Tag Archives: Kongsberg

Officially handed over

National/Norwegian Advanced Surface to Air Missile System (NASAMS) medium-range air defence systems has been officially handed over to the Lithuanian Armed Forces. Representatives of the National Defence System and Kongsberg, Norwegian manufacturer of NASAMS, signed a document certifying good testing results of the system on October 30 at the Lithuanian Armed Forces Air Defence Battalion. On that moment Lithuania became a full-fledged owner of the systems that had been delivered to the Air Defence Battalion from Norway in the summer this year.

NASAMS
NASAMS medium-range air defence system officially handed over to the Lithuanian Armed Forces

«Guarded airspace is among the most critical enablers for Allies to deploy into the region if such a necessity arises», Minister of National Defence Raimundas Karoblis says. «We have acquired a fully assembled and integrated mid-range air defence capability, something we were in need and short of so far, in NASAMS. This, to a degree, fills one of the worst gaps in national defence – airspace security».

Minister also points out the excellent synergy among the Lithuanian and the Norwegian Defence Ministries, the Lithuanian Air Force and Kongsberg that has enabled the implementation of such a critical project within the set timeline and financial limits.

«Arrival of the system enhances Lithuania’s airspace defence and further strengthens deterrence. When we link together all the components of collective defence, we get the good result that makes potential adversaries think twice on their intents and gives more security and discretion to us», Chief of Defence of Lithuania Lieutenant General Valdemaras Rupšys underscores.

NASAMS is the most widely used medium-range air defence system across NATO. Lithuania has acquired the latest, third generation system (NASAMS 3) which is still used by the manufacturer, Norway, only.

NASAMS 3 comprises command post fire distribution centres, missile canister launchers, communications equipment, etc. The procurement has been coupled with upgrading of the short-range air defence systems RBS-70 in possession of the Lithuanian Armed Forces – the two systems will be integrated into the overall Lithuanian air defence shield.

Specialized staff began training to operate the new acquisition back in late 2019, in Norway, using training methodology and programmes developed by the Norwegian Armed Forces and Kongsberg Defence & Aerospace. Later the training was continued in Lithuania – Norwegian experts and Lithuanian military have been working on it at the Air Defence Battalion. Staff training is planned to be completed and integration of the Lithuanian NASAMS into the NATO Integrated Air Defence System begun by 2021.

The MoD Work Group analysed mid-range air defence systems available on the market to implement the NASAMS procurement project. Potential procurements were assessed according to such criteria as efficiency, compatibility with the systems used by other NATO allies, maintenance and repair costs, timetable of delivery, etc. NASAMS was selected as the closest choice to the formulated requirement and criteria.

The contract on procuring the NASAMS mid-range air defence system for the Lithuanian Air Force was signed on 26 October 2017 by the Ministry of National Defence and Norway’s Kongsberg, NASAMS manufacturer. The contract has made the cooperation between Lithuania and Norway stronger, which is very important to the security of the Baltic region allies in the current geopolitical context.

Naval Strike Missile

The State Department has made a determination approving a possible Foreign Military Sale to the Government of Romania of Naval Strike Missile (NSM) Coastal Defense Systems (CDS) and related equipment for an estimated cost of $300 million. The Defense Security Cooperation Agency delivered the required certification notifying Congress of this possible sale today.

Naval Strike Missile (NSM)
The Naval Strike Missile was developed by Norway’s Kongsberg, and is now being marketed internationally by Raytheon. Romania has been cleared to buy two coastal defense versions with four mobile launchers (Kongsberg photo)

The Government of Romania has requested to buy two (2) Coastal Defense Systems (CDS) consisting of up to ten (10) Link-16 Multifunctional Information Distribution System – Joint Tactical Radio Systems (MIDS-JTRS).

Also included are two Coastal Defense System Fire Distribution Centers; four Mobile Launch Vehicles; Transport Loading Vehicles; Naval Strike Missiles; non-operational Inert Handling/Loading Missile (IHM) to support missile handling and loading/unloading; training missile and equipment spares; associated containers; training and training equipment; publications and technical documentation; spares parts; loading and mobile maintenance support; U.S. Government and contractor engineering, technical, and logistics support services; and other related elements of logistical and program support.

The estimated total cost is $300 million.

This proposed sale will support the foreign policy and national security of the United States by helping to improve the security of a NATO Ally in developing and maintaining a strong and ready self-defense capability. This proposed sale will enhance U.S. national security objectives in the region.

The proposed sale will improve Romania’s capability to meet current and future threats by improving Romania’s maritime defense capabilities in the Black Sea and increasing interoperability with the United States. Romania will use this long-range, precision strike weapon to enhance mission effectiveness, survivability, and NATO interoperability in current and future missions and operations. Romania will have no difficulty absorbing this equipment and support into its armed forces.

The proposed sale of this equipment and support will not alter the basic military balance in the region.

The principal U.S. contractor will be Raytheon Missile and Defense, Tucson, AZ. There are no known offset agreements proposed in connection with this potential sale.

Implementation of the proposed sale will require U.S. Government and contractor personnel to visit Romania on a temporary basis in conjunction with program technical oversight and support requirements, including program and technical reviews, as well as to provide training and maintenance support in country.

There will be no adverse impact on U.S. defense readiness as a result of this proposed sale.

This notice of a potential sale is required by law. The description and dollar value is for the highest estimated quantity and dollar value based on initial requirements. Actual dollar value will be lower depending on final requirements, budget authority, and signed sales agreement(s), if and when concluded.

Medium Caliber Turret

Kongsberg will deliver up to 150 MCTs (Medium Caliber Turret) in a phased program as part of this contract. Test article delivery will commence early 2021 followed by production phases.

Kongsberg Defence & Aerospace AS (Kongsberg) has been selected by BAE Systems, Inc. to design and manufacture the remote Medium Caliber Turret (MCT) for the United States Marine Corps’ Amphibious Combat Vehicle (ACV)-30 program

The Kongsberg MCT-30 is the first remotely operated 30-mm turret to be qualified and fielded in the United States. The system provides highly accurate firepower for wheeled or tracked combat vehicles. It is remotely controlled and operated from a protected position inside the vehicle compartment for optimized crew safety.

The MCT-30 leverages a link-less medium caliber cannon providing lethality, extremely high reliability and multi-user functions to the Marine Corps ACV and other platforms.

«The ACV-30 with Kongsberg’s MCT-30 turret signifies a powerful lethality capability for the Marine Corps, representative of a new era in U.S. amphibious operations», said Pål E Bratlie, Executive Vice President Kongsberg Defence & Aerospace.

The U.S. Army, in 2015, chose Kongsberg’s MCT-30 to increase the lethality of the Stryker Brigade in Europe. The system has been fielded and operated with the Army as part of the European Deterrence Initiative since 2018.

It is the primary armament and fire control system for the Infantry Carrier Vehicle – Dragoon (ICV-D) Strykers. All MCT-30s, and any remote weapon stations, bound for U.S. customers are manufactured in the Kongsberg Johnstown, PA facility leveraging a U.S. supply base located in over 30 states.

Lithuanian NASAMS

In the end of September specialists of the Lithuanian Air Force began tests of the NASAMS medium-range air defence system made for the Lithuanian Air Force at the Kongsberg factory in Norway. Components of the weaponry system produced specifically for the Lithuanian Air Force will be first tested at the factor and then put to field trials when the air defence systems are brought to Lithuania.

Lithuania has begun testing two batteries of NASAMS medium-range air-defense missiles it ordered for 110 million euros in 2017; Lithuania’s system uses second-hand launchers from the Norwegian army and new AMRAAM missiles from the US (LT MoD photo)

The trials will assess technical and tactical conformity of NASAMS components to the determined weaponry specification. The tests will run until February 2020 and test all the NASAMS components – missile launchers, radars, electro-optical sensors, components of integration with the RBS70 short-range air defence systems, communication, and control components, and vehicles.

The NASAMS medium-range air defence system is planned to be delivered to Lithuania by the end of 2020.

Once the systems are delivered, specialist operator training will begin at the Lithuanian Air Force Air Defence Battalion.

The contract for procuring the NSAMS mid-range air defence system for the Lithuanian Air Force was signed by the Ministry of National Defence and Norway’s Kongsberg NASAMS manufacturer on 26 October 2017.

For the sum of EUR 110 million, equipment for two air defence batteries and logistical maintenance package, as well as training for operators and maintenance personnel of the system are bought from Norwegian NASAMS manufacturer Kongsberg.

Upon the completion of the project, Lithuania will have acquired a complete and integrated medium range air defence capability.

«Protected airspace is one of the main conditions necessary for deployment of allies into the region in case of necessity», Minister of National Defence Raimundas Karoblis says. «NASAMS is an assembled and integrated medium-range air defence capability we needed and did not have till present. This procurement partly fills one of the biggest gaps in national defence – airspace protection».

The system procured by Lithuania is new, except for the launchers that are pre-used by the Norwegian Armed Forces and currently upgraded to manufacturer’s parameters. The systems procured from Norway use U.S.-made AMRAAM aircraft defence missiles capable of destroying aircraft and missiles of an adversary several tens of kilometres away. All the equipment is planned to be fully delivered to Lithuania, personnel trained, and all the components integrated into a system capable of completing air defence tasks: monitor and control air space, issue warning to ground-based units about air threats, and to destroy targets if necessary.

The MoD Work Group analysed mid-range air defence systems available on the market to implement the NASAMS procurement project. Potential procurements were assessed according to such criteria as efficiency, compatibility with systems of NATO allies, maintenance and repair cost, times of delivery, etc. NASAMS was selected as the closest choice to the requirement and criteria formulated.

Lithuanian Air Force experts begin testing NASAMS medium-range air defence system

TITAN UGV

In June this year, KONGSBERG proved their innovative capabilities by firing a remotely controlled Raytheon/Lockheed Martin Javelin missile from a PROTECTOR Remote Weapon Station on an Unmanned Ground Vehicle. The event took place at Redstone Test Center, Alabama, USA.

KONGSBERG presents ground-breaking RWS capabilities on an Unmanned Ground Vehicle at DSEI 2019

A TITAN Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV), featuring QinetiQ UGV control technology on a Milrem Robotics Tracked Hybrid Modular Infantry System (THeMIS) mobility platform was used in the demonstration. Javelin and .50 caliber/12.7-mm machine gun were fired, remotely and wireless, from a PROTECTOR Common Remotely Operated Weapon Station (CROWS). Video from the missile and RWS, as well as control and firing signals was transferred on a secure circuit over radio.

This was also the first combined Javelin and M230LF 30-mm Cannon firing from a single RWS, as the event also featured the Northrup Grumman M230LF (30 mm × 113 mm) cannon. The KONGSBERG LW30 RWS was mounted on an Oshkosh Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV).

This event is nothing short of ground-breaking. The customers have been consistent in their demand for wireless capability and for increased lethality like Anti-Tank Guided Missile Integration. Our ability to integrate our partners’ quality systems into common interfaces was essential to this demonstrations success.

The combination of a wireless and remotely controlled weapon system, integrated on an unmanned vehicle, introduces capabilities that will secure our soldiers mission and safety to an even greater extent, said Pål Bratlie, Executive Vice President Kongsberg Defence & Aerospace AS.

At DSEI 2019, the Milrem Robotics’ 5th generation THeMIS UGV integrated with a PROTECTOR RWS Javelin, will be displayed at the KONGSBERG stand.

Combing unmanned ground vehicles with modern weapon systems will bring disruptive capabilities to the battlefield. Milrem Robotics has experienced this effect already with several Armies using the THeMIS with an integrated heavy machine gun. Adding such a capable antitank missile as the Javelin will significantly increase the disruptive effect, said Kuldar Väärsi, CEO of Milrem Robotics.

LAND 19 Phase 7B

On March 15, 2019, Raytheon Australia and Kongsberg Defence & Aerospace (KONGSBERG) joined Defence Minister, the Hon. Christopher Pyne and South Australian Premier, the Hon. Steven Marshall, to announce that the National Advanced Surface to Air Missile System, NASAMS, was selected for the Australian Government’s Short Range Ground Based Air Defence program known as LAND19 Phase 7B. KONGSBERG is a subcontractor to Raytheon Australia.

NASAMS has been selected by the Australian Goverment for their LAND 19 Phase 7B
NASAMS has been selected by the Australian Goverment for their LAND 19 Phase 7B

NASAMS was in 2017 chosen for a Single Supplier Limited Tender process and has gone through a Risk Mitigation Activity, and subsequently passed Government approval marked at today’s event in Adelaide. NASAMS is a fully networked and distributed system allowing the Australian Army to counter complex air threats beyond visual range and, considerably increase protection of Australian soldiers.

«This announcement lays the foundation for further expansion in Australia and the region. KONGSBERG sees more significant opportunities in Australia and have been a partner to the Australian Defence Force for 30 years starting with the Penguin anti-ship missile program. We opened an office in Canberra last year and is increasing our staff in the country», says Eirik Lie, President Kongsberg Defence & Aerospace AS.

«NASAMS is the most sold air defence system in its class in the last 10 years. Its continuous evolution enables new capabilities to be implemented in the system», says Kjetil Reiten Myhra, Executive Vice President Kongsberg Defence & Aerospace AS.

Joint Strike Missile

Kongsberg Defence & Aerospace AS (KONGSBERG) has entered into contract with Japan to supply the initial deliveries of JSM (Joint Strike Missile) for their fleet of F-35 Lightning II fighter aircrafts.

KONGSBERG awarded Joint Strike Missile contract with Japan
KONGSBERG awarded Joint Strike Missile contract with Japan

The JSM development started in 2008 and was completed in mid-2018 after a series of successful validation test firings.

«This is an important international breakthrough which demonstrates the importance of cooperation between Norwegian authorities, Norwegian Defence Research Establishment and Norwegian industry», says CEO of KONGSBERG Geir Håøy.

The JSM is the only long-range sea- and land-target missile that can be carried internally in the F-35 Lightning II and thus ensuring the aircraft’s low-signature (stealth) capabilities. JSM is a new missile that will expand the overall capabilities of the F-35 Lightning II. No other weapon on the market today, can perform the same types of missions.

«The international F-35 Lightning II user consortium is showing great interest in the JSM and KONGSBERG is very proud to have been selected by Japan to provide the JSM for their F-35 Lightning II fleet. This is a major milestone for the JSM program, entering into the production phase», says Eirik Lie, President, Kongsberg Defence & Aerospace AS.

Test Program

A team of U.S. Air Force engineers, test pilots, and Norwegian government and industry personnel recently completed a large phase of testing for the Joint Strike Missile (JSM).

A weapons load team prepares to remove a Joint Strike Missile from a 416th Flight Test Squadron F-16 Fighting Falcon following a captive carriage test flight, February 27, 2018 (U.S. Air Force photo by Christopher Okula)
A weapons load team prepares to remove a Joint Strike Missile from a 416th Flight Test Squadron F-16 Fighting Falcon following a captive carriage test flight, February 27, 2018 (U.S. Air Force photo by Christopher Okula)

The JSM is Norway’s advanced anti-surface warfare missile designed for the new F-35A Lighting II’s internal weapons bay. The missile can be employed against sea- and land-based targets. Norway is a partner nation in the development of the fifth-generation Joint Strike Fighter (JSF).

Before proceeding with integration testing on the F-35A Lighting II, the JSM was tested at Edwards Air Force Base (AFB) on F-16 Fighting Falcons from the 416th Flight Test Squadron.

«The F-16 is a much more proven and mature platform in terms of technology development», said Collin Drake, 416th FLTS JSM project engineer. «The F-35 is still undergoing its own technology development and design iterations, which brings its own challenges. It made it a lot more efficient and effective to use F-16s to be able to test, mid-cycle, a new type of weapon».

Drake said the weapons development program at Edwards AFB began in 2015. The JSM missile system was matured and proven with ground testing, captive carriage testing (flight test missions to ensure the weapon would perform its designed functions prior to being released from the aircraft), and live-drop testing to verify the JSM’s ability to safely release from the aircraft and perform its autonomous functions.

Testing included multiple variants of the JSM that increased in complexity and capability throughout the course of the program. The first JSM was a glide-only weapon with an active autopilot, but without a live engine, according to Drake. The next several tests used a version of the JSM that still did not have a warhead, but had a live engine and navigation avionics. The different variants proved the JSM could sustain extended periods of flight under its own power and successfully navigate over different terrain.

All variants of the JSM were inert until the final flight test events where it hit a target with full mission systems software and guidance. Throughout the test program, numerous software and hardware changes and updates were made. All live releases of the weapon were conducted at the Utah Test and Training Range.

«The multi-national test team, including the 416th FLTS, was able to work with the weapon developer over the course of the program to improve the JSM in an incremental fashion, which has resulted in a reliable and high-performance missile system», Drake said. «It was an enormous milestone to release the final, all-up-round weapon».

Drake said Edwards AFB’s airspace, personnel, assets and the American-Norway alliance make it the ideal situation to test the JSM.

«The weapons ranges needed simply don’t exist in Norway», Drake said. «So, they were able to come here and utilize the Edwards AFB airspace and ground test facilities for the captive carriage flight and ground testing. The 416th FLTS has a long and storied history of testing systems with our foreign partners, especially with Norway. Norway has been a partner in F-16 development since its inception, so it was a natural fit to work with the Norwegian Ministry of Defense to make this technology development program a reality. The 416th FLTS is equipped to provide flight test expertise and is adaptable to accommodate the testing of first-of-its-kind hardware and software, such as that of the Joint Strike Missile».

The next step is for the Norwegians to integrate the JSM on to the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter and then on to further weapons and integration testing.

A U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcon carries a developmental test version of Norway’s Joint Strike Missile to its release point above the Utah Test and Training Range west of Salt Lake City. When development is complete, the JSM is intended for use aboard the F-35A Lighting II. The 416th Flight Test Squadron recently wrapped up JSM testing (U.S. Air Force photo by Christopher Okula)
A U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcon carries a developmental test version of Norway’s Joint Strike Missile to its release point above the Utah Test and Training Range west of Salt Lake City. When development is complete, the JSM is intended for use aboard the F-35A Lighting II. The 416th Flight Test Squadron recently wrapped up JSM testing (U.S. Air Force photo by Christopher Okula)

Over-the-Horizon

Raytheon Co., Missile Systems, Tucson, Arizona, is awarded a $14,856,016 firm-fixed-price contract for Over-the-Horizon Weapon Systems.

Ten years after the first LCS ship was commissioned, the U.S. Navy has finally ordered a long-range missile for these vessels, whose only other weapon is a 57-mm turret. The Naval Strike Missile is made by Norway’s Kongsberg group (Kongsberg photo)
Ten years after the first LCS ship was commissioned, the U.S. Navy has finally ordered a long-range missile for these vessels, whose only other weapon is a 57-mm turret. The Naval Strike Missile is made by Norway’s Kongsberg group (Kongsberg photo)

This contract will manufacture and deliver Over-the-Horizon Weapon Systems, which consists of:

  • Encanistered Missiles (EM) loaded into Launching Mechanisms (LM);
  • a single Fire Control Suite (FCS).

This contract consists of:

  • EMs (tactical, telemetered and inert operational);
  • FCSs;
  • LMs;
  • mission support equipment, training equipment and courses;
  • engineering services;
  • travel and other direct costs.

This contract includes options which, if exercised, would bring the cumulative value of this contract to $847,611,857.

Work will be performed in:

  • Kongsberg, Norway (75 percent);
  • Tucson, Arizona (15 percent);
  • Schrobenhausen, Germany (4 percent);
  • Raufoss, Norway (3 percent);
  • McKinney, Texas (2 percent);
  • Louisville, Kentucky (1 percent),

and is expected to be completed by May 2020.

Fiscal 2018 research, development, test and evaluation (Navy) funding; and fiscal 2018 other procurement (Navy) funding in the amount of $14,856,016 will be obligated at time of award and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year.

This contract was competitively procured via the Federal Business Opportunities website, with one offer received.

The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, District of Columbia, is the contracting activity (N00024-18-C-5432).

NASAMS for Lithuania

On October 26, 2017, KONGSBERG has signed a contract worth 109 MEURO (approx. 1.000 MNOK) with the Ministry of National Defence of the Republic of Lithuania to supply a NASAMS air defence system.

KONGSBERG contract with Lithuania for NASAMS air defence system worth 109 MEURO
KONGSBERG contract with Lithuania for NASAMS air defence system worth 109 MEURO

Lithuania announced 21 October 2016 an agreement with the Norwegian Ministry of Defence on procurement of NASAMS components; today’s contract includes new additional equipment, training and integrated logistics support package, as well as refurbishment and integration of government supplied components for a complete NASAMS system.

«We are pleased that the Lithuanian Armed Forces has chosen NASAMS. NASAMS, produced by KONGSBERG and Raytheon, is the most sold air defence system in NATO in recent years, and will be the backbone air defence system for many nations in decades to come», says Eirik Lie, President, Kongsberg Defence & Aerospace AS.

 

KONGSBERG, in partnership with Raytheon, is offering one of the most modern and flexible medium-range air defence systems in the world: NASAMS – Surface Launched AMRAAM System.

Characteristics:

  • Open architecture provides growth potential
  • Single and multiple engagement capability
  • Unprecedented fire capability
  • Beyond visual range capability with active seeker missile
  • Strategic and high mobility
  • Low manpower requirements
  • Network Centric Warfare principles of operation
  • High survivability against electronic countermeasures
  • Look down/shoot down capability
  • High value asset defense, area and army defense, vital point and air base defense

Unlike many international air defense systems either in use or in development, NASAMS is truly a netted and distributed system.

 

Integration of sensors

The proven, fielded, reliable and highly capable NASAMS system contains a BMC4I (Battle Management, Command, Control, Computers, Communications, and Intelligence) Air Defense capability through the integration of sensors and launchers. It employs the Advanced Medium Range Air-to-Air Missile (AIM-120) as the primary weapon. Targets are detected and tracked by a high-resolution, 3D pencil beam radar. Multiple of these radars and the associated Fire Distribution Centres (FDCs) are netted together via radio data links, creating a real-time recognized air picture.

NASAMS can fire on target data provided by external sensors. Advanced emission control features of the radars minimize the risk of revealing the NASAMS unit’s own position. The FDC automatically performs track correlation, identification, jam strobe triangulation, threat evaluation and weapon assignment. The AMRAAM missiles used within NASAMS are identical to those used on fighter aircraft, yielding considerable rationalization returns for the user.

 

NASAMS in operation

The Royal Norwegian Air Force (RNoAF) was the first customer to introduce the NASAMS (Norwegian Advanced Surface-to-Air Missile System) program. Because of their success during NATO live flying exercises, NASAMS batteries are taken extremely serious by NATO aircrew. From 2004, NASAMS is earmarked by the Norwegian armed forces to be deployed in support of international crisis management operations.

NASAMS is under continuous development and every new program is adapted to the latest available technology. Currently, NASAMS is in use in 6 different nations.