Tag Archives: Northrop Grumman

Mine Hunting Sonar

Northrop Grumman Corporation has delivered the first of three lots of mine hunting sonar upgrade kits to the U.S. Navy’s Naval Surface Warfare Center, Panama City Division. The ultimate end users will be the HM-12, -14 and -15 Mine Countermeasures Squadrons.

Northrop Grumman has delivered the first of three lots of mine hunting sonar upgrade kits to the U.S. Navy’s Naval Surface Warfare Center, Panama City Division
Northrop Grumman has delivered the first of three lots of mine hunting sonar upgrade kits to the U.S. Navy’s Naval Surface Warfare Center, Panama City Division

The production contracts from the U.S. Navy’s PMS-495 (Mine Warfare) are for upgrading 27 AQS-24A mine hunting systems into the more advanced AQS-24B system. The kits contain all the components necessary to upgrade the existing 27 AQS-24A mine hunting systems into the more advanced AQS-24B sonar system. Work is being done in three production lots. The first production lot has now completed delivery. Production lot two will deliver in the fall and production lot three in spring, 2017.

The upgrades eliminate diminishing material issues while increasing performance dramatically by adding the world’s first high speed synthetic aperture sonar, which increases sonar resolution by a factor of three while maintaining 18 knots/20.7 mph/33.3 km/h speed performance.

«The successful delivery of the initial eight production AQS-24B kits allows for the first operational employment of High Speed Synthetic Aperture Sonar technology by the U.S. Navy», said Alan Lytle, vice president, undersea systems, Northrop Grumman Mission Systems.

The Synthetic Aperture Sonar (SAS) enables the device to scan the ocean floor at three times the resolution of the earlier system while operating at a speed of 18 knots/20.7 mph/33.3 km/h, nearly twice as much as any other operational towed mine hunting device in the world. The AQS-24B will be operated from MH-53E Super Stallion helicopters and the Mine Hunting Unmanned Surface Vessels (MHU) currently deployed in the Arabian Gulf.

Northrop Grumman is a leading global security company providing innovative systems, products and solutions in autonomous systems, cyber, Command, Control, Communications, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (C4ISR), strike, and logistics and modernization to customers worldwide.

The AQS-24B will be operated from MH-53E Super Stallion helicopters and the Mine Hunting Unmanned Surface Vessels (MHU) currently deployed in the Arabian Gulf
The AQS-24B will be operated from MH-53E Super Stallion helicopters and the Mine Hunting Unmanned Surface Vessels (MHU) currently deployed in the Arabian Gulf

 

AN/AQS-24 detects, classifies and localizes bottom and volume mines

 

Tomorrow’s minehunting capability available today

The Raider

The Air Force’s long-range strike bomber has officially been named the B-21 Raider. Air Force Secretary Deborah Lee James announced the results of the Air Force Global Strike Command led naming contest alongside selected members during her remarks at the Air Force Association’s Air, Space and Cyber Conference here September 19, 2016.

Air Force Names the B-21 Bomber the Raider
Air Force Names the B-21 Bomber the Raider

«Today I want to recognize three Airmen who answered the call to be a part of a new Air Force legacy and name our new bomber», James said. «The first two … submitted proposals that captured the essence of the bomber force and they are the winners of our contest».

The third Airmen James recognized, calling him one of the greatest men of his generation, was Doolittle Raider retired Lieutenant Colonel Richard E. Cole. The Doolittle Raiders are known for their surprise attack against Japan during World War II on April 18, 1942, which forced the Japanese to recall combat forces for home defense, and boosted morale among Americans and U.S. allies abroad.

The name was ultimately selected by James and Air Force Chief of Staff General Dave Goldfein after a panel composed of staff from Air Force Global Strike Command (AFGSC) and Headquarters Air Force determined the top-ranked selections from more than 2,100 unique naming submissions.

While there were multiple entries advocating for the B-21 to be dubbed Raider, Air Force officials said the members were selected based on the overall quality of their justification.

James has often highlighted the important role the B-21 Raider will play in allowing the Air Force to operate in tomorrow’s high end threat environment, and in providing the Air Force the flexibility and capability to launch from the continental United States and deliver air strikes on any location in the world. She has also cautioned of the delays the program could face under a continuing resolution.

«A short-term (continuing resolution) is manageable … but, let me tell you, a long-term continuing resolution would be very damaging for the Air Force», James said. «It would cap the production of the KC-46, prevent us from devoting more funds to developing the B-21 next year, and delay about 50 construction projects».

The service’s ability to divest old capabilities and build new is paramount, and modernization remains a priority for the Air Force as it continues to play a major role defending against current and emerging threats.

«We have the oldest aircraft fleet we have ever had, 27 years old on average», James said. «This absolutely needs to be a focus for us».

The B-21 Raider, designed based on a set of requirements that allow the use of existing and mature technology, is currently in the Engineering and Manufacturing Development (EMD) phase and the Air Force plans to field the initial capability of the aircraft in mid-2020s.

B-21 naming contest selected members:

  • Lieutenant Colonel Jaime I. Hernandez, 337th Test and Evaluation Squadron commander, Dyess Air Force Base, Texas;
  • Technical Sergeant Derek D. White, emergency management craftsman, 175th Civil Engineering Squadron, Maryland Air National Guard.

Air Force Secretary Deborah Lee James announced today the B-21 bomber will be called the B-21 Raider. The name represents the historically important role the new long-range stealth bomber will lead for the next 50 years

Network-connected ship

Northrop Grumman Corporation’s Sperry Marine business unit announced the launch of CompassNet, a network-connected ship heading management system which allows for the deployment of different configurations which can be upgraded easily and affordably at the Shipbuilding, Machinery and Maritime technology show (SMM) in Hamburg, Germany.

CompassNet, a network-connected ship heading management system allows for the deployment of different configurations which can be upgraded easily and affordably at the Shipbuilding, Machinery and Maritime technology show (SMM) in Hamburg, Germany
CompassNet, a network-connected ship heading management system allows for the deployment of different configurations which can be upgraded easily and affordably at the Shipbuilding, Machinery and Maritime technology show (SMM) in Hamburg, Germany

CompassNet allows multiple ship heading management controls through the groundbreaking use of standard Ethernet connectivity to link the heading sensors and the distribution portion of the heading management system. As a fully type-approved system, it provides improved efficiency for a wide range of sensors and controls configurations from a basic setup to more complex arrangements with redundant monitoring stations. CompassNet will benefit a wide range of vessels including high-end commercial ships, cruise liners, and survey vessels as well as military support and control vessels.

«The flexibility of CompassNet, combined with a significant decrease in the cabling required, makes the system particularly attractive to shipyards for new builds», said Jeanne Usher, managing director, Northrop Grumman Sperry Marine. «The reduction in both material quantities and installation time will create lower costs for shipyards and owners».

CompassNet improves system redundancy and resiliency by offering «plug and play» functionality through the use of fewer required control and display units. With a reduction in cabling requirements of up to 80 percent, the system reduces installation and commissioning costs. Fewer connections make it easier to enhance heading management requirements with additional equipment. Functionality is further simplified through the use of two 24V DC power sources for all components. Additionally, a Sperry Marine NAVITWIN V control and display unit allows for connecting up to five heading sensors. Besides the installation process, Ethernet technology in a Sperry Marine heading management system facilitates modularity and improves reliability, operational performance and consequently navigational safety.

Remote Mine Hunting

Northrop Grumman Corporation will be participating in the Royal Navy’s Unmanned Warrior exercise where it will demonstrate its unmanned mine hunting capability.

Northrop Grumman to Demonstrate Remote Mine Hunting Capability in Unmanned Warrior Exercise
Northrop Grumman to Demonstrate Remote Mine Hunting Capability in Unmanned Warrior Exercise

The unmanned mine hunting element of Unmanned Warrior will feature Northrop Grumman’s AQS-24B towed mine hunting sensor operated from an Atlas Elektronik UK ARCIMS Unmanned Surface Vessel (USV). The AQS-24B, which is a towed mine hunting sensor used by the U.S. Navy, features the world’s only high speed synthetic aperture sonar for mine detection, localisation and classification, and an optical laser line scan sensor for mine identification. The ARCIMS USV is a surface craft 36 feet/11 meters long that will be operated via remote control while towing the AQS-24B through a simulated mine field.

«Securing access and situational awareness in the maritime environment has become increasingly important for many nations», said Andrew Tyler, chief executive, Northrop Grumman Europe. «We look forward to participating in Unmanned Warrior and demonstrating how innovative, state of the art U.K. and U.S. technologies can come together to advance unmanned military capabilities that can potentially benefit both navies as well as those of our allies».

Unmanned Warrior, which takes place at Ministry of Defence (MoD) exercise areas in Scotland and the Western Isles, is part of the biannual Joint Warrior exercise, and is the largest capability demonstration event of its kind. It will feature more than 40 unmanned vehicles, sensors and systems demonstrating, in a challenging environment, key military missions for the Royal Navy in a series of themed activities including mine-hunting, sea surveying, submarine simulation and fleet reconnaissance. The exercise will help inform the Royal Navy’s future capability planning and demonstrate how the systems being showcased deliver maritime situational awareness.

The demonstration of unmanned systems overlaid onto the Joint Warrior exercise scenario will create a challenging environment for the participants and allow the Royal Navy to see first-hand how the systems and sensors could integrate into current and future maritime operations.

Autonomous undersea

Northrop Grumman Corporation demonstrated new cross domain approaches for autonomous undersea, surface and air vehicles to advance the Anti-Submarine Warfare mission during this year’s Annual Naval Technology Exercise (ANTX) at Naval Undersea Warfare Center (NUWC) in Newport.

A surrogate autonomous aircraft drops a replica torpedo during a cross domain demonstration at the Annual Naval Technology Exercise in Newport, Rhode Island, Naval Undersea Warfare Center (Northrop Grumman Photo)
A surrogate autonomous aircraft drops a replica torpedo during a cross domain demonstration at the Annual Naval Technology Exercise in Newport, Rhode Island, Naval Undersea Warfare Center (Northrop Grumman Photo)

Data collected from multiple sensors arrayed across autonomous undersea, surface and air vehicles were fused autonomously to develop a real-time tracking solution that guided a surrogate autonomous air vehicle to engage a contact for live drop of a replica torpedo, for the first time.

ANTX is an annual three-day event developed by NUWC to demonstrate future Navy technologies in a low risk environment. Government, academia and industry participants gather to showcase new capabilities to push the boundaries of what is possible in a complex environment.

«Integration of our proven autonomous systems across the different maritime environments will enable a shared allied network and common operating picture for enhanced maritime domain awareness which remains a challenge», said Brian Chappel, vice president, autonomous systems, Northrop Grumman.

The demonstration features advanced mission management and control of a multi-vehicle collaborative autonomous system-of-systems conducting full spectrum search, detect, track, classify and engagement of submerged targets.

«Northrop Grumman continues to invest to broaden the capabilities of individual autonomous systems and expand the ability of those unmanned systems to interoperate effectively to perform missions», said Alan Lytle, vice president, undersea systems, Northrop Grumman. «Our mission level autonomy allows heterogeneous autonomous systems to understand the unfolding mission and dynamically re-task themselves without human intervention».

Northrop Grumman brings a strong skillset of sensor, maritime and autonomous expertise to this area. Earlier this year, the company demonstrated its latest maritime domain awareness detection capabilities off the southern coast of California during a 43-day test. In collaboration with Ultra USSI and Liquid Robotics the team validated a range of sensors and systems using autonomous surface vehicles.

The autonomous surface vehicles collected data, validated contacts and processed real time data transmission to ground operators via surrogate autonomous aircraft and satellite for exploitation, thus providing an effective maritime domain capability.

«These long-endurance autonomous demonstrations are a vital part of our maritime efforts», said Rick Crooks, director, advanced development, Northrop Grumman. «Our advanced architecture enables an integrated cross-domain data flow throughout maritime centers, creating actionable intelligence for emerging threats».

G/ATOR Block II

Northrop Grumman Corporation and the U.S. Marine Corps have achieved two major milestones in developing the Ground Weapon Locating Radar (GWLR) mode for the AN/TPS-80 Ground/Air Task-Oriented Radar (G/ATOR).

Northrop Grumman and the U.S. Marine Corps have achieved two major milestones in developing the Ground Weapon Locating Radar mode for the AN/TPS-80 Ground/Air Task-Oriented Radar
Northrop Grumman and the U.S. Marine Corps have achieved two major milestones in developing the Ground Weapon Locating Radar mode for the AN/TPS-80 Ground/Air Task-Oriented Radar

The GWLR preliminary design review in February and critical design review in August marked the successful completion of the design reviews for the development of this capability. These reviews will be followed by an Initial Integration Event (IIE) in October to perform initial testing of the system and take data on several targets to assist in the remaining integration work.

The IIE will be an initial demonstration of G/ATOR’s ability to detect and track multiple types of rocket, artillery and mortar rounds simultaneously. G/ATOR has a significant output power advantage compared to current U.S. counter-fire target acquisition radars, equating directly to longer-range threat detection and tracking. This provides additional time to successfully engage and negate these threats with both current and future longer-range engagement weapons.

«It is critical that we deliver this capability to our warfighters on time and at an affordable cost», said Roshan Roeder, director, mission solutions, Northrop Grumman. «Our unmatched experience in developing and fielding algorithms for the counter-fire targeting mission, combined with internally-funded risk reduction systems that have participated in nearly 1,000 live fire events prior to this contract award, ensured the successful completion of these reviews and support an initial operating capability for G/ATOR Block II in mid-2018».

The GWLR mode adds software to the G/ATOR system to detect, track, and identify rocket, artillery, and mortar projectiles, both 360-degree and sector-only. The GWLR mode addresses multiple types of simultaneous threats.

In addition to providing a broad range of optimized radar capabilities, AN/TPS-80 G/ATOR provides automatic adaptability via a scalable open system architecture
In addition to providing a broad range of optimized radar capabilities, AN/TPS-80 G/ATOR provides automatic adaptability via a scalable open system architecture

 

G/ATOR (AN/TPS-80 Ground/Air Task Oriented Radar)

 

View of Earth

Astro Aerospace, a Northrop Grumman Corporation company, has completed the Preliminary Design Review (PDR) of the AstroMesh radar antenna reflector for the NASA-Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) Synthetic Aperture Radar (NISAR) satellite. The antenna reflector, furnished by Astro Aerospace, is part of the NISAR L-band synthetic aperture radar managed by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL).

NISAR will be the first radar imaging satellite to use dual L-Band and S-Band frequencies, providing an unprecedented, detailed view of Earth (Credit: NASA JPL)
NISAR will be the first radar imaging satellite to use dual L-Band and S-Band frequencies, providing an unprecedented, detailed view of Earth (Credit: NASA JPL)

Scheduled to launch in 2021, NISAR will be the first radar imaging satellite to use dual L-Band and S-Band frequencies, providing an unprecedented, detailed view of Earth. NISAR is designed to observe some of the planet’s most complex processes, including ecosystem disturbances, ice-sheet dynamics, and natural hazards such as earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanoes and landslides. Data collected from NISAR will reveal information about the evolution and state of Earth’s crust, help scientists better understand our planet’s processes and changing climate, and aid future resource and hazard management. The mission is a partnership between NASA and ISRO.

With 100 percent on orbit success since 1958, Astro Aerospace brings unmatched expertise in space hardware and deployable structures to NISAR. Astro Aerospace utilizes its proprietary AstroMesh deployable mesh reflector for NISAR’s 39.4-foot/12-meter aperture antenna, building an ultralight and extremely stiff reflector that is ideally suited for high frequency communications and radar applications.

The NISAR instrument design review represents a major program milestone. With the preliminary design review successfully completed, the program will move into detailed design and fabrication.

«We are proud to support JPL and the NISAR program on this important Earth science program», said John A. Alvarez, general manager, Astro Aerospace. «Thank you to the entire Astro NISAR team who worked tirelessly to ensure a successful PDR».

NISAR follows the successful engineering, deployment and spin up of JPL’s Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite, launched January 31, 2015. Astro supplied the 19.7-foot/6-meter AstroMesh antenna for SMAP, the largest spinning reflector ever created.

Since 1958, Astro Aerospace, part of Northrop Grumman’s Aerospace Products business unit, has helped enable complex missions to Earth’s orbit, Mars and beyond with its innovative deployable space structures and mechanisms. The business unit’s products have been successfully deployed on hundreds of space flights with a 100 percent success rate, a testament to Northrop Grumman’s commitment to reliability, quality and affordability.

Northrop Grumman is a leading global security company providing innovative systems, products and solutions in autonomous systems, cyber, Command, Control, Communications, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (C4ISR), strike, and logistics and modernization to customers worldwide.

Through LEXIOS

Northrop Grumman Corporation and the U.S. Air Force have achieved the first integration of fifth- and fourth-generation fighter aircraft – a critical capability to prevail in combat – during a Live, Virtual and Constructive (LVC) training event. As part of Distant Frontier training at the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex, Northrop Grumman integrated two virtual F-22 Raptor fifth-generation fighters to fly and train alongside four live fourth-generation F-16 Fighting Falcons.

An F-22A Raptor, assigned to the 27th Fighter Squadron at Joint Base Langley-Eustis
An F-22A Raptor, assigned to the 27th Fighter Squadron at Joint Base Langley-Eustis

The F-16 aircraft were from the Air Force’s 80th Fighter Squadron based at Kunsan Air Base, Korea, operating out of Eielson Air Force Base (AFB). The F-22s were operated by members of the 90th Fighter Squadron from simulators at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson in Anchorage. They trained for air-to-air combat against four live F-16s from the 18th Aggressor Squadron based at Eielson Air Force Base.

«The 353rd Combat Training Squadron with great support from Northrop Grumman is spearheading efforts to integrate LVC elements into day-to-day training. As adversaries continually improve their capabilities, the ability to add LVC is critical to best train and prepare F-22 pilots for dealing with the full complement and degree of threats», said Colonel Brian E. Toth, the 354th Operations Group commander at Eielson Air Force Base. The group’s component units include the 353rd Combat Training Squadron and 18th Aggressor Squadron. «LVC is vital for fifth-generation aircraft. It provides realistic threats and is capable of evolving to meet future training requirements», said Toth.

A predecessor to the large-scale, joint Red Flag-Alaska advanced aerial combat training exercise hosted at Eielson Air Force Base, Distant Frontier provides unit-level training for local and deployed units to enhance tactical interoperability. «No aircraft goes to war alone. With our increasingly joint and networked approach, fighter integration training is extremely consequential to effective execution in combat», said Martin J. Amen, director, satellite and network operations, Northrop Grumman Mission Systems. «Although Distant Frontier is a small-scale training event, with this achievement Northrop Grumman has demonstrated that we can provide full-spectrum combat training and truly transform the way pilots train to fight».

The live F-16 and virtual F-22 participants were linked by the LEXIOS (LVC Experimentation, Integration and Operations Suite) system developed by Northrop Grumman. Through LEXIOS, virtual aircraft operated by actual aircrew members participate in the same airspace alongside their live counterparts via networked simulators at full security levels. Constructive – simulated forces in a simulated environment – components can also be used to augment the battlespace with a full complement of threats.

«The ability to provide combat air forces with LVC training at this level of realism as threat environments become increasingly complex and networking needs escalate is significant, particularly when we can also provide cost savings to the Air Force», said Amen.

Northrop Grumman is the prime contractor for the Air Force’s Distributed Mission Operations Network (DMON), a system that enables dissimilar aircraft platforms located across the globe to seamlessly interoperate and train together in a realistic virtual environment. Northrop Grumman has been working on the Combat Air Forces Distributed Mission Training Operations and Integration program since its inception in 1999. LEXIOS builds and integrates elements of the DMON and enables live interaction.

The aircraft was variously designated F-22 and F/A-22 prior to formally entering service in December 2005 as the F-22A
The aircraft was variously designated F-22 and F/A-22 prior to formally entering service in December 2005 as the F-22A

 

General Characteristics

Primary Function Air dominance, multi-role fighter
Contractor Lockheed-Martin, Boeing
Crew 1
Length 62 feet/18.90 m
Height 16.7 feet/5.09 m
Wingspan 44.5 feet/13.56 m
Wing area 840 feet2/78.04 m2
Horizontal tail span 29 feet/8.84 m
Weight empty 43,340 lbs/19,700 kg
Maximum take-off weight 83,500 lbs/38,000 kg
Internal fuel 18,000 lbs/8,200 kg
Fuel Capacity with 2 external wing tanks 26,000 lbs/11,900 kg
Speed Mach 2 class
Ceiling >50,000 feet/15,000 m
Range >1,600 NM/1,841 miles/2,963 km
Power plant Two F119-PW-100 turbofan engines with two-dimensional thrust vectoring nozzles
Armament One M61A2 20-mm cannon with 480 rounds, internal side weapon bays carriage of 2 AIM-9 infrared (heat seeking) air-to-air missiles and internal main weapon bays carriage of 6 AIM-120 radar-guided air-to-air missiles (air-to-air loadout) or two 1,000-pound GBU-32 JDAMs and two AIM-120 radar-guided air-to-air missiles (air-to-ground loadout)
Unit Cost $143 million
Initial operating capability December 2005
Inventory Total force, 183
The United States Air Force is the only operator of the F-22. It ordered 8 test and 187 operational production aircraft. In November 2012, it had 184 production aircraft in inventory
The United States Air Force is the only operator of the F-22. It ordered 8 test and 187 operational production aircraft. In November 2012, it had 184 production aircraft in inventory

 

F119-PW-100 Characteristics

Type Twin-spool, augmented turbofan
Thrust 35,000 pound/15,876 kg/156 kN thrust class
Engine control FADEC (Full-Authority Digital Engine Control)
Compression system Dual-rotor, counter-rotating, axial flow, low aspect ratio
·         Three-stage fan
·         Six-stage high-pressure compressor
Combustor Annular, Floatwall configuration
Turbines Axial flow, counter-rotating
·         One-stage high-pressure turbine
·         One-stage low-pressure turbine
Nozzle Two-dimensional pitch-vectoring convergent/divergent
F119-PW-100 Thrust Vectoring Test
F119-PW-100 Thrust Vectoring Test

Japanese Hawkeye

Northrop Grumman Corporation has received a U.S. Navy contract to begin production of a second Japanese E-2D Advanced Hawkeye Airborne Early Warning (AEW) and surveillance aircraft. The first Japanese E-2D is in production and will be delivered in 2018.

Northrop Grumman has received a U.S. Navy contract to begin configuration of a second Japanese E-2D Advanced Hawkeye
Northrop Grumman has received a U.S. Navy contract to begin configuration of a second Japanese E-2D Advanced Hawkeye

The aircraft will be produced at the company’s Aircraft Integration Center of Excellence in St. Augustine, Florida. Northrop Grumman will manufacture the Japanese E-2D Advanced Hawkeye on the same multiyear production line used for U.S. aircraft, which allows for a more efficient and affordable delivery schedule. The E-2D Advanced Hawkeye is the world’s only AEW aircraft in production.

«For more than 50 years, Northrop Grumman has partnered with Japan by providing a range of capabilities and technologies in defense, security and communications», said Jane Bishop, vice president, E-2D Advanced Hawkeye programs, Northrop Grumman. «We are honored to continue this strong partnership through the E-2D program, which brings Japan a powerful new tool that meets their immediate airborne surveillance needs and facilitates information sharing across many platforms, making it a force multiplier for the future as well».

In 2014, the Japanese Ministry of Defense competitively selected the E-2D to fulfill the nation’s AEW requirements. The Japan Air Self-Defense Force (JASDF) has operated the E-2C Hawkeye since the 1983. The E-2C Hawkeye is also currently used by Taiwan, France and Egypt.

 

General Characteristics

Wingspan 24.56 m/80 feet 7 in
Width, wings folded 8.94 m/29 feet 4 in
Length overall 17.60 m/57 feet 8.75 in
Height overall 5.58 m/18 feet 3.75 in
Diameter of rotodome 7.32 m/24 feet
Weight empty 19,536 kg/43,068 lbs
Internal fuel 5,624 kg/12,400 lbs
Takeoff gross weight 26,083 kg/57,500 lbs
Maximum level speed 648 km/h/350 knots/403 mph
Maximum cruise speed 602 km/h/325 knots/374 mph
Cruise speed 474 km/h/256 knots/295 mph
Approach speed 200 km/h/108 knots/124 mph
Service ceiling 10,576 m/34,700 feet
Minimum takeoff distance 410 m/1,346 feet ground roll
Minimum landing distance 537 m/1,764 feet ground roll
Ferry range 2,708 km/1,462 NM/1,683 miles
Crew Members 5
Power Plant 2 × Rolls-Royce T56-A-427A, rated at 5,100 eshp each
Unrefueled >6 hours
In-flight refueling 12 hours

 

Bomb Disposal Robot

The U.S. Navy and Northrop Grumman Corporation have successfully completed the Critical Design Review (CDR) for increment one of the Advanced Explosive Ordnance Disposal Robotic System (AEODRS) program.

Northrop Grumman, US Navy Complete Critical Design Review for Bomb Disposal Robot Program
Northrop Grumman, US Navy Complete Critical Design Review for Bomb Disposal Robot Program

AEODRS increment one is the dismounted operations system designed for Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) reconnaissance and threat assessment. The CDR provided an in-depth assessment, by a government team of experts, managers and U.S. Navy and Marine Corps users, that the final design for the AEODRS dismounted operations variant is programmatically and technically realistic and achievable. The successful review determined the detailed design satisfies cost, schedule and mission performance requirements and demonstrates the maturity for proceeding with system fabrication, assembly, integration and test.

«The successful CDR so soon after contract award clearly shows the commitment of the Navy and Northrop Grumman team to fill this key gap for EOD robotic operations», said Dan Verwiel, vice president and general manager, missile defense and protective systems division, Northrop Grumman Mission Systems. «We will continue our close collaboration with the Navy and user communities to ensure the delivery of a quality system that meets Navy requirements».

The AEODRS program will create a family of unmanned ground vehicle systems with a high degree of interoperability for rapid integration of new technologies. The «back-packable» increment one system weighs less than 35 pounds/15.9 kg and comprises the handheld operator control unit, communications link, mobility capability module, master capability module, power capability module, manipulator capability module, end effector capability module, visual sensors capability module, autonomous behaviors capability module and other minor components.

Naval Sea Systems Command awarded AEODRS increment one on August 31, 2015 to the Northrop Grumman team that includes Bokam Engineering, Carnegie Robotics, Harris Corporation, Hunter Defense Technologies, Neya Systems, QinetiQ North America, and Telefactor Robotics. Northrop Grumman’s offering uses a modular, open systems approach that allows the robot to be quickly adapted for a variety of mission scenarios.