Tag Archives: JLTV

Combat Vehicle

The State Department has made a determination approving a possible Foreign Military Sale to Lithuania of five hundred Joint Light Tactical Vehicles with support for an estimated cost of $170.8 million. The Defense Security Cooperation Agency delivered the required certification notifying Congress of this possible sale on August 27, 2019.

Light Combat Tactical All-Terrain Vehicle (L-ATV)

The Government of Lithuania has requested to buy five hundred Joint Light Tactical Vehicles, M1278A1 Heavy Guns Carriers. Also included are Baseline Integration Kits; Ballistic Kits Armor; Explosive Formed Protection Kit; Shot Detection Boomerang Kits; Shot Detection, Boomerang III; GPS Stand Alone kits; Network Switch – 8 port; M153 Common Remote Weapon Stations (CROWS); CROWS Baseline v2 Integration Kit; MK-93 Weapons Mounts; M2 QCB .50 CAL/12.7-mm Machine Guns; M230 TAC-FLIR Systems; Opaque Armor (windows); Basic Issue Item Kits; Winch Kits; Flat Tow Kits; Run-Flat Kits; Spare Tire Kits; Combat Bumper Kits; Duramax Turbo Engine with Allison 6 speed automatic transmission and 4×4 TAK-4i Independent suspension systems; personnel training and training equipment; U.S. Government and contractor engineering, technical and logistics support services; and other related elements of logistical and program support. The total estimated program cost is $170.8 million.

This proposed sale will support the foreign policy and national security objectives of the United States by helping to improve the military capability of Lithuania, a NATO ally that is an important force for ensuring political stability and economic progress within Easter Europe.

The proposed sale of the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) will help improve Lithuania’s light tactical vehicle fleet and enhance the capabilities to meet current and future enemy threats. Lithuania will have no difficulty absorbing this equipment into its armed forces.

The proposed sale of this equipment and support will not alter the basic military balance in the region.

The principal contractor will be Oshkosh Defense LLC of Oshkosh, Wisconsin. There are no known offset agreements associated with this proposed sale.

Implementation of this proposed sale will not require the assignment of additional U.S. Government or contractor representatives to Lithuania. However, it is anticipated that engineering and technical support services provided by the U.S. Government and/or the contractor may be required on an interim basis for training and technical assistance.

There will be no adverse impact on U.S. defense readiness as a result of this proposed sale.

This notice of a potential sale is required by law and does not mean the sale has been concluded.

Ready to deploy

The Marine Corps’ Joint Light Tactical Vehicle is officially ready to deploy and support missions of the naval expeditionary force-in-readiness worldwide.

The Corps’ JLTV achieves Initial Operational Capability

Marine Corps Combat Development Command, Combat Development and Integration declared the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) program – part of the Light Tactical Vehicle portfolio at Program Executive Officer (PEO) Land Systems – reached Initial Operational Capability, or IOC, on August 2, nearly a year ahead of schedule.

«Congratulations to the combined JLTV Team for acting with a sense of urgency and reaching IOC early», said Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Research, Development and Acquisition James Geurts. «Changing the speed in which we deliver, combined with coming in under cost and meeting all performance requirements, is a fine example of increasing Marine Corps capabilities at the speed of relevance which enables our Marines to compete and win on the modern battlefield».

The JLTV, a program led by the Army, will fully replace the Corps’ aging High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle fleet. The JLTV family of vehicles comes in different variants with multiple mission package configurations, all providing protected, sustained, networked mobility that balances payload, performance and protection across the full range of military operations.

«I’m proud of what our team, in collaboration with the Army, has accomplished. Their commitment to supporting the warfighter delivered an exceptional vehicle, ahead of schedule, that Marines will use to dominate on the battlefield now and well into the future».

Several elements need to be met before a program can declare IOC of a system, which encompasses more than delivery of the system itself. The program office also had to ensure all the operators were fully trained and maintenance tools and spare parts packages were ready.

«IOC is more than just saying that the schoolhouses and an infantry battalion all have their trucks», said Eugene Morin, product manager for JLTV at PEO Land Systems. «All of the tools and parts required to support the system need to be in place, the units must have had received sufficient training and each unit commander needs to declare that he is combat-ready».

For the JLTV, this means the program office had to fully field battle-ready vehicles to the Marine Corps schoolhouses – School of Infantry East at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina; School of Infantry West at Camp Pendleton, California; The Basic School at Quantico, Virginia; and the Motor Transport Maintenance Instruction Course at Camp Johnson, North Carolina – and to an infantry battalion at II Marine Expeditionary Force. The program office started delivering vehicles to the schoolhouses earlier this year and started delivering vehicles to the infantry battalion last month.

On August 2, Lieutenant Colonel Neil Berry, the commanding officer for 3rd Battalion, 8th Marines, notified Morin and his team of the unit’s combat readiness with the JLTV. On August 5, The Director, Ground Combat Element Division at Combat Development and Integration (CD&I) notified Program Manager (PM) LTV of its IOC achievement. The JLTV is scheduled to start fielding to I Marine Expeditionary Force (MEF I) and III MEF before the end of September.

According to LTV Program Manager Andrew Rodgers, during the post-acquisition Milestone C rebaseline of the JLTV schedule in January 2016, IOC was projected to occur by June 2020.

Rodgers says that detailed program scheduling, planning and, most importantly, teamwork with stakeholders across the enterprise enabled the program office to deliver the vehicles and reach IOC ahead of schedule.

«It was definitely a team effort, and we built up a really great team», said Rodgers. «In terms of leadership, our product managers’ – both Gene Morin and his predecessor, Dave Bias – detailed focus and ability to track cost, schedule and performance was key. Neal Justis, our deputy program manager, has significant prior military experience working for the Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics and Technology, so having him on board knowing how to work the Pentagon network was a huge force multiplier».

Rodgers is quick to note that, although the team has reached IOC, this is really only the beginning of the JLTV’s future legacy.

«We are really at the starting line right now. Our grandchildren and great-grandchildren will see JLTVs in the Department of Defense», said Rodgers. «We’ll easily still have these assets somewhere in the DOD in the year 2100. Welcome to the start of many generations of JLTVs».

Ambulance vehicles

Oshkosh Defense, LLC, an Oshkosh Corporation company, will showcase for the first time its L-ATV Ambulance at the Association of the United States Army (AUSA) Global Force Symposium in Huntsville, Alabama, from March 26-28, 2019.

The L-ATV Ambulance enables Army medics and Marine corpsmen to keep up with powerful JLTV while offering protection for medical personnel and wounded warriors as they move to, through and away from combat

The new L-ATV Ambulance enables Army medics and Marine corpsmen to keep up with the powerful Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) while also offering protection for medical personnel and wounded warriors as they move to, through and away from combat.

«The L-ATV Ambulance is the next generation of ambulance vehicles, designed specifically to protect wounded Warfighters without sacrificing the speed and mobility needed to keep up with JLTVs on the battlefield», said George Mansfield, Vice President and General Manager, Joint Programs. «In addition to its ability to protect and maneuver with the JLTV in combat operations, the L-ATV Ambulance has the flexibility and payload capacity medics require to transport life-saving equipment, allowing them to safely and efficiently perform their operations on the move».

With the L-ATV Ambulance’s powerful drivetrain and TAK-4i intelligent independent suspension system, the vehicle can travel off-road at JLTV speeds while the vastly improved ride quality enables medics and corpsmen to render medical aid while transporting the wounded to combat support hospitals.

The L-ATV Ambulance’s rear cab area can hold 4 litters or up to 8 seated patients or a combination of the two. There is also ample storage for any combination of high-use combat medical equipment.

Oshkosh Defense leadership will be available at booth #819 to discuss the L-ATV, along with the company’s full portfolio of vehicles, technologies, integration capabilities and aftermarket solutions.

$484 million order

Oshkosh Defense, LLC, an Oshkosh Corporation (OSK) company, announced today that the U.S. Army has placed a $484 million order for 1,574 Joint Light Tactical Vehicles (JLTV) and associated installed and packaged kits.

This latest order follows the completion of the Multiservice Operational Test and Evaluation (MOT&E) conducted by the U.S. Army and Marine Corps and further demonstrates that the JLTV program continues to be a top modernization priority for our armed services
This latest order follows the completion of the Multiservice Operational Test and Evaluation (MOT&E) conducted by the U.S. Army and Marine Corps and further demonstrates that the JLTV program continues to be a top modernization priority for our armed services

«This latest order follows the completion of the Multiservice Operational Test and Evaluation (MOT&E) conducted by the U.S. Army and Marine Corps and further demonstrates that the JLTV program continues to be a top modernization priority for our armed services», said George Mansfield, Vice President and General Manager of Joint Programs at Oshkosh Defense. «The JLTV is ready to support our troops, and we look forward to getting more soldiers and Marines into this extremely mobile, protected, and proven next-generation light tactical vehicle».

In addition to the recently completed operational testing, the JLTV also completed Reliability Qualification Testing earlier this year, accumulating over 100,000 miles and exceeding reliability requirements.

To date, Oshkosh has produced more than 2,000 JLTVs and has delivered more than 1,600 JLTVs to the U.S. Army and Marine Corps. A Full Rate Production (FRP) decision is expected in FY19.

Operational testing

Marines and Soldiers will finish testing the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle Thursday at the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center here.

Marines with Weapons Company, 1st Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment, Twentynine Palms, California, run a Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) down the road during JLTV operational testing at Twentynine Palms' Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by William C. Beach, U.S. Army Operational Test Command Test and Documentation Team)
Marines with Weapons Company, 1st Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment, Twentynine Palms, California, run a Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) down the road during JLTV operational testing at Twentynine Palms’ Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by William C. Beach, U.S. Army Operational Test Command Test and Documentation Team)

Soldiers from Bravo Troop, 1st Squadron, 33rd Cavalry Regiment, 3rd Brigade, 101st Airborne Division joined with Marines of Weapons Company, 1st Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment, to run the JLTV through its paces by conducting real-world missions in an operational environment as realistic as Iraq or Afghanistan.

Testing began late February, and according to Randall G. Fincher, JLTV test officer with the U.S. Army Operational Test Command, 39 JLTVs in two variants of Combat Tactical Vehicle and Combat Support Vehicle were split, with 18 going to the Marines and 21 to the Army test units.

«The Marines and the Army were equipped with both variants in the following mission packages: Heavy Guns Carrier, General Purpose, Close Combat Weapons Carrier, and the Utility version», said Fincher.

The biggest advantage to testing was the almost unreserved size of the MCAGCC training area and its harsh terrain, providing a true test of the vehicle’s maneuverability.

«The Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center offers us a large expanse of maneuverable terrain with hardball routes, secondary routes, and cross-country terrain in a realistic desert environment», said Colonel John W. Leffers, director of USAOTC’s Maneuver Support and Sustainment Test Directorate.

«The terrain I see out there, is very indicative of what a Soldier or Marine would see in southern Afghanistan», he continued. «It’s absolutely the conditions the JLTV will be operating in, real-world, based on past deployments and the strong possibility of areas we will operate in for the foreseeable future».

Leffers said the two particular Marine and Army units performing tests represent the JLTV’s primary customers.

«It’s a joint vehicle», he said. «We used the Marines, who picked the company they thought would use the JLTV on a frequent basis. And, for the Army, the Recon Troop was perfect because of the number of JLTVs we wanted to test in a variety of missions that we project the JLTV might be operating under».

Operationally realistic scenarios allowed the test unit Marines and Soldiers to tell the Department of Defense how well the system supports their mission execution.

For the Marines, live fire and helicopter sling load operations, as well as a Marine Amphibious Landing mission at Camp Pendleton, California were added to testing.

One combined anti-armor team section leader Marine who has been deployed to Iraq twice, said training during JLTV testing was beneficial.

«In terms of everything we did specific to Twentynine Palms and the combat center here – all of the scenarios – we’re pretty much experts at», said Marine Sergeant McLennan S. Janes. «That’s all we do. That’s our bread and butter, in terms of movement to contact and conducting deliberate attacks, defense in-depths, and conducting raids and clearances. The things exclusive to JLTV testing included the amphibious landings and sling loads by helicopter that we never get to do».

The 101st Airborne Division Soldiers from Fort Campbell, Kentucky compared the MCAGCC terrain and size to much smaller training areas at their home station.

«It’s not very often my Troop gets to go out anywhere for an extended period of time and train mounted tactics, especially in this kind of terrain», said Captain Michael D. Rodriguez, Bravo Troop commander. «It’s just not what’s at Fort Campbell».

Rodriguez said a Mounted Cavalry Troop is required to spread out over distances up to 15 kilometers and be able to shoot, move and communicate.

«The main thing we can’t get at Campbell that we can get out here is the ability to do our mission over a great distance», he said. We’ve been doing long movements, we’ve been doing missions at distance, and we’ve been identifying enemy outside of our weapons range, which is ideal for what we want to do as Scouts – we want to identify the enemy outside of weapons range and use indirect fire instead of direct fire to disrupt their ability to operate. At Fort Campbell, we come right up on our pretend enemy and get into a direct engagement with them. That’s good training, but it helps to be out here for my Soldiers to be able to see how big the battlespace is that we are required to cover as a Mounted Troop».

Rodriguez also said he welcomed the opportunity to be involved in an operational test without the normal distractions at home station.

«I was able to look at all of my Soldiers and say, ‘Hey, your job is scouting for the next two months.’ That’s pretty valuable», he said.

One of Rodriguez’s platoon leaders said the training experience during the JLTV test will go a long way for him and his Soldiers.

«Traversing in new terrain which is unfamiliar is just like being on a deployment and it’s a good experience for all of us», said First Lieutenant Mike D. Towery. «Now, we have this knowledge base of what it’s like to maneuver in a desert environment, which will most likely be coming up for us, so now we have that experience in our back pocket. We now know the best way to maneuver these vehicles, and especially for myself, I will know how to maneuver a platoon in this type of desert environment».

The operational test’s purpose is to collect data to be used to address operational effectiveness, suitability and survivability of the JLTV in its intended environment, according to Fincher.

The Soldiers and Marines felt their opinions were being listened to and considered when test officers solicited their feedback.

«It is a good opportunity to be able to work out the kinks and provide the future generations in the Marine Corps with a vehicle that is going to be able to operate efficiently in combat», said Janes.

«After every test after action review, I would write about three pages and submit about 20 comment cards per week», said Staff Sergeant Matthew A. Smith, 2nd Platoon Sergeant for the 101st’s Bravo Troop.

With 9-and-a-half years as a Cavalry Scout and five wartime deployments, Smith was content with giving his opinion on what works and what does not work with the JLTV.

Smith said that while USAOTC Commander, Brigadier General John C. Ulrich, was on the ground April 10, he felt the general listened to him with great concern.

«A lot of the comments that I’ve made have been brought up», he explained.

«I was actually able to talk with the general one-on-one about some issues I addressed during data collection», said Smith. «They’re definitely taking our recommendations. It seems like they want to make this the best vehicle possible, so they’re like, ‘Hey, here is what we’ve designed. What do we need to improve upon?’»

Smith said a lot of his Soldiers are young, and outside of JLTV testing, his troops got lots of training on battlefield operations.

«At Fort Campbell, we focus more on dismounted and air assault tactics, and we focus more on the squad level», he said. So, to come here, we have a 100-kilometer square that we can operate in and we’re out here with 20 vehicles fighting as a unit. Space is something that’s limited at Fort Campbell because there’s trees everywhere, and you can’t put every vehicle in the Troop out there and be able to fight a threat like you can here».

The Army, lead for the JLTV portfolio, plans to purchase some 49,000 JLTVs while the Marine Corps plans to purchase 9,000.

Order for 258 JLTV

Oshkosh Defense, LLC, an Oshkosh Corporation company, announced on December 21, 2017 that the U.S. Army has placed a $100.1 million order for the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) program, to include 258 vehicles and associated installed and packaged kits. This is the seventh order for JLTVs since the contract was awarded in August 2015.

Intended to replace the aging up-armored HMMWV fleet, the JLTV program fills a critical capability gap in the U.S. military’s current vehicle line-up
Intended to replace the aging up-armored HMMWV fleet, the JLTV program fills a critical capability gap in the U.S. military’s current vehicle line-up

Intended to replace the aging up-armored High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV) fleet, the JLTV program fills a critical capability gap in the U.S. military’s current vehicle line-up.

«From a scheduling perspective, the JLTV program is on track. We are currently in Low Rate Initial Production (LRIP) and have delivered over 1,000 vehicles since October 2016», said Dave Diersen, Vice President and General Manager of Joint Programs at Oshkosh Defense. «The initial LRIP vehicles are undergoing a spectrum of Government testing, and Soldiers and Marines will begin receiving JLTVs for operational use in FY19».

The program also anticipates a Full Rate Production decision in FY19, and both Army and Marine Corps Initial Operating Capability (IOC) in early FY20.

«Over time, we are confident there will be opportunities to expand this powerful vehicle platform to include new variants and configurations», Diersen continued. «The JLTV program was designed to provide a new generation of protection, mobility and network capability. We also see significant international market potential for allies requiring a tactical wheeled vehicle proven to provide the ballistic protection of a light tank, the underbody protection of a Mine-Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP)-class vehicle, the network capability of a mobile command center, and the off-road mobility of a Baja racer».

Armed JLTV

Oshkosh Defense, LLC, an Oshkosh Corporation company, showcased two variants of its Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) with next generation lethality and networking capabilities at the AUSA Conference 2017. The vehicles were on display at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C. from October 9-11, 2017.

Oshkosh Defense showcases JLTV vehicles with next generation weapon integration capabilities at AUSA 2017
Oshkosh Defense showcases JLTV vehicles with next generation weapon integration capabilities at AUSA 2017

«The Oshkosh JLTV is engineered to support a wide range of mission kits and weapon systems required for the modern battlefield», said John Bryant, Senior Vice President of Oshkosh Corporation and President of Oshkosh Defense. «Our JLTV will replace existing light tactical vehicles with a platform that is flexible, scalable, and customizable for specific missions ‘outside the wire’. We are proud to be demonstrating this JLTV capability».

The JLTV Family of Vehicles was designed with room for growth to provide Warfighters with next-generation protected mobility in the light vehicle class, while supporting advanced networking and increased fire power. The JLTV General Purpose vehicle on display in the Oshkosh booth is equipped with a Boeing Compact Laser Weapon System (CLWS), a Kongsberg Protector LW 30 Remote Weapon System (RWS) with a M230LF cannon, and a communications suite that includes a Thales VRC-111 and Thales VRC-121 VIPER.

The JLTV Utility vehicle on display (shown above) is equipped with the Boeing Maneuver Short Range Air Defense (SHORAD) Launcher including a M3P .50 cal/12.7-mm machine gun, M299 launcher with four Longbow Hellfire missiles, sensor suite, and a communications suite including a Thales VRC-111.

A third Oshkosh JLTV, a General-Purpose vehicle, will be on the show floor in the Rafael Advanced Defense Systems booth #1911, showcasing Rafael’s Samson RWS Dual Stabilized Remote Weapon Systems (RWS) with M230 LF, and the Trophy Light Active Protection System (APS).

«The JLTV program continues to be run as a model program», said Dave Diersen, Vice President and General Manager of Joint Programs, Oshkosh Defense. «Working closely with our government customer, we have completed Reliability Qualification Testing, accumulating over 100,000 miles/160,934 km and exceeding reliability requirements. Production ramp up is on track and Oshkosh has delivered over 600 vehicles. We are very pleased with program progress and look forward to a successful Full Rate Production (FRP) decision in Fiscal Year 2019».

Next Generation Vehicles

Oshkosh Defense, LLC, an Oshkosh Corporation company, will showcase its MRAP All-Terrain Vehicle (M-ATV) and Light Combat Tactical All-Terrain Vehicle (L-ATV), the U.S. military’s Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) solution, at the IDEX Conference 2017. The vehicles will be on display at the Abu Dhabi National Exhibition Centre, in Abu Dhabi from February 19-23, 2017.

M-ATV Assault 2
M-ATV Assault 2

«Our M-ATV and L-ATV platforms serve a full spectrum of military and security missions around the world», said George Mansfield, vice president and general manager of International Programs for Oshkosh Defense. «Both platforms having a place on today’s modern and undefined battlefields, these vehicles represent a new generation of protection, mobility, lethality and communications, which is allowing customers to redefine their ground vehicle capability».

The battle-proven M-ATV Family of Vehicles combines best-in-class off-road mobility and life-saving survivability to deliver optimal protected mobility with MRAP-level protection against IEDs and other battlefield threats. The M-ATV Assault variant on display is outfitted with a Moog Reconfigurable Integrated-weapons Platform (RIwP), which can help achieve tactical unit overmatch with proven precision lethality in any operational environment. The featured RIwP configuration employs the Orbital ATK M230LF 30-mm lightweight automatic chain gun, an M249 machine gun, a Javelin missile, and the DRS Long Range target acquisition sensor suite. RIwP provides commanders with options of direct fire, missile, sight and non-lethal configurations to meet changing enemy threats. It also improves soldier situational awareness with a gunner’s hatch and protects them through weapon reload under armor. The M-ATV is further equipped with the DRS Technologies Driver’s Vision Enhancer and Enhanced Situational Awareness System to provide greater coverage and mission capability.

M-ATVs are offered in standard and extended wheel base models with five variants to meet mission requirements for militaries and security forces around the world. The M-ATV variants include:

  • M-ATV Special Forces;
  • M-ATV Assault;
  • M-ATV Engineer;
  • M-ATV Command;
  • M-ATV Utility.

After years of U.S. Government testing, the Oshkosh JLTV Family of Vehicles is recognized as the most capable light tactical vehicles ever built, providing troops with the payload, performance and protection they need for current and future battlefields. Built with the future in mind, the JLTV takes lessons learned from past conflicts to prepare for threats unknown. The JLTV General Purpose variant on display is equipped with an EOS R-400S-MK2 remote weapon system integrated with Orbital ATK’s M230 LF 30 mm lightweight automatic chain gun to demonstrate the vehicle’s ability to support increased lethality including a medium caliber weapon system. The JLTV is available in 2-door and 4-door models in the following configurations:

  • JLTV Utility;
  • JLTV General Purpose;
  • JLTV Close Combat Weapons Carrier;
  • JLTV Heavy Guns Carrier.

Oshkosh Defense leadership will be available to discuss the Oshkosh M-ATV and L-ATV Family of Vehicles, and the Company’s full portfolio of Heavy, Medium, Aircraft Rescue Fire Fighting (ARFF) and protected vehicles, technologies, integration capabilities and aftermarket solutions at IDEX 2017 in booth 02-B11.

Another order for JLTV

Oshkosh Defense, LLC, an Oshkosh Corporation company, announced today that the U.S. Army has placed another order for the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) program including 409 vehicles, 1,984 installed kits, 82 packaged kits and related services and support. The order valued at more than $176 million, is the fourth order for JLTVs since the contract was awarded in August 2015.

The Oshkosh JLTV is equipped with the EOS (Electro Optic Systems) R-400S-MK2 remote weapons system and the Orbital ATK M230 LF 30-mm gun
The Oshkosh JLTV is equipped with the EOS (Electro Optic Systems) R-400S-MK2 remote weapons system and the Orbital ATK M230 LF 30-mm gun

«The JLTV program is providing our Soldiers and Marines with the world’s most capable light tactical vehicle», said Dave Diersen, Oshkosh Defense vice president and general manager of Joint Programs. «We have begun delivering low rate production vehicles to the Army and Marine Corps for government testing in environments around the country and we have been pleased with its performance thus far». The vehicles and kits for this order will begin delivery in late 2017.

 

U.S. Soldiers and Marines can expect:

  • A vehicle 1/3 smaller and 1/3 lighter than the Oshkosh Mine-Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) All-Terrain Vehicle, or M-ATV
  • Off-road speeds 70 percent faster than today’s gold standard, the Oshkosh M-ATV
  • A modular design that can be quickly and efficiently outfitted for a full range of missions
  • Banks 866T, 6.6 Liter Turbo Diesel Engine, based on GM Duramax architecture
  • Fully transportable by air or sea, such as Lockheed C-130 Hercules, Sikorsky CH-53 Stallion and Boeing CH-47 Chinook
  • Network ready and VICTORY compliant – Vehicular Integration for Command, Control, Communications, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (C4ISR)/Electronic Warfare (EW) Interoperability
  • Superior ride quality

 

JLTV for testing

The first seven joint light tactical vehicles were turned over to the Army and Marine Corps in late September by Oshkosh Defense for testing at different sites around the force.

An Oshkosh Defense prototype of the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle negotiates an off-road demonstration course at Quantico, Virginia, in June 2013. The Oshkosh version beat out JLTV prototypes there from AM General and Lockheed Martin (Photo Credit: Courtesy Oshkosh Defense)
An Oshkosh Defense prototype of the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle negotiates an off-road demonstration course at Quantico, Virginia, in June 2013. The Oshkosh version beat out JLTV prototypes there from AM General and Lockheed Martin (Photo Credit: Courtesy Oshkosh Defense)

A total of about 100 of the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) «production vehicles» will be provided to the Army and Marine Corps for testing over the next year, at a rate of about 10 per month, officials said. The vehicles will undergo maneuverability and automotive testing at Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona, and other sites around the country.

The JLTV is a tactical wheeled vehicle with a chassis that offers protection from underbelly blasts and an «intelligent» suspension system that can be raised and lowered for off-road conditions. It also touts greater fuel efficiency than current tactical vehicles.

In addition to testing at Yuma, the vehicles will undergo testing for cyber integration of command, control, communications and intelligence at the Electronics Proving Ground on Fort Huachuca, Arizona. The vehicles will also be tested for automotive performance at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland and the Cold Regions Test Center on Fort Greely, Alaska.

«It’s on schedule», said Scott Davis, program executive officer for combat support and combat service support, about the JLTV program. «It’s doing everything we ever expected it to. It’s just incredible».

The JLTV has four different variants: a general-purpose truck, a close-combat weapons carrier, a heavy guns carrier, and a two-door utility pickup version. The group of trucks delivered last week included all but one of the variant types, the close-combat weapons carrier. That variant should be included in the next delivery in a few weeks, according to an Oshkosh spokesman.

Colonel Shane Fullmer, project manager for the JLTV program, said the decision on the caliber of the weapons to be fielded on the variants will be made over the next few months.

Once full production begins on the JLTV program in 2019, Army acquisition officials expect to shave five years off the original fielding schedule. The schedule reduction is expected to save $6 billion from previous estimates, Davis said.

«Based on our original budget-planning figures for the vehicle, if it now comes in at a lower price, we’ll be able to buy more each year, which shrinks the total length of the contract», Davis said. «Of course, as you shorten things up, you accrue cost avoidances».

Originally, plans for the program called for fielding all 54,599 vehicles for the Army and Marine Corps by the early 2040s. However, as a result of the unit cost savings, the Army should be able to buy more trucks faster. The Army may acquire the full complement by as early as the mid-2030s, officials said.

Katrina McFarland, assistant secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics and Technology, called the JLTV is «a marvelous construct» designed by brilliant engineers.

The JLTV program has already been recognized as a model in acquisition, winning the Department of Defense’s prestigious David Packard Award for Acquisition Excellence twice – in 2013 and 2015.

Just this past week, at the Association of the U.S. Army’s Annual Meeting and Exhibition, Army leaders honored the program with the 2015 Secretary of the Army’s Award for Environmental Excellence in Weapon System Acquisition.

A Joint Light Tactical Vehicle production model is displayed by Oshkosh on the floor of the AUSA Annual Meeting and Exhibition in the Washington Convention Center October 4, 2016 (Photo Credit: Gary Sheftick)
A Joint Light Tactical Vehicle production model is displayed by Oshkosh on the floor of the AUSA Annual Meeting and Exhibition in the Washington Convention Center October 4, 2016 (Photo Credit: Gary Sheftick)