Tag Archives: Lockheed Martin

«Adir» for Israel

Lockheed Martin and Israeli Ministry of Defense officials commemorated the beginning of the first F-35A «Adir» (meaning «mighty one» in Hebrew) manufactured for Israel here January 7.

First F-35A «Adir» for Israel Taking Shape in Fort Worth
First F-35A «Adir» for Israel Taking Shape in Fort Worth

The aircraft, designated as F-35A aircraft AS-1, officially began its mate process, where the four major components of the 5th Generation fighter aircraft are joined together in the Electronic Mate and Assembly Station to form the aircraft’s structure. AS-1 will continue its assembly here and is expected to roll out of the factory in June and be delivered to the Israeli Air Force (IAF) later this year.

«These 5th Generation aircraft will greatly enhance the IAF’s ability to defend the State of Israel from the serious threats we face», said Aharon Marmarosh, director, Israel Ministry of Defense Mission in New York.

«Today marks a new beginning for tactical aviation for Israel», said Jeff Babione, Lockheed Martin F-35 program manager. «Lockheed Martin is proud of our long and storied relationship with Israel’s armed forces. The F-35A Adir strengthens our solid relationship with the IAF and ensures that the Israeli aerospace industry will remain strong for decades to come».

Israel has contracted for 33 F-35A Adir Conventional Take Off and Landing (CTOL) aircraft through the U.S. government’s Foreign Military Sales program. Israel’s contribution to the F-35 program includes Israel Aerospace Industries F-35A wing production; Elbit Systems Ltd. work on the Generation III helmet-mounted display system, which all F-35 pilots fleet-wide will wear; and Elbit Systems-Cyclone F-35 center fuselage composite components production.

The F-35A Adir will be a significant addition to maintaining Israel’s qualitative military edge in the Middle East, with the advanced capability to defeat emerging threats, such as advanced missiles and heavily-defended airspace through its combination of low-observability and sensor fusion. The F-35A Lightning II, a 5th generation fighter, combines advanced low observable stealth technology with fighter speed and agility, fully fused sensor information, network-enabled operations and advanced sustainment.

12 more HIMARSs

Lockheed Martin was awarded a $142,750,920 firm-fixed-price, foreign military sales contract for 12 High Mobility Artillery Rocket Systems (HIMARS) with increased crew protection cabs incorporating sapphire transparent armor glass, associated training, spares, software, modernization updates, and planned enhancements and product improvement modifications for the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Procurement also includes synergistic spares purchase for Jordon. Work will be performed in Camden, Arkansas (63.80 percent); and Dallas, Texas (36.20 percent), with an estimated completion date of December 30, 2017.

High Mobility Artillery Rocket System (HIMARS) is the newest member of the MLRS launcher family
High Mobility Artillery Rocket System (HIMARS) is the newest member of the MLRS launcher family

According to Jeremy Binnie, Jane’s Defence Weekly correspondent in London, the U.S. Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA) announced in 2006 that the UAE had requested the sale of 20 HIMARSs with 202 ATACMS pods, 260 GMLRS pods, and 104 M26 pods. The U.S. Army confirmed in October 2013 that the HIMARS systems had been delivered when it released photographs of them being operated by the UAE’s 97th Heavy Artillery Regiment during a training exercise. The DSCA announced in September 2014 that the UAE had requested a second batch of 12 HIMARSs with 100 ATACMS pods and 65 GMLRS pods. The Department of Defense (DoD) announced in May 2015 that Lockheed Martin had been awarded a $174 million contract to produce an unspecified number of ATACMS missiles for the UAE.

 

HIMARS

The High Mobility Artillery Rocket System is a wheeled launcher that delivers a lethal mix of precision munitions on the U.S. Army’s FMTV 5-ton truck. HIMARS carries a single six-pack of MLRS rockets or one ATACMS missile. HIMARS is designed to launch the entire MLRS family of munitions, including the transformational GMLRS and all ATACMS variants. HIMARS became a joint system when the U.S. Marine Corps joined the program in 2000. Approval to enter production was received in March 2003. HIMARS is currently in full-rate production.

The combat-proven HIMARS is C-130 transportable, allowing MLRS firepower to be moved rapidly into areas previously inaccessible
The combat-proven HIMARS is C-130 transportable, allowing MLRS firepower to be moved rapidly into areas previously inaccessible

Under contract to the U.S. Army, Lockheed Martin has delivered more than 400 HIMARS launchers to the Army, Marine Corps and international customers. In May 2005, the 3rd Battalion, 27th Field Artillery Regiment, XVIII Airborne Corps Artillery became the first unit equipped with HIMARS. Since then the U.S. Army has fielded eleven additional battalions, in both active and National Guard units. The U.S. Army plans to field an additional six battalions. Additionally, the Marines have fielded more than 38 launchers. HIMARS has expanded its global presence and has begun to serve the international market, including such countries as Jordan, Singapore and the United Arab Emirates.

HIMARS rolls off a C-130 combat loaded and delivers GMLRS and ATACMS munitions with pinpoint accuracy. The combat-proven HIMARS provides increased responsiveness, increased crew protection and increased effectiveness against time-critical targets, and supports conventional and Special Forces operations around the globe.

The HIMARS launcher fires MLRS rockets and ATACMS missiles
The HIMARS launcher fires MLRS rockets and ATACMS missiles

32 Super Hercules

Lockheed Martin will deliver 78 C-130J Super Hercules to the U.S. government through a C-130J Multiyear II contract, which was announced by the U.S. government on December 30, 2015.

The C-130J Super Hercules is the most flexible airlifter in the world
The C-130J Super Hercules is the most flexible airlifter in the world

The Department of Defense announced the award of more than $1 billion ($1,060,940,036) in funding for the first 32 aircraft of the Multiyear contract (13 C-130J-30, five HC-130J, 11 MC-130J, two KC-130J and one U.S. Coast Guard HC-130J aircraft). The overall contract, worth $5.3 billion, provides 78 Super Hercules aircraft to the U.S. Air Force (30 MC-130Js, 13 HC-130Js and 29 C-130J-30s) and the U.S. Marine Corps (six KC-130Js). Also through this contract, the U.S. Coast Guard has the option to acquire five HC-130Js. Aircraft purchased through the multiyear contract will deliver between 2016 and 2020.

«We are proud to partner with the U.S. government to continue to deliver to the U.S. Air Force, U.S. Marine Corps and U.S. Coast Guard the world’s most proven, versatile and advanced airlifter», said George Shultz, vice president and general manager, Air Mobility & Maritime Missions at Lockheed Martin. «This multiyear contract provides true value to our U.S. operators as they recapitalize and expand their much-relied-upon Hercules aircraft, which has the distinction of being the world’s largest and most tasked C-130 fleet».

The C-130J-30 Super Hercules is a stretch version of the C-130J
The C-130J-30 Super Hercules is a stretch version of the C-130J

Constructed in alignment with the U.S. government’s Better Buying Power initiative, this contract provides significant savings to the U.S. government through multiyear procurement as compared to annual buys.

Lockheed Martin provided 60 C-130Js to the U.S. government through an initial multiyear contract announced in 2003, which delivered aircraft to the U.S. Air Force and U.S Marine Corps from 2003-2008.

The C-130J Super Hercules is the standard in tactical airlift, providing a unique mix of versatility and performance to complete any mission, anytime, anywhere. It is the airlifter of choice for 16 nations and 19 different operators. The Super Hercules worldwide fleet has more than 1.3 million flight hours to its credit.

The HC-130J Combat King II – this C-130J variation specializes in tactical profiles and avoiding detection and recovery operations in austere environments
The HC-130J Combat King II – this C-130J variation specializes in tactical profiles and avoiding detection and recovery operations in austere environments

 

C-130J Super Hercules

Power Plant Four Rolls-Royce AE 2100D3 turboprops; 4,691 horsepower/3,498 kW
Length 97 feet, 9 inch/29.3 m
Height 38 feet, 10 inch/11. 9 m
Wingspan 132 feet, 7 inch/39.7 m
Cargo Compartment Length – 40 feet/12.31 m; width – 119 inch/3.12 m; height – 9 feet/2.74 m
Rear ramp Length – 123 inch/3.12 m; width – 119 inch/3.02 m
Speed 362 knots/Mach 0.59/417 mph/671 km/h at 22,000 feet/6,706 m
Ceiling 28,000 feet/8,615 m with 42,000 lbs/19,090 kg payload
Maximum Take-Off Weight (MTOW) 155,000 lbs/69,750 kg
Maximum Allowable Payload 42,000 lbs/19,090 kg
Maximum Normal Payload 34,000 lbs/15,422 kg
Range at Maximum Normal Payload 1,800 NM/2,071 miles/3,333 km
Range with 35,000 lbs/15,876 kg of Payload 1,600 NM/1,841 miles/2,963 km
Maximum Load 6 pallets or 74 litters or 16 CDS bundles or 92 combat troops or 64 paratroopers, or a combination of any of these up to the cargo compartment capacity or maximum allowable weight
Crew Three (two pilots and loadmaster)
The MC-130J Commando II is assigned to the Air Force Special Operations Command (AFSOC)
The MC-130J Commando II is assigned to the Air Force Special Operations Command (AFSOC)

 

C-130J-30 Super Hercules

Power Plant Four Rolls-Royce AE 2100D3 turboprops; 4,691 horsepower/3,498 kW
Length 112 feet, 9 inch/34.69 m
Height 38 feet, 10 inch/11. 9 m
Wingspan 132 feet, 7 inch/39.7 m
Cargo Compartment Length – 55 feet/16.9 m; width – 119 inch/3.12 m; height – 9 feet/2.74 m
Rear ramp Length – 123 inch/3.12 m; width – 119 inch/3.02 m
Speed 356 knots/Mach 0.58/410 mph/660 km/h at 22,000 feet/6,706 m
Ceiling 26,000 feet/8,000 m with 44,500 lbs/20,227 kg payload
Maximum Take-Off Weight (MTOW) 164,000 lbs/74,393 kg
Maximum Allowable Payload 44,000 lbs/19,958 kg
Maximum Normal Payload 36,000 lbs/16,329 kg
Range at Maximum Normal Payload 2,100 NM/2,417 miles/3,890 km
Range with 35,000 lbs/15,876 kg of Payload 1,700 NM/1,956 miles/3,148 km
Maximum Load 8 pallets or 97 litters or 24 CDS bundles or 128 combat troops or 92 paratroopers, or a combination of any of these up to the cargo compartment capacity or maximum allowable weight
Crew Three (two pilots and loadmaster)
The KC-130J Tanker is the global leader in aerial refueling for tactical and tiltrotor aircraft and helicopters
The KC-130J Tanker is the global leader in aerial refueling for tactical and tiltrotor aircraft and helicopters

First Italian F-35

The first delivery of an F-35 outside the United States happened December 3 at the F-35 Final Assembly and Check Out (FACO) facility in Cameri, Italy. The first Italian F-35A Lightning II for the Italian armed forces, known as AL-1, marked a production milestone for Italy’s national defense and aerospace industry.

Lieutenant General Pasquale Preziosa, Chief of the Italian Air Force, welcomes the first Italian F-35A into the Italian armed forces at a December 3 acceptance ceremony in Cameri
Lieutenant General Pasquale Preziosa, Chief of the Italian Air Force, welcomes the first Italian F-35A into the Italian armed forces at a December 3 acceptance ceremony in Cameri

«When Leonardo DaVinci first envisioned human flight as an Italian creation, there is no way he could have imagined what we have here today», said Lieutenant General Chris Bogdan, F-35 Joint Program Executive Officer. «The F-35 aircraft built here in Cameri will take flight on the wings of Italian craftsmanship, ingenuity, and skill and will help build the first global fleet of fifth generation fighters».

Italy is the sixth nation to receive an F-35 joining Australia, Netherlands, Norway, United Kingdom and the United States with jets in their service’s inventory.

The F-35s being assembled and delivered at the Italian FACO will transition to Italy’s Aeronautica Militare (Air Force) and Marina Militare (Navy). AL-1 first rolled out of the production facility in March with first flight September 7, one month ahead of schedule. Italy’s first two pilots have begun F-35 flight training at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona, where Cameri-built F-35As will be delivered in 2016 to support international pilot training.

«This is a monumental achievement for the F-35 program», said Lorraine Martin, Lockheed Martin F-35 Program General Manager. «The F-35 provides Italy’s aerospace industry with high technology work, ensuring the future health and competitiveness for their defense industry. To date, Italian industry has contracts worth more than $1 billion, along with opportunities for additional work over the life of the program».

The first two operational F-35A Lightning II aircraft arrive at Hill Air Force Base, Utah, September 2, 2015. The jets were piloted by Colonel David Lyons, 388th Fighter Wing commander, and Lieutenant Colonel Yosef Morris, 34th Fighter Squadron director of operations. Hill will receive up to 70 additional combat-coded F-35s on a staggered basis through 2019. The jets will be flown and maintained by Hill Airmen assigned to the active-duty 388th Fighter Wing and its Reserve component 419th Fighter Wing (U.S. Air Force photo/Alex R. Lloyd)
The first two operational F-35A Lightning II aircraft arrive at Hill Air Force Base, Utah, September 2, 2015. The jets were piloted by Colonel David Lyons, 388th Fighter Wing commander, and Lieutenant Colonel Yosef Morris, 34th Fighter Squadron director of operations. Hill will receive up to 70 additional combat-coded F-35s on a staggered basis through 2019. The jets will be flown and maintained by Hill Airmen assigned to the active-duty 388th Fighter Wing and its Reserve component 419th Fighter Wing (U.S. Air Force photo/Alex R. Lloyd)

 

Specifications

Length 51.4 feet/15.7 m
Height 14.4 feet/4.38 m
Wingspan 35 feet/10.7 m
Wing area 460 feet2/42.7 m2
Horizontal tail span 22.5 feet/6.86 m
Weight empty 29,300 lbs/13,290 kg
Internal fuel capacity 18,250 lbs/8,278 kg
Weapons payload 18,000 lbs/8,160 kg
Maximum weight 70,000 lbs class/31,751 kg
Standard internal weapons load Two AIM-120C air-to-air missiles
Two 2,000-pound/907 kg GBU-31 JDAM (Joint Direct Attack Munition) guided bombs
Propulsion (uninstalled thrust ratings) F135-PW-100
Maximum Power (with afterburner) 43,000 lbs/191,3 kN/19,507 kgf
Military Power (without afterburner) 28,000 lbs/128,1 kN/13,063 kgf
Engine Length 220 in/5.59 m
Engine Inlet Diameter 46 in/1.17 m
Engine Maximum Diameter 51 in/1.30 m
Bypass Ratio 0.57
Overall Pressure Ratio 28
Speed (full internal weapons load) Mach 1.6 (~1,043 knots/1,200 mph/1,931 km/h)
Combat radius (internal fuel) >590 NM/679 miles/1,093 km
Range (internal fuel) >1,200 NM/1,367 miles/2,200 km
Maximum g-rating 9.0
F-35A test pilot Maj Charles «Flak» Trickey fires the first aerial gun test burst of the GAU-22/A 25-mm gun from F-35A aircraft AF-2
F-35A test pilot Maj Charles «Flak» Trickey fires the first aerial gun test burst of the GAU-22/A 25-mm gun from F-35A aircraft AF-2

Navy Accepts MUOS

Following the completion of successful on-orbit testing, on November 30, the U.S. Navy accepted the fourth Lockheed Martin-built Mobile User Objective System (MUOS) satellite. Launched September 2, MUOS-4 is the latest addition to a network of orbiting satellites and relay ground stations that is revolutionizing secure communications for mobile military forces. Users with operational MUOS terminals can seamlessly connect beyond line-of-sight around the world and into the Global Information Grid. MUOS’ new commercial, cellular-based capabilities include simultaneous, crystal-clear voice, video and mission data, over a secure high-speed Internet Protocol-based system.

MUOS satellites are equipped with a Wideband Code Division Multiple Access (WCDMA) payload that provides a 16-fold increase in transmission throughput over the current Ultra High Frequency (UHF) satellite system
MUOS satellites are equipped with a Wideband Code Division Multiple Access (WCDMA) payload that provides a 16-fold increase in transmission throughput over the current Ultra High Frequency (UHF) satellite system

«MUOS-4 completes the initial constellation, providing the MUOS network with nearly global coverage. Mobile forces, equipped with MUOS terminals, will soon be able to communicate with each other – including voice, data and exchanging imagery – real-time, virtually anywhere on the Earth», said Iris Bombelyn, Lockheed Martin’s vice president for Narrowband Communications. «This is a tremendous upgrade in communications capabilities over what currently exists for our nation and our allies».

MUOS-4 will be relocated in Spring 2016 to its on-orbit operational slot in preparation for operational acceptance. The satellite joins MUOS-1, MUOS-2 and MUOS-3, launched respectively in 2012, 2013 and January 2015, and four required MUOS ground stations. MUOS-5, an on-orbit spare, also will be launched next year.

Once fully operational, the MUOS network will provide 16 times the capacity of the legacy ultra high frequency communications satellite system, which it will continue to support, and eventually replace. More than 55,000 currently fielded radio terminals can be upgraded to be MUOS-compatible, with many of them requiring just a software upgrade.

On January 29, Lockheed Martin encapsulated the first MUOS satellite into its launch vehicle payload fairing in preparation for its February 16 launch aboard an Atlas V rocket
On January 29, Lockheed Martin encapsulated the first MUOS satellite into its launch vehicle payload fairing in preparation for its February 16 launch aboard an Atlas V rocket

 

Activity in the arctic is growing as the polar sheet cap recedes. More people, shipping, exploration and search and rescue expose the need for secure communications to protect the region. However, getting satellite communications signal is extremely difficult. But not anymore

 

Funding for Freedom

The U.S. Navy has issued a Lockheed Martin led industry team the balance of funding of $279 million for the construction of the future USS Cooperstown (LCS-23). The funding approved by Congress provides the financing required to maintain the cost and schedule of this critical national asset. Congress provided $79 million in advanced procurement funding for LCS-23 in March 2015.

Slicing its way through the choppy waters of Lake Michigan, the future USS Milwaukee (LCS-5) passed its final test, earning high marks and a thumbs-up from the U.S. Navy after successfully completing its acceptance trial September 18
Slicing its way through the choppy waters of Lake Michigan, the future USS Milwaukee (LCS-5) passed its final test, earning high marks and a thumbs-up from the U.S. Navy after successfully completing its acceptance trial September 18

«By providing this funding, the U.S. Navy demonstrates its commitment to the Lockheed Martin-led team in building the advanced Freedom-variant littoral combat ship», said Joe North, vice president of Littoral Ships and Systems at Lockheed Martin Mission Systems and Training. «We have delivered three of these ships to the fleet so far, and we stand committed on the remaining block buy deliveries».

The award comes just days after the Navy commissioned the Freedom-variant USS Milwaukee (LCS-5) in the city of Milwaukee.

The Lockheed Martin-led industry team, which includes shipbuilder Fincantieri Marinette Marine and naval architect Gibbs & Cox, has already delivered three Freedom-variant littoral combat ships to the U.S. Navy. USS Freedom (LCS-1) conducted a successful deployment to Southeast Asia in 2013 and is currently operating out of her homeport in San Diego. USS Fort Worth (LCS-3) is currently deployed in Southeast Asia, serving in the U.S. 7th Fleet.

There is current interest in hull lengths from 85 meters to 118 meters; the hull is proved from 67 meters to 150 meters at various displacements
There is current interest in hull lengths from 85 meters to 118 meters; the hull is proved from 67 meters to 150 meters at various displacements

 

Ship Design Specifications

Hull Advanced semiplaning steel monohull
Length Overall 389 feet/118.6 m
Beam Overall 57 feet/17.5 m
Draft 13.5 feet/4.1 m
Full Load Displacement Approximately 3,200 metric tons
Top Speed Greater than 40 knots/46 mph/74 km/h
Range at top speed 1,000 NM/1,151 miles/1,852 km
Range at cruise speed 4,000 NM/4,603 miles/7,408 km
Watercraft Launch and Recovery Up to Sea State 4
Aircraft Launch and Recovery Up to Sea State 5
Propulsion Combined diesel and gas turbine with steerable water jet propulsion
Power 85 MW/113,600 horsepower
Hangar Space Two MH-60 Romeo Helicopters
One MH-60 Romeo Helicopter and three Vertical Take-off and Land Tactical Unmanned Air Vehicles (VTUAVs)
Core Crew Less than 50
Accommodations for 75 sailors provide higher sailor quality of life than current fleet
Integrated Bridge System Fully digital nautical charts are interfaced to ship sensors to support safe ship operation
Core Self-Defense Suite Includes 3D air search radar
Electro-Optical/Infrared (EO/IR) gunfire control system
Rolling-Airframe Missile Launching System
57-mm Main Gun
Mine, Torpedo Detection
Decoy Launching System
SUW Configured Freedom
SUW Configured Freedom

 

Ship list

USS Freedom (LCS-1)

USS Fort Worth (LCS-3)

USS Milwaukee (LCS-5)

USS Detroit (LCS-7)

USS Little Rock (LCS-9)

USS Sioux City (LCS-11)

USS Wichita (LCS-13)

USS Billings (LCS-15)

USS Indianapolis (LCS-17)

USS St. Louis (LCS-19)

USS Minneapolis/St. Paul (LCS-21)

USS Cooperstown (LCS-23)

The U.S. Navy’s Freedom class littoral combat ship, a revolutionary surface combatant being built by a Lockheed Martin team achieved multiple operational and production milestones

 

Hit-to-kill interceptor

A Lockheed Martin PAC-3 Missile successfully intercepted an incoming target on Thursday, November 19, as part of a U.S. Army-led missile defense flight test at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico. The PAC-3 interceptor successfully detected, tracked and intercepted a Patriot-as-a-Target (PAAT), which is a legacy Patriot missile modified to represent a tactical ballistic missile common in today’s operational environment.

Enemy tactical ballistic missiles, cruise missiles and aircraft have met their match. Meet the PAC-3 interceptor – one the most advanced, capable and powerful terminal air defense missiles in the world
Enemy tactical ballistic missiles, cruise missiles and aircraft have met their match. Meet the PAC-3 interceptor – one the most advanced, capable and powerful terminal air defense missiles in the world

«The PAC-3 Missile continues to demonstrate its reliability in the field, and it remains the only combat proven hit-to-kill interceptor in the world», said Scott Arnold, vice president of PAC-3 programs at Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control. «As global threats escalate, we expect PAC-3 interceptors to continue serving as a critical defense layer in the protection of soldiers, citizens and infrastructure».

The intercept is the second successful PAC-3 Missile test in just under one week. On Thursday, November 12, a PAC-3 also intercepted an airborne target as part of the U.S. Army’s Integrated Air & Missile Defense Battle Command System (IBCS) fight test at White Sands.

The PAC-3 Missile is a high-velocity interceptor that defends against incoming threats including tactical ballistic missiles, cruise missiles and aircraft using hit-to-kill technology. PAC-3 currently provides missile defense capabilities for six nations – the U.S., the Netherlands, Germany, Japan, United Arab Emirates and Taiwan; and Lockheed Martin is on contract for PAC-3 with four additional nations – Kuwait, Qatar, South Korea and Saudi Arabia.

Patriot Advanced Capability-3 (PAC-3)
Patriot Advanced Capability-3 (PAC-3)

 

PATRIOT Advanced Capability-3 (PAC-3)

The most mature hit-to-kill weapon system of the Ballistic Missile Defense System (BMDS), the Patriot Weapon System using Patriot Advanced Capability (PAC)-3 missiles, is now operational and fielded by the U.S. Army.

A land-based element built upon the proven Patriot air and missile defense infrastructure.

PAC-3 was deployed to the Middle East as part of Operation Iraqi Freedom where it intercepted ballistic missiles with a combination of GEM and PAC-3 missiles. The GEM missile uses a blast fragmentation warhead while the PAC-3 missile employs hit-to-kill technology to kill ballistic missiles.

The Army is responsible for production and further development of the PAC-3 and the Medium Extended Air Defense System (MEADS); the Missile Defense Agency remains responsible for the BMDS and PAC-3 interoperability and integration efforts.

Provides simultaneous air and missile defense capabilities as the Lower Tier element in defense of U.S. deployed forces and allies.

Works with Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) to provide an integrated, overlapping defense against missile threats in the terminal phase of flight. Jointly, these systems engage the threat by forming a multi-tier theater defense against adversary missile threats using peer-to-peer engagement coordination, early warning track data, and battle management situational awareness.

Contributes to the entire system’s situational awareness by transmitting precision cueing data to other theater elements while simultaneously protecting system assets against short-range ballistic missiles, large-caliber rockets, and air-breathing threats.

For homeland defense, Patriot provides detection, track, and engagement of short-range ballistic missiles and cruise missiles. These engagements are further enhanced by networked remote sensors that supply early warning data to increase the probability of success.

Patriot has added Upper-Tier Debris Mitigation capability to mitigate the excessive radar load and potential missile waste caused by debris from upper-tier intercepts.

October 25, 2012 – A Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) interceptor is launched from Meck Island and a PATRIOT Advanced Capability 3 (PAC-3) interceptor is launched from Omelek Island during MDA’s historic integrated flight test on October 24, 2012 (October 25 on Kwajalein)

Milwaukee is ready

The U.S. Navy commissioned the nation’s fifth Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) – USS Milwaukee (LCS-5) – in Milwaukee on November 21, officially placing the ship designed and constructed by a Lockheed Martin-led industry team into active service. Milwaukee, the third Freedom-variant in the LCS class, successfully passed Acceptance Trials in September and was delivered to the U.S. Navy on October 16.

Vice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO) Admiral Michelle Howard speaks during the commissioning of USS Milwaukee (LCS-5)
Vice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO) Admiral Michelle Howard speaks during the commissioning of USS Milwaukee (LCS-5)

«The USS Milwaukee is a warship with capabilities unlike any others», said Stephanie C. Hill, vice president of Ship & Aviation Systems for Lockheed Martin Mission Systems and Training business. «The entire Lockheed Martin-led LCS industry team is proud to deliver USS Milwaukee to the crew who will bring this great ship to life to participate in the defense of our great nation».

The fifth U.S. Navy vessel bearing the name, Milwaukee will transit to its homeport in San Diego, California, where it will be integrated into the fleet and the industry-Navy team will conduct additional program testing and crew training.

The Lockheed Martin-led industry team, which includes shipbuilder Fincantieri Marinette Marine and naval architect Gibbs & Cox, has already delivered two Freedom-variant littoral combat ships to the U.S. Navy. USS Freedom (LCS-1) conducted a successful deployment to Southeast Asia in 2013 and is currently operating out of her homeport in San Diego. USS Fort Worth (LCS-3) is currently deployed in Southeast Asia, serving in the U.S. 7th Fleet.

USS Detroit (LCS-7) is scheduled to be delivered in early 2016. USS Sioux City (LCS-11), USS Wichita (LCS-13), USS Billings (LCS-15), and USS Indianapolis (LCS-17) are in construction. USS St. Louis (LCS-19) and USS Minneapolis/St. Paul (LCS-21) are in long-lead material procurement.

The commissioning is the final act that marks entrance of a ship into the naval forces of her nation. It is the final of three events that bring a ship to life: keel laying, launching and christening, and commissioning.

The USS Milwaukee (LCS-5) departs Fincantieri Marinette Marine shipyard for the last time as LCS crew 104 guides her to Lake Michigan
The USS Milwaukee (LCS-5) departs Fincantieri Marinette Marine shipyard for the last time as LCS crew 104 guides her to Lake Michigan

 

Ship Design Specifications

Hull Advanced semiplaning steel monohull
Length Overall 389 feet/118.6 m
Beam Overall 57 feet/17.5 m
Draft 13.5 feet/4.1 m
Full Load Displacement Approximately 3,200 metric tons
Top Speed Greater than 40 knots/46 mph/74 km/h
Range at top speed 1,000 NM/1,151 miles/1,852 km
Range at cruise speed 4,000 NM/4,603 miles/7,408 km
Watercraft Launch and Recovery Up to Sea State 4
Aircraft Launch and Recovery Up to Sea State 5
Propulsion Combined diesel and gas turbine with steerable water jet propulsion
Power 85 MW/113,600 horsepower
Hangar Space Two MH-60 Romeo Helicopters
One MH-60 Romeo Helicopter and three Vertical Take-off and Land Tactical Unmanned Air Vehicles (VTUAVs)
Core Crew Less than 50
Accommodations for 75 sailors provide higher sailor quality of life than current fleet
Integrated Bridge System Fully digital nautical charts are interfaced to ship sensors to support safe ship operation
Core Self-Defense Suite Includes 3D air search radar
Electro-Optical/Infrared (EO/IR) gunfire control system
Rolling-Airframe Missile Launching System
57-mm Main Gun
Mine, Torpedo Detection
Decoy Launching System
Slicing its way through the choppy waters of Lake Michigan, the future USS Milwaukee (LCS-5) passed its final test, earning high marks and a thumbs-up from the U.S. Navy after successfully completing its acceptance trial September 18
Slicing its way through the choppy waters of Lake Michigan, the future USS Milwaukee (LCS-5) passed its final test, earning high marks and a thumbs-up from the U.S. Navy after successfully completing its acceptance trial September 18

 

Ship list

USS Freedom (LCS-1)

USS Fort Worth (LCS-3)

USS Milwaukee (LCS-5)

USS Detroit (LCS-7)

USS Little Rock (LCS-9)

USS Sioux City (LCS-11)

USS Wichita (LCS-13)

USS Billings (LCS-15)

USS Indianapolis (LCS-17)

USS St. Louis (LCS-19)

USS Minneapolis/St. Paul (LCS-21)

USS Cooperstown (LCS-23)

She will join her sister Freedom-variant littoral combat ships, USS Freedom and USS Fort Worth, in the Fleet
She will join her sister Freedom-variant littoral combat ships, USS Freedom and USS Fort Worth, in the Fleet

Finnish GMLRS

The Finnish Defence Forces is currently preparing the procurement of GMLRS AW and the GMLRS UNITARY munitions. The invitation to tender concerning the procurement is currently under consideration in the United States Congress.

The Integration software of the upgraded M20B1 UK launcher fires its first GMLRS rocket at the White Sand Missile Range in New Mexico. GMLRS and M270B1 are now deployed in theater in support of UK ground forces and complement their US counterparts (Photo by Lockheed Martin)
The Integration software of the upgraded M20B1 UK launcher fires its first GMLRS rocket at the White Sand Missile Range in New Mexico. GMLRS and M270B1 are now deployed in theater in support of UK ground forces and complement their US counterparts (Photo by Lockheed Martin)

Procurement of the new guided munitions will make the use of the rocket launch system procured in 2006 more efficient and diversify the range of munitions available for the multiple launch rocket systems. The use of guided munitions is possible due to the reform of the fire control of rocket launcher systems drawn up in 2012-15.

When exploding the GMLRS AW spreads fragments above the target. The effect of the GMLRS UNITARY on the other hand is based on its explosive and pressure impact. The range of both the munitions is approximately 70 kilometres.

The procurement decision for the munitions will be made by Finland’s Ministry of Defence following the contract negotiations. The product is in accordance with the international Convention on Cluster Munitions.

Guided MLRS Unitary Rocket diagram (Photo by Lockheed Martin)
Guided MLRS Unitary Rocket diagram (Photo by Lockheed Martin)

 

Guided MLRS Unitary Rocket

The MLRS Family of Munitions includes three rockets and four missiles with an additional six variants in development. This MFOM meets the complete Army requirement for tactical and operational support.

Guided Unitary MLRS:

  • A pre-planned product improvement to GMLRS;
  • Integrates approximately 200 pound Unitary Warhead into the GMLRS;
  • Enhanced anti-jam and accuracy processor;
  • Low cost/risk program to greatly reduce collateral damage;
  • One round, one kill capability.

 

Successful test flights

The U.S. Navy conducted successful test flights November 7 and 9 of two Trident II D5 Fleet Ballistic Missiles built by Lockheed Martin. The world’s most reliable large ballistic missile, the D5 missile has achieved a total of 157 successful test flights since design completion in 1989. The D5 is the sixth in a series of missile generations deployed since the sea-based deterrent program began 60 years ago.

The U.S. Navy tested two Trident II D5 fleet ballistic missiles November 7 and 9 in the Pacific Ocean. One of the missiles is shown here shortly after its launch from a submerged submarine (Photo: U.S. Navy)
The U.S. Navy tested two Trident II D5 fleet ballistic missiles November 7 and 9 in the Pacific Ocean. One of the missiles is shown here shortly after its launch from a submerged submarine (Photo: U.S. Navy)

The Navy launched the unarmed missiles in the Pacific Ocean from a submerged Ohio-class submarine. The missiles were converted into test configurations using kits produced by Lockheed Martin that contain range safety devices and flight telemetry instrumentation. The test flights were part of a demonstration and shakedown operation, which the Navy uses to certify a submarine for deployment following an overhaul.

«This reliability record is a testament to the unwavering dedication to the deterrence mission by the Navy program office, the submarine crews and the industry team», said Mat Joyce, vice president of Fleet Ballistic Missile programs and deputy for Strategic and Missile Defense Systems, Lockheed Martin Space Systems. «Building on a six-decade history of success, we’re moving into the future by implementing new engineering methods that will pave the way for continued innovation and performance».

To support the U.S. Navy Strategic Systems Programs, Lockheed Martin is incorporating modernized electronics technology to cost effectively prolong the service life of the D5 missile design on current and next-generation submarine platforms. These two missile flights formally qualify the new flight control and interlocks electronics packages for deployment in 2017. The modernized avionics subsystems, which control key missile functions during flight, enable missile life extension through 2042.

The company also is transitioning to designing components in a digital environment and using 3-D printing to efficiently produce prototypes.

«This is an example of how Lockheed Martin continually moves forward in advancing our ballistic missile systems to ensure that we are employing the latest technologies to meet our customers’ mission and budget requirements», said Joyce.

The Trident II D5 missile is deployed aboard U.S. Navy Ohio-class and U.K. Royal Navy Vanguard-class submarines to deter nuclear aggression. The three-stage ballistic missile can travel a nominal range of 4,000 nautical miles/4,603 miles/7,408 km and carry multiple independently targeted reentry bodies.

Lockheed Martin has been the Navy’s strategic missile prime contractor since December 27, 1955 – one of the longest government and industry partnerships for a major U.S. weapon system. The company also performs program management and engineering services for the Royal Navy under the Polaris Sales Agreement.

 

General Characteristics

Primary Function Strategic Nuclear Deterrence
Contractor Lockheed Missiles and Space Co., Inc., Sunnyvale, California
Date Deployed 1990
Unit Cost $30.9 million
Propulsion Three-stage solid-propellant rocket
Length 44 feet/13.41 m
Diameter 83 inches/2.11 m
Weight 130,000 pounds/58,500 kg
Range Greater than 4,000 NM/4,603 miles/7,408 km
Guidance System Inertial
Warhead Nuclear MIRV (Multiple Independently Targetable Re-entry Vehicles)