories where we produce many of the world’s most advanced missiles and other weapons systems».

Raytheon expects to perform final assembly, integration and test of NSM at the company’s Tucson, Arizona facility. Launchers would be manufactured at Raytheon’s factory in Louisville, Kentucky.

With a range of more than 100 nautical miles/115 miles/185 km, NSM is a long-range, anti-ship missile that provides superior strike capability against land and sea targets. Raytheon and Kongsberg believe NSM is an ideal solution for navies around the globe and the best over-the-horizon missile for the U.S. Navy’s Littoral Combat Ship (LCS).

«Warfighters around the globe will benefit from the Kongsberg-Raytheon partnership on NSM», said Harald Ånnestad, President Kongsberg Defence Systems. «Production of NSM in the United States will secure ramp up and sustainability of NSM, the world’s only Fifth Generation Naval Strike Missile with Land Target capabilities, for the US and our allies. Increased volume of NSM creates and secures jobs in both the US and Norway».

The companies are also teamed on the development of the Joint Strike Missile and National Advanced Surface-to-Air Missile Systems also known as NASAMS.

 

About NSM

Provides excellent penetration capability against enemy air defense systems.

Features an advanced Imaging Infrared Seeker with Autonomous Target Recognition.

Has high survivability against modern and future air defense systems.

Can fly at extremely low sea-skimming altitude, and has terrain-following flight capability.

 

Decoy-Jammer

The U.S. Air Force awarded Raytheon Company $34.8 million to demonstrate upgraded electronic warfare capabilities for the Miniature Air Launched Decoy-Jammer missile. Development of the new version of the MALD-J, called MALD-X, will be completed in only 24 months and will culminate in two flight demonstrations.

MALD weighs less than 300 pounds/136 kg and has a range of approximately 500 nautical miles/575 miles/926 km
MALD weighs less than 300 pounds/136 kg and has a range of approximately 500 nautical miles/575 miles/926 km

«MALD-X will build on the successful MALD platform to demonstrate the advanced electronic warfare capabilities needed today and in the future», said Mike Jarrett, Raytheon vice president of Air Warfare Systems. «MALD-X creates an upgrade path for the current MALD-J program of record and meets the requirements for the MALD-N, a net-enabled decoy/jammer for the U.S. Navy».

MALD is a flying vehicle that confuses adversaries by posing as friendly aircraft. MALD-X, a modular weapon designed for the Strategic Capabilities Office under the U.S. Secretary of Defense, will demonstrate an improved electronic warfare payload, low-altitude flight and a datalink that will allow the weapon to communicate with other net enabled systems.

«MALD-X will allow the Air Force and Navy to quickly move on to the next generation of MALD, providing a substantial increase in capability and potential mission areas», said Dr. Will Roper, director of the Special Capabilities Office at the Office of the Secretary of Defense. «The program will provide the combatant command with a flexible capability that will address key needs in multiple regions of the world».

MALD-X is a uniquely collaborative effort, contracted and managed by the MALD Program Office at Eglin Air Force Base in Florida, with program oversight from the SCO and shared technical management by both the Air Force and Navy.

 

About MALD and MALD-J

MALD is a state-of-the-art, low-cost, expendable flight vehicle that is modular, air-launched and programmable. It weighs less than 300 pounds/136 kg and has range/endurance of approximately 500 nautical miles/575 miles/926 km and 90 minutes. MALD-J adds radar-jamming capability to the basic MALD platform.

MALD confuses enemy air defenses by duplicating friendly aircraft flight profiles and radar signatures.

MALD-J maintains all capabilities of MALD and adds jamming capabilities.

Raytheon began delivery of MALD-Js in the fall of 2012.

Demonstrating how the MALD enhances penetrating airspace for combat aircraft in an Anti-Access Aerial Denial scenario

Live target testing

Raytheon Company delivered the first AN/SPY-6(V) Air and Missile Defense Radar (AMDR) array to the U.S. Navy’s Pacific Missile Range Facility in Hawaii ahead of schedule. The array is now being installed according to plan, in preparation for first radar light-off in early July. SPY-6(V) is the next-generation integrated air and ballistic missile defense radar for the U.S. Navy, filling a critical capability gap for the surface fleet.

AN/SPY-6(V) Air and Missile Defense Radar array at the U.S. Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility in Hawaii (PRNewsFoto/Raytheon Company)
AN/SPY-6(V) Air and Missile Defense Radar array at the U.S. Navy’s Pacific Missile Range Facility in Hawaii (PRNewsFoto/Raytheon Company)

This delivery is the latest in a series of milestones achieved on time or ahead of schedule, as SPY-6(V) advances through the Engineering and Manufacturing Development (EMD) phase, which is now close to 80 percent complete. In less than 30 months, the SPY-6(V) array completed design, fabrication and initial testing. Soon to transition to Low Rate Initial Production (LRIP), SPY-6(V) remains on track for delivery in 2019 for the first DDG-51 Flight III destroyer.

«Several months of testing at our near-field range facility, where the array completed characterization and calibration, have proven the system ready for live target tracking», said Raytheon’s Tad Dickenson, AMDR program director. «The array was the last component to ship. With all other components, including the back-end processing equipment, delivered earlier and already integrated at the range, AMDR will be up and running in short order».

«The extensive testing to date has demonstrated good compliance to the radar’s key technical performance parameters», said U.S. Navy Captain Seiko Okano, major program manager, Above Water Sensors (IWS 2.0). «The technologies are proven mature and ready for testing in the far-field range, against live targets, to verify and validate the radar’s exceptional capabilities».

 

About SPY-6(V) AMDR

SPY-6(V) is the first scalable radar, built with RMAs – radar building blocks. Each RMA (Radar Modular Assembly), roughly 2′ × 2′ × 2′ in size, is a standalone radar that can be grouped to build any size radar aperture, from a single RMA to configurations larger than currently fielded radars. All cooling, power, command logic and software are scalable, allowing for new instantiations without significant radar development costs.

Providing greater capability – in range, sensitivity and discrimination accuracy – than currently deployed radars, SPY-6(V) increases battlespace, situational awareness and reaction time to effectively counter current and future threats. Designed for scalability, reliability and ease of production, SPY-6(V) incorporates innovative and proven technologies, including RMAs, digital beamforming and Gallium Nitride (GaN), to offer exceptional radar capabilities to fit any ship for any mission.

JSOW C-1 achieves IOC

The U.S. Navy’s first air-to-ground network-enabled weapon, Joint Standoff Weapon (JSOW) C-1, has been delivered to the fleet after achieving Initial Operational Capability (IOC) in early June.

A Joint Standoff Weapon (JSOW) C-1 impacts a target during a flight test in March 2016 at Point Mugu Sea Test Range, California (U.S. Navy photo)
A Joint Standoff Weapon (JSOW) C-1 impacts a target during a flight test in March 2016 at Point Mugu Sea Test Range, California (U.S. Navy photo)

Rear Admiral DeWolfe Miller, director of Air Warfare, made the announcement after JSOW-C1 completed operational testing against land and sea targets, adding this capability will provide more lethality and accuracy to the U.S. Navy’s already very capable deployed air wings around the world.

«As our mission’s focus shift, we are providing the warfighter with the first of several net-enabled weapons required to maintain strategic dominance over the Pacific», said Captain Jaime Engdahl, Precision Strike Weapons (PMA-201) program manager. «The JSOW C-1 is critical to the support of the Navy’s strategic vision of integrated warfare capability».

The newest iteration of JSOW is integrated with a Link 16 network radio, enabling the weapon to engage moving targets at sea. The radio allows the launch aircraft or another designated controller to provide real-time target updates to the weapon, reassign it to another target, or to abort the mission. The weapon also uses a terminal InfraRed (IR) seeker and GPS/Inertial Navigation System (INS) for guidance.

«The precision targeting of this weapon and its ability to receive real-time target updates makes it the fleet’s weapon for the fight tonight», said Commander Sam Messer, JSOW program manager. «JSOW C-1 provides the ability to engage our enemies at longer ranges and the flexibility to engage in direct attack even if enemy air defenses deny our aircraft access».

The Raytheon-built weapon will be launched from F/A-18E/F and F-35A/C aircraft.