Tag Archives: Irving Shipbuilding

Surface Combatant

Canadian technology, experience and infrastructure proved a winning combination for Canada’s new fleet of surface combatants, as Canada’s Combat Ship Team has been awarded the Canadian Surface Combatant design contract by Irving Shipbuilding. Irving Shipbuilding is the Canadian Surface Combatant prime contractor and will build all 15 ships at Halifax Shipyard.

Canada's Combat Ship Team awarded contract for Canadian Surface Combatant
Canada’s Combat Ship Team awarded contract for Canadian Surface Combatant

BAE Systems, CAE, Lockheed Martin Canada, L3 Technologies, MDA and Ultra Electronics partnered as Canada’s Combat Ship Team to offer the Royal Canadian Navy the most advanced and modern warship design, the Type 26 Global Combat Ship, with high-tech platform innovations from prominent Canadian companies. The solution includes the internationally renowned and Canadian-developed combat management system, CMS 330.

Bringing together a pan-Canadian team, the six companies have a uniquely skilled workforce and supply chain that are ready to begin work on the program today. Canada’s Combat Ship team employs a combined 9,000 Canadians in 40 facilities from coast to coast and engages a Canadian supply chain of more than 4,000 small and medium sized enterprises. The team also secured several additional partners, including Rolls-Royce with its Canadian-designed and manufactured Mission Bay Handling System that will enable adaptability for the ships’ operations.

The Type 26 Global Combat Ship is a globally deployable multi-role warship that meets the distinctive mission requirements of the Royal Canadian Navy. It is enhanced with the team’s collective Canadian naval expertise in combat system design, integration, training, logistics and program management.  Purposely designed for high-end anti-submarine warfare and capable of performing a variety of missions around the world, the Type 26 is acoustically quiet, versatile, highly survivable, and allows for significant growth margins for future modernization.

Canada’s Combat Ship Team will deliver lasting economic benefits to Canadian industry through $17 billion in value proposition commitments in innovation across Canada’s priority areas, including $2 billion in supplier development, $2 billion in research and development, and $200 million in advanced manufacturing.

All of this contributes to a strong Canadian team – Canada’s Home Team – ready to begin work on day one as promised.

Keel-laying for Margaret

The Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) marked the traditional keel-laying ceremony for the second Arctic and Offshore Patrol Vessel, HMCS Margaret Brooke, at Irving Shipbuilding’s Halifax Shipyard on May 29, 2017.

Keel-laying ceremony for HMCS Margaret Brooke marks a shipbuilding milestone
Keel-laying ceremony for HMCS Margaret Brooke marks a shipbuilding milestone

A keel-laying ceremony is one of the most significant dates in a ship’s construction. This ceremony was marked by the placing of a coin onto the keel of the ship by Olivia Strowbridge, the first woman in a trade supervisory role at Halifax Shipyard, and its first female certified ship spray painter. In shipbuilding tradition, this coin will remain embedded within the ship’s structure for its entire life, and will invite good luck for all who sail in it. Once the coin was placed, Ms. Strowbridge declared that the keel is now «well and truly laid».

The ceremony was also attended by Rear-Admiral John Newton, Commander of Maritime Forces Atlantic; Mr. Kevin McCoy, President of Irving Shipbuilding; and Commander Michele Tessier, the future Commanding Officer of HMCS Margaret Brooke, among others.

The coin placed on this ship depicts a four-leaf clover; a symbol with special significance to LCdr Brooke, who carried two four-leaf clovers in a silver locket as a good luck charm following her survival of the sinking of the ferry SS Caribou in 1942.

The Harry DeWolf-class Arctic and Offshore Patrol Vessels will increase Canada’s capability in the Arctic and along its other two coasts. They will deliver armed, seaborne surveillance and increase Canada’s awareness of activities in these regions.

 

Quick Facts

In traditional ship construction, the keel typically extends the entire length of the vessel, running along the bottom of the ship and serving as its «backbone». Today, many ships, including the Arctic and Offshore Patrol Vessels, are instead constructed in modules or blocks, fabricated separately then brought together to form the superstructure of the ship. However, the keel-laying tradition has endured.

Construction continues on HMCS Margaret Brooke at Halifax Shipyard. The ship is expected to be officially launched in a Naming/Launching ceremony in 2019.

HMCS Margaret Brooke is named after LCdr Margaret M. Brooke, an RCN Nursing Sister in the Second World War who was named a Member of the Order of the British Empire for her selfless act of bravery in attempting to save the life of a colleague after the ferry they were travelling on, the SS Caribou, was torpedoed and sunk by a German U-boat off the coast of Newfoundland in October 1942.

When the name of HMCS Margaret Brooke was announced in April 2015, it was the first RCN ship ever to be named after a living Canadian woman. LCdr Brooke passed away the following year at the age of 100.

During her work in Sydney, Nova Scotia, at a naval hospital, a patient gave then-Sub-Lieutenant Margaret Brooke two four-leaf clovers. She had them with her when the SS Caribou was torpedoed and sunk on the night of October 14, 1942. She often said that she felt they were her good luck charm.

The niece of LCdr Margaret Brooke, Ms. Margaret Elizabeth Brooke, is the sponsor of the ship that will bear her aunt’s name.

The Arctic and Offshore Patrol Vessels will be large, ice-capable ships, more than 328 feet/100 meters long, and designed for a variety of missions in Canadian waters and abroad. Commander Michele Tessier has been appointed as the first Commanding Officer of HMCS Margaret Brooke.

Keel for DeWolf

On June 9, 2016, at Irving Shipbuilding’s facility in Halifax, Rear Admiral John Newton, Commander Joint Task Force Atlantic and Commander Maritime Forces Atlantic (MARLANT), along with Kevin McCoy, President of Irving Shipbuilding, and Chief Petty Officer 1st Class Pierre Auger, MARLANT Formation Chief, attended a coin placement ceremony for the future Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship (HMCS) Harry DeWolf, the lead ship in the class.

Mr. Kevin McKoy, Co-Chief Executive Officer of Irving Shipbuilding; Mr. Carl Risser (46 years of service with Irving); Rear-Admiral Newton, Commander Maritime Forces Atlantic; Chief Petty Officer First Class Pierre Auger, Formation Chief Petty Officer
Mr. Kevin McKoy, Co-Chief Executive Officer of Irving Shipbuilding; Mr. Carl Risser (46 years of service with Irving); Rear-Admiral Newton, Commander Maritime Forces Atlantic; Chief Petty Officer First Class Pierre Auger, Formation Chief Petty Officer

The coin placement is a shipbuilder and naval tradition where a newly minted coin is placed on the ship’s structure to bring luck to the vessel and her crew for the life of the ship. The coin was placed by Carl Risser who, with 46 years of shipbuilding experience at Irving Shipbuilding, declared the keel as «well and truly laid». The ceremony was attended by representatives of the Arctic and Offshore Patrol Ships (AOPS) project office as well as Irving Shipbuilding employees, and marks another significant milestone in the ongoing construction of HMCS Harry DeWolf.

The Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) is eagerly anticipating the delivery of HMCS Harry DeWolf, the first of the Harry DeWolf-class AOPS, in 2018. The ship is named after Vice-Admiral Harry DeWolf, a widely-respected officer who served with distinction in the Second World War and later rose to be Chief of the Naval Staff in the late 1950s.

The Harry DeWolf Class will be capable of:

  • armed sea-borne surveillance of Canada’s waters, including the Arctic;
  • providing government situational awareness of activities and events in these regions;
  • cooperating with other partners in the Canadian Armed Forces and other government departments to assert and enforce Canadian sovereignty, when and where necessary.

The Harry DeWolf Class will provide the RCN with the ability to operate much further north on a sustained basis into the Canadian Arctic and will allow the RCN to continue, and indeed increase, its close Arctic collaboration with the Canadian Coast Guard, as well as other governmental departments and international allies, while continuing to build the RCN’s own Arctic sea-going competencies.

With their robust sealift and utility capability, the Harry DeWolf Class will also be extremely useful throughout the non-navigable Arctic seasons in carrying out a variety of missions and tasks such as humanitarian assistance, disaster relief, or support to remote communities wherever they may be operating.

Harry DeWolf-Class Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship
Harry DeWolf-Class Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship

The announced names of the Harry DeWolf-class ships to date are:

  • HMCS Harry DeWolf
  • HMCS Margaret Brooke
  • HMCS Max Bernays
  • HMCS William Hall
  • HMCS Frédérick Rolette
  • HMCS Robert Hampton Gray

 

Specifications

Displacement 6,440 tonnes
Length 338 feet/103 m
Beam 62.3 feet/19 m
Maximum speed 17 knots/19.5 mph/31 km/h
Cruising speed 14 knots/16 mph/26 km/h
Range at Cruising speed 6,800 NM/7,825 miles/12,593.6 km
Complement 65
International ice classification standard Polar Class 5
Be able to sustain operations up to 4 months
Remain operational 25 years beyond Initial Operational Capability (IOC)

 

First AOPS for Canada

Hundreds of employees gathered in the new Assembly Hall at the Halifax Shipyard to celebrate the start of production of the first Arctic Offshore Patrol Ship (AOPS) for Canada. Delivery of the first HMCS Harry DeWolf-class ship is expected in 2018.

Kevin McCoy, President of Irving Shipbuilding and hundreds of employees at the Halifax Shipyard mark the start of production of the first Arctic Offshore Patrol Ship on September 1
Kevin McCoy, President of Irving Shipbuilding and hundreds of employees at the Halifax Shipyard mark the start of production of the first Arctic Offshore Patrol Ship on September 1

«Today is a milestone we have all been anticipating. It is a great day to be a shipbuilder in Nova Scotia as we mark the beginning of this generational opportunity», said Kevin McCoy, President of Irving Shipbuilding. «We’re doing this with the best team and the largest and most modern shipbuilding facility in North America. Our focus is on delivering the best value to Canada with a growing supply chain from coast to coast to coast».

Production has begun on two units for the center section of the first Arctic Offshore Patrol ship. Welders, pipefitters, marine fabricators and ironworkers are among the trades involved in the process, using the new state-of-the-art panel line.

The ship is the first of up to 21 vessels that will renew Canada’s combatant fleet over the next 30 years under the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy. Irving Shipbuilding has built more than 80% of Canada’s current combatant ships.

All of the employees on the recall list have been contacted. Current direct employment at Marine Fabricators in Dartmouth (where steel is cut) and the Halifax Shipyard is about 900 direct employees (staff and hourly). Over the next two years, the workforce at both sites is expected to rise to 1,600 direct employees with over 1,000 directly employed on AOPS production. In addition, total employment at Irving Shipbuilding (all operations) is forecasted to rise to over 2,500 direct employees at peak production of the larger Canadian Surface Combatant vessels that will replace Canada’s current fleet of Halifax Class frigates.

To date, the modernization at Irving Shipbuilding and the AOPS contract have resulted in over $1 Billion in spending commitments:

  • Over $850 Million committed within Canada (84% of contracts awarded);
  • Over $300 Million committed spend to companies in Nova Scotia;
  • Over 2,000 suppliers now registered with Irving Shipbuilding.

These spend will generate:

  • Over 8,700 Direct and Indirect jobs in Canada (3,400 in Nova Scotia);
  • Over $550 Million in Direct and Indirect Employment Income;
  • An Estimated $400 Million in Consumer Spending.
Halifax Shipyard worker cuts components for the first AOPS ship using state-of-the-art plasma cutter
Halifax Shipyard worker cuts components for the first AOPS ship using state-of-the-art plasma cutter

 

Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ships

The Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship (AOPS) project will deliver six ice-capable ships, designated as the Harry DeWolf Class, after Canadian wartime naval hero Vice-Admiral Harry DeWolf.

The AOPS will be capable of:

  • armed sea-borne surveillance of Canada’s waters, including the Arctic;
  • providing government situational awareness of activities and events in these regions;
  • cooperating with other partners in the Canadian Armed Forces and other government departments to assert and enforce Canadian sovereignty, when and where necessary.

Construction of the first AOPS will begin in September 2015, with HMCS Harry DeWolf scheduled for delivery in 2018.

The announced names of the Harry DeWolf-class ships to date are:

  • HMCS Harry DeWolf
  • HMCS Margaret Brooke
  • HMCS Max Bernays
  • HMCS William Hall
  • HMCS Frédérick Rolette
Centre section component of first AOPS ship underway at Halifax Shipyard
Centre section component of first AOPS ship underway at Halifax Shipyard

 

Specifications

Displacement 6,440 tonnes
Length 338 feet/103 m
Beam 62.3 feet/19 m
Maximum speed 17 knots/19.5 mph/31 km/h
Cruising speed 14 knots/16 mph/26 km/h
Range at Cruising speed 6,800 NM/7,825 miles/12,593.6 km
Complement 65
International ice classification standard Polar Class 5
Be able to sustain operations up to 4 months
Remain operational 25 years beyond Initial Operational Capability (IOC)
Harry DeWolf-Class Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship
Harry DeWolf-Class Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship

 

Features

Integrated Bridge Navigation System

Modern integrated bridge, from which control of navigation, machinery, and damage control systems can be performed.

Multi-Purpose Operational Space

Where operational planning and mission execution will be coordinated.

BAE Mk-38 Gun

Remote controlled 25-mm gun to support domestic constabulary role.

Enclosed Focsle/Cable Deck

Protects foredeck machinery and workspace from harsh Arctic environment.

Helicopter Capability

Depending on the mission, the embarked helicopter could range from a small utility aircraft right up to the new CH-148 maritime helicopter.

Cargo/Payloads

Multiple payload options such as shipping containers, underwater survey equipment, or a landing craft. Ship has a 20-tonne crane to self-load/unload.

Vehicle Bay

For rapid mobility over land or ice, the ship can carry vehicles such as pickup trucks, All-Terrain Vehicles (ATVs), and snowmobiles.

Diesel/Electric Propulsion

Propulsion: Two 4.5 MW main propulsion engines, four 3.6 MW generators.

Retractable Active Fin Stabilizers

Deployed to reduce ship roll for open ocean operations, retracted for operations in ice.

Multi-Role Rescue Boats

Top speed of 35+ knots/40+ mph/65+ km/h, 28 feet/8.5 meters long. Will support rescues, personnel transfers, or boarding operations.

Bow Thrusters

To enable maneuvering or berthing without tug assistance.

Artist’s impression of the Harry DeWolf-Class Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship
Artist’s impression of the Harry DeWolf-Class Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship

Guns for Patrol

Irving Shipbuilding of Canada has awarded BAE Systems a contract to deliver up to six modified 25-mm Mk-38 Machine Gun Systems for the Royal Canadian Navy’s Arctic Offshore Patrol Ship (AOPS) program. The award also covers spare parts, technical support, and long-term field support services. Irving Shipbuilding is the prime contractor for the ships and will build them at its Halifax shipyards.

The Mk-38 Mod 2 Machine Gun System (MGS) from BAE Systems
The Mk-38 Mod 2 Machine Gun System (MGS) from BAE Systems

«We will be working very closely with Canadian industry on this program», said Joseph Senftle, vice president and general manager of Weapons Systems at BAE Systems. «BAE Systems is currently selecting its Canadian partners to participate not only in the build of these naval gun systems, but also to join our Mk-38 global supply chain. This will help bring sustained economic value to Canada as part of the AOPS program».

The AOPS program will introduce six vessels that can patrol the Arctic region and remain there for longer than the service’s existing ships to support sovereignty and surveillance operations. BAE Systems’ first gun system will be delivered in 2017, with follow-on deliveries of approximately one per year through 2021, as the AOPS ships are built and become ready for launch.

Each Mk-38 System features a highly accurate gun targeting and surveillance system as well as the M242 Cannon. They will be modified for protection against arctic conditions. The Mk-38 has also been selected by the U.S. Navy, U.S. Coast Guard, and the Spanish Navy.

Harry DeWolf-Class Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship
Harry DeWolf-Class Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship

Mk-38 Mod 2 MGS

The Mk-38 Mod 2 Machine Gun System (MGS) from BAE Systems sets the standard for shipboard defense against small, fast, and agile surface threats. With system variants deployed worldwide, the stabilized, remote control Mk-38 Mod 2 MGS is proven capable in defending against multiple surface threats – in all sea states. The Mk-38 Mod 2 MGS incorporates the service-proven Toplite electro-optical fire control system to optimize effective engagement of enemy targets in all weather conditions, day or night.

Weaponry. The Mk-38 Mod 2 MGS main weapon is the proven M242 NATO standard auto cannon with 2.5-km range and selectable rates of fire.

Lethality. The M242 fires all U.S. Navy (USN) approved 25-mm ammunition at up to 180 rounds per minute, with the Mk-38 Mod 2 MGS providing up to 200 ready rounds on-mount.

Command and Control. The Toplite Fire Control System (FCS) provides four axis gimbal stabilization and superior optics including the forward-looking infrared radar with three fields-of-view, a low contrast, low light level color television camera, and an eye-safe laser range finder.

Survivability. The Mk-38 Mod 2 MGS provides for crew-safe conditions with a remote operation console located in the Combat Information Center or in other protected ship structures.

Adaptability. The enhanced Mk-38 Mod 2 MGS is the USN’s ORDALT choice to upgrade the Mk-38 Mod 0/1 25-mm machine gun.

The system can be applied to a wide range of different ship classes and platform designs of 50 tons or greater displacement. Near term product upgrades include larger magazine, 30-mm cannon, advanced optics, and integration of laser effects.

Artist’s impression of the Harry DeWolf-Class Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship
Artist’s impression of the Harry DeWolf-Class Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship

 

Specifications

Weight (with gun, w/o ammo) 2,300 lbs/1,042 kg
Weapon station
Train ± 15° to ± 165° adjustable to any value in range
Elevation -20° to +40°
Electro-Optical Fire Control System (relative to mount)
Train ± 165°
Elevation -20° to +85°
Gun type 25-mm M242
Ammunition feed Dual
Ammunition capacity 200 ready rounds
Rate of fire 5 rates from single to 180 rpm max
Personnel requirements
Remote 1
Ammunition loading 2
Operability tests and scheduled maintenance (average daily) 6 minutes
Ammunition reloading time 5 minutes
Availability (inherent/predicted) 99.9%

 

With more than 90 system variants deployed worldwide, the stabilized, remote controlled Mk-38 Mod 2 minor caliber gun is proven capable in defending against multiple surface threats – in all sea states