Tag Archives: Lockheed Martin

Lightning is ready

The Marine Corps declared on July 31 that a squadron of 10 F-35B Lightning II aircraft is ready for worldwide deployment. The Marines’ declaration of Initial Operational Capability (IOC) for its squadron of F-35Bs «marks a significant milestone in the continued evolution of the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) program», Undersecretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics Frank Kendall said in a statement issued on July 31.

An F-35B Lightning II prepares to taxi on the flight deck of the USS Wasp during night operations at sea as part of a Marine Corps operational test, May, 22, 2015 (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Corporal Anne K. Henry)
An F-35B Lightning II prepares to taxi on the flight deck of the USS Wasp during night operations at sea as part of a Marine Corps operational test, May, 22, 2015 (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Corporal Anne K. Henry)

«The decision was made following a thorough operational readiness inspection, which assessed the U.S. Marine Corps’ ability to employ this complex weapon system in an operational environment», Kendall continued. «This achievement is a testament to the efforts of the F-35 Joint Program Office and industry team, as well as the hard work and support from the U.S. Marine Corps».

 

The F-35 Program is on Track

«This accomplishment is an affirmation that the F-35 program is on track to deliver essential 5th generation warfighting capabilities to our U.S. services and international partners», Kendall added. «It is also a reminder that we still have work ahead to deliver the full warfighting capability required by all three services and our partners while we continue our successful efforts to drive cost out of the program».

Two F-35B Lightning II Joint Strike Fighters complete vertical landings aboard the USS Wasp (LHD-1) during the opening day of the first session of operational testing, May 18, 2015 (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Remington Hall/Released)
Two F-35B Lightning II Joint Strike Fighters complete vertical landings aboard the USS Wasp (LHD-1) during the opening day of the first session of operational testing, May 18, 2015 (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Remington Hall/Released)

Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 121, or VMFA-121, based in Yuma, Arizona, is the first squadron in military history to become operational with an F-35 variant, following a five-day operational readiness inspection, which concluded July 17, according to a news release issued on July 31 by the U.S. Marine Corps.

«I am pleased to announce that VMFA-121 has achieved Initial Operational Capability in the F-35B, as defined by requirements outlined in the June 2014 Joint Report to Congressional Defense Committees», Marine Corps General Joseph F. Dunford Jr., commandant of the Marine Corps, said in the U.S. Marine Corps release.

«VMFA-121 has ten aircraft in the Block 2B configuration with the requisite performance envelope and weapons clearances, to include the training, sustainment capabilities, and infrastructure to deploy to an austere site or a ship», Dunford continued. «It is capable of conducting close air support, offensive and defensive counter air, air interdiction, assault support escort and armed reconnaissance as part of a Marine air-ground task force, or in support of the joint force».

Dunford stated that he has his full confidence in the F-35B’s ability to support Marines in combat, predicated on years of concurrent developmental testing and operational flying.

«Prior to declaring Initial Operating Capability, we have conducted flight operations for seven weeks at sea aboard an L-Class carrier, participated in multiple large force exercises, and executed a recent operational evaluation which included multiple live ordnance sorties», Dunford said. «The F-35B’s ability to conduct operations from expeditionary airstrips or sea-based carriers provides our nation with its first 5th generation strike fighter, which will transform the way we fight and win».

F135-PW-600 engine for F-35B Short Take Off and Vertical Landing (STOVL)
F135-PW-600 engine for F-35B Short Take Off and Vertical Landing (STOVL)

 

F-35 Will Eventually Replace Legacy Aircraft

As the future of Marine Corps tactical aviation, the F-35 will eventually replace three legacy platforms: the AV-8B Harrier, the F/A-18 Hornet, and the EA-6B Prowler, according to the Marine Corps release.

«The success of VMFA-121 is a reflection of the hard work and effort by the Marines in the squadron, those involved in the program over many years, and the support we have received from across the Department of the Navy, the joint program office, our industry partners, and the undersecretary of defense», Dunford added. «Achieving Initial Operating Capability has truly been a team effort».

The Marine Corps has trained and qualified more than 50 Marine F-35B pilots and certified about 500 maintenance personnel to assume autonomous, organic-level maintenance support for the F-35B, the release said.

Marine Attack Squadron 211, an AV-8B Harrier II squadron, is scheduled to transition next to the F-35B in fiscal year 2016, according to the release. In 2018, Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 122, an F/A-18 Hornet squadron, will conduct its transition.

Arrival (Vertical landing) on USS Wasp for DT-II. Mr. Peter Wilson was the pilot on 12 August 2013
Arrival (Vertical landing) on USS Wasp for DT-II. Mr. Peter Wilson was the pilot on 12 August 2013

 

Specifications

Length 51.2 feet/15.6 m
Height 14.3 feet/4.36 m
Wingspan 35 feet/10.7 m
Wing area 460 feet2/42.7 m2
Horizontal tail span 21.8 feet/6.65 m
Weight empty 32,300 lbs/14,651 kg
Internal fuel capacity 13,500 lbs/6,125 kg
Weapons payload 15,000 lbs/6,800 kg
Maximum weight 60,000 lbs class/27,215 kg
Standard internal weapons load Two AIM-120C air-to-air missiles
Two 2,000-pound/907 kg GBU-31 JDAM (Joint Direct Attack Munition) guided bombs
Propulsion (uninstalled thrust ratings) F135-PW-600
Maximum Power (with afterburner) 41,000 lbs/182,4 kN/18,597 kgf
Military Power (without afterburner) 27,000 lbs/120,1 kN/12,247 kgf
Short Take Off Thrust 40,740 lbs/181,2 kN/18,479 kgf
Hover Thrust 40,650 lbs/180,8 kN/18,438 kgf
Main Engine 18,680 lbs/83,1 kN/8,473 kgf
Lift Fan 18,680 lbs/83,1 kN/8,473 kgf
Roll Post 3,290 lbs/14,6 kN/1,492 kgf
Main Engine Length 369 inch/9.37 m
Main Engine Inlet Diameter 43 inch/1.09 m
Main Engine Maximum Diameter 46 inch/1.17 m
Lift Fan Inlet Diameter 51 inch/1,30 m
Lift Fan Maximum Diameter 53 inch/1,34 m
Conventional Bypass Ratio 0.57
Powered Lift Bypass Ratio 0.51
Conventional Overall Pressure Ratio 28
Powered Lift Overall Pressure Ratio 29
Speed (full internal weapons load) Mach 1.6 (~1,043 knots/1,200 mph/ 1,931 km/h)
Combat radius (internal fuel) >450 NM/517.6 miles/833 km
Range (internal fuel) >900 NM/1,036 miles/1,667 km
Max g-rating 7.0
Planned Quantities
U.S. Marine Corps 340
U.K. Royal Air Force/Royal Navy 138
Italy 30
In total 508
An F-35B test jet takes off from the USS Wasp on Aug. 21, 2013. The takeoff was part of Developmental Test Phase Two for the F-35 short takeoff/vertical landing variant
An F-35B test jet takes off from the USS Wasp on Aug. 21, 2013. The takeoff was part of Developmental Test Phase Two for the F-35 short takeoff/vertical landing variant

The first Ghostrider

The first AC-130J Ghostrider landed at Hurlburt Field, Florida July 29, making it Air Force Special Operations Command’s (AFSOC’s) first AC-130J. After completing the initial developmental test and evaluation by the 413th Flight Test Squadron at Eglin Air Force Base (AFB), Florida, the aircraft will be flown by the 1st Special Operations Group (SOG) Detachment 2 and maintained by the 1st Special Operations Aircraft Maintenance Squadron (SOAMXS) during its initial operational tests and evaluations at Hurlburt Field.

A crowd gathers to view the inside of the Air Force Special Operations Command’s first AC-130J Ghostrider at Hurlburt Field, Florida, July 29, 2015. The aircrews of the 1st Special Operations Group Detachment 2 were hand selected from the AC-130 community for their operational expertise and will begin initial operational testing and evaluation of the AC-130J later this year (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Kai White/Released)
A crowd gathers to view the inside of the Air Force Special Operations Command’s first AC-130J Ghostrider at Hurlburt Field, Florida, July 29, 2015. The aircrews of the 1st Special Operations Group Detachment 2 were hand selected from the AC-130 community for their operational expertise and will begin initial operational testing and evaluation of the AC-130J later this year (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Kai White/Released)

«Putting it through these tests will allow us to wring out the AC-130J in a simulated combat environment, instead of the more rigid flight profiles in formal developmental testing», said Lieutenant Colonel Brett DeAngelis, the 1st SOG Detachment 2 commander. «Now that we know the equipment works when we turn it on, it’s our task to determine the best way to employ our newest asset».

«The AC-130J brings new technology to the table for AFSOC with more efficient engines, improved fuel efficiency and the ability to fly higher, further and quieter», said Master Sergeant Michael Ezell, the 1st SOAMXS production superintendent. «Additionally, the modified weapons system it possesses is a precision strike package that was collected from the older models, such as the laser-guided bombs and AGM-176 Griffin bombs, and combined to give us all the capabilities of the AC-130W Stinger II and AC-130U Spooky all in one package».

The AC-130J is a modified MC-130J Commando II, containing advanced features that will enable it to provide ground forces with an expeditionary, direct-fire platform that is persistent, suited for urban operations and capable of delivering precision munitions against ground targets.

«This is an exciting transition as we move the AC-130J from the test community to the operational community», DeAngelis said. «While we still have initial operational testing in front of us to accomplish, it will now be done by aircrews selected for their combat expertise, instead of their testing background».

A cadre of 60 aircrew and maintainers were selected by the Air Force Personnel Center to stand up the program, and there will be an additional 30 contractors to help work on the new gunship. «We will be training on the airplane, getting all the qualifications and hands-on experience we need to be able to perform operational testing in order to give an exact picture of how this plane will operate in a real-world environment», Ezell said. «Our focus right now is to learn how to maintain the aircraft and the operators will learn how to fly it and get ready for (initial operational test and evaluation), which should start later this year».

Airmen were hand selected to work on the new AC-130J; they encompass a solid background and level of expertise on C-130Js. The maintenance team cadre came from Little Rock AFB, Arkansas, Dyess AFB, Texas, Kirtland AFB, New Mexico, Davis-Monthan AFB, Arizona, and Cannon AFB, New Mexico.

«As more AC-130Js are produced and delivered, the older models will slowly be retired», DeAngelis said. «Until then, we’ll hold on to them while the AC-130J completes operational tests and the fleet becomes abundant in numbers».

Operational testing is expected to be complete in spring 2016.

«Detachment 2’s mission is simple; ‘Get it right,’» DeAngelis said. «And we have the right group of people to do just that».

Master Sergeant James Knight right, an 18th Flight Test Squadron aerial gunner, instructs Staff Sergeant Rob Turner, left, a 1st Special Operations Group Detachment 2 aerial gunner, on new changes regarding preflight inspections in an AC-130J Ghostrider on Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, July 29, 2015 (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Christopher Callaway)
Master Sergeant James Knight right, an 18th Flight Test Squadron aerial gunner, instructs Staff Sergeant Rob Turner, left, a 1st Special Operations Group Detachment 2 aerial gunner, on new changes regarding preflight inspections in an AC-130J Ghostrider on Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, July 29, 2015 (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Christopher Callaway)

 

AC-130J Ghostrider

 

Mission

The AC-130J Ghostrider’s primary missions are close air support and air interdiction. Close air support missions include troops in contact, convoy escort and point air defense. Air interdiction missions are conducted against preplanned targets or targets of opportunity and include strike coordination and reconnaissance. The AC-130J will provide ground forces an expeditionary, direct-fire platform that is persistent, ideally suited for urban operations and delivers precision low-yield munitions against ground targets.

 

Features

The AC-130J is a highly modified C-130J aircraft that contains many advanced features. It contains an advanced two-pilot flight station with fully integrated digital avionics. The aircraft is capable of extremely accurate navigation due to the fully integrated navigation systems with dual inertial navigation systems and Global Positioning System. Aircraft defensive systems and color weather radar are integrated as well. The aircraft is capable of Air Refueling with the Universal Air Refueling Receptacle Slipway Installation (UARRSI) system. To handle power requirements imposed by the advanced avionics and aircraft systems, the AC-130J is equipped with 60/90 kilo volt amp generators that provide increased DC electrical output. In anticipation of IR countermeasure installation, it is provisioned for Large Aircraft Infrared Countermeasures (LAIRCM) installation.

Additionally, the AC-130J is modified with a precision strike package, which includes a mission management console, robust communications suite, two electro-optical/infrared sensors, advanced fire control equipment, precision guided munitions delivery capability as well as trainable 30-mm and 105-mm weapons. The mission management system will fuse sensor, communication, environment, order of battle and threat information into a common operating picture.

 

Background

The AC-130J is the fourth generation gunship replacing the aging SOF fleet of 37 AC-130H/U/W gunships. AC-130 gunships have an extensive combat history dating to back to Vietnam where gunships destroyed more than 10,000 trucks and were credited with many life-saving close air support missions. Over the past four decades, AC-130s have deployed constantly to hotspots throughout the world in support of special operations and conventional forces. In South America, Africa, Europe and throughout the Middle East, gunships have significantly contributed to mission success.

The first AC-130J aircraft is scheduled to begin developmental test and evaluation in January 2014. The first squadron will be located at Cannon Air Force Base, New Mexico, while other locations are to be determined. Initial operational capacity is expected in fiscal 2017 and the last delivery is scheduled for fiscal 2021. The aircraft was officially named Ghostrider in May 2012.

Major Jason Fox, a 18th Flight Test Squadron pilot, delivers the Air Force Special Operations Command’s first AC-130J Ghostrider to the 1st Special Operations Wing on Hurlburt Field, Florida, July 29, 2015 (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Christopher Callaway)
Major Jason Fox, a 18th Flight Test Squadron pilot, delivers the Air Force Special Operations Command’s first AC-130J Ghostrider to the 1st Special Operations Wing on Hurlburt Field, Florida, July 29, 2015 (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Christopher Callaway)

 

General Characteristics

Primary Function Close air support and air interdiction with associated collateral missions
Builder Lockheed Martin
Power Plant 4 × Rolls-Royce AE 2100D3 Turboprops
Thrust 4 × 4,591 shaft horsepower
Wingspan 132 feet 7 inch/39.7 m
Length 97 feet 9 inch/29.3 m
Height 38 feet 10 inch/11.9 m
Speed 362 knots/416.6 mph/670.4 km/h at 22,000 feet/6,705.6 m
Ceiling 28,000 feet/8,534.4 m with 42,000 lbs/19,051 kg payload
Maximum Take-Off Weight (MTOW) 164,000 lbs/74,389 kg
Range 2,607 NM/3,000 miles/4,828 km
Crew Two pilots
Two combat systems officers
Three enlisted gunners
ARMAMENT
Precision Strike Package (PSP) 30-mm GAU-23/A cannon
105-mm cannon
SOPGM (Standoff Precision Guided Munitions) GBU-39 Small Diameter Bomb
AGM-176 Griffin missile
Unit Cost $109 million (fiscal 2010 dollars)
Inventory Active force, 32 by fiscal 2021
AFSOC flight crew inspects the armament of the first AC-130J Ghostrider gunship to arrive at Hurlburt Field in Florida. The air force expects to field 32 such aircraft once deliveries are complete (Source: US Air Force)
AFSOC flight crew inspects the armament of the first AC-130J Ghostrider gunship to arrive at Hurlburt Field in Florida. The air force expects to field 32 such aircraft once deliveries are complete (Source: US Air Force)

Little Rock Launch

The Lockheed Martin-led industry team launched the nation’s ninth Littoral Combat Ship (LCS), Little Rock, into the Menominee River at the Marinette Marine Corporation (MMC) shipyard on July 18. The ship’s sponsor, Mrs. Janee Bonner, christened USS Little Rock (LCS-9) with the traditional smashing of a champagne bottle across the ship’s bow just prior to the launch.

The ninth Littoral Combat Ship, the future USS Little Rock (LCS-9), was christened and launched into the Menominee River in Marinette, Wisconsin, on July 18
The ninth Littoral Combat Ship, the future USS Little Rock (LCS-9), was christened and launched into the Menominee River in Marinette, Wisconsin, on July 18

«It is such an honor and a privilege to serve as the sponsor of the future USS Little Rock (LCS-9) and to be a part of this major milestone along the way to her assuming her place as part of the great U.S. Navy fleet», Bonner said.

Secretary of the U.S. Navy Ray Mabus, who served as an officer aboard the cruiser USS Little Rock, presented the keynote address. Following christening and launch, USS Little Rock (LCS-9) will continue to undergo outfitting and testing before delivery to the U.S. Navy later this year.

«This future USS Little Rock (LCS-9) will use interchangeable mission modules that empower her to face a variety of high-priority missions, from Anti-Surface Warfare (ASuW) to Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) to Mine CounterMeasures (MCM)», said Vice President of Littoral Ships & Systems, Joe North. «She is ideally suited to navigate the reefs and shallows in the Asia-Pacific, as so well demonstrated by USS Fort Worth (LCS-3) on her current deployment».

The USS Little Rock (LCS-9) is one of seven Littoral Combat Ships under construction at Marinette Marine. The Lockheed Martin-led industry team is building the Freedom variant, and has already delivered two ships to the U.S. Navy. USS Freedom (LCS-1) successfully deployed to Southeast Asia in 2013 and is currently operating out of her homeport in San Diego, California. USS Fort Worth (LCS-3) is currently deployed in Southeast Asia, serving in the U.S. 7th Fleet to strengthen international relationships, engage in multi-regional naval exercises and further LCS capabilities using manned and unmanned assets.

USS Milwaukee (LCS-5) was christened and launched in 2013, and is slated to be delivered to the U.S. Navy this fall. USS Detroit (LCS-7) was launched in 2014. USS Sioux City (LCS-11) is in construction, and USS Wichita (LCS-13) had its keel laid in February 2015. USS Billings (LCS-15), USS Indianapolis (LCS-17) and USS St. Louis (LCS-19) are in the construction phase.

Ship sponsor Mrs. Janée Bonner conducted the time-honored tradition of christening the ship by smashing a bottle of champagne across the bow
Ship sponsor Mrs. Janée Bonner conducted the time-honored tradition of christening the ship by smashing a bottle of champagne across the bow

 

Ship Design Specifications

Hull Advanced semiplaning steel monohull
Length Overall 389 feet/118.6 m
Beam Overall 57 feet/17.5 m
Draft 13.5 feet/4.1 m
Full Load Displacement Approximately 3,200 metric tons
Top Speed Greater than 40 knots/46 mph/74 km/h
Range at top speed 1,000 NM/1,151 miles/1,852 km
Range at cruise speed 4,000 NM/4,603 miles/7,408 km
Watercraft Launch and Recovery Up to Sea State 4
Aircraft Launch and Recovery Up to Sea State 5
Propulsion Combined diesel and gas turbine with steerable water jet propulsion
Power 85 MW/113,600 horsepower
Hangar Space Two MH-60 Romeo Helicopters
One MH-60 Romeo Helicopter and three Vertical Take-off and Land Tactical Unmanned Air Vehicles (VTUAVs)
Core Crew Less than 50
Accommodations for 75 sailors provide higher sailor quality of life than current fleet
Integrated Bridge System Fully digital nautical charts are interfaced to ship sensors to support safe ship operation
Core Self-Defense Suite Includes 3D air search radar
Electro-Optical/Infrared (EO/IR) gunfire control system
Rolling-Airframe Missile Launching System
57-mm Main Gun
Mine, Torpedo Detection
Decoy Launching System
Lockheed Martin is a global security and aerospace company that employs approximately 112,000 people worldwide
Lockheed Martin is a global security and aerospace company that employs approximately 112,000 people worldwide

 

Ship list

USS Freedom (LCS-1)

USS Fort Worth (LCS-3)

USS Milwaukee (LCS-5)

USS Detroit (LCS-7)

USS Little Rock (LCS-9)

USS Sioux City (LCS-11)

USS Wichita (LCS-13)

USS Billings (LCS-15)

USS Indianapolis (LCS-17)

USS St. Louis (LCS-19)

Marinette Marine Corporation (MMC) is located on the Menominee River flowage into Green Bay

Flight Tests

Lockheed Martin demonstrated its multi-mode Joint Air-to-Ground Missile (JAGM), engaging two laser-designated stationary targets during recent Government-led flight tests at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida.

The new, improved have been integrated into our JAGM guidance section and mated with our AGM-114R missile bus and demonstrated during multiple guided flight tests
The new, improved have been integrated into our JAGM guidance section and mated with our AGM-114R missile bus and demonstrated during multiple guided flight tests

In the first test, the missile flew four kilometers, engaged its precision-strike, semi-active laser and hit the stationary target. During the second flight, the missile flew four kilometers, acquired the target using its precision strike, semi-active laser while simultaneously tracking the target with its millimeter wave radar, and hit the stationary target.

«These flight tests demonstrate the maturity of Lockheed Martin’s JAGM design and prove our risk-mitigation success and readiness for production», said Frank St. John, vice president of Tactical Missiles and Combat Maneuver Systems at Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control. «Our innovative, affordable JAGM solution will provide operational flexibility and combat effectiveness, keeping the warfighter ahead of the threat».

JAGM’s design integrates our AGM-114R multi-purpose Hellfire II missile body (including the control actuation system, warhead and rocket motor) and capitalizes on missile program improvements that have migrated into the modern Hellfire II design
JAGM’s design integrates our AGM-114R multi-purpose Hellfire II missile body (including the control actuation system, warhead and rocket motor) and capitalizes on missile program improvements that have migrated into the modern Hellfire II design

The risk-reduction flight tests are critical to Lockheed Martin’s performance on the U.S. Army’s Continued Technology Development program in providing warfighters with enhanced accuracy and increased survivability against stationary and moving targets in all weather conditions.

Lockheed Martin recently submitted its JAGM Engineering and Manufacturing Development and Low-Rate Initial Production (LRIP) proposal to the U.S. Army. Contract award is expected later this year.

Lockheed Martin’s JAGM will be manufactured on existing production lines. The modularity and open architecture of the company’s JAGM design readily support a low-risk path to a tri-mode seeker, should the Army’s Incremental Acquisition Strategy require it in the future.

In recent flight tests, our multi-mode JAGM missile flew more than six kilometers and engaged moving targets, demonstrating our mature solution and readiness to enter production upon completion of the Army’s Continued Technology Development (CTD) program
In recent flight tests, our multi-mode JAGM missile flew more than six kilometers and engaged moving targets, demonstrating our mature solution and readiness to enter production upon completion of the Army’s Continued Technology Development (CTD) program

 

Joint Air-to-Ground Missile

The Lockheed Martin JAGM multi-mode guidance section offers enhanced performance on tomorrow’s battlefield. Our multi-mode seeker provides an improved Semi-Active Laser (SAL) sensor for precision-strike and a fire-and-forget Millimeter Wave (MMW) radar for moving targets in all-weather conditions. These new sensors have been integrated into our JAGM guidance section and mated with our AGM-114R missile bus and demonstrated during multiple guided flight tests.

Fire-and-forget engagement modes significantly increase JAGM user survivability against threat defenses in GPS denied and austere communications environments. JAGM can engage multiple stationary and moving targets, in the presence of adverse weather, battlefield obscurants and advanced countermeasures. Laser and radar guided engagement modes allow JAGM users to strike accurately across wide target sets and reduce collateral damage. JAGM’s target sets include moving and stationary armor, air defense units, patrol craft, artillery, transporter erector/launchers, radar sites and Command & Control (C2) nodes in addition to bunkers and other structures in urban and complex terrain.

The modularity of Lockheed Martin’s proven, low-risk JAGM design ensures continued affordability in support of the Army’s incremental acquisition strategy and the Department of Defense Better Buying Power initiatives.

All multi-mode guidance sections and missiles are manufactured on the same active production lines that we will use in the Engineering and Manufacturing Development (EMD) phase
All multi-mode guidance sections and missiles are manufactured on the same active production lines that we will use in the Engineering and Manufacturing Development (EMD) phase

 

Features

SAL sensor provides precision-point accuracy.

MMW sensor provides robust capability against countermeasures and enhances accuracy in clear and adverse weather versus moving targets.

Fire-and-forget capability supports rapid-fire launches at multiple targets and increases survivability.

Lock-on before and lock-on after launch maximizes operational engagement and flexibility while minimizing collateral damage.

A modular seeker design independent of the missile bus offers rapid response to future requirements.

When paired with the Hellfire II missile bus, the JAGM guidance section is fully compatible with all Hellfire platforms, including the AH-64D/E Apache and AH-1Z Cobra attack helicopters and MQ-1C Gray Eagle and MQ-9 Reaper Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS).

Lockheed Martin’s JAGM is also compatible with multiple platforms
Lockheed Martin’s JAGM is also compatible with multiple platforms

 

Specifications

(Multi-Mode JAGM with Hellfire Missile Bus)

Range 0.3 to 4.9+ miles/0.5 to 8+km
Guidance Multi-Mode SAL/MMW
Warhead Multi-purpose, cockpit-selectable, tandem, shaped charge, blast fragmentation
Weight 112 lbs/50.8 kg
Length 70 inch/177.8 cm
Diameter 7 inch/17.8 cm
With Lockheed Martin’s JAGM solution, aircrews will have the right missile on board
With Lockheed Martin’s JAGM solution, aircrews will have the right missile on board

Australian Romeo

Two of the Royal Australian Navy’s (RAN) MH-60R Seahawk helicopters were loaded onto a Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) C-17 at Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (HX) 21 at Naval Air Station (NAS) Patuxent River, Maryland, for delivery to their new home in Australia May 27, 2015. These two Seahawks mark the halfway point for the U.S. Navy’s foreign military sales agreement with the Commonwealth of Australia for training and production of 24 MH-60R Seahawk helicopters, which began in June 2011.

Two more MH-60R Seahawk helicopters inside a RAAF C-17 transport aircraft for their delivery to the Royal Australian Navy, which has now received half of the 24 Seahawks it has on order (Naval Air Systems Command photo)
Two more MH-60R Seahawk helicopters inside a RAAF C-17 transport aircraft for their delivery to the Royal Australian Navy, which has now received half of the 24 Seahawks it has on order (Naval Air Systems Command photo)

«As they come off the production line, the Australians have picked them up two at a time», said Commander Scott Stringer, HX-21 MH-60R government flight test director. «This is a multi-year plan that should carry into mid-2016. We are delivering brand new aircraft to the Australians. They still have that new car smell with very few flight hours».

RAN squadron 725 is in the process of establishing MH-60R operations at NAS Nowra, New South Wales. Later this year, HX-21 and RAN squadron 725 are scheduled to test unique modifications on the MH-60Rs. These modifications are based on unique RAN requirements and include the addition of an instrument landing system and a crash-survivable data recorder. The collaborative U.S. and RAN test and evaluation of the MH-60R modifications also allows for an open exchange of professional views and experiences.

Because of interoperability – how the two navies have trained and operated together – Stringer explained how he could foresee a U.S. Navy H-60 pilot seamlessly operating during a cross-deck tour on an Australian ship or vice versa.

«We have six people supporting the MH-60R acquisition and sustainment effort at Pax River and share office space with the RAAF Classic Hornet and Super Hornet sustainment team», said Commander Andrew Dawes, RAN MH-60R project resident team lead. «This is something we take a great deal of pride in and greatly appreciate the support that everyone at NAS Pax River is providing in this process».

The mission of HX-21 is to conduct the highest quality developmental flight test and evaluation of rotary-wing and tilt-rotor aircraft, airborne systems in support of all U.S. Navy and U.S. Marine Corps training, operational combat and operational combat support missions.

A pair of U.S. Navy Sikorsky MH-60R Seahawks, NE 712 166556 and NE 700 166541 of HSM-77 'Sabrehawks', cruise past the USS Sterett (DDG-104) in the Pacific Ocean
A pair of U.S. Navy Sikorsky MH-60R Seahawks, NE 712 166556 and NE 700 166541 of HSM-77 ‘Sabrehawks’, cruise past the USS Sterett (DDG-104) in the Pacific Ocean

 

MH-60R Seahawk (Romeo)

The MH-60R «Romeo» is the most capable and mature Anti-Submarine (ASW)/Anti-Surface Warfare (ASuW) multi-mission helicopter available in the world today. Together with its sibling, the MH-60S «Sierra», the Seahawk variants have flown more than 650,000 hours across a 500+ aircraft fleet. The MH-60R Seahawk is deployed globally with the U.S. Navy fleet and a growing number of allied international navies.

The journey from the start of MH-60R Seahawk flight-testing through the first deployment, in 2009, of 11 MH-60R helicopters aboard the USS Stennis, represents 1,900 flight hours, the equivalent of 500 labor years, and a considerable financial commitment by Lockheed Martin.

The MH-60R Seahawk, manufactured by Sikorsky Aircraft Corp, and equipped with advanced mission systems and sensors by Lockheed Martin Mission Systems and Training (MST), is capable of detecting and prosecuting modern submarines in littoral and open ocean scenarios.

In addition, MH-60R Seahawk is capable of conducting stand-alone or joint Anti-Surface Warfare missions with other «Romeo» or MH-60S «Sierra» aircraft. Secondary missions include electronic support measures, search and rescue, vertical replenishment, and medical evacuation.

The advanced mission sensor suite developed and integrated by Lockheed Martin includes:

  • APS-147 Multi-mode radar (including Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar);
  • AQS-22 Airborne Low Frequency Dipping Sonar (ALFS) subsystem and sonobuoys;
  • ALQ-210 Electronic Support Measures with an integrated helo threat warning capability;
  • AAS-44 Forward Looking Infrared Electro-Optical device;
  • Integrated self-defense;
  • A weapons suite including torpedoes and anti-ship missiles.
Two multi-mission MH-60R Seahawk helicopters fly in tandem during section landings at Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Florida. The new Seahawk variant has many improvements, such as the glass cockpit, improved mission systems, new sensors and advanced avionics. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Shannon Renfroe/Released)
Two multi-mission MH-60R Seahawk helicopters fly in tandem during section landings at Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Florida. The new Seahawk variant has many improvements, such as the glass cockpit, improved mission systems, new sensors and advanced avionics. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Shannon Renfroe/Released)

Lockheed Martin MST also produces the Common Cockpit avionics, fielded on both the MH-60R «Romeo» and MH-60S «Sierra». The 400th Common Cockpit will be installed on the first Royal Australian Navy MH-60R. In 2012, the Common Cockpit exceeded 600,000 flight hours across an operational fleet of 360 aircraft. The digital, all-glass cockpit features four large, flat-panel, multi-function, night-vision-compatible, color displays. The suite processes and manages communications and sensor data streaming into MH-60 multi-mission helicopters, presenting to the crew of three actionable information that significantly reduces workload while increasing situational awareness.

The U.S. Navy is committed to a long-term preplanned product improvement program, also known as P3I, to keep the MH-60R Seahawk current throughout its life. Recent upgrades have included vital software and mission management systems in the Situational Awareness Technology Insertion (SATI) package as well as design upgrades to the Identification Friend-or-Foe Interrogator Subsystem. Combined with the aircraft’s Automatic Radar Periscope Detection and Discrimination system, the MH-60R’s range of detection will expand – enhancing situational awareness and advanced threat detection – while interference with civil air traffic control systems will diminish.

The MH-60R Electronic Surveillance Measures (ESM) system, which provides aircrew with valuable threat-warning capabilities, has benefited from the installation and maintenance of an ESM autoloader, and the development of Mission Data Loads, which comprise a database of possible threats within a specific region of operations.

Smaller elements are included as well, including the integration of a new multi-function radio called the ARC210 Gen 5 (which sister-aircraft MH-60S «Sierra» will also receive), crucial spare assemblies and integration of other core technologies. The Gen 5 radio will provide MH-60R Seahawk aircrew with flexible and secure communication.

Survivability and crashworthiness are not just attributes of the Seahawk helicopter, they are inherent to the design. A strict military standard makes the Seahawk helicopter a rugged and extremely durable helicopter that delivers safety. Safety that has been proven in real missions, around the world. Some of our aircraft have over thirty years of service and continue to support operations in the most rigorous of environments known to man.

Capable of launching eight Hellfire missiles from right and left extended pylons
Capable of launching eight Hellfire missiles from right and left extended pylons

 

Airframe

  • Marinized airframe structure for improved survivability
  • Multi-functional and durable cabin flooring
  • Two jettisonable cockpit doors
  • Single cabin sliding door
  • Recovery, Assist, Secure and Traverse (RAST) System
  • Automatic main rotor blade fold
  • Built-in work platforms, engine cowlings and hydraulic deck
  • External rescue hoist
  • 6,000 lbs/2,721.55 kg external cargo hook
  • Active vibration control system

 

Cockpit

  • Enhanced Advanced Flight Control System (AFCS) with naval modules and coupled hover capability
  • Four 8×10 inch (20.3×25.4 cm) full color, night vision device capable, sunlight readable, multi-function mission and flight displays
  • Secure Very High Frequency/Ultra High Frequency (VHF/UHF) communication
  • Inertial navigation system
  • Satellite communication
  • Data link
  • AAS-44 Forward Looking Infrared/Night Vision (FLIR/NVG) capability
Proven network centric warfare capabilities achieve greater effectiveness
Proven network centric warfare capabilities achieve greater effectiveness

 

Powerplant and fuel system

  • Two fully marinized T700-GE401C engines
  • Auxiliary power unit
  • Fuel dump system
  • Sealed tub design
  • Hover in-flight refueling
  • Auxiliary external fuel tanks, 120 gallons each

 

Dynamic System

  • Automatic main rotor blade fold
  • Manual pylon and stabilator fold
  • Dual redundant and isolated flight controls
  • Rotor brake
  • Ballistically tolerant transmission and drive system

 

Electrical

  • ALQ-210 Electronic Support Measures
  • Integrated avionics with 1553 data bus
  • Environmental control system
Sailors aboard the littoral combat ship USS Freedom (LCS-1) signal an MH-60R Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 77 to land during a joint maritime exercise. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Sebastian McCormack/Released)
Sailors aboard the littoral combat ship USS Freedom (LCS-1) signal an MH-60R Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 77 to land during a joint maritime exercise. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Sebastian McCormack/Released)

 

Specifications

Airframe dimensions
Operating length 64.83 feet/19.76 m
Operating width 53.66 feet/16.35 m
Operating height 16.70 feet/5.10 m
Folded Length 41.05 feet/12.51 m
Folded width 11.00 feet/3.37 m
Folded height 12.92 feet/3.94 m
Main rotor diameter 53.66 feet/16.35 m
Tail rotor diameter 11.00 feet/3.35 m
Accommodations
Cabin Length 10.8 feet/3.2 m
Cabin Width 6.1 feet/1.8 m
Cabin Height 4.4 feet/1.3 m
Cabin Area 65 feet2/6.0 m2
Cabin Volume 299 feet3/8.5 m3
Powerplant and fuel system
Number of Engines 2
Engine Type T700-GE401C
Maximum Take Off 3,426 shp/2,554 kW
One Engine Inoperative Shaft horsepower 1,911 shp/1,425 kW
Performance
Maximum Take-Off Gross Weight 23,500 lbs/10,682 kg
Mission Gross Weight (Surface Warfare) 21,290 lbs/9,657 kg
Mission Endurance (Surface Warfare) 3.30 hours
Maximum Speed 180 knots/207 mph/333 km/h
Maximum Cruise Speed 144 knots/166 mph/267 km/h
Hovering In Ground Effect (HIGE) Ceiling 14,847 feet/4,525 m
Hover Out of Ground Effect (HOGE) Ceiling 9,945 feet/3,031 m
All Engine Operable (AEO) Service Ceiling 11,282 feet/3,438 m
Weapons Anti-ship missiles, torpedoes, 50 cal. guns

Lieutenant Eugene Cleary, Royal Australian Navy, describes this «formidable ASW and Anti-surface platform». Designed for maritime dominance and deployed with the U.S. Navy, the MH-60R Seahawk is the world’s most advanced multi-mission helicopter. The «Romeo» has also been selected by the Royal Danish Navy

MEADS Selection

The German Federal Ministry of Defence has chosen the Medium Extended Air Defense System (MEADS) as the basis for Taktisches LuftVerteidigungsSystem (TLVS), a next-generation network-based tactical air and missile defense system. It will replace Patriot air defense systems initially fielded in the 1980s. Lockheed Martin will share in development of Germany’s TLVS with its MEADS International partner MBDA Deutschland.

A second MEADS Launcher has been integrated onto a German MAN Prime Mover
A second MEADS Launcher has been integrated onto a German MAN Prime Mover

«Lockheed Martin is fully committed to the success of TLVS», said Rick Edwards, president of Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control. «It reflects our continuing commitment to international partnerships and ongoing support for the German government’s leadership role in European missile defense».

MEADS has been developed through MEADS International, a cooperative venture between MBDA and Lockheed Martin. The TLVS program ensures seamless continuation of this successful development partnership. Lockheed Martin companies in Dallas, Texas; Huntsville, Alabama; Orlando, Florida; and Syracuse, New York, are expected to support the German program.

«With this decision in favour of MEADS, Germany has opted for a powerful, state-of-the-art, long term ground-based air and missile defence system sufficient to meet the threats both of today and of the future», said Thomas Homberg, managing director of MBDA Deutschland. «It is now our shared responsibility, together with the armed forces, to provide a solid basis for the introduction of the system».

A MEADS MFCR in the U.S. configuration completes an emplacement demonstration in Syracuse, New York. Range testing continues in preparation for a tactical ballistic missile intercept test in late 2013
A MEADS MFCR in the U.S. configuration completes an emplacement demonstration in Syracuse, New York. Range testing continues in preparation for a tactical ballistic missile intercept test in late 2013

In 2013, at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, MEADS became the first air and missile defense system to demonstrate a dual intercept of targets attacking simultaneously from opposite directions. MEADS is designed to significantly reduce operation and support costs by covering a larger area with less manpower and equipment, and less demand on airlift. Once in theater, MEADS elements emplace more quickly and can be repositioned without shutting the system down.

«We are honored that MEADS will provide the foundation for Germany’s next-generation air and missile defense system», said Mike Trotsky, vice president of air and missile defense at Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control. «Only MEADS has demonstrated the advanced network capabilities and 360-degree defense that are now essential requirements for air and missile defense systems».

TLVS is being carried out under the system leadership of MBDA Deutschland, which continues to draw on MBDA Italia capabilities as well as on a proven industry partnership involving Lockheed Martin and Airbus Defence and Space as well as the skills of many German and international subcontractors.

The MEADS-based TLVS can be used for both national and alliance defence and to protect deployed troops during operations. Special features of the system include 360-degree coverage, open system architecture and «plug & fight» capability, which allows for the coupling of additional sensors and weapon systems, as well as rapid deployability. In addition, the TLVS air defence system can be operated at a significantly lower cost to the user than existing systems and with fewer personnel. The technologies generated within the framework of the tri-national MEADS development process represent the equivalent of €4 billion. Germany shouldered a 25% share of the investment.

Shown in their German configurations, a MEADS Multifunction Fire Control Radar, launcher, and battle manager appear together near Freinhausen, Germany
Shown in their German configurations, a MEADS Multifunction Fire Control Radar, launcher, and battle manager appear together near Freinhausen, Germany

 

Medium Extended Air Defense System

The MEADS provides a robust, 360-degree defense using the Patriot Advanced Capability-Three (PAC-3) hit-to-kill Missile Segment Enhancement (MSE) against the full spectrum of theater ballistic missiles, anti-radiation missiles, cruise missiles, unmanned aerial vehicles, tactical air-to-surface missiles, and rotary- and fixed-wing threats. MEADS will also provide defense against multiple and simultaneous attacks by short-range ballistic missiles, cruise missiles, and other air-breathing threats. MEADS can be immediately deployed by air for early entry operations. MEADS also has the mobility to displace rapidly and protect maneuver force assets during offensive operations. Netted, distributed, open architecture and modular components are utilized in the MEADS to increase survivability and flexibility of use in a number of operational configurations. The PAC-3 MSE improves upon the current missile configuration ranges/altitudes and improves performance against evolving threats.

The MEADS weapon system will use its netted and distributed architecture to ensure Joint and allied interoperability, and to enable a seamless interface to the next generation of Battle Management Command, Control, Communications, Computers and Intelligence (BMC4I). The system’s improved sensor components and its ability to link other airborne and ground-based sensors facilitate the employment of its battle elements.

The MEADS weapon system’s objective battle management Tactical Operations Center (TOC) will provide the basis for the future common Air and Missile Defense (AMD) TOC, leveraging modular battle elements and a distributed and open architecture to facilitate continuous exchange of information to support a more effective AMD system-of-systems.

A MEADS MFCR is shown in deployed configuration in Germany. In European tests, the radar demonstrated tracking and canceling of jamming signals; searching, cueing, and tracking in ground clutter; and successfully classified target data using kinematic information
A MEADS MFCR is shown in deployed configuration in Germany. In European tests, the radar demonstrated tracking and canceling of jamming signals; searching, cueing, and tracking in ground clutter; and successfully classified target data using kinematic information

 

PAC-3 Missile Segment Enhancement

The PAC-3 MSE is an evolution of the battle-proven PAC-3 Missile. The hit-to-kill PAC-3 MSE provides performance enhancements that counter evolving threat advancements. The enhancements ensure the PAC-3 Missile Segment of the Patriot Air Defense System is capable of engaging new and evolving threats. The hit-to-kill PAC-3 Missile is the world’s most advanced, and capable theater air defense missile and defender against the entire threat to the Patriot Air Defense System: Tactical Ballistic Missiles (TBMs) carrying weapons of mass destruction, evolving cruise missiles and aircraft.

The PAC-3 MSE design utilizes the latest technology to significantly increase performance. The PAC-3 MSE incorporates a larger, dual pulse solid rocket motor; larger fins; and upgraded actuators and thermal batteries to accommodate increased performance. The modifications extend the missile’s reach.

The PAC-3 MSE is packaged in a single canister that stacks to provide logistical flexibility. Twelve individual PAC-3 MSE Missiles can be loaded on a Patriot Launcher or a combination of six MSEs and eight PAC-3 Missiles (two four packs) can be loaded.

Several successful intercept flight tests of the missiles have been conducted.

PAC-3 MSE has completed operational testing and has received approval for initial production.

MEADS demonstrated its ability to engage and defeat a target coming from anywhere using just a single launcher
MEADS demonstrated its ability to engage and defeat a target coming from anywhere using just a single launcher

 

MEADS Introduction

Navy Accepts MUOS

Following successful completion of on-orbit testing, the U.S. Navy accepted the third Lockheed Martin-built Mobile User Objective System (MUOS) satellite.

MUOS-4, the next satellite scheduled to join the MUOS network later this year, is in final assembly and test at Lockheed Martin’s satellite manufacturing facility in Sunnyvale, California
MUOS-4, the next satellite scheduled to join the MUOS network later this year, is in final assembly and test at Lockheed Martin’s satellite manufacturing facility in Sunnyvale, California

Launched January 20, MUOS-3 is the latest addition to a network of orbiting satellites and relay ground stations that is revolutionizing secure communications for mobile military forces. Users with operational MUOS terminals can seamlessly connect around the globe, beyond line-of-sight, with new smartphone-like capabilities, including simultaneous and crystal-clear voice, video and mission data, on a high-speed Internet Protocol-based system.

«MUOS is a game-changer in communications for every branch of our military, which all have mobile users who will benefit from these new capabilities», said Iris Bombelyn, Lockheed Martin’s vice president for narrowband communications. «This latest satellite will expand the MUOS network’s coverage over more than three-quarters of the globe, including significantly more coverage north and south than the current legacy voice-only system».

With on-orbit testing complete, MUOS-3 is being relocated to its on-orbit operational slot in preparation for operational acceptance.

The MUOS network is expected to provide near global coverage before year-end. MUOS-1 and MUOS-2, launched respectively in 2012 and 2013, are already operational and providing high-quality voice communications. Lockheed Martin handed over the last of four required ground stations to the Navy in February. MUOS-4 is expected to launch later this year.

The system consists of four satellites in geosynchronous earth orbit (GEO) with one on-orbit spare and a fiber optic terrestrial network connecting four ground stations
The system consists of four satellites in geosynchronous earth orbit (GEO) with one on-orbit spare and a fiber optic terrestrial network connecting four ground stations

 

Communication Service Types

Voice:                                                Conversational and recognition voice

Data:                                                  Low data rate telemetry, short digital messaging, imagery transfer, file transfer, electronic mail, remote computer access, remote sensor reception, sporadic messaging for distributed applications, video, video teleconferencing

Mixed Voice and Data Services:      Mixed transport of voice and data

 

Communication Characteristics

Satellites:

4 GEO satellites and an on-orbit spare. 16 WCDMA beams per satellite. Satellite carries MUOS WCDMA and legacy UHF SATCOM payloads

Access Type:                              WCDMA

Data Rates:                                 Up to 384 kbps on the move

Bandwidth:                                 Four 5-MHz carriers

Transport Network:              IPv4 and IPv6 dual stack network

DoD Teleport:                          Portal to Defense Information Systems Network:                                     DSN, SIPRNET, NIPRNET

Access Type:                             Legacy UHF SATCOM

Bandwidth:                               17 25-kHz and 21 5-kHz channels

This third satellite extends MUOS network’s coverage over more than three-quarters of the globe
This third satellite extends MUOS network’s coverage over more than three-quarters of the globe

Airborne Early Warning

The State Department has made a determination approving a possible Foreign Military Sale to Japan for E-2D Advanced Hawkeye Airborne Early Warning and Control Aircraft and associated equipment, parts and logistical support for an estimated cost of $1.7 billion. The Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA) delivered the required certification notifying Congress of this possible sale on Jun 1, 2015.

The E-2D introduces a rotating, UHF-band, Lockheed Martin APY-9 radar designed to track objects as small as cruise missiles against the background clutter of a coastal environment
The E-2D introduces a rotating, UHF-band, Lockheed Martin APY-9 radar designed to track objects as small as cruise missiles against the background clutter of a coastal environment

The Government of Japan has requested a possible sale of:

  • four (4) Northrop Grumman E-2D Advanced Hawkeye (AHE) Airborne Early Warning and Control (AEW&C) aircraft;
  • ten (10) Rolls-Royce T56-A-427A engines (8 installed and 2 spares);
  • eight (8) Multifunction Information Distribution System Low Volume Terminals (MIDS-LVT);
  • four (4) Lockheed Martin APY-9 Radars;
  • modifications;
  • spare and repair parts;
  • support equipment;
  • publications and technical documentation;
  • personnel training and training equipment;
  • ferry services;
  • aerial refueling support;
  • S. Government and contractor logistics;
  • engineering and technical support services;
  • other related elements of logistics and program support.

The estimated cost is $1.7 billion.

A completely new radar featuring both mechanical and electronic scanning capabilities
A completely new radar featuring both mechanical and electronic scanning capabilities

This proposed sale will contribute to the foreign policy and national security of the United States. Japan is one of the major political and economic powers in East Asia and the Western Pacific and a key partner of the United States in ensuring peace and stability in that region. It is vital to the U.S. national interest to assist Japan in developing and maintaining a strong and ready self-defense capability. This proposed sale is consistent with U.S. foreign policy and national security objectives and the 1960 Treaty of Mutual Cooperation and Security.

The proposed sale of E-2D AHE aircraft will improve Japan’s ability to effectively provide homeland defense utilizing an AEW&C capability. Japan will use the E-2D AHE aircraft to provide AEW&C situational awareness of air and naval activity in the Pacific region and to augment its existing E-2C Hawkeye AEW&C fleet. Japan will have no difficulty absorbing these aircraft into its armed forces.

The proposed sale of these aircraft and support will not alter the basic military balance in the Pacific region.

The principal contractor will be Northrop Grumman Corporation Aerospace Systems in Melbourne, Florida. The acquisition and integration of all systems will be managed by the U.S. Navy’s Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR). There are no known offset agreements proposed in connection with this potential sale.

Fully Integrated «All Glass» Tactical Cockpit
Fully Integrated «All Glass» Tactical Cockpit

 

E-2D Advanced Hawkeye

The E-2D Advanced Hawkeye is a game changer in how the Navy will conduct battle management command and control. By serving as the «digital quarterback» to sweep ahead of strike, manage the mission, and keep our net-centric carrier battle groups out of harms way, the E-2D Advanced Hawkeye is the key to advancing the mission, no matter what it may be. The E-2D gives the warfighter expanded battlespace awareness, especially in the area of information operations delivering battle management, theater air and missile defense, and multiple sensor fusion capabilities in an airborne system.

Hardware with system characteristics that provides:

  • Substantial target processing capacity (>3,000 reports per second)
  • Three highly automated and common operator stations
  • High-capacity, flat-panel color high-resolution displays
  • Extensive video type selection (radar and identification friend/foe)
  • HF/VHF/UHF and satellite communications systems
  • Extensive data link capabilities
  • Inertial navigational system and global positioning system navigation and in-flight alignment
  • Integrated and centralized diagnostic system
  • Glass Cockpit allows software reconfigurable flight/mission displays
  • Cockpit – 4th tactical operator
  • Open architecture ensures rapid technology upgrades and customized configuration options
The Hawkeye provides all-weather airborne early warning, airborne battle management and command and control functions for the Carrier Strike Group and Joint Force Commander
The Hawkeye provides all-weather airborne early warning, airborne battle management and command and control functions for the Carrier Strike Group and Joint Force Commander

 

General Characteristics

Wingspan:                                              24.56 m/80 feet 7 in

Width, wings folded:                        8.94 m/29 feet 4 in

Length overall:                                    17.60 m/57 feet 8.75 in

Height overall:                                     5.58 m/18 feet 3.75 in

Diameter of rotodome:                  7.32 m/24 feet

Weight empty:                                     19,536 kg/43,068 lbs

Internal fuel:                                          5,624 kg/12,400 lbs

Takeoff gross weight:                       26,083 kg/57,500 lbs

Maximum level speed:                     648 km/h/350 knots/403 mph

Maximum cruise speed:                  602 km/h/325 knots/374 mph

Cruise speed:                                         474 km/h/256 knots/295 mph

Approach speed:                                  200 km/h/108 knots/124 mph

Service ceiling:                                      10,576 m/34,700 feet

Minimum takeoff distance:            410 m/1,346 feet ground roll

Minimum landing distance:            537 m/1,764 feet ground roll

Ferry range:                                             2,708 km/1,462 NM

Crew Members:                                    5

Power Plant:                                           2 × Rolls-Royce T56-A-427A, rated at 5,100 eshp each

Unrefueled:                                             >6 hours

In-flight refueling:                               12 hours

True 360-degree radar coverage provides uncompromised all-weather tracking and situational awareness
True 360-degree radar coverage provides uncompromised all-weather tracking and situational awareness

GPS number III

First GPS III space vehicle prepares for testing in simulated harsh space environments. Using a 10-ton crane, Lockheed Martin engineers and technicians gently lowered the system module of the U.S. Air Force’s first next generation GPS III satellite into place over its propulsion core, successfully integrating the two into one space vehicle.

An artist’s rendering of the GPS III satellite
An artist’s rendering of the GPS III satellite

GPS III space vehicle one (SV 01) is the first of a new, advanced GPS satellite design block for the U.S. Air Force. GPS III will deliver three times better accuracy, provide up to eight times improved anti-jamming capabilities and extend spacecraft life to 15 years, 25 percent longer than the satellites launching today. GPS III’s new L1C civil signal also will make it the first GPS satellite interoperable with other international global navigation satellite systems.

The systems integration event brought together several major fully functional satellite components. The system module includes the navigation payload, which performs the primary positioning, navigation and timing mission. The functional bus contains sophisticated electronics that manage all satellite operations. The propulsion core allows the satellite to maneuver for operations on orbit.

«The final integration of the first GPS III satellite is a major milestone for the GPS III program», said Mark Stewart, vice president of Lockheed Martin’s Navigation Systems mission area. «This summer, SV 01 will begin Thermal Vacuum testing, where it will be subjected to simulated harsh space environments. Successful completion of this testing is critical as it will help validate our design and manufacturing processes for all follow-on GPS III satellites».

Lockheed Martin is currently under contract to build eight GPS III satellites at its GPS III Processing Facility near Denver, a factory specifically designed to streamline satellite production.

The GPS III team is led by the Global Positioning Systems Directorate at the U.S. Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center. Air Force Space Command’s 2nd Space Operations Squadron (2SOPS), based at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado, manages and operates the GPS constellation for both civil and military users.

Lockheed Martin recently fully integrated the U.S. Air Force’s first next generation GPS III satellite at the company’s Denver-area satellite manufacturing facility.  The first in a design block of new, more powerful and accurate GPS satellites, GPS III Space Vehicle One is now preparing for system-level testing this summer
Lockheed Martin recently fully integrated the U.S. Air Force’s first next generation GPS III satellite at the company’s Denver-area satellite manufacturing facility. The first in a design block of new, more powerful and accurate GPS satellites, GPS III Space Vehicle One is now preparing for system-level testing this summer

 

GPS III Facts

GPS III Specification
Customer U.S. Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center
Mission Highly accurate 3-D position, velocity and precise time
Orbit Six orbit planes at 55° inclination
Altitude 10,898 NM/20,183.1 km
Design life 15 years; 13-year MMD (Mean Mission Duration)
Launch weight 8,553 lbs/3,879.58kg
On-orbit weight 5,003 lbs/2,269.32 kg
Size (W×D×H) 97×70×134 inch/2.46×1.78×3.40 m
Position accuracy Under one meter, with daily updates from the control segment
Electrical Power System
Solar array 307 feet2/28.52 m2; high-efficiency UTJ (Ultra Triple Junction) cells; 4,480-W EOL (End-Of-Life) capability
Battery system Nickel hydrogen (NiH2); rechargeable
Electronics Central controller with redundant discharge converters, battery chargers
Attitude Determination and Control
Design approach Zero momentum, 3-axis stabilized, Earth-oriented, Sun-Nadir pointing
Attitude reference Static Earth sensor, Sun sensor, control reaction wheels/magnetic torquers
Propulsion Subsystem
Design approach Bipropellant; Hydrazine, NTO (Nitrogen Tetroxide Oxidizer)
Propellant capacity 5,180 lbm
Thrusters 100-lb Liquid Apogee Engine, twelve 0.2-lb REAs, six 5-lb REAs (Rocket Engine Assembly)
Structural and Thermal
Modular design Four aluminum honeycomb panels mounted to a central composite core
Passive thermal Heat pipes in equipment panels, control blankets, thermal coatings, radiators and electrically controlled heaters
Navigation Payload
Timekeeping Enhanced performance for increased subsystem accuracy; improved anomaly resolution; includes multiple atomic frequency standards (Rubidium clocks), radiation-hardened design, high stability timing, automated integrity monitoring
Mission data unit Rad-Hard processor; expanded waveform generation, full message encoding and processing; real-time Kalman filter
Crosslink transponder Legacy UHF (Ultra High Frequency) receive and transmit, precision intersatellite ranging, full-frame modulation and mode control
New GPS III signal L1C (p, d); programmable waveform generation
Tracking, Telemetry and Command
Space vehicle computer Rad-Hard processor; command and telemetry processing, Bus functions, payload accommodation
Autonomy Redundancy management for on-board power and Bus components
Security architecture Encrypted data links using redundant architecture cryptographic units, centralized command decoding, flexible telemetry communications
RF links S-Band, SGLS/USB Transponder

 

GPS provides critical situational awareness and precision weapon guidance for the military and supports a wide range of civil, scientific and commercial functions – from air traffic control to navigation systems in cars, cell phones and wristwatches

 

First Evacuation

Dangerous frontline operations call for a safe and efficient method to locate and evacuate wounded personnel. To address this critical need and help save lives, Lockheed Martin, Kaman Aerospace, and Neya Systems demonstrated the first ever collaborative unmanned air and ground casualty evacuation using the Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) Control Segment (UCS) Architecture and K-MAX cargo helicopter on March 26, 2015.

A ground controller uses a ruggedized laptop with command and control software to develop and upload a mission flight plan to the aircraft’s on-board Mission Management Computer (MMC) prior to launch
A ground controller uses a ruggedized laptop with command and control software to develop and upload a mission flight plan to the aircraft’s on-board Mission Management Computer (MMC) prior to launch

During the demonstration, a distress call led ground operators to send an unmanned ground vehicle to assess the area and injured party. The ground operators used control stations that communicated with one another using the UAS Control Segment Architecture. Upon successful identification, the ground operators requested airlift by unmanned K-MAX of one individual who was injured. From the ground, the K-MAX operators used a tablet to determine the precise location and a safe landing area to provide assistance to the team. The injured team member was strapped into a seat on the side of the unmanned K-MAX, which then flew that individual to safety.

«This application of the unmanned K-MAX enables day or night transport of wounded personnel to safety without endangering additional lives», said Jay McConville, director of business development for Unmanned Integrated Solutions at Lockheed Martin Mission Systems and Training. «Since the K-MAX returned from a nearly three-year deployment with the U.S. Marine Corps, we’ve seen benefits of and extended our open system design incorporating the UCS Architecture, which allows rapid integration of new applications across industry to increase the safety of operations, such as casualty evacuation, where lives are at stake».

«Neya is continuing to develop advanced technologies for human robot interfaces for complex platforms and multi-robot missions», said Dr. Parag Batavia, president of Neya. «Our and Lockheed Martin’s use of the Unmanned Aircraft System Control Segment Architecture greatly sped up integration of our respective technologies, resulting in a comprehensive capability that can be ultimately transitioned to the warfighter very efficiently».

Portable antennae for line-ofsight and satellite-based beyond line-of-sight data links maintain continuous connectivity with the unmanned K-MAX anywhere in the world
Portable antennae for line-ofsight and satellite-based beyond line-of-sight data links maintain continuous connectivity with the unmanned K-MAX anywhere in the world

While deployed with the U.S. Marine Corps from 2011 to 2014, unmanned K-MAX successfully conducted resupply operations, delivering more than 4.5 million pounds of cargo during more than 1,900 missions. Manufactured by Kaman and outfitted with an advanced mission suite by Lockheed Martin, unmanned K-MAX is engineered with a twin-rotor design that maximizes lift capability in the most challenging environments, from the mountainous Alps to the Persian Gulf. Its advanced autonomy allows unmanned K-MAX to work day and night, in all-weather, even when manned assets are unable to fly. Lockheed Martin continues to extend and mature the K-MAX helicopter’s onboard technology and autonomy for defense operations, as well as demonstrate its use for civil and commercial applications.

With five decades of experience in unmanned and robotic systems for air, land and sea, Lockheed Martin’s unmanned systems are engineered to help our military, civil and commercial customers accomplish their most difficult challenges today and in the future.

Kaman Aerospace is a division Kaman Corporation, which was founded in 1945 by aviation pioneer Charles H. Kaman. Neya Systems, LLC is a small business unmanned systems company in Wexford, Pennsylvania. Founded in 2009, Neya focuses on developing interoperable solutions to the world’s hardest robotics problems.

The MMC communicates the ground controller’s objectives to the FCC (autopilot). FCC dual redundancy provides high reliability
The MMC communicates the ground controller’s objectives to the FCC (autopilot). FCC dual redundancy provides high reliability

 

K-MAX Unmanned Aerial System

Lockheed Martin Corporation and Kaman Aerospace Corporation have successfully transformed Kaman’s proven K-MAX power lift helicopter into an Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) capable of autonomous or remote controlled cargo delivery. Its mission: battlefield cargo resupply for the U.S. military.

The K-MAX UAS is a transformational technology for a fast-moving battlefield that will enable Marines to deliver supplies either day or night to precise locations without risk of losing life in the process. The aircraft can fly at higher altitudes with a larger payload than any other rotary wing UAS. With its four-hook carousel, the K-MAX UAS can also deliver more cargo to more locations in one flight

The team has flown the K-MAX UAS more than 750 hours in autonomous mode since joining forces in 2007. The rugged system can lift and deliver a full 6,000 lbs/2,722 kg of cargo at sea level and more than 4,000 pounds/1,814 kg at 15,000 feet/4,572 m density altitude.

The K-MAX continues to exceed expectations as an unmanned platform. The aircraft has met all unmanned milestones to date and continues to excel in the commercial logging and firefighting industries. The aircraft will remain optionally piloted for ease of National Airspace Operations, occasional manned mission flexibility, ferry flights, rapid integration of new mission equipment, and allow rapid return-to-service activities.

The manned version of the K-MAX is used for repetitive lift operations by commercial operators for the construction and logging industries. To date, the fleet has accumulated more than 255,000 flight hours since 1994.

Twin counter-rotating, intermeshing main rotors eliminate the need for a tail rotor drive system
Twin counter-rotating, intermeshing main rotors eliminate the need for a tail rotor drive system

 

Technical characteristics

Weights and Measurements
Max gross weight (with external load) 12,000 lbs/5,443 kg
Max take-off weight 7,000 lbs/3,175 kg
Empty weight 5,145 lbs/2,334 kg
Useful load 6,855 lbs/3,109 kg
Cargo hook capacity 6,000 lbs/2,722 kg
Lift Performance – ISA (International Standard Atmosphere) +15°C (59°F)
Sea Level 6,000 lbs/2,722 kg
5,000 feet/1,524 m 5,663 lbs/2,574 kg
10,000 feet/3,048 m 5,163 lbs/2,347 kg
15,000 feet/4,572 m 4,313 lbs/1,960 kg
Hover Performance – 4,000 feet/1,219 m, 35°C (95°F)
Hover IGE (In Ground Effect) 12,000 lbs/5,443 kg
Hover OGE (Out of Ground Effect) 11,500 lbs/5,216 kg
Powerplant
Model Honeywell T53-17 gas turbine
Thermodynamic rating 1,800 shaft horsepower
Maximum Airspeed
Without external load 100 knots/115 mph/185.2 km/h
With external load 80 knots/92 mph/148.2 km/h
Fuel System
Total usable fuel 219.5 gal/831 liters
Average fuel consumption 85 gal/hr/321.7 l/hr
Jet A fuel 557.6 lbs/hr/252.9 kg/hr
Maximum endurance 12+ hr
Maximum range 1,150 miles/1,852 km (est)
Maximum speed with external load 80 knots/92 mph/148.2 km/h
Maximum speed without external load 100 knots/115 mph/185.2 km/h
Internal fuel endurance 2 hr 41 min
Range with external load 246 miles/396.3 km
Range without external load 307 miles/494.5 km
Approved fuels Jet A/A-1, JP-5
Jet B/JP-4
JP-8

 

Lockheed Martin-Kaman’s unmanned helicopter successfully completing the Navy’s Quick Reaction Assessment

 

The rugged K-MAX multi-mission helicopter that Lockheed Martin and Kaman Aerospace have transformed into an Unmanned Aerial Truck proves why it is the best for unmanned battlefield cargo resupply missions

 

In January, 2010, the Unmanned K-MAX helicopter demonstrated autonomous and remote control flight over both line-of-sight and satellite-based beyond line-of-sight data link