Tag Archives: Lockheed Martin

Navy Accepts MUOS

Following successful completion of on-orbit testing, the U.S. Navy accepted the third Lockheed Martin-built Mobile User Objective System (MUOS) satellite.

MUOS-4, the next satellite scheduled to join the MUOS network later this year, is in final assembly and test at Lockheed Martin’s satellite manufacturing facility in Sunnyvale, California
MUOS-4, the next satellite scheduled to join the MUOS network later this year, is in final assembly and test at Lockheed Martin’s satellite manufacturing facility in Sunnyvale, California

Launched January 20, MUOS-3 is the latest addition to a network of orbiting satellites and relay ground stations that is revolutionizing secure communications for mobile military forces. Users with operational MUOS terminals can seamlessly connect around the globe, beyond line-of-sight, with new smartphone-like capabilities, including simultaneous and crystal-clear voice, video and mission data, on a high-speed Internet Protocol-based system.

«MUOS is a game-changer in communications for every branch of our military, which all have mobile users who will benefit from these new capabilities», said Iris Bombelyn, Lockheed Martin’s vice president for narrowband communications. «This latest satellite will expand the MUOS network’s coverage over more than three-quarters of the globe, including significantly more coverage north and south than the current legacy voice-only system».

With on-orbit testing complete, MUOS-3 is being relocated to its on-orbit operational slot in preparation for operational acceptance.

The MUOS network is expected to provide near global coverage before year-end. MUOS-1 and MUOS-2, launched respectively in 2012 and 2013, are already operational and providing high-quality voice communications. Lockheed Martin handed over the last of four required ground stations to the Navy in February. MUOS-4 is expected to launch later this year.

The system consists of four satellites in geosynchronous earth orbit (GEO) with one on-orbit spare and a fiber optic terrestrial network connecting four ground stations
The system consists of four satellites in geosynchronous earth orbit (GEO) with one on-orbit spare and a fiber optic terrestrial network connecting four ground stations

 

Communication Service Types

Voice:                                                Conversational and recognition voice

Data:                                                  Low data rate telemetry, short digital messaging, imagery transfer, file transfer, electronic mail, remote computer access, remote sensor reception, sporadic messaging for distributed applications, video, video teleconferencing

Mixed Voice and Data Services:      Mixed transport of voice and data

 

Communication Characteristics

Satellites:

4 GEO satellites and an on-orbit spare. 16 WCDMA beams per satellite. Satellite carries MUOS WCDMA and legacy UHF SATCOM payloads

Access Type:                              WCDMA

Data Rates:                                 Up to 384 kbps on the move

Bandwidth:                                 Four 5-MHz carriers

Transport Network:              IPv4 and IPv6 dual stack network

DoD Teleport:                          Portal to Defense Information Systems Network:                                     DSN, SIPRNET, NIPRNET

Access Type:                             Legacy UHF SATCOM

Bandwidth:                               17 25-kHz and 21 5-kHz channels

This third satellite extends MUOS network’s coverage over more than three-quarters of the globe
This third satellite extends MUOS network’s coverage over more than three-quarters of the globe

Airborne Early Warning

The State Department has made a determination approving a possible Foreign Military Sale to Japan for E-2D Advanced Hawkeye Airborne Early Warning and Control Aircraft and associated equipment, parts and logistical support for an estimated cost of $1.7 billion. The Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA) delivered the required certification notifying Congress of this possible sale on Jun 1, 2015.

The E-2D introduces a rotating, UHF-band, Lockheed Martin APY-9 radar designed to track objects as small as cruise missiles against the background clutter of a coastal environment
The E-2D introduces a rotating, UHF-band, Lockheed Martin APY-9 radar designed to track objects as small as cruise missiles against the background clutter of a coastal environment

The Government of Japan has requested a possible sale of:

  • four (4) Northrop Grumman E-2D Advanced Hawkeye (AHE) Airborne Early Warning and Control (AEW&C) aircraft;
  • ten (10) Rolls-Royce T56-A-427A engines (8 installed and 2 spares);
  • eight (8) Multifunction Information Distribution System Low Volume Terminals (MIDS-LVT);
  • four (4) Lockheed Martin APY-9 Radars;
  • modifications;
  • spare and repair parts;
  • support equipment;
  • publications and technical documentation;
  • personnel training and training equipment;
  • ferry services;
  • aerial refueling support;
  • S. Government and contractor logistics;
  • engineering and technical support services;
  • other related elements of logistics and program support.

The estimated cost is $1.7 billion.

A completely new radar featuring both mechanical and electronic scanning capabilities
A completely new radar featuring both mechanical and electronic scanning capabilities

This proposed sale will contribute to the foreign policy and national security of the United States. Japan is one of the major political and economic powers in East Asia and the Western Pacific and a key partner of the United States in ensuring peace and stability in that region. It is vital to the U.S. national interest to assist Japan in developing and maintaining a strong and ready self-defense capability. This proposed sale is consistent with U.S. foreign policy and national security objectives and the 1960 Treaty of Mutual Cooperation and Security.

The proposed sale of E-2D AHE aircraft will improve Japan’s ability to effectively provide homeland defense utilizing an AEW&C capability. Japan will use the E-2D AHE aircraft to provide AEW&C situational awareness of air and naval activity in the Pacific region and to augment its existing E-2C Hawkeye AEW&C fleet. Japan will have no difficulty absorbing these aircraft into its armed forces.

The proposed sale of these aircraft and support will not alter the basic military balance in the Pacific region.

The principal contractor will be Northrop Grumman Corporation Aerospace Systems in Melbourne, Florida. The acquisition and integration of all systems will be managed by the U.S. Navy’s Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR). There are no known offset agreements proposed in connection with this potential sale.

Fully Integrated «All Glass» Tactical Cockpit
Fully Integrated «All Glass» Tactical Cockpit

 

E-2D Advanced Hawkeye

The E-2D Advanced Hawkeye is a game changer in how the Navy will conduct battle management command and control. By serving as the «digital quarterback» to sweep ahead of strike, manage the mission, and keep our net-centric carrier battle groups out of harms way, the E-2D Advanced Hawkeye is the key to advancing the mission, no matter what it may be. The E-2D gives the warfighter expanded battlespace awareness, especially in the area of information operations delivering battle management, theater air and missile defense, and multiple sensor fusion capabilities in an airborne system.

Hardware with system characteristics that provides:

  • Substantial target processing capacity (>3,000 reports per second)
  • Three highly automated and common operator stations
  • High-capacity, flat-panel color high-resolution displays
  • Extensive video type selection (radar and identification friend/foe)
  • HF/VHF/UHF and satellite communications systems
  • Extensive data link capabilities
  • Inertial navigational system and global positioning system navigation and in-flight alignment
  • Integrated and centralized diagnostic system
  • Glass Cockpit allows software reconfigurable flight/mission displays
  • Cockpit – 4th tactical operator
  • Open architecture ensures rapid technology upgrades and customized configuration options
The Hawkeye provides all-weather airborne early warning, airborne battle management and command and control functions for the Carrier Strike Group and Joint Force Commander
The Hawkeye provides all-weather airborne early warning, airborne battle management and command and control functions for the Carrier Strike Group and Joint Force Commander

 

General Characteristics

Wingspan:                                              24.56 m/80 feet 7 in

Width, wings folded:                        8.94 m/29 feet 4 in

Length overall:                                    17.60 m/57 feet 8.75 in

Height overall:                                     5.58 m/18 feet 3.75 in

Diameter of rotodome:                  7.32 m/24 feet

Weight empty:                                     19,536 kg/43,068 lbs

Internal fuel:                                          5,624 kg/12,400 lbs

Takeoff gross weight:                       26,083 kg/57,500 lbs

Maximum level speed:                     648 km/h/350 knots/403 mph

Maximum cruise speed:                  602 km/h/325 knots/374 mph

Cruise speed:                                         474 km/h/256 knots/295 mph

Approach speed:                                  200 km/h/108 knots/124 mph

Service ceiling:                                      10,576 m/34,700 feet

Minimum takeoff distance:            410 m/1,346 feet ground roll

Minimum landing distance:            537 m/1,764 feet ground roll

Ferry range:                                             2,708 km/1,462 NM

Crew Members:                                    5

Power Plant:                                           2 × Rolls-Royce T56-A-427A, rated at 5,100 eshp each

Unrefueled:                                             >6 hours

In-flight refueling:                               12 hours

True 360-degree radar coverage provides uncompromised all-weather tracking and situational awareness
True 360-degree radar coverage provides uncompromised all-weather tracking and situational awareness

GPS number III

First GPS III space vehicle prepares for testing in simulated harsh space environments. Using a 10-ton crane, Lockheed Martin engineers and technicians gently lowered the system module of the U.S. Air Force’s first next generation GPS III satellite into place over its propulsion core, successfully integrating the two into one space vehicle.

An artist’s rendering of the GPS III satellite
An artist’s rendering of the GPS III satellite

GPS III space vehicle one (SV 01) is the first of a new, advanced GPS satellite design block for the U.S. Air Force. GPS III will deliver three times better accuracy, provide up to eight times improved anti-jamming capabilities and extend spacecraft life to 15 years, 25 percent longer than the satellites launching today. GPS III’s new L1C civil signal also will make it the first GPS satellite interoperable with other international global navigation satellite systems.

The systems integration event brought together several major fully functional satellite components. The system module includes the navigation payload, which performs the primary positioning, navigation and timing mission. The functional bus contains sophisticated electronics that manage all satellite operations. The propulsion core allows the satellite to maneuver for operations on orbit.

«The final integration of the first GPS III satellite is a major milestone for the GPS III program», said Mark Stewart, vice president of Lockheed Martin’s Navigation Systems mission area. «This summer, SV 01 will begin Thermal Vacuum testing, where it will be subjected to simulated harsh space environments. Successful completion of this testing is critical as it will help validate our design and manufacturing processes for all follow-on GPS III satellites».

Lockheed Martin is currently under contract to build eight GPS III satellites at its GPS III Processing Facility near Denver, a factory specifically designed to streamline satellite production.

The GPS III team is led by the Global Positioning Systems Directorate at the U.S. Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center. Air Force Space Command’s 2nd Space Operations Squadron (2SOPS), based at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado, manages and operates the GPS constellation for both civil and military users.

Lockheed Martin recently fully integrated the U.S. Air Force’s first next generation GPS III satellite at the company’s Denver-area satellite manufacturing facility.  The first in a design block of new, more powerful and accurate GPS satellites, GPS III Space Vehicle One is now preparing for system-level testing this summer
Lockheed Martin recently fully integrated the U.S. Air Force’s first next generation GPS III satellite at the company’s Denver-area satellite manufacturing facility. The first in a design block of new, more powerful and accurate GPS satellites, GPS III Space Vehicle One is now preparing for system-level testing this summer

 

GPS III Facts

GPS III Specification
Customer U.S. Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center
Mission Highly accurate 3-D position, velocity and precise time
Orbit Six orbit planes at 55° inclination
Altitude 10,898 NM/20,183.1 km
Design life 15 years; 13-year MMD (Mean Mission Duration)
Launch weight 8,553 lbs/3,879.58kg
On-orbit weight 5,003 lbs/2,269.32 kg
Size (W×D×H) 97×70×134 inch/2.46×1.78×3.40 m
Position accuracy Under one meter, with daily updates from the control segment
Electrical Power System
Solar array 307 feet2/28.52 m2; high-efficiency UTJ (Ultra Triple Junction) cells; 4,480-W EOL (End-Of-Life) capability
Battery system Nickel hydrogen (NiH2); rechargeable
Electronics Central controller with redundant discharge converters, battery chargers
Attitude Determination and Control
Design approach Zero momentum, 3-axis stabilized, Earth-oriented, Sun-Nadir pointing
Attitude reference Static Earth sensor, Sun sensor, control reaction wheels/magnetic torquers
Propulsion Subsystem
Design approach Bipropellant; Hydrazine, NTO (Nitrogen Tetroxide Oxidizer)
Propellant capacity 5,180 lbm
Thrusters 100-lb Liquid Apogee Engine, twelve 0.2-lb REAs, six 5-lb REAs (Rocket Engine Assembly)
Structural and Thermal
Modular design Four aluminum honeycomb panels mounted to a central composite core
Passive thermal Heat pipes in equipment panels, control blankets, thermal coatings, radiators and electrically controlled heaters
Navigation Payload
Timekeeping Enhanced performance for increased subsystem accuracy; improved anomaly resolution; includes multiple atomic frequency standards (Rubidium clocks), radiation-hardened design, high stability timing, automated integrity monitoring
Mission data unit Rad-Hard processor; expanded waveform generation, full message encoding and processing; real-time Kalman filter
Crosslink transponder Legacy UHF (Ultra High Frequency) receive and transmit, precision intersatellite ranging, full-frame modulation and mode control
New GPS III signal L1C (p, d); programmable waveform generation
Tracking, Telemetry and Command
Space vehicle computer Rad-Hard processor; command and telemetry processing, Bus functions, payload accommodation
Autonomy Redundancy management for on-board power and Bus components
Security architecture Encrypted data links using redundant architecture cryptographic units, centralized command decoding, flexible telemetry communications
RF links S-Band, SGLS/USB Transponder

 

GPS provides critical situational awareness and precision weapon guidance for the military and supports a wide range of civil, scientific and commercial functions – from air traffic control to navigation systems in cars, cell phones and wristwatches

 

First Evacuation

Dangerous frontline operations call for a safe and efficient method to locate and evacuate wounded personnel. To address this critical need and help save lives, Lockheed Martin, Kaman Aerospace, and Neya Systems demonstrated the first ever collaborative unmanned air and ground casualty evacuation using the Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) Control Segment (UCS) Architecture and K-MAX cargo helicopter on March 26, 2015.

A ground controller uses a ruggedized laptop with command and control software to develop and upload a mission flight plan to the aircraft’s on-board Mission Management Computer (MMC) prior to launch
A ground controller uses a ruggedized laptop with command and control software to develop and upload a mission flight plan to the aircraft’s on-board Mission Management Computer (MMC) prior to launch

During the demonstration, a distress call led ground operators to send an unmanned ground vehicle to assess the area and injured party. The ground operators used control stations that communicated with one another using the UAS Control Segment Architecture. Upon successful identification, the ground operators requested airlift by unmanned K-MAX of one individual who was injured. From the ground, the K-MAX operators used a tablet to determine the precise location and a safe landing area to provide assistance to the team. The injured team member was strapped into a seat on the side of the unmanned K-MAX, which then flew that individual to safety.

«This application of the unmanned K-MAX enables day or night transport of wounded personnel to safety without endangering additional lives», said Jay McConville, director of business development for Unmanned Integrated Solutions at Lockheed Martin Mission Systems and Training. «Since the K-MAX returned from a nearly three-year deployment with the U.S. Marine Corps, we’ve seen benefits of and extended our open system design incorporating the UCS Architecture, which allows rapid integration of new applications across industry to increase the safety of operations, such as casualty evacuation, where lives are at stake».

«Neya is continuing to develop advanced technologies for human robot interfaces for complex platforms and multi-robot missions», said Dr. Parag Batavia, president of Neya. «Our and Lockheed Martin’s use of the Unmanned Aircraft System Control Segment Architecture greatly sped up integration of our respective technologies, resulting in a comprehensive capability that can be ultimately transitioned to the warfighter very efficiently».

Portable antennae for line-ofsight and satellite-based beyond line-of-sight data links maintain continuous connectivity with the unmanned K-MAX anywhere in the world
Portable antennae for line-ofsight and satellite-based beyond line-of-sight data links maintain continuous connectivity with the unmanned K-MAX anywhere in the world

While deployed with the U.S. Marine Corps from 2011 to 2014, unmanned K-MAX successfully conducted resupply operations, delivering more than 4.5 million pounds of cargo during more than 1,900 missions. Manufactured by Kaman and outfitted with an advanced mission suite by Lockheed Martin, unmanned K-MAX is engineered with a twin-rotor design that maximizes lift capability in the most challenging environments, from the mountainous Alps to the Persian Gulf. Its advanced autonomy allows unmanned K-MAX to work day and night, in all-weather, even when manned assets are unable to fly. Lockheed Martin continues to extend and mature the K-MAX helicopter’s onboard technology and autonomy for defense operations, as well as demonstrate its use for civil and commercial applications.

With five decades of experience in unmanned and robotic systems for air, land and sea, Lockheed Martin’s unmanned systems are engineered to help our military, civil and commercial customers accomplish their most difficult challenges today and in the future.

Kaman Aerospace is a division Kaman Corporation, which was founded in 1945 by aviation pioneer Charles H. Kaman. Neya Systems, LLC is a small business unmanned systems company in Wexford, Pennsylvania. Founded in 2009, Neya focuses on developing interoperable solutions to the world’s hardest robotics problems.

The MMC communicates the ground controller’s objectives to the FCC (autopilot). FCC dual redundancy provides high reliability
The MMC communicates the ground controller’s objectives to the FCC (autopilot). FCC dual redundancy provides high reliability

 

K-MAX Unmanned Aerial System

Lockheed Martin Corporation and Kaman Aerospace Corporation have successfully transformed Kaman’s proven K-MAX power lift helicopter into an Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) capable of autonomous or remote controlled cargo delivery. Its mission: battlefield cargo resupply for the U.S. military.

The K-MAX UAS is a transformational technology for a fast-moving battlefield that will enable Marines to deliver supplies either day or night to precise locations without risk of losing life in the process. The aircraft can fly at higher altitudes with a larger payload than any other rotary wing UAS. With its four-hook carousel, the K-MAX UAS can also deliver more cargo to more locations in one flight

The team has flown the K-MAX UAS more than 750 hours in autonomous mode since joining forces in 2007. The rugged system can lift and deliver a full 6,000 lbs/2,722 kg of cargo at sea level and more than 4,000 pounds/1,814 kg at 15,000 feet/4,572 m density altitude.

The K-MAX continues to exceed expectations as an unmanned platform. The aircraft has met all unmanned milestones to date and continues to excel in the commercial logging and firefighting industries. The aircraft will remain optionally piloted for ease of National Airspace Operations, occasional manned mission flexibility, ferry flights, rapid integration of new mission equipment, and allow rapid return-to-service activities.

The manned version of the K-MAX is used for repetitive lift operations by commercial operators for the construction and logging industries. To date, the fleet has accumulated more than 255,000 flight hours since 1994.

Twin counter-rotating, intermeshing main rotors eliminate the need for a tail rotor drive system
Twin counter-rotating, intermeshing main rotors eliminate the need for a tail rotor drive system

 

Technical characteristics

Weights and Measurements
Max gross weight (with external load) 12,000 lbs/5,443 kg
Max take-off weight 7,000 lbs/3,175 kg
Empty weight 5,145 lbs/2,334 kg
Useful load 6,855 lbs/3,109 kg
Cargo hook capacity 6,000 lbs/2,722 kg
Lift Performance – ISA (International Standard Atmosphere) +15°C (59°F)
Sea Level 6,000 lbs/2,722 kg
5,000 feet/1,524 m 5,663 lbs/2,574 kg
10,000 feet/3,048 m 5,163 lbs/2,347 kg
15,000 feet/4,572 m 4,313 lbs/1,960 kg
Hover Performance – 4,000 feet/1,219 m, 35°C (95°F)
Hover IGE (In Ground Effect) 12,000 lbs/5,443 kg
Hover OGE (Out of Ground Effect) 11,500 lbs/5,216 kg
Powerplant
Model Honeywell T53-17 gas turbine
Thermodynamic rating 1,800 shaft horsepower
Maximum Airspeed
Without external load 100 knots/115 mph/185.2 km/h
With external load 80 knots/92 mph/148.2 km/h
Fuel System
Total usable fuel 219.5 gal/831 liters
Average fuel consumption 85 gal/hr/321.7 l/hr
Jet A fuel 557.6 lbs/hr/252.9 kg/hr
Maximum endurance 12+ hr
Maximum range 1,150 miles/1,852 km (est)
Maximum speed with external load 80 knots/92 mph/148.2 km/h
Maximum speed without external load 100 knots/115 mph/185.2 km/h
Internal fuel endurance 2 hr 41 min
Range with external load 246 miles/396.3 km
Range without external load 307 miles/494.5 km
Approved fuels Jet A/A-1, JP-5
Jet B/JP-4
JP-8

 

Lockheed Martin-Kaman’s unmanned helicopter successfully completing the Navy’s Quick Reaction Assessment

 

The rugged K-MAX multi-mission helicopter that Lockheed Martin and Kaman Aerospace have transformed into an Unmanned Aerial Truck proves why it is the best for unmanned battlefield cargo resupply missions

 

In January, 2010, the Unmanned K-MAX helicopter demonstrated autonomous and remote control flight over both line-of-sight and satellite-based beyond line-of-sight data link

 

Interceptors Ashore

Lockheed Martin is studying adding an Anti-Air Warfare (AAW) to Aegis Ashore Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) sites, reported Sam LaGrone, USNI News editor. The studies are not in advance of a new program of record for modifications of the installations and are at the behest of the Missile Defense Agency, said Jim Sheridan, Director of AEGIS development for Lockheed Martin in a briefing to reporters ahead of the Navy League Sea-Air-Space Exposition 2015.

Aegis Ashore provides a proven, affordable solution to expand the protection of the Aegis Combat System to inland areas
Aegis Ashore provides a proven, affordable solution to expand the protection of the Aegis Combat System to inland areas

«There’s been some detailed discussion over the past couple of years about the possibility of reconstituting or adding an AAW capability to the Aegis Ashore configuration», Jim Sheridan told reporters. «We’ve been turned on to do some studies on what it would take to do that going forward in the future».

Aegis Ashore – created in conjunction with Missile Defense Agency (MDA) and the Navy – uses the SPY-1D radar and the Mk-41 Vertical Launch System (VLS) tubes native to the Navy’s Arleigh Burke guided missile destroyers (DDG-51) to detect and launch Standard Missile-3 (SM-3) interceptors to counter ballistic missile threats.

Since most of the hardware is the same, Jim Sheridan said it would not be difficult to reconfigure the installations in Poland and Romania: «There is no program of record to reconstitute or add AAW capabilities to the Aegis Ashore configuration, but they’re just asking in the event in the future, what it would take to do that. We think it would not be difficult because that’s the same configuration we’re delivering to destroyers today».

Aegis Ashore is the land-based component of the Ballistic Missile Defense System and will use the same components that will be used onboard the Navy’s new construction Aegis BMD Destroyers
Aegis Ashore is the land-based component of the Ballistic Missile Defense System and will use the same components that will be used onboard the Navy’s new construction Aegis BMD Destroyers

It is said in The NavyTimes that a 430-acre (174 hectare) Aegis Ashore facility will be operational by year’s end in Deveselu, Romania, and manned by about 200 U.S. service members, government civilians and support contractors. It will be armed with SM-3 IB interceptors. A second site planned for Poland, scheduled to become operational in 2018, will be armed with SM-3 IIA interceptors.

The SM-3 Cooperative Development Program focuses on joint U.S. and Japan development of a 21-inch diameter variant of the SM-3 missile, referred to as SM-3 Block IIA. Aegis BMD 5.1 will integrate the SM-3 Block IIA missile into the combat system. Data links will also be improved to enable Engage on Remote track data. Deployment begins in 2018.

SM-3 Block IIA guided missile development completed Critical Design Review and successfully conducted a Propulsion Test Vehicle (PTV) flight test. The PTV round consisted of a live booster with an inert 21-inch diameter upper-stage assembly encanisted in a Vertical Launch System canister.

The deckhouse for the Aegis Ashore system at the Pacific Missile Range Facility. This is the test asset for the Aegis Ashore system that will be emplaced in Romania and Poland (Missile Defense Agency Photo)
The deckhouse for the Aegis Ashore system at the Pacific Missile Range Facility. This is the test asset for the Aegis Ashore system that will be emplaced in Romania and Poland (Missile Defense Agency Photo)

 

Aegis Ashore

Aegis Ashore is a land-based capability of the Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense System to address the evolving ballistic missile security environment. The re-locatable deckhouse is equipped with the Aegis BMD weapon system and Standard Missile-3, with upgrades being phased during this decade. Each Aegis BMD upgrade provides increased capability for countering ballistic missile threats. In addition to Aegis BMD ships, Aegis Ashore is part of Phased Adaptive Approach (PAA) Phases II and III.

 

Development

Uses the same combat system elements (AN/SPY-1 Radar, Command, Control, Communications, Computers and Intelligence systems, Vertical Launching System, computer processors, display system, power supplies and cooling) that are used onboard the Navy’s new construction Aegis BMD Destroyers.

Conducting flight tests at the Aegis Ashore Missile Defense Test Complex at Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF) in Kauai, Hawaii. Each test will increase the operational realism and complexity of targets and scenarios and will be witnessed by Navy and Department of Defense test agents.

Integrates advances in sensor technology such as launch of an SM-3 missile in response to remote sensor data.

Defeats short- to intermediate-range ballistic missile threats.

Incorporates future capability upgrades in association with Aegis BMD Program of Record.

The Aegis Ashore deckhouse during a Missile Defense Agency and U.S. Navy test from Kauai, Hawaii
The Aegis Ashore deckhouse during a Missile Defense Agency and U.S. Navy test from Kauai, Hawaii

 

Aegis Ashore Missile Defense Test Complex (AAMDTC)

The AAMDTC at the PMRF is a test and evaluation center in the development of the PAA. The test complex leverages the Aegis BMD Weapon System and the new SM-3 Block IB missile for PAA Phase II deployment, as well as, supports deployment decisions and upgrades of future PAA Phase capabilities.

The AAMDTC fired the first land-based SM-3 Block IB missile in May 2014.

 

Deployment

In 2015, Aegis Ashore will be installed in Romania as part of the PAA Phase II. This deployed capability will use Aegis BMD 5.0 CU and SM-3 Block IB to provide ballistic missile coverage of southern Europe.

In 2018, Aegis Ashore will be installed in Poland, as part of the PAA Phase III. This deployed capability will use Aegis BMD 5.1 and SM-3 Blocks IB and IIA to support increased additional defense of Europe.

 

Future Capabilities

Engagement of longer range ballistic missiles.

 

Land-based Aegis Ashore, as part of Phased Adaptive Approach (PAA), will use the same components as those onboard the Navy’s new construction Aegis BMD Destroyers

 

Into Record Books

In the early morning hours of April 3, 2015 a C-5M Super Galaxy aircrew from Travis Air Force Base, California, put the aircraft’s capabilities to the test. The eight-person crew, with members of the 60th Air Mobility Wing’s 22nd Airlift Squadron and the 349th Air Mobility Wing’s 312th Airlift Squadron, accomplished their goal of establishing standards in 45 previously unset categories. The aircrew claimed records in the Class C-1.T jet category for altitude in horizontal flight, altitude with payload, time-to-climb, time-to-climb with payload and greatest payload to 9,000 meters/29,527.6 feet.

A C-5M Super Galaxy from the 22nd Airlift Squadron takes off from Travis Air Force Base, California, early April 3, 2015. The flight, which lasted approximately one hour, claimed 45 aeronautical records, positioning the U.S. military's largest airframe as the world's top aviation record holder with a total of 86 world records (U.S. Air Force photo/Ken Wright)
A C-5M Super Galaxy from the 22nd Airlift Squadron takes off from Travis Air Force Base, California, early April 3, 2015. The flight, which lasted approximately one hour, claimed 45 aeronautical records, positioning the U.S. military’s largest airframe as the world’s top aviation record holder with a total of 86 world records (U.S. Air Force photo/Ken Wright)

«The successful completion of this mission exemplifies both the great teamwork required by the whole team to keep Travis’ aircraft flying and the fabulous strategic mobility capabilities the C-5M Super Galaxy brings our combatant commanders around the world», said Colonel Joel Jackson, 60th Air Mobility Wing commander. «Thanks to everyone who contributed to this powerful showcase of Travis’ culture of excellence».

The C-5M Super Galaxy was loaded with pallets, fuel and the aircrew for a total of 731,220 pounds/331,676 kg, including the weight of the plane. «We took on approximately 265,000 pounds/120,202 kg of cargo and our goal was to climb as fast as we could at 3,000, 6,000 and 9,000 meters/9,842.52, 19,685 and 29,527.6 feet», said Major Jon Flowers, 22nd Airlift Squadron chief of standardization and evaluation and pilot for the flight. «We got up to an altitude of approximately 37,000 feet/11,277.6 meters before we ran out of performance». Among the records achieved were altitude in horizontal flight at 37,000 feet/11,277.6 meters, altitude with payload of 265,000 pounds/120,202 kg and time it takes to climb at 27.5 minutes (Source: US Air Force).

The C-5M Super Galaxy has now unofficially claimed a total of 86 world aeronautical records, surpassing the B-1B Lancer at 83 records. All records will be certified by the National Aeronautic Association, the nation’s oldest aviation organization. Formal certifications of the C-5M Super Galaxy records are expected to take several weeks.

The new ability of the C-5M Super Galaxy, when compared to the A, B and C models, to reach speeds at a faster rate, is critical for the Air Force mission. «The model before this was performance limited», Major Jon Flowers said. «It did not have the climb capability or the cargo capability. The C-5M Super Galaxy has been changing the game for the warfighter and tonight we made that point to put the capabilities in the record books».

From aerial porters to maintainers, active duty and reservists from Team Travis made a joint effort to effectively achieve this goal. «We’re honored to play a role in this historic demonstration», said Colonel Matthew Burger, 349th Air Mobility Wing commander. «The new capabilities of the C-5M Super Galaxy make America better equipped to the global challenges of the 21st Century».

Two M-1 Abrams tanks loaded into the cargo area of the C-5M Super Galaxy (U.S. Air Force photo by Lieutenant Colonel Chad Gibson)
Two M-1 Abrams tanks loaded into the cargo area of the C-5M Super Galaxy (U.S. Air Force photo by Lieutenant Colonel Chad Gibson)

 

C-5M Super Galaxy

The C-5M Super Galaxy aircraft is a game changer to the warfighter and America’s premier global direct delivery weapons system. It is also the Air Force’s only true strategic airlifter. While setting 86 world records in airlift, the C-5M Super Galaxy established new benchmarks in carrying more cargo faster and farther than any other airlifter.

A venerable workhorse, the recognized improvements in performance, efficiency and safety it provides validate the tremendous value to the taxpayer in modernizing proven and viable aircraft. As the only strategic airlifter with the capability of carrying 100 percent of certified air-transportable cargo, the C-5M Super Galaxy can carry twice the cargo of other strategic airlift systems. The C-5M Super Galaxy also has a dedicated passenger compartment, carrying troops and their supplies straight to the theater. It can be loaded from the front and back simultaneously, and vehicles can also be driven directly on or off the Galaxy. This means the C-5M Super Galaxy can be loaded quickly and efficiently.

The C-5M Super Galaxy has been a vital element of strategic airlift in every major contingency and humanitarian relief effort since it entered service. The C-5M Super Galaxy is the only strategic airlifter capable of linking America directly to the warfighter in all theatres of combat with mission capable rates excess of 80 percent. With more than half of its useful structural life remaining, the C-5M Super Galaxy will be a force multiplier through 2040 and beyond.

C-5M Super Galaxy Specifications
C-5M Super Galaxy Specifications

Current and future C-5M Wings include:
60th Air Mobility Wing, Travis AFB;
349th Air Mobility Wing, Travis AFB;
436th Airlift Wing, Dover AFB;
439th Airlift Wing, Westover AFB;
512th Airlift Wing, Dover AFB.

The C-5M flies during its First Flight ceremony at Lockheed Martin’s Marietta, Georgia plant
The C-5M flies during its First Flight ceremony at Lockheed Martin’s Marietta, Georgia plant

 

General Characteristics

Primary Function Outsize cargo transport
Prime Contractor Lockheed-Georgia Co.
Crew Seven: pilot, co-pilot, 2 flight engineers and 3 loadmasters
Length 247.8 feet/75.53 m
Height 65.1 feet/19.84 m
Wingspan 222.8 feet/67.91 m
Power Plant 4 × General Electric CF6-80C2 turbofans
Thrust 50,580 lbs/22,942.7 kgf/225 kN
Normal cruise speed Mach 0.77/518 mph/834 km/h
Unrefueled Range (with 120,000 lbs/54,431 kg) 5,250 NM/9,723 km
Max takeoff weight (2.2 g) 840,000 lbs/381,018 kg
Operating weight 400,000 lbs/181,437 kg
Fuel capacity 332,500 lbs/150,819 kg
Max payload (2.0 g) 285,000 lbs/129,274 kg
Cargo Compartment
Length 143.7 feet/43.8 m
Width 19 feet/5.79 m
Height 13.48 feet/4.11 m
Pallet Positions 36
Unit Cost $90 million (fiscal 2009 constant dollars)
Deployed 2009
Inventory
16 C-5Ms have been delivered through December 2013
52 C-5Ms are scheduled to be in the inventory by fiscal 2017

 

C-5M Strategic Airlift Redefined

 

155 Successful
Test Flights

The U.S. Navy conducted successful test flights February 22 of two Trident II D5 Fleet Ballistic Missiles built by Lockheed Martin. This brings the D5 missile’s record to 155 successful test flights since design completion in 1989, a 25-year-plus reliability record unmatched by any other large ballistic missile.

The Mark 5 MIRV can carry up to 14 W88 (475 kt) warheads
The Mark 5 MIRV can carry up to 14 W88 (475 kt) warheads

«These latest test flights demonstrate the reliability of the D5 missile and the readiness of the entire Trident Strategic Weapon System every minute of every day», said Mat Joyce, vice president of Fleet Ballistic Missile programs and deputy for Strategic & Missile Defense Systems, Lockheed Martin Space Systems. «The Navy program office, the submarine crews and the industry team never rest to ensure the safety, security and performance of this crucial deterrence system».

The Navy launched the unarmed missiles in the Pacific Ocean from a submerged Ohio-class submarine. The missiles were converted into test configurations using kits produced by Lockheed Martin that contain range safety devices and flight telemetry instrumentation.

The Trident II Strategic Weapons System is an improved Submarine Launched Ballistic Missile with greater accuracy, payload, and range than the Trident C-4
The Trident II Strategic Weapons System is an improved Submarine Launched Ballistic Missile with greater accuracy, payload, and range than the Trident C-4

The Navy conducts a continuing series of operational system evaluation tests of the Trident Strategic Weapon System, which is the sea-based element of the nation’s nuclear deterrent triad, under the testing guidelines of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

First deployed in 1990, the D5 missile is aboard U.S. Navy Ohio-class and U.K. Royal Navy Vanguard-class submarines. The three-stage ballistic missile can travel a nominal range of 4,000 nautical miles (7,408 kilometers) and carries multiple independently targeted reentry bodies.

Trident II missiles are carried by 14 US Ohio and 4 British Vanguard-class submarines, with 24 missiles on each Ohio class and 16 missiles on each Vanguard class
Trident II missiles are carried by 14 US Ohio and 4 British Vanguard-class submarines, with 24 missiles on each Ohio class and 16 missiles on each Vanguard class

 

Trident II D5 Fleet Ballistic Missile (FBM)

The Trident II D5 is the latest generation of the U.S. Navy’s submarine-launched fleet ballistic missiles, following the highly successful Polaris, Poseidon, and Trident I C4 programs. First deployed in 1990, the Trident II D5 missile is currently aboard Ohio-class and British Vanguard-class submarines. Each missile weighs approximately 130,000 pounds (58,967 kilograms).

Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company, the Navy’s Trident missile prime contractor, developed and produced the missile and support equipment. The company also supplies technical and logistical support at sites where the missiles are deployed.

Maximum speed: approximately 18,030 mph/29,020 km/h/Mach 24
Maximum speed: approximately 18,030 mph/29,020 km/h/Mach 24

The FBM team continues to build on a remarkable mission success track record. Through June 2014, the Trident II D5 missile has achieved 150 successful test flights since design completion in 1989 – a record unmatched by any other large ballistic missile or space launch vehicle.

The first Fleet Ballistic Missile (FBM) developed and deployed by the United States was the Polaris A1 missile, named for the North Star. A two-stage ballistic missile with a range of 1,200 nautical miles (2,222 kilometers), the A1 was powered by solid fuel rocket motors and guided by a self-contained inertial guidance system independent of external commands or control. The A1’s first successful underwater launch from a submarine on July 20, 1960, brought to fruition a remarkable Navy and industry research and development effort begun only four years earlier. Subsequent Polaris missiles, the A2 and A3, increased the range and thus the operating area of the stealthy deterrent. U.S. deployment of the Polaris missile series ended with the retirement of the A3 in 1979.

The Trident II is a three-stage rocket, each stage containing a Solid-fuel rocket motor
The Trident II is a three-stage rocket, each stage containing a Solid-fuel rocket motor

The next generation of fleet ballistic missiles to follow Polaris was the Poseidon C3 missile. The Poseidon, despite being 20 inches (508 mm) wider in diameter, 36 inches (914 mm) longer and approximately 30,000 pounds (13,608 kilograms) heavier, fit into the same 16 launch tubes that carried Polaris. Poseidon carried twice the payload of the Polaris A3 with significantly improved accuracy. The first Poseidon test launch occurred on August 16, 1968. The first submarine-based test launch occurred on August 3, 1970, from USS James Madison (SSBN-627). The Poseidon was declared operational on March 31, 1971, and was deployed aboard all 31 Lafayette Class submarines.

The Trident I C4 missiles were the longest continuously operated Fleet Ballistic Missiles ever deployed by the U.S. Navy. Using advanced technology in propellants, micro-electronics and new weight-saving materials, the Trident I C4 missile incorporated the multiple independently-targeted vehicle capability of its predecessor Poseidon and provided an astounding range of more than 4,000 nautical miles (7,408 kilometers) with a full payload.

Third flight test

The Long Range Anti-Ship Missile (LRASM) built by Lockheed Martin achieved a third successful air-launched flight test, with the missile performing as expected during low altitude flight. The test, conducted on February 4, was in support of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), U.S. Air Force and U.S. Navy joint-service LRASM program.

Lockheed Martin is the prime contractor for the DARPA/ONR funded Long Range Anti-Ship Missile (LRASM) program that is developing both an air- and surface-launch compatible anti-ship missile that will provide OASuW capabilities
Lockheed Martin is the prime contractor for the DARPA/ONR funded Long Range Anti-Ship Missile (LRASM) program that is developing both an air- and surface-launch compatible anti-ship missile that will provide OASuW capabilities

Flying over the Sea Range at Point Mugu, California, a U.S. Air Force Rockwell B-1B Lancer bomber from the 337th Test and Evaluation Squadron at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas, released the LRASM prototype, which navigated through planned waypoints receiving in-flight targeting updates from the weapon data link.

«LRASM continues to prove its maturity and capabilities in this flight test program», said Mike Fleming, LRASM air launch program director at Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control. «This much-needed weapon seeks to provide a new capability that would enable deep strike in previously denied battle environments».

LRASM is a precision-guided anti-ship standoff missile leveraging the successful Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missile Extended Range (JASSM-ER) heritage, and is designed to meet the needs of U.S. Navy and Air Force warfighters in a robust anti-access/area-denial threat environment. JASSM-ER, which recently completed its operational test program, provides a significant number of parts and assembly-process synergies with LRASM, resulting in cost savings for the U.S. Navy and Air Force Offensive Anti-Surface Warfare programs.

The tactically representative LRASM is built on the same award-winning production line in Pike County, Alabama, as JASSM-ER, demonstrating manufacturing and technology readiness levels sufficient to enter the engineering, manufacturing and development phase and to meet urgent operational needs.

LRASM launched from a Rockwell B-1B Lancer attacks a maritime ship target during flight-testing (Photo courtesy of DARPA)
LRASM launched from a Rockwell B-1B Lancer attacks a maritime ship target during flight-testing (Photo courtesy of DARPA)

 

LRASM

Long Range Anti-Ship Missile is a new generation weapon system for Air- and Ship-Launched Anti-Surface Warfare (ASuW). LRASM is a precision-guided anti-ship standoff missile leveraging of the successful JASSM-ER heritage, and is designed to meet the needs of U.S. Navy and Air Force warfighters. Armed with a penetrator and blast fragmentation warhead, LRASM employs semi-autonomous guidance, day or night in all weather conditions. The missile employs a multi-modal sensor suite, weapon data link, and enhanced digital anti-jam Global Positioning System (GPS) to detect and destroy specific targets within a group of numerous ships at sea.

 

Background

Lockheed Martin is executing a LRASM contract, funded by DARPA and the U.S. Navy, to demonstrate tactically-relevant prototypes of a next generation anti-surface warfare weapon that can be either air or surface launched. The long-range capability of LRASM will enable target engagement from well outside the range of direct counter-fire weapons. LRASM will also employ enhanced survivability features to penetrate advanced integrated air defense systems. The combination of range, survivability, and lethality ensures mission success.

LRASM technology will reduce dependence on ISR (Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance) platforms, network links, and GPS navigation in aggressive electronic warfare environments. The semi-autonomous guidance capability gets LRASM safely to the enemy area, where the weapon can use gross target cueing data to find and destroy its pre-determined target in denied environments. Precision lethality against surface targets ensures LRASM will become an important addition to the Warfighter’s arsenal.

Lockheed Martin Corporation has invested $30 million into the shipboard integration effort, to be worked in partnership with LM Mission Systems and Sensors who is responsible for the Mk-41 VLS (Vertical Launching System) integration of the missile, and IS&GS who will be working the weapon control system integration (Photo courtesy of LM)
Lockheed Martin Corporation has invested $30 million into the shipboard integration effort, to be worked in partnership with LM Mission Systems and Sensors who is responsible for the Mk-41 VLS (Vertical Launching System) integration of the missile, and IS&GS who will be working the weapon control system integration (Photo courtesy of LM)

 

Specifications

Approach: Autonomous sensing and dynamic routing coupled with advanced signature control

Speed: Subsonic

Seeker: Multi-mode

Warhead: 1,000-pound penetrating blast fragmentation

 

Features

Engagement from well outside direct counter-fire ranges

High probabilities of target kill

LRASM prototypes demonstrated tactically relevant system maturity during flight tests in 2013

Rapid transition to meet Warfighter needs for ASuW weapon capability

 

The keel of Wichita

The Lockheed Martin industry team officially laid the keel for the U.S. Navy’s thirteenth Littoral Combat Ship (LCS), the future USS Wichita, in a ceremony held at Marinette Marine Corporation in Marinette, Wisconsin, on February 9, 2015.

Lay the keel is a shipbuilding term that marks the beginning of the module erection process, which is a significant undertaking that signifies the ship coming to life
Lay the keel is a shipbuilding term that marks the beginning of the module erection process, which is a significant undertaking that signifies the ship coming to life

Ship sponsor Mrs. Kate Staples Lehrer completed the time-honored tradition and authenticated the keel of Wichita (LCS-13). Mrs. Lehrer had her initials welded into a sheet of the ship’s steel, which will ultimately be mounted in the ship throughout its entire service. «This is an honor and a pleasure for me to be a sponsor of the USS Wichita», said Mrs. Lehrer. «My right hand will remain forever in a salute to those men and women who are building and to those who will serve on this special ship».

Wichita is a flexible Freedom-variant LCS that will be designed and outfitted with mission systems to conduct a variety of missions including anti-surface warfare, mine countermeasures and submarine warfare. The industry team building Wichita has delivered two ships with six others in various stages of construction and testing. The nation’s first LCS, USS Freedom, completed a U.S. Navy deployment in 2013, and USS Fort Worth (LCS-3) is currently deployed for 16 months to Southeast Asia. These two deployments demonstrate how the ship class is addressing the U.S. Navy’s need for an affordable, highly-networked and modular ship unlike any other in the world.

The industry team building Wichita has delivered two ships with six others in various stages of construction and testing
The industry team building Wichita has delivered two ships with six others in various stages of construction and testing

«This ship class, and the industry team behind it, has shown it can adapt to meet the Navy’s most challenging missions and provide a powerful, modular platform», said Joe North, vice president of Littoral Ships and Systems at Lockheed Martin. «We have leveraged best practices and incorporated improvements based on sailors’ feedback to ensure the fleet is prepared and empowered to fight, operate and support the ship in the littorals and open seas worldwide».

The Lockheed Martin-led LCS team includes ship builder Marinette Marine Corporation, a Fincantieri company, naval architect Gibbs & Cox, as well as nearly 900 suppliers in 43 states. «The LCS 13, Wichita, is a tangible measure of the collaboration and strength within this industry team», said Jan Allman, president and chief executive officer of Marinette Marine Corporation. «I’m extremely proud of our skilled workforce, the hardworking men and women that transform the LCS from a design into a powerful warship that will serve an invaluable role in the Fleet. Through Fincantieri’s expansion and improvement in our facility, Marinette Marine was tailored to grow with this program, and we look forward to continuing our valuable partnership with the U.S. Navy».

Lay the keel is a shipbuilding term that marks the beginning of the module erection process, which is a significant undertaking that signifies the ship coming to life. Modern warships are now largely built in a series of pre-fabricated, complete hull sections rather than a single keel, so the actual start of the shipbuilding process is now considered to be when the first sheet of steel is cut and is often marked with a ceremonial event.

 

The USS Fort Worth (LCS-3) is operating in the vicinity of the tail section and is supporting Indonesian-led efforts to locate the downed aircraft. (U.S. Navy video by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Antonio P. Turretto Ramos)

 

Enter the Dragon

All three variants of the F-35 Lightning II continue on a path toward full weapons certification by successfully completing numerous milestones during the previous four months. Highlights included validating 2B weapons software and successfully executing several weapons separation and engagement tests. The most recent accomplishments are in support of the first military service Initial Operational Capability (IOC) declaration by the U.S. Marine Corps in July.

An F-35A, at Edwards AFB, California, is pictured with its F-35 Systems Development and Demonstration Weapons Suite the aircraft is designed to carry. The F-35 can carry more than 35-hundred pounds of ordinance in Low Observable (stealth) mode and over 18-thousand pounds uncontested (Lockheed Martin Photo by Matt Short)
An F-35A, at Edwards AFB, California, is pictured with its F-35 Systems Development and Demonstration Weapons Suite the aircraft is designed to carry. The F-35 can carry more than 35-hundred pounds of ordinance in Low Observable (stealth) mode and over 18-thousand pounds uncontested (Lockheed Martin Photo by Matt Short)

The program also surpassed 25,000 combined flight hours in December with F-35 military fleet aircraft (16,200 hours) nearly doubling the System Development and Demonstration (SDD) test aircraft (8,950) hours. Comprehensive flight test on the F-35A variant GAU-22 25-mm gun system is scheduled to begin mid-year at Edwards AFB, California, and will include ground fire tests, muzzle calibration, flight test integration and in-flight operational tests. The 25-mm missionized gun pod carried externally, centerline mounted on the F-35B and F-35C also begins testing this year to meet U.S. service’s desired schedule for full warfighting capability software known as 3F. The 3F software is currently planned for delivery with the Low Rate Initial Production 9 (LRIP 9) U.S. aircraft in 2017.

«The weapons development program continues to track forward on the plan laid out by the Technical Baseline Review approved in 2010», said Lt. Gen. Chris Bogdan, F-35 Program Executive Officer. «All weapons tests needed for 2B software, the software the U.S. Marine Corps will use to declare IOC, is complete and will be ready to go for their combat capability certification».

F-35 Weapons Stations
F-35 Weapons Stations

Specific F-35 Flight Test accomplishments during the past four months include:

  • First F-35 day and night Mission Effectiveness Close Air Support (CAS) flights completing 2B CAS testing (October 21).
  • Completion of live fire testing on an F-35B ground test article. (September 9).
  • Successful first (September 9) and night flight (September 18) with the Generation III helmet-mounted display with 3iR4 software.
  • Completion of final buffet, loads and high-angle-of-attack testing required for F-35A Block 2B software (November 18).
  • Successfully launched an AIM-120 Advanced Medium Range Air-to-Air Missile (AMRAAM) from an F-35C, marking the last weapon separation test needed for Block 2B software (September 30).
  • F-35C set a record for 17 sorties in a day for a single F-35 aircraft (November 5) and a record 22 sorties with F-35C aircraft CF-3 and CF-5 combined aboard USS Nimitz for F-35C Sea Trials off the coast of San Diego (November 3-14).
  • First separation test of a GBU-39 Small Diameter Bomb, a 250-lb. precision-guided glide weapon (October 21) and multi-separation test (November 20).
  • First F-35 external flutter tests flown with the AIM-132 Advanced Short Range Air-to-Air Missile (ASRAAM) (October 29) and Paveway IV missiles (November 13).
  • Three Weapon(s) Delivery Accuracy (WDA) live fire events completed in a week. The F-35 employed two AIM-120 AMRAAMs and one Joint Direct Attack Munition (JDAM). These events included the first supersonic-guided missile launch and the first JDAM release on target coordinates generated from the Electro-Optical Targeting System (EOTS) (November 18-25 ).
Weapons Carriage Requirements
Weapons Carriage Requirements