Tag Archives: Navantia

Proposal for CSC

Navantia team has announced the submission of its proposal for the Canadian Surface Combatant (CSC) program.

Navantia team submits proposal for CSC
Navantia team submits proposal for CSC

«We are pleased to announce that Navantia-led team has submitted its tender response for the Canadian Surface Combatant program, with Saab Australia as the Combat Systems Integrator (CSI) and CEA Technologies providing key elements of the proposed solution. With a strong heritage in designing and building frigates and destroyers and proven technology transfer in global programs, the Navantia team offers a compliant solution with the best capability for the Royal Canadian Navy and the Canadian shipbuilding industry», said Navantia Chairman Esteban García Vilasánchez.

The team’s proposal is focused on delivering an operationally proven design and leveraging the capabilities key Canadian companies to deliver a ship that is ideally suited to Canada’s requirement. A solution based on the proven F-105 frigate design for the Spanish Navy has been proposed. Navantia has a proud history of delivering for partner navies around the world variants of this design that are currently in service for Norwegian Navy and, most recently, the destroyer HMAS Hobart to the Royal Australian Navy (RAN).

This modern Anti-Submarine Warfare ship will incorporate Saab’s globally recognised 9LV Combat Management Systems (CMS), elements of which are in service on over 240 platforms in 16 navies across the globe, including Canada’s own Halifax class frigates. Demonstrating the proven capabilities Saab Australia and the 9LVCMS it was recently mandated by the Australian Government for use on all major surface combatants of the Royal Australian Navy.

«Our expertise in developing high quality solutions for Australian programs in partnership with CEA Technologies, Navantia and others allows us to provide a low-risk, high capability solution for Canada, which will be fully interoperable with partner navies. The confidence of the Australian Government in mandating Saab combat systems and tactical interfaces across the whole RAN fleet demonstrates the strength of our capability and we look forward to continuing to work with the Royal Australian and Royal Canadian Navies to continue to develop our world-leading systems».

The submission of the CSC bid is also a significant moment for CEA Technologies, providing further opportunities for global partnership, and recognition of the radar expertise the company has built.

«We are excited about the opportunity to collaborate with Canada in the CSC program», said CEA Technologies CEO Merv Davis.

«We can deliver a mature radar which is outperforming the expectations of the Royal Australian Navy and has substantial potential for future growth. Building partnerships through international programs such as CSC is an opportunity for CEA to continue to demonstrate the performance of our innovative solutions. We are proud to be able to provide our Australian technologies to our international partners and allies».

«Other key suppliers engaged by Saab to support the CSC program include Lockheed Martin (Moorestown, New Jersey), General Dynamic Mission Systems – Canada (GDMS-C), DRS Technologies Limited Canada (DRS TCL), OSI Maritime Service and Rheinmetall Canada».

«Our solution will utilise and develop the unique capabilities of over fifty Canadian companies and will create over one thousand long-term, high tech jobs in Canada. Our proposal includes a full technology transfer of Navantia’s design and Saab’s 9LV CMS to Canada to be integrated and maintained by Canadian companies».

«The F-105 is far beyond the conceptual stage of a slowly evolving design process, and is marketed based on proven operational performance as opposed to claims of wishful thinking.  Selection of the Navantia solution will ensure Canada is not burdened with unnecessary cost and risk concerns as CSC transitions from design, to production and ultimately, to a proven operational capability».

«An exciting opportunity, the Navantia team looks forward to having the opportunity to work with Canada in developing and delivering the full capability of the Canadian Surface Combatant to the Royal Canadian Navy».

Under the CSC program, the Royal Canadian Navy will acquire up to 15 frigates to replace the Iroquois Class destroyers and Halifax Class frigates. Construction of the frigates will begin in the early 2020s.

Acceptance of the first
AWD

Minister for Defence Industry, the Hon Christopher Pyne MP, on 16 June 2017 attended a ceremony at the Osborne Naval Shipyard in Adelaide to mark the Government’s provisional acceptance of the first Air Warfare Destroyer (AWD) Hobart.

Defence accepts delivery of first Air Warfare Destroyer Hobart
Defence accepts delivery of first Air Warfare Destroyer Hobart

Minister Pyne said Hobart is the first of three AWD’s being built and integrated by the Air Warfare Destroyer Alliance which comprises the Department of Defence, Raytheon Australia, ASC and support from Navantia.

«The acceptance of this first of class ship is a further demonstration of the success of the Government-led reform initiative, with the program meeting all budget and schedule targets, Hobart will enter into service later this year», Minister Pyne said.

«Hobart will play a critical role for Defence by providing new interoperable capabilities for the Royal Australian Navy. By using a combination of U.S. and Australian technologies, these ships will allow us to work even closer with our allies. Importantly, these ships will provide a safer environment for Australia’s entire Defence Force, as they have the ability to move faster for longer, whilst forming a protective bubble around themselves and other assets in a task force», he said.

Over the last decade, more than 5,000 skilled Australians have constructed all three AWD’s whilst also creating a new combat and support system to meet the unique needs of the Australian Defence Force.

Minister Pyne said provisional acceptance represented some of the most complex and innovative engineering accomplishments ever undertaken in Australia.

«These skills have taken over a decade to build and position Australia well to support the Government’s new Naval Shipbuilding Plan», he said. «The AWD program underscores the importance of Australia’s defence industry as a fundamental input into capability. Rather than just being a supplier for Defence, this program proves how Australian defence industry is truly a strategic partner with Defence».

 

Characteristics

Length 481.3 feet/146.7 m
Beam 61 feet/18.6 m
Draft 23.6 feet/7.2 m
Full load displacement 7,000 tonnes
Main Engine 36 MW/48,276 hp
Top speed 28+ knots/32 mph/52 km/h
Range at 18+ knots/21 mph/33 km/h 5,000+ NM/5,779 miles/9,300 km
Crew 186
Accommodation 234
Combat System Aegis Weapon System Baseline 7.1
AN/SPY-1D(V) Phased Array Radar (81 NM/93 miles/150 km)
AN/SPQ-9B Horizon Search Radar
Mk-41 Vertical Launch System (48 VLS cells: RIM-162 Evolved SeaSparrow Missile (ESSM)/Standard Missile-2 (SM-2)/SM-6)
Mk-45 Mod.4 5” (127-mm) 62 Calibre Gun (Range: 20 NM/23 miles/37 km)
Advanced Harpoon Weapon Control (2 × 4 launchers)
Electronic Warfare (EW) Suite
Very Short Range Air and Surface Defence
Nulka Active Missile Decoy system
Integrated Sonar System incorporating a hull mounted and towed array sonar
Communications Suite
Aviation Flightdeck and hangar for one helicopter
Boats Two Rigid Hulled Inflatable Boats (RHIBs)

 

Maritime Action Ship

Navantia on March 30 launched the Maritime Action Ship (Buque de Acción Marítima, BAM) «Audaz» (P-45) for the Spanish navy at its San Fernando shipyard. The ceremony was sponsored by Defense Minister María Dolores de Cospedal García. The construction of the BAM, until its delivery in 2018, involves 1.1 million hours of work for Navantia sites in the Bay of Cádiz.

Navantia Launches the Maritime Action Ship «Audaz» (P-45) for the Spanish Navy
Navantia Launches the Maritime Action Ship «Audaz» (P-45) for the Spanish Navy

In addition to the Minister of Defense, the launching ceremony was attended by, among others, the Minister of Economy and Knowledge of the Junta de Andalucía, Antonio Ramírez de Arellano; the mayor of San Fernando, Patricia Cavada Montañés; Chief of Staff of the Navy, Admiral Jaime Muñoz-Delgado y Díaz del Río; the president of SEPI, Pilar Platero Sanz, and the president of Navantia, José Manuel Revuelta Lapique.

This ship is the fifth of this type to be built, and the first of the second batch that Navantia contracted with the Spanish Navy, according to the Order of Execution signed on December 5, 2014. Navantia commissioned the lead ship of the first batch in 2006, which was completed in 2012 with the construction and delivery to the Spanish Navy of four BAMs, named Meteoro (P-41), Rayo (P-42), Relámpago (P-43) and Tornado (P-44). These vessels have successfully participated in numerous national and international operations.

The construction of this ship means 1.1 million hours of work for Navantia Bahía de Cádiz, both for the company’s own staff and for the auxiliary industry. Likewise, and with a similar workload, the Navantia shipyards in the Ría de Ferrol are building the sixth BAM, «Furor» (P-46), which will be launched soon. The «Audaz» (P-45) and the «Furor» (P-46) will enter service from 2018. The keel-laying of the BAM «Audaz» (P-45) took place on April 29, 2016; it is the third vessel of the Spanish Navy to receive this name.

The BAMs are modern ships with advanced technology, and combine moderate size, high performance, great versatility in terms of missions, high level of commonality with other ships of the Navy and reduced acquisition and life-cycle costs.

They will incorporate all measures regarding MARPOL environmental regulations, such as new propulsion, auxiliary and emergency engines, as well as the TAR wastewater treatment plant.

It will also incorporate improvements aimed at reducing weight, new equipment derived from obsolescence, suitability for a larger load and the application of updated regulations on prevention and operational safety.

Its main missions are:

  • Protection and escort of other ships;
  • Control of maritime traffic;
  • Control and neutralization of terrorist actions and piracy;
  • Operations against drug trafficking and trafficking in persons;
  • Maritime Rescue and Rescue Operations;
  • Support for crisis situations and humanitarian aid;
  • Control of fisheries legislation;
  • Control of environmental and anti-pollution legislation.

Sea Acceptance Trials

06 March 2017, the Air Warfare Destroyer Alliance celebrated the successful completion of Sea Acceptance Trials by the first destroyer HMAS Hobart (DDGH-39) following 21 days at sea off the coast of South Australia.

Hobart Sea Acceptance Trials
Hobart Sea Acceptance Trials

AWD Alliance General Manager Paul Evans remarked that sea trials were a significant achievement for the Air Warfare Destroyer project in proving the advanced platform and combat systems on-board the ship. «Over the past five weeks, the AWD Alliance has conducted some 20 platform system tests and 45 combat system tests, to successfully validate Hobart’s complete Mission System. Combined, these systems will deliver a world leading capability for the Royal Australian Navy», said Evans. «Completing Acceptance Sea Trials on a first of class ship is a momentous occasion for the Alliance as we move closer to delivering Hobart to Defence. It has been achieved through the extraordinary efforts of the on-board crew and support team, whose dedication and commitment has been instrumental in ensuring the success of Hobart’s sea trials».

The Alliance is on track to deliver HMAS Hobart (DDGH-39) to Defence in June 2017 representing more than decade of dedication and effort by the AWD shipbuilding and combat system workforce on one of the most complex defence projects in Australia’s history.

Significant progress has been made on the AWD project and destroyer HMAS Hobart (DDGH-39) to reach this milestone with work commencing in January 2010, hull consolidation in March 2014, official launch in May 2015 and Builder’s Sea Trials in September 2016.

Shipbuilder ASC, shipbuilder manager Navantia, and combat systems integrator Raytheon Australia, offered their congratulations on the successful completion of Sea Acceptance Trials.

ASC Shipbuilding CEO, Mark Lamarre, expressed his pride in the shipbuilding workforce and the broader naval shipbuilding industry in Australia. «Successful completion of Sea Acceptance Trials is a great moment for the thousands of shipbuilders who have been working on this project, bringing the ship to life», Lamarre said. «This proves the highly skilled and professional naval shipbuilding capability that exists right here in South Australia. It is a testament to the collaborative nature of the project, which has seen industry working together to deliver to the RAN a new and potent air warfare capability. This achievement shows the way forward for future shipbuilding in Australia».

Navantia Australian Operations Director, Jorge Filgueira, echoed these sentiments: «Navantia acknowledges this significant achievement as being the result of a team effort, where Navantia’s experience as designer and shipbuilder has contributed significantly to the success of the Program», Filgueira said. «Navantia’s highly skilled team is well integrated within the AWD Alliance and is committed to having the Program achieve its delivery schedule. The results of the sea trials are very encouraging and provide the necessary confidence that we are on track to build up the capability that will be necessary to undertake the future naval continuous shipbuilding programs in Australia».

Managing Director of Raytheon Australia, Michael Ward, said that this is a momentous day for Raytheon Australia, its dedicated workforce and our nation’s sovereign defence industry. «The successful testing of the AWD combat system highlights the strength of Raytheon Australia’s capabilities in combat systems integration and the company’s ability to deliver to budget and schedule», Ward said. «As the combat systems integrator for the project, Raytheon Australia has applied its highly skilled AWD workforce of 350 people including architects, systems engineers and project managers to the project over the last decade. The combat system is what gives the AWDs their lethality. The work that Raytheon Australia has successfully undertaken is critical to the deterrent nature of the naval surface fleet and its ability to interoperate with the United States».

AWD Alliance Program Manager, Commodore Craig Bourke commented that the successful completion of Sea Acceptance Trials was achieved through the combined efforts of the 200+ crew on-board, with assistance from the Royal Australian Navy, Royal Australian Air Force, and Defence industry. «Hobart’s sensors, weapons and communications systems have been put to the test by Royal Australian Air Force and civilian aircraft, Royal Australian Navy ships and helicopters through a complex series of simulated scenarios and battle space management», Commodore Bourke said. «This achievement demonstrates and proves the capacity of Australia’s sovereign defence industry to successfully build and integrate ships for our specific defence needs. It also speaks volumes about the AWD Alliance’s close level of customer involvement and collaboration on every aspect of the project, laying the foundations for future defence projects in Australia».

Further progress on the AWD Project is expected to be achieved in 2017 with the second destroyer, Brisbane undertaking Builder’s Sea Trials and third destroyer, Sydney, achieving hull consolidation later this year.

 

Characteristics

Length 481.3 feet/146.7 m
Beam 61 feet/18.6 m
Draft 23.6 feet/7.2 m
Full load displacement 7,000 tonnes
Main Engine 36 MW/48,276 hp
Top speed 28+ knots/32 mph/52 km/h
Range at 18+ knots/21 mph/33 km/h 5,000+ NM/5,779 miles/9,300 km
Crew 186
Accommodation 234
Combat System Aegis Weapon System Baseline 7.1
AN/SPY-1D(V) Phased Array Radar (81 NM/93 miles/150 km)
AN/SPQ-9B Horizon Search Radar
Mk-41 Vertical Launch System (48 VLS cells: RIM-162 Evolved SeaSparrow Missile (ESSM)/Standard Missile-2 (SM-2)/SM-6)
Mk-45 Mod.4 5” (127-mm) 62 Calibre Gun (Range: 20 NM/23 miles/37 km)
Advanced Harpoon Weapon Control (2 × 4 launchers)
Electronic Warfare (EW) Suite
Very Short Range Air and Surface Defence
Nulka Active Missile Decoy system
Integrated Sonar System incorporating a hull mounted and towed array sonar
Communications Suite
Aviation Flightdeck and hangar for one helicopter
Boats Two Rigid Hulled Inflatable Boats (RHIBs)

 

Two AORs for Australia

The Commonwealth of Australia and Navantia have signed a contract to supply two AORs (Auxiliary Oiler Replenishment). These two ships are based on the Spanish Navy ship SPS Cantabria (A15) which will be tailored to fulfil specific Australian standards and requirements. The agreement with the Commonwealth of Australia also includes the sustainment of the two AOR ships for a period of five years.

SPS Cantabria (A15) has a maximum sustained speed of 20 knots/23 mph/37 km/h and a range of 6,000 nautical miles/6,900 miles/11,000 km; the ship's complement is 122
SPS Cantabria (A15) has a maximum sustained speed of 20 knots/23 mph/37 km/h and a range of 6,000 nautical miles/6,900 miles/11,000 km; the ship’s complement is 122

These contracts include a significant amount of participation from Australian industry, with companies such as Saab Australia as supplier of the Combat System, Scientific Management Associates (SMA) as suppliers of engineering services, Baker and Provan as supplier of cranes and an Australian communication system supplier. In relation to Support, all the sustainment activities will be performed in Australia (New South Wales, NSW and Western Australia, WA) with Navantia Australia and its subcontractors, which has been partnering with Australian companies since 2007. Other opportunities for Australian suppliers will be published through the ICN gateway.

With this contract, Navantia has further established a reputation for being a reference platform designer for the Royal Australian Navy (RAN). These two ships will join the two LHDs, the three AWDs and the twelve Landing Craft designed by Navantia. Navantia is proud of its participation in the development of the naval capabilities for the RAN.

Navantia Australia has significant capability established in Australia which with the company’s Technical Operation Centre located in Adelaide, will be a valuable asset for future shipbuilding activities in Australia, providing the required expertise to face the challenge of future projects. Navantia is fully committed to Australia and will contribute to naval projects with proven capacity and ability to supply. Navantia now looks forward to working with the Commonwealth and Industry even more closely, to achieve program goals that we all totally share.

Navantia selected to supply two Auxiliary Oiler Replenishment ship to Australia
Navantia selected to supply two Auxiliary Oiler Replenishment ship to Australia

Hobart Commences
Main Engine

The AWD Alliance reached another major milestone in the lead up to sea trials for the HMAS Hobart (DDGH-39) with the commencement of «Main Engine Light-Off» – or starting of one of the main engines that will drive the ship’s propellers.

The Hobart-class destroyers are being built under Australia’s SEA 4000 program, which will ultimately deliver three advanced multirole ships
The Hobart-class destroyers are being built under Australia’s SEA 4000 program, which will ultimately deliver three advanced multirole ships

The large 5,650 kW/7,577 hp Bravo V16 Propulsion Diesel engine burst into life on Thursday 14 April, in an engine room deep below the main superstructure of the ship.

It will drive the port-side propeller while the other Bravo propulsion diesel, to be started in coming weeks, will drive the starboard propeller. They will provide the propulsion power for the HMAS Hobart (DDGH-39) to travel at low speeds, while higher speeds will be achieved by two gas turbines, which are yet to be commissioned on the ship.

Platform Test and Activation Manager Mike Clements said the successful commencement of Main Engine Light-Off (MELO) is a testament to the work completed by hundreds of AWD personnel across the shipyard in bringing the ship’s systems and engine to this point.

«Main Engine Light-Off is a major milestone for any warship and the start of the MELO activities this week is a great achievement for everyone who has contributed to the ship to date», Mike said.

The main propulsion engines were made by Navantia in Spain and transported to Australia by barge. There are a further four diesel generator engines on-board for the ship’s electrical power that have been commissioned and are currently undergoing parallel testing.

In coming months, once MELO is complete, the propulsion engines will be connected to the propellers and «dock trials» conducted, in which the engines turn the propellers while the ship remains roped to the dock.

The main propulsion engines were made by Navantia in Spain and transported to Australia by barge
The main propulsion engines were made by Navantia in Spain and transported to Australia by barge

 

Characteristics

Length 481.3 feet/146.7 m
Beam 61 feet/18.6 m
Draft 23.6 feet/7.2 m
Full load displacement 7,000 tonnes
Main Engine 36 MW/48,276 hp
Top speed 28+ knots/32 mph/52 km/h
Range at 18+ knots/21 mph/33 km/h 5,000+ NM/5,779 miles/9,300 km
Crew 186
Accommodation 234
Combat System Aegis Weapon System Baseline 7.1
AN/SPY-1D(V) Phased Array Radar (81 NM/93 miles/150 km)
AN/SPQ-9B Horizon Search Radar
Mk-41 Vertical Launch System (48 VLS cells: RIM-162 Evolved SeaSparrow Missile (ESSM)/Standard Missile-2 (SM-2)/SM-6)
Mk-45 Mod.4 5” (127-mm) 62 Calibre Gun (Range: 20 NM/23 miles/37 km)
Advanced Harpoon Weapon Control (2 × 4 launchers)
Electronic Warfare (EW) Suite
Very Short Range Air and Surface Defence
Nulka Active Missile Decoy system
Integrated Sonar System incorporating a hull mounted and towed array sonar
Communications Suite
Aviation Flightdeck and hangar for one helicopter
Boats Two Rigid Hulled Inflatable Boats (RHIBs)

 

This computer-generated animation highlights the multi-mission capability of the three naval destroyers being built as part of the Air Warfare Destroyer Project

 

Four LLC to Australia

Navantia has the pleasure in delivering to the Commonwealth in Sydney the final batch of four LLCs. This is a major achievement, where Navantia has played an important role – that of Prime Contractor for the first time in an Australian program. Since 2007, Navantia has been working in three important programs for the ADF, namely the Air Warfare Destroyers (AWDs), Landing Helicopter Docks (LHDs), and the LHD Landing Craft (LLCs), under different contractual schemes to deliver to the best of its ability.

HMAS Canberra docks down in Sydney Harbour in order to receive the ship’s LHD Landing Craft for the very first time
HMAS Canberra docks down in Sydney Harbour in order to receive the ship’s LHD Landing Craft for the very first time

On 16th December 2011, Navantia signed a contract with the then Defence Materiel Organisation (DMO) under JP 2048 Phase 3 to build and deliver twelve LHD Landing Craft (LLCs) to the Commonwealth. All twelve have now been delivered to HMAS Waterhen in Sydney on or ahead of schedule and to budget. The LLCs were built and tested in Cádiz, Spain, and shipped out to Australia.

Navantia understands that the first eight units are in operation with the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) and are performing to the full satisfaction of Navy, having achieved various missions during sea trials with HMAS Canberra (L02), which has also been commissioned into the RAN. Her sister ship, HMAS Adelaide (L01), is due to be commissioned in Sydney on 4th December 2015. Since delivery of the LLCs, Navantia has provided in-country support and is committed to ensuring its availability for service at all times. This commitment will be maintained by Navantia Australia Pty Ltd, which is also assisting BAE Systems with Through Life Support of the LHDs.

Navantia is fully committed to Australia and will contribute to projects as far as possible within its proven capacity and ability to supply. We look forward to working with the Commonwealth and industry even more closely than before, to achieve the program goals that we totally share. In this regard, Navantia is currently engaged in the SEA 1654 Phase 3 Maritime Operational Support Capability tender process, and is working in a collaborative environment in the SEA 5000 Future Frigate program and the SEA 1180 Offshore Patrol Vessels project.

The Royal Australian Navy's first four LCM-1E landing craft for the LHD have arrived at their new home HMAS Waterhen in Sydney
The Royal Australian Navy’s first four LCM-1E landing craft for the LHD have arrived at their new home HMAS Waterhen in Sydney

 

LHD Landing Craft (LLC)

The LCM-1E is a class of amphibious Landing Craft, Mechanized (LCM) manufactured by Navantia who also build the LHD hulls. In Royal Australian Navy service these craft are purpose built for the Landing Helicopter Dock (LHD) and are referred to as LHD Landing Craft (LLC).

These landing craft are intended to deliver troops and equipment onshore where there are no fixed port facilities. They have the ability to be used Over The Horizon, which means that the LCM-1E can transport between the ship and the coast starting at a distance greater than that marks the horizon, i.e. greater than 20 nautical miles (23 miles/37 km). To perform this type of landing, the LCM-1E are equipped with a radar navigation, GPS, gyro needle/magnetic and HF communications equipment, VHF and UHF.

Another important point is the speed and autonomy. The propulsion is by two engines MAN of 806 kW and two water jet propellers (waterjets), offering a speed of 22 knots/25 mph/41 km/h without load and 13.5 knots/15.5 mph/25 km/h laden, with a range of 190 nautical miles (219 miles/352 km).

The LCM-1E incorporates a stern gate, facilitating the loading/unloading of rolling stock within the flood levee, not necessary the output of the front two boats to load/unload the rear, with a limit of 12 tonnes maximum for the transfer of vehicles one barge to another.

The watercraft will enable transport of troops and equipment from the LHDs to the shore including where there are no fixed port facilities.

 

Characteristics

Type Amphibious Warfare Ancillary Craft
Displacement 56.6 tonnes (light)
110 tonnes (full load)
Length 76.4 feet/23.3 m
Beam 21 feet/6.4 m
Main Machinery 2 × MAN D-2842 LE 402X diesel engines (809 kW each)
2 × waterjets
Speed 22 knots/25 mph/41 km/h (light)
13.5 knots/15.5 mph/25 km/h (full load)
Company 4
Range 190 NM/219 miles/352 km

 

Canberra trials

The Navy’s Aircraft Maintenance and Flight Trials Unit along with C Squadron, 5 Aviation Regiment has conducted a «quick look» trial of the CH-47D Chinook onboard the Navy’s Flag Ship, HMAS Canberra (L02). The trials were conducted over a week with preliminary work being conducted at HMAS Albatross (air station, also known as Naval Air Station Nowra) and the flying trials conducted at sea on 20-21 October 2015.

A CH-47D Chinook conducts load-lifting trials with HMAS Canberra in Jervis Bay
A CH-47D Chinook conducts load-lifting trials with HMAS Canberra in Jervis Bay

The Chinook helicopter conducted a series of evolutions to HMAS Canberra’s flight deck including launch and recoveries along with an assessment of external load operations known as vertical replenishment or VERTREP (Vertical Replenishment). An assessment was also made of aircraft lashing schemes and refuelling procedures.

This trial was the precursor for a full First of Class Flight Trial planned for the CH-47F in late 2016. The CH-47D and CH-47F are both operated by C Squadron from Townsville in Queensland.

Commander Air HMAS Canberra, Commander Paul Moggach, said the trial represented another milestone in operational capability for the ship. «We are already authorised for deck operations with MRH-90 Taipan and S-70B-2 Seahawk helicopters, and the Chinook activity this week has further expanded our knowledge», he said. «We look forward to operating with Army helicopters in support of our amphibious roles».

The outcome of the trial is to provide a limited CH-47D operating envelope to the Landing Helicopter Dock or amphibious assault ship.

A CH-47D Chinook on the deck of HMAS Canberra during First of Class Flight Trials in Jervis Bay
A CH-47D Chinook on the deck of HMAS Canberra during First of Class Flight Trials in Jervis Bay

 

Characteristics

PLATFORM CHARACTERISTICS
Length Overall 757 feet/230.8 m
Length Waterline 680 feet/207.2 m
Beam 105 feet/32 m
Design Draft 23.5 feet/7.18 m
Full Load Displacement 27,831 tonnes
Crew and Embarked Forced Accommodation 1,403
MACHINERY
Propulsion 2 × Siemens 11,000 kW PODs
Bowthruster 2 × 1,500 kW Brunvoll/Siemens motors
Stabilisers 2 × Fincantieri
Generators 1 × 22,000 kW GE LM2500 Gas Turbine and 2 × 7,680 kW Diesel
Integrated Platform Management System Navantia – Sistemas
Fresh Water 6 × Reverse Osmosis Plants (each 25 tonnes/day)
Sewage 2 × Treatment Plants
PERFORMANCE
Maximum Speed 20+ knots/23+ mph/37+ km/h
Economic Speed 15 knots/17 mph/28 km/h
Maximum Range 9,250 NM/10,644 miles/17,131 km
Endurance 45+ days
CAPACITY
Flight Deck 51,128.57 feet²/4,750 m²
Dock (including ramp) 12,540 feet²/1,165 m²
Heavy Cargo Garage 12,270.86 feet²/1,410 m²
Light Cargo Garage 20,236 feet²/1,880 m²
Hangar 10,656.27 feet²/990 m²
Garages, Hangar and Well Dock 1,350 lane meter (2.9 m wide)
General Store Rooms 11,614.26 feet²/1,079 m²
Future Growth Margin 672 tonnes
A CH-47D Chinook approaches HMAS Canberra during First of Class Flight Trials. HMAS Gascoyne (M 85) can be seen in the background
A CH-47D Chinook approaches HMAS Canberra during First of Class Flight Trials. HMAS Gascoyne (M 85) can be seen in the background

Turkish LPD

On 7th May, during IDEF 2015, the Defence exhibition in Istanbul, the Turkish shipyard SEDEF has signed a contract with the SSM for the design and construction of one Landing Platform Dock (LPD, also called Amphibious Transport Dock) ship for the Turkish Navy. Navantia participates in this contract as a technological partner.

This ship is the biggest warship ever built in Spain and is named after H.R.M. King Juan Carlos I
This ship is the biggest warship ever built in Spain and is named after H.R.M. King Juan Carlos I

Navantia will provide the design, transfer of technology, equipments and technical assistance to SEDEF for local construction. The design, based on the Landing Helicopter Dock (LHD) Juan Carlos I for the Spanish Navy, is adapted to the Turkish Navy requirements, having the advantage of being a tested ship with excellent performance since commissioning. Navantia will also provide several components and systems, as the engines and the IPMS (Integrated Platform Management System).

The selection of the design was announced on 27th December 2013 and the commissioning of the ship is scheduled for 2021.

Navantia has also a contract for two similar ships in Australia, the HMAS Canberra (L02), already commissioned and the HMAS Adelaide (L01), to be commissioned in the last quarter of 2015. Last, this contract means the entrance of Navantia in the Turkish market, where has opened an office in 2013 and is also involved in the anti-air frigates program, as well as the consolidation of Navantia as a reference in the LHD market.

 

Juan Carlos I (L61)

The Juan Carlos I is a single hull ship made of steel with the superstructure on the starboard side. Her design is based on a combination of military and commercial standards and specifications; the structure, equipment and materials follow Lloyd’s Register of Shipping’s civil standards, whilst her combat system, ordnance handling and stowage systems, systems of supply at sea, flight deck and the damage control system follow military standards.

Garage for heavy loads, with 1,410 square meters and a capacity to house 29 Leopard or similar battle tanks, AAV amphibious vehicles and practically any type of caterpillar track vehicle, as well as 16 tonne TEU cargo containers.  Its length is 90 metres, with a width of 16 metres
Garage for heavy loads, with 1,410 square meters and a capacity to house 29 Leopard or similar battle tanks, AAV amphibious vehicles and practically any type of caterpillar track vehicle, as well as 16 tonne TEU cargo containers. Its length is 90 metres, with a width of 16 metres

 

Characteristics

Length overall 231 m/758 feet
Maximum beam 32 m/105 feet
Draught at full load 7.1 m/23.3 feet
Height 58 m/190 feet
Flight deck height over water level 20 m/65.6 feet
Maximum displacement 26,000 tonnes
Maximum displacement in Amphibious Operation 30,000 tonnes
Maximum speed 21 knots/24 mph/39 km/h
Range at 15 knots/17 mph/28 km/h 9,000 NM/10,357 miles/16,668 km
Capacity 1,435 personnel
Crew 254
Embarked or transport forces 883
Chiefs of Staff 103
Embarked Air Wing Unit 172
Naval Beach Group 23