Tag Archives: Lockheed Martin

The latest addition

The U.S. Navy and Lockheed Martin delivered the fifth Mobile User Objective System (MUOS) satellite to Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, on March 3, prior to its expected May launch. The spacecraft will be the third MUOS satellite launched in a 16-month span, a cadence that demonstrates the production line concept put into place for the delivery of this five-satellite build.

MUOS-5 is third satellite to launch in 16 months for U.S. Navy’s Smart Phone-Like Network
MUOS-5 is third satellite to launch in 16 months for U.S. Navy’s Smart Phone-Like Network

MUOS-5 is the latest addition to a network of orbiting satellites and relay ground stations that is revolutionizing secure communications for mobile military forces. Users with operational MUOS terminals will be able to seamlessly connect beyond line-of-sight around the world and into the Global Information Grid. MUOS’ new capabilities include simultaneous, crystal-clear voice, video and mission data, over a secure high-speed Internet Protocol-based system, similar to today’s smart phones.

MUOS-5 will complete the U.S. Navy’s baseline constellation and serve as an on-orbit spare for the system, ensuring the network is always available to support U.S. and allied mobile forces.

«As MUOS-5’s launch approaches, MUOS-4 is preparing to begin operations on-station, enabling MUOS’ near-global coverage», said Mark Woempner, program director of Lockheed Martin’s Narrowband Communications mission area. «We are proud that we will soon be providing our mobile forces access to the system’s enhanced communications capabilities from nearly anywhere, including further into polar regions than ever before».

Lockheed Martin manufactured MUOS-5 at its Sunnyvale, California facility. For its trip to Florida the satellite was loaded aboard a C-5 Galaxy aircraft at nearby Moffett Federal Air Field by the 60th Air Mobility Wing of Travis Air Force Base (AFB). Astrotech Space Operations, a Lockheed Martin wholly-owned subsidiary in Florida, will complete MUOS-5’s pre-launch processing.

The satellite joins MUOS-1, MUOS-2, MUOS-3, and MUOS-4 already on orbit. All four required MUOS ground stations are complete. More than 55,000 currently fielded radio terminals can be upgraded to be MUOS-compatible, with many of them requiring just a software upgrade.

Once fully operational, the MUOS network will provide 16 times the capacity of the legacy ultra-high frequency communications satellite system, which it will continue to support, and eventually replace.

On March 3, MUOS-5, the next satellite scheduled to join the U.S. Navy’s Mobile User Objective System secure communications network, arrived at Cape Canaveral after shipping from Lockheed Martin’s satellite manufacturing facility in Sunnyvale, California
On March 3, MUOS-5, the next satellite scheduled to join the U.S. Navy’s Mobile User Objective System secure communications network, arrived at Cape Canaveral after shipping from Lockheed Martin’s satellite manufacturing facility in Sunnyvale, California

Thermal Vacuum Test

Engineers at Lockheed Martin recently proved their design for the world’s most powerful Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite can operate in and withstand the harsh conditions it will experience on orbit. On December 23, Lockheed Martin’s first GPS III satellite for the U.S. Air Force completed system-level Thermal Vacuum (TVAC) testing, validating the design of the entire assembled satellite. TVAC is a rigorous test designed to prove a satellite’s integrity and operational capabilities by subjecting it to prolonged cycles of simulated space temperature extremes in a special depressurized chamber.

The first GPS III satellite recently completed system-level Thermal Vacuum testing, validating Lockheed Martin’s design for the next generation of more powerful GPS satellites
The first GPS III satellite recently completed system-level Thermal Vacuum testing, validating Lockheed Martin’s design for the next generation of more powerful GPS satellites

«TVAC is the most comprehensive and perceptive test performed at the spacecraft level. If there is an issue with your design or production processes, you are going to find it here», said Mark Stewart, vice president of Lockheed Martin’s Navigation Systems mission area. «Successful completion of this significant test validates the thermal design of the spacecraft and verifies that all spacecraft components and interfaces operate at the temperature extremes of the space environment. We credit this performance to the Back to Basics work we performed earlier and the program’s unique GPS III Non-flight Satellite Testbed».

TVAC is the latest in a string of milestones for the first GPS III satellite. Last spring, the satellite’s major functional components were successfully integrated to form the first complete satellite. Last fall, the new satellite also successfully completed acoustic testing, where it was pounded with sound waves to simulate the vibrations it will endure during its launch.

With eight satellites under contract, the production line is now on a steady tempo at Lockheed Martin’s GPS III Processing Facility outside of Denver. The first four GPS III satellites are in various stages of assembly and test with most major components – including their structure and propulsion systems, solar arrays, and antennas – already delivered. This spring, with Harris Corporation’s delivery of its second navigation payload, the second GPS III satellite is expected to be integrated and begin environmental testing. Components for the next four GPS III satellites are already being assembled, tested and delivered on schedule by more than 250 aerospace industry companies from 29 states.

«We have a world class industry team supporting the development and production of GPS III for the Air Force and our nation», continued Stewart. «I thank them for their excellent work and commitment to this program».

GPS III will deliver three times better accuracy, provide up to eight times improved anti-jamming capabilities and extend spacecraft life to 15 years, 25 percent longer than the satellites launching today. GPS III’s new L1C civil signal also will make it the first GPS satellite to be interoperable with other international global navigation satellite systems.

The GPS III team is led by the Global Positioning Systems Directorate at the U.S. Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center. U.S. Air Force Space Command’s 2nd Space Operations Squadron (2SOPS), based at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado, manages and operates the GPS constellation for both civil and military users.

Christening of
Sioux City

The Lockheed Martin-led industry team launched the nation’s 11th Littoral Combat Ship (LCS), Sioux City, into the Menominee River at the Fincantieri Marinette Marine (FMM) shipyard on January 30. The ship’s sponsor, Mrs. Mary Winnefeld, christened the USS Sioux City (LCS-11) with the traditional smashing of a champagne bottle across the ship’s bow just prior to the launch.

The Lockheed Martin-led industry team launched the nation's 11th LCS, Sioux City, into the Menominee River at the FMM shipyard
The Lockheed Martin-led industry team launched the nation’s 11th LCS, Sioux City, into the Menominee River at the FMM shipyard

«It is an honor and a privilege to serve as the sponsor of the future USS Sioux City (LCS-11) and to be a part of this major milestone along the way to her assuming her place as part of the great U.S. Navy fleet», said Mrs. Winnefeld. «I also look forward to an ongoing relationship with her courageous crews and their families throughout the ship’s lifetime».

Following christening and launch, USS Sioux City (LCS-11) will continue to undergo outfitting and testing before delivery to the U.S. Navy in early 2017.

«The future USS Sioux City’s interchangeable mission modules will empower her to face a variety of high-priority missions, from Anti-Surface Warfare (ASuW) to Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) to Mine CounterMeasures (MCM)», said Joe North, Lockheed Martin vice president of Littoral Ships & Systems. «She is ideally suited to navigate the reefs and shallows in the Asia-Pacific, as USS Fort Worth (LCS-3) has demonstrated on her current 20-month deployment».

The Freedom-variant ships have demonstrated their value with successful deployments to Southeast Asia, including USS Fort Worth (LCS-3), which is providing the necessary capabilities for contingency operations in the region today. USS Freedom (LCS-1) conducted a successful deployment to Southeast Asia in 2013 and is currently operating out of her homeport in San Diego.

«The Christening and Launch of the USS Sioux City (LCS-11) is a proud event for FMM», said Jan Allman, President and CEO of Fincantieri Marinette Marine. «It showcases the craftsmanship and engineering capabilities of our workforce. We are confident that this ship will play a vital role in the Fleet, and carry the spirit of our industry team as she sails the globe».

The Lockheed Martin-led industry team is currently in serial production of the Freedom-variant, and has already delivered three ships to the U.S. Navy to date. The USS Sioux City (LCS-11) is one of seven ships in various stages of construction at Fincantieri Marinette Marine, with two more in long-lead production.

Mrs. Mary Winnefeld, ship sponsor of the future USS Sioux City, christens the 11th littoral combat ship before launching sideways into the Menominee River in Marinette, Wisconsin
Mrs. Mary Winnefeld, ship sponsor of the future USS Sioux City, christens the 11th littoral combat ship before launching sideways into the Menominee River in Marinette, Wisconsin

 

Ship Design Specifications

Hull Advanced semiplaning steel monohull
Length Overall 389 feet/118.6 m
Beam Overall 57 feet/17.5 m
Draft 13.5 feet/4.1 m
Full Load Displacement Approximately 3,200 metric tons
Top Speed Greater than 40 knots/46 mph/74 km/h
Range at top speed 1,000 NM/1,151 miles/1,852 km
Range at cruise speed 4,000 NM/4,603 miles/7,408 km
Watercraft Launch and Recovery Up to Sea State 4
Aircraft Launch and Recovery Up to Sea State 5
Propulsion Combined diesel and gas turbine with steerable water jet propulsion
Power 85 MW/113,600 horsepower
Hangar Space Two MH-60 Romeo Helicopters
One MH-60 Romeo Helicopter and three Vertical Take-off and Land Tactical Unmanned Air Vehicles (VTUAVs)
Core Crew Less than 50
Accommodations for 75 sailors provide higher sailor quality of life than current fleet
Integrated Bridge System Fully digital nautical charts are interfaced to ship sensors to support safe ship operation
Core Self-Defense Suite Includes 3D air search radar
Electro-Optical/Infrared (EO/IR) gunfire control system
Rolling-Airframe Missile Launching System
57-mm Main Gun
Mine, Torpedo Detection
Decoy Launching System
U.S. Navy to receive nation’s 11th littoral combat ship
U.S. Navy to receive nation’s 11th littoral combat ship

 

Freedom-class

Ship Laid down Launched Commissioned Homeport
USS Freedom (LCS-1) 06-02-2005 09-23-2006 11-08-2008 San Diego, California
USS Fort Worth (LCS-3) 07-11-2009 12-07-2010 09-22-2012 San Diego, California
USS Milwaukee (LCS-5) 10-27-2011 12-18-2013 11-21-2015 San Diego, California
USS Detroit (LCS-7) 08-11-2012 10-18-2014
USS Little Rock (LCS-9) 06-27-2013 07-18-2015
USS Sioux City (LCS-11) 02-19-2014  01-30-2016
USS Wichita (LCS-13) 02-09-2015
USS Billings (LCS-15) 11-02-2015
USS Indianapolis (LCS-17)
USS St. Louis (LCS-19)
USS Minneapolis/St. Paul (LCS-21)
USS Cooperstown (LCS-23)

 

The U.S. Navy’s 11th littoral combat ship, the future USS Sioux City, launched sideways into the Menominee River in Marinette, Wisconsin, on January 30. Ship sponsor Mrs. Mary Winnefeld conducted the time-honored tradition of christening the ship by smashing a bottle of champagne across the bow

 

F-35 fires AIM-9X

An F-35 Lightning II fighter jet from the 461st Flight Test Squadron launched an AIM-9X missile for the first time over the Pacific Sea Test Range January 12.

AF-1, of the 461st Flight Test Squadron at Edwards Air Force Base, California, became the first F-35 to fire the AIM-9X missile January 12, 2016 (Lockheed Martin photo/Chad Bellay)
AF-1, of the 461st Flight Test Squadron at Edwards Air Force Base, California, became the first F-35 to fire the AIM-9X missile January 12, 2016 (Lockheed Martin photo/Chad Bellay)

The flight sciences aircraft, AF-1, of the Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) Integrated Test Force, was piloted by David Nelson, the Lockheed Martin chief F-35 Lightning II test pilot at Edwards Air Force Base, California.

The AIM-9X is an advanced infrared missile and the newest of the Sidewinder family of short-range air-to-air missiles carried on a wide range of fighter jets.

The missile was launched at 6,000 feet/1,829 m.

The shot paves the way for the F-35 Lightning II to utilize the weapon’s high off-boresight and targeting capabilities, increasing lethality in the visual arena.

 

Specifications

Length 51.4 feet/15.7 m
Height 14.4 feet/4.38 m
Wingspan 35 feet/10.7 m
Wing area 460 feet2/42.7 m2
Horizontal tail span 22.5 feet/6.86 m
Weight empty 29,300 lbs/13,290 kg
Internal fuel capacity 18,250 lbs/8,278 kg
Weapons payload 18,000 lbs/8,160 kg
Maximum weight 70,000 lbs class/31,751 kg
Standard internal weapons load Two AIM-120C air-to-air missiles
Two 2,000-pound/907 kg GBU-31 JDAM (Joint Direct Attack Munition) guided bombs
Propulsion (uninstalled thrust ratings) F135-PW-100
Maximum Power (with afterburner) 43,000 lbs/191,3 kN/19,507 kgf
Military Power (without afterburner) 28,000 lbs/128,1 kN/13,063 kgf
Engine Length 220 in/5.59 m
Engine Inlet Diameter 46 in/1.17 m
Engine Maximum Diameter 51 in/1.30 m
Bypass Ratio 0.57
Overall Pressure Ratio 28
Speed (full internal weapons load) Mach 1.6 (~1,043 knots/1,200 mph/1,931 km/h)
Combat radius (internal fuel) >590 NM/679 miles/1,093 km
Range (internal fuel) >1,200 NM/1,367 miles/2,200 km
Maximum g-rating 9.0

 

The Aegis baseline

The U.S. Navy and Missile Defense Agency (MDA) certified the latest evolution of the Aegis Combat System – called Baseline 9.C1 – for the U.S. destroyer fleet. The Aegis baseline, built by Lockheed Martin offers advanced defense capabilities and enhanced integration with other systems external to the ship.

The latest evolution of the Aegis Combat System – Baseline 9.C1 – was certified for the U.S. Destroyer fleet, which will one day include the USS John Finn (DDG-113), now under construction
The latest evolution of the Aegis Combat System – Baseline 9.C1 – was certified for the U.S. Destroyer fleet, which will one day include the USS John Finn (DDG-113), now under construction

«The Aegis Combat System Baseline 9.C1 offers unprecedented capabilities, including simultaneous air and ballistic missile defense», said Jim Sheridan, Lockheed Martin director of Aegis programs. «This Aegis baseline also improves Aegis networking capabilities, allowing Aegis vessels to automatically coordinate defense with input from satellite and ground-based radar assets – forming a true shield of defense over a wide area».

Baseline 9.C1, also includes the most current generation of ballistic missile defense programming, known as BMD 5.0 Capability Upgrade, which offers the proven capability to shoot down ballistic missiles in both the exo-atmosphere (upper atmosphere) and endo-atmosphere (lower atmosphere). The BMD capabilities of Baseline 9.C1 are also present in Aegis Ashore, the ground-based missile defense program that is the second phase of the U.S. Phased Adaptive Approach to protect Europe from ballistic missile attack.

Over the summer, the U.S. Navy and MDA conducted the Multi-Mission Warfare (MMW) tests to verify performance of recent BMD upgrades and are a critical part of the baseline certification process. Over the course of the four test events aboard USS John Paul Jones (DDG-53), Aegis flawlessly detected, tracked, and engaged two Ballistic Missile and two air warfare targets. Each event resulted in the successful intercept of a single target.

Aegis Baseline 9.C1 provides the U.S. Navy surface fleet with the most advanced air defense capability ever. Under this baseline configuration, Aegis merges BMD and anti-air warfare into its Integrated Air and Missile Defense (IAMD) capability using commercial-off-the-shelf and open architecture technologies.

The central component of the Lockheed Martin-developed Aegis BMD Combat System is the SPY-1 radar, deployed on more than 100 ships worldwide – the most widely fielded naval phased array radar in the world. SPY-1 capability has been greatly enhanced with the introduction of a new Multi-Mission Signal Processor (MMSP). Baseline 9.C1 improves radar resolution and discrimination abilities.

As the Aegis Combat Systems Engineering Agent, Lockheed Martin leads the ongoing development of the weapon system for the U.S. Navy and MDA. Lockheed Martin pioneered the open-architecture software design of Aegis and each new program developed for Aegis becomes part of the Aegis Common Source Library, which allows the U.S. Navy and MDA to affordably and efficiently re-use and upgrade Aegis programing across a variety of defense platforms.

«Adir» for Israel

Lockheed Martin and Israeli Ministry of Defense officials commemorated the beginning of the first F-35A «Adir» (meaning «mighty one» in Hebrew) manufactured for Israel here January 7.

First F-35A «Adir» for Israel Taking Shape in Fort Worth
First F-35A «Adir» for Israel Taking Shape in Fort Worth

The aircraft, designated as F-35A aircraft AS-1, officially began its mate process, where the four major components of the 5th Generation fighter aircraft are joined together in the Electronic Mate and Assembly Station to form the aircraft’s structure. AS-1 will continue its assembly here and is expected to roll out of the factory in June and be delivered to the Israeli Air Force (IAF) later this year.

«These 5th Generation aircraft will greatly enhance the IAF’s ability to defend the State of Israel from the serious threats we face», said Aharon Marmarosh, director, Israel Ministry of Defense Mission in New York.

«Today marks a new beginning for tactical aviation for Israel», said Jeff Babione, Lockheed Martin F-35 program manager. «Lockheed Martin is proud of our long and storied relationship with Israel’s armed forces. The F-35A Adir strengthens our solid relationship with the IAF and ensures that the Israeli aerospace industry will remain strong for decades to come».

Israel has contracted for 33 F-35A Adir Conventional Take Off and Landing (CTOL) aircraft through the U.S. government’s Foreign Military Sales program. Israel’s contribution to the F-35 program includes Israel Aerospace Industries F-35A wing production; Elbit Systems Ltd. work on the Generation III helmet-mounted display system, which all F-35 pilots fleet-wide will wear; and Elbit Systems-Cyclone F-35 center fuselage composite components production.

The F-35A Adir will be a significant addition to maintaining Israel’s qualitative military edge in the Middle East, with the advanced capability to defeat emerging threats, such as advanced missiles and heavily-defended airspace through its combination of low-observability and sensor fusion. The F-35A Lightning II, a 5th generation fighter, combines advanced low observable stealth technology with fighter speed and agility, fully fused sensor information, network-enabled operations and advanced sustainment.

12 more HIMARSs

Lockheed Martin was awarded a $142,750,920 firm-fixed-price, foreign military sales contract for 12 High Mobility Artillery Rocket Systems (HIMARS) with increased crew protection cabs incorporating sapphire transparent armor glass, associated training, spares, software, modernization updates, and planned enhancements and product improvement modifications for the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Procurement also includes synergistic spares purchase for Jordon. Work will be performed in Camden, Arkansas (63.80 percent); and Dallas, Texas (36.20 percent), with an estimated completion date of December 30, 2017.

High Mobility Artillery Rocket System (HIMARS) is the newest member of the MLRS launcher family
High Mobility Artillery Rocket System (HIMARS) is the newest member of the MLRS launcher family

According to Jeremy Binnie, Jane’s Defence Weekly correspondent in London, the U.S. Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA) announced in 2006 that the UAE had requested the sale of 20 HIMARSs with 202 ATACMS pods, 260 GMLRS pods, and 104 M26 pods. The U.S. Army confirmed in October 2013 that the HIMARS systems had been delivered when it released photographs of them being operated by the UAE’s 97th Heavy Artillery Regiment during a training exercise. The DSCA announced in September 2014 that the UAE had requested a second batch of 12 HIMARSs with 100 ATACMS pods and 65 GMLRS pods. The Department of Defense (DoD) announced in May 2015 that Lockheed Martin had been awarded a $174 million contract to produce an unspecified number of ATACMS missiles for the UAE.

 

HIMARS

The High Mobility Artillery Rocket System is a wheeled launcher that delivers a lethal mix of precision munitions on the U.S. Army’s FMTV 5-ton truck. HIMARS carries a single six-pack of MLRS rockets or one ATACMS missile. HIMARS is designed to launch the entire MLRS family of munitions, including the transformational GMLRS and all ATACMS variants. HIMARS became a joint system when the U.S. Marine Corps joined the program in 2000. Approval to enter production was received in March 2003. HIMARS is currently in full-rate production.

The combat-proven HIMARS is C-130 transportable, allowing MLRS firepower to be moved rapidly into areas previously inaccessible
The combat-proven HIMARS is C-130 transportable, allowing MLRS firepower to be moved rapidly into areas previously inaccessible

Under contract to the U.S. Army, Lockheed Martin has delivered more than 400 HIMARS launchers to the Army, Marine Corps and international customers. In May 2005, the 3rd Battalion, 27th Field Artillery Regiment, XVIII Airborne Corps Artillery became the first unit equipped with HIMARS. Since then the U.S. Army has fielded eleven additional battalions, in both active and National Guard units. The U.S. Army plans to field an additional six battalions. Additionally, the Marines have fielded more than 38 launchers. HIMARS has expanded its global presence and has begun to serve the international market, including such countries as Jordan, Singapore and the United Arab Emirates.

HIMARS rolls off a C-130 combat loaded and delivers GMLRS and ATACMS munitions with pinpoint accuracy. The combat-proven HIMARS provides increased responsiveness, increased crew protection and increased effectiveness against time-critical targets, and supports conventional and Special Forces operations around the globe.

The HIMARS launcher fires MLRS rockets and ATACMS missiles
The HIMARS launcher fires MLRS rockets and ATACMS missiles

32 Super Hercules

Lockheed Martin will deliver 78 C-130J Super Hercules to the U.S. government through a C-130J Multiyear II contract, which was announced by the U.S. government on December 30, 2015.

The C-130J Super Hercules is the most flexible airlifter in the world
The C-130J Super Hercules is the most flexible airlifter in the world

The Department of Defense announced the award of more than $1 billion ($1,060,940,036) in funding for the first 32 aircraft of the Multiyear contract (13 C-130J-30, five HC-130J, 11 MC-130J, two KC-130J and one U.S. Coast Guard HC-130J aircraft). The overall contract, worth $5.3 billion, provides 78 Super Hercules aircraft to the U.S. Air Force (30 MC-130Js, 13 HC-130Js and 29 C-130J-30s) and the U.S. Marine Corps (six KC-130Js). Also through this contract, the U.S. Coast Guard has the option to acquire five HC-130Js. Aircraft purchased through the multiyear contract will deliver between 2016 and 2020.

«We are proud to partner with the U.S. government to continue to deliver to the U.S. Air Force, U.S. Marine Corps and U.S. Coast Guard the world’s most proven, versatile and advanced airlifter», said George Shultz, vice president and general manager, Air Mobility & Maritime Missions at Lockheed Martin. «This multiyear contract provides true value to our U.S. operators as they recapitalize and expand their much-relied-upon Hercules aircraft, which has the distinction of being the world’s largest and most tasked C-130 fleet».

The C-130J-30 Super Hercules is a stretch version of the C-130J
The C-130J-30 Super Hercules is a stretch version of the C-130J

Constructed in alignment with the U.S. government’s Better Buying Power initiative, this contract provides significant savings to the U.S. government through multiyear procurement as compared to annual buys.

Lockheed Martin provided 60 C-130Js to the U.S. government through an initial multiyear contract announced in 2003, which delivered aircraft to the U.S. Air Force and U.S Marine Corps from 2003-2008.

The C-130J Super Hercules is the standard in tactical airlift, providing a unique mix of versatility and performance to complete any mission, anytime, anywhere. It is the airlifter of choice for 16 nations and 19 different operators. The Super Hercules worldwide fleet has more than 1.3 million flight hours to its credit.

The HC-130J Combat King II – this C-130J variation specializes in tactical profiles and avoiding detection and recovery operations in austere environments
The HC-130J Combat King II – this C-130J variation specializes in tactical profiles and avoiding detection and recovery operations in austere environments

 

C-130J Super Hercules

Power Plant Four Rolls-Royce AE 2100D3 turboprops; 4,691 horsepower/3,498 kW
Length 97 feet, 9 inch/29.3 m
Height 38 feet, 10 inch/11. 9 m
Wingspan 132 feet, 7 inch/39.7 m
Cargo Compartment Length – 40 feet/12.31 m; width – 119 inch/3.12 m; height – 9 feet/2.74 m
Rear ramp Length – 123 inch/3.12 m; width – 119 inch/3.02 m
Speed 362 knots/Mach 0.59/417 mph/671 km/h at 22,000 feet/6,706 m
Ceiling 28,000 feet/8,615 m with 42,000 lbs/19,090 kg payload
Maximum Take-Off Weight (MTOW) 155,000 lbs/69,750 kg
Maximum Allowable Payload 42,000 lbs/19,090 kg
Maximum Normal Payload 34,000 lbs/15,422 kg
Range at Maximum Normal Payload 1,800 NM/2,071 miles/3,333 km
Range with 35,000 lbs/15,876 kg of Payload 1,600 NM/1,841 miles/2,963 km
Maximum Load 6 pallets or 74 litters or 16 CDS bundles or 92 combat troops or 64 paratroopers, or a combination of any of these up to the cargo compartment capacity or maximum allowable weight
Crew Three (two pilots and loadmaster)
The MC-130J Commando II is assigned to the Air Force Special Operations Command (AFSOC)
The MC-130J Commando II is assigned to the Air Force Special Operations Command (AFSOC)

 

C-130J-30 Super Hercules

Power Plant Four Rolls-Royce AE 2100D3 turboprops; 4,691 horsepower/3,498 kW
Length 112 feet, 9 inch/34.69 m
Height 38 feet, 10 inch/11. 9 m
Wingspan 132 feet, 7 inch/39.7 m
Cargo Compartment Length – 55 feet/16.9 m; width – 119 inch/3.12 m; height – 9 feet/2.74 m
Rear ramp Length – 123 inch/3.12 m; width – 119 inch/3.02 m
Speed 356 knots/Mach 0.58/410 mph/660 km/h at 22,000 feet/6,706 m
Ceiling 26,000 feet/8,000 m with 44,500 lbs/20,227 kg payload
Maximum Take-Off Weight (MTOW) 164,000 lbs/74,393 kg
Maximum Allowable Payload 44,000 lbs/19,958 kg
Maximum Normal Payload 36,000 lbs/16,329 kg
Range at Maximum Normal Payload 2,100 NM/2,417 miles/3,890 km
Range with 35,000 lbs/15,876 kg of Payload 1,700 NM/1,956 miles/3,148 km
Maximum Load 8 pallets or 97 litters or 24 CDS bundles or 128 combat troops or 92 paratroopers, or a combination of any of these up to the cargo compartment capacity or maximum allowable weight
Crew Three (two pilots and loadmaster)
The KC-130J Tanker is the global leader in aerial refueling for tactical and tiltrotor aircraft and helicopters
The KC-130J Tanker is the global leader in aerial refueling for tactical and tiltrotor aircraft and helicopters

First Italian F-35

The first delivery of an F-35 outside the United States happened December 3 at the F-35 Final Assembly and Check Out (FACO) facility in Cameri, Italy. The first Italian F-35A Lightning II for the Italian armed forces, known as AL-1, marked a production milestone for Italy’s national defense and aerospace industry.

Lieutenant General Pasquale Preziosa, Chief of the Italian Air Force, welcomes the first Italian F-35A into the Italian armed forces at a December 3 acceptance ceremony in Cameri
Lieutenant General Pasquale Preziosa, Chief of the Italian Air Force, welcomes the first Italian F-35A into the Italian armed forces at a December 3 acceptance ceremony in Cameri

«When Leonardo DaVinci first envisioned human flight as an Italian creation, there is no way he could have imagined what we have here today», said Lieutenant General Chris Bogdan, F-35 Joint Program Executive Officer. «The F-35 aircraft built here in Cameri will take flight on the wings of Italian craftsmanship, ingenuity, and skill and will help build the first global fleet of fifth generation fighters».

Italy is the sixth nation to receive an F-35 joining Australia, Netherlands, Norway, United Kingdom and the United States with jets in their service’s inventory.

The F-35s being assembled and delivered at the Italian FACO will transition to Italy’s Aeronautica Militare (Air Force) and Marina Militare (Navy). AL-1 first rolled out of the production facility in March with first flight September 7, one month ahead of schedule. Italy’s first two pilots have begun F-35 flight training at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona, where Cameri-built F-35As will be delivered in 2016 to support international pilot training.

«This is a monumental achievement for the F-35 program», said Lorraine Martin, Lockheed Martin F-35 Program General Manager. «The F-35 provides Italy’s aerospace industry with high technology work, ensuring the future health and competitiveness for their defense industry. To date, Italian industry has contracts worth more than $1 billion, along with opportunities for additional work over the life of the program».

The first two operational F-35A Lightning II aircraft arrive at Hill Air Force Base, Utah, September 2, 2015. The jets were piloted by Colonel David Lyons, 388th Fighter Wing commander, and Lieutenant Colonel Yosef Morris, 34th Fighter Squadron director of operations. Hill will receive up to 70 additional combat-coded F-35s on a staggered basis through 2019. The jets will be flown and maintained by Hill Airmen assigned to the active-duty 388th Fighter Wing and its Reserve component 419th Fighter Wing (U.S. Air Force photo/Alex R. Lloyd)
The first two operational F-35A Lightning II aircraft arrive at Hill Air Force Base, Utah, September 2, 2015. The jets were piloted by Colonel David Lyons, 388th Fighter Wing commander, and Lieutenant Colonel Yosef Morris, 34th Fighter Squadron director of operations. Hill will receive up to 70 additional combat-coded F-35s on a staggered basis through 2019. The jets will be flown and maintained by Hill Airmen assigned to the active-duty 388th Fighter Wing and its Reserve component 419th Fighter Wing (U.S. Air Force photo/Alex R. Lloyd)

 

Specifications

Length 51.4 feet/15.7 m
Height 14.4 feet/4.38 m
Wingspan 35 feet/10.7 m
Wing area 460 feet2/42.7 m2
Horizontal tail span 22.5 feet/6.86 m
Weight empty 29,300 lbs/13,290 kg
Internal fuel capacity 18,250 lbs/8,278 kg
Weapons payload 18,000 lbs/8,160 kg
Maximum weight 70,000 lbs class/31,751 kg
Standard internal weapons load Two AIM-120C air-to-air missiles
Two 2,000-pound/907 kg GBU-31 JDAM (Joint Direct Attack Munition) guided bombs
Propulsion (uninstalled thrust ratings) F135-PW-100
Maximum Power (with afterburner) 43,000 lbs/191,3 kN/19,507 kgf
Military Power (without afterburner) 28,000 lbs/128,1 kN/13,063 kgf
Engine Length 220 in/5.59 m
Engine Inlet Diameter 46 in/1.17 m
Engine Maximum Diameter 51 in/1.30 m
Bypass Ratio 0.57
Overall Pressure Ratio 28
Speed (full internal weapons load) Mach 1.6 (~1,043 knots/1,200 mph/1,931 km/h)
Combat radius (internal fuel) >590 NM/679 miles/1,093 km
Range (internal fuel) >1,200 NM/1,367 miles/2,200 km
Maximum g-rating 9.0
F-35A test pilot Maj Charles «Flak» Trickey fires the first aerial gun test burst of the GAU-22/A 25-mm gun from F-35A aircraft AF-2
F-35A test pilot Maj Charles «Flak» Trickey fires the first aerial gun test burst of the GAU-22/A 25-mm gun from F-35A aircraft AF-2

Navy Accepts MUOS

Following the completion of successful on-orbit testing, on November 30, the U.S. Navy accepted the fourth Lockheed Martin-built Mobile User Objective System (MUOS) satellite. Launched September 2, MUOS-4 is the latest addition to a network of orbiting satellites and relay ground stations that is revolutionizing secure communications for mobile military forces. Users with operational MUOS terminals can seamlessly connect beyond line-of-sight around the world and into the Global Information Grid. MUOS’ new commercial, cellular-based capabilities include simultaneous, crystal-clear voice, video and mission data, over a secure high-speed Internet Protocol-based system.

MUOS satellites are equipped with a Wideband Code Division Multiple Access (WCDMA) payload that provides a 16-fold increase in transmission throughput over the current Ultra High Frequency (UHF) satellite system
MUOS satellites are equipped with a Wideband Code Division Multiple Access (WCDMA) payload that provides a 16-fold increase in transmission throughput over the current Ultra High Frequency (UHF) satellite system

«MUOS-4 completes the initial constellation, providing the MUOS network with nearly global coverage. Mobile forces, equipped with MUOS terminals, will soon be able to communicate with each other – including voice, data and exchanging imagery – real-time, virtually anywhere on the Earth», said Iris Bombelyn, Lockheed Martin’s vice president for Narrowband Communications. «This is a tremendous upgrade in communications capabilities over what currently exists for our nation and our allies».

MUOS-4 will be relocated in Spring 2016 to its on-orbit operational slot in preparation for operational acceptance. The satellite joins MUOS-1, MUOS-2 and MUOS-3, launched respectively in 2012, 2013 and January 2015, and four required MUOS ground stations. MUOS-5, an on-orbit spare, also will be launched next year.

Once fully operational, the MUOS network will provide 16 times the capacity of the legacy ultra high frequency communications satellite system, which it will continue to support, and eventually replace. More than 55,000 currently fielded radio terminals can be upgraded to be MUOS-compatible, with many of them requiring just a software upgrade.

On January 29, Lockheed Martin encapsulated the first MUOS satellite into its launch vehicle payload fairing in preparation for its February 16 launch aboard an Atlas V rocket
On January 29, Lockheed Martin encapsulated the first MUOS satellite into its launch vehicle payload fairing in preparation for its February 16 launch aboard an Atlas V rocket

 

Activity in the arctic is growing as the polar sheet cap recedes. More people, shipping, exploration and search and rescue expose the need for secure communications to protect the region. However, getting satellite communications signal is extremely difficult. But not anymore