Tag Archives: Ingalls Shipbuilding

Christening of Midgett

December 09, 2017, Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division christened the Legend-class National Security Cutter (NSC) USCGC Midgett (WMSL-757) in front of hundreds of guests.

Ship’s Sponsor Jazania H. O’Neal smashes a bottle of sparkling wine against the bow of the National Security Cutter USCGC Midgett (WMSL-757). Also pictured (left to right) are Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias; Coast Guard Vice Commandant Admiral Charles Michel; Matron of Honor Jonna Midgette; and Captain Anthony Williams, the ship’s prospective commanding officer (Photo by Andrew Young/HII)
Ship’s Sponsor Jazania H. O’Neal smashes a bottle of sparkling wine against the bow of the National Security Cutter USCGC Midgett (WMSL-757). Also pictured (left to right) are Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias; Coast Guard Vice Commandant Admiral Charles Michel; Matron of Honor Jonna Midgette; and Captain Anthony Williams, the ship’s prospective commanding officer (Photo by Andrew Young/HII)

«We often speak of our service as a family, our Coast Guard family», said Admiral Charles Michel, vice commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard, who was the ceremony’s keynote speaker. «The Midgett name takes that seriously with a family legacy unprecedented in the armed services, a family that is all about service before self. Such a special name deserves to be emblazoned on a special platform. The Ingalls Shipbuilding team have built this incredible platform, something to be incredibly proud of and something the men and women of the United States Coast Guard take very proudly».

The ship is named to honor John Allen Midgett, who was awarded the Silver Cup by the U.K. Board of Trade in 1918 for the renowned rescue of 42 British sailors aboard the British tanker Mirlo after it was torpedoed by a German U-boat off the coast of North Carolina. He was also awarded the Gold Lifesaving Medal by the U.S. Coast Guard in 1924. Midgett was a senior enlisted member of the U.S. Lifesaving Service when it merged with the U.S. Lighthouse Service and U.S. Revenue Cutter Service to become today’s U.S. Coast Guard.

«Midgett is the eighth ship we have built in this class», said Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias. «And with her, we’ve proven once again that American workers, Ingalls shipbuilders, can take on some of the most challenging manufacturing projects in the world. All Ingalls ships are built with one goal in mind: to protect the brave men and women who protect our freedom. Our Ingalls/Coast Guard team continues to get stronger and more efficient with every ship we produce. And Midgett will be no exception».

Jazania O’Neal, Midgett’s granddaughter, is the ship’s sponsor. She christened the ship by breaking a bottle of sparkling wine across its bow, saying, «In the name of the United States of America, I christen thee Midgett. May God bless this ship and all who sail in her».

Ingalls is the sole builder of Legend-class NSCs and has successfully delivered six to the Coast Guard. Midgett, the eighth ship in the class, was successfully launched in November. USCGC Kimball (WMSL-756) is scheduled to be delivered to the Coast Guard in 2018.

Legend-class NSCs are the flagships of the U.S. Coast Guard. They are the most technologically advanced ships in the Coast Guard’s fleet, with capabilities for maritime homeland security, law enforcement and national security missions. NSCs are 418 feet/127 m long with a 54-foot/16 m beam and displace 4,500 long tons with a full load. They have a top speed of 28 knots/32 mph/52 km/h, a range of 12,000 NM/13,809 miles/22,224 km, an endurance of 60 days and a crew of 120. The Legend-class of cutters plays an important role in enhancing the Coast Guard’s operational readiness, capacity and effectiveness at a time when the demand for their services has never been greater.

 

Facts

Displacement 4,500 long tons
Length 418 feet/127 m
Beam 54 feet/16 m
Speed 28 knots/32 mph/52 km/h
Range 12,000 NM/13,809 miles/22,224 km
Endurance 60 days
Crew 120
Equipped with Mk-110 57-mm turret mounted gun
6 × 12.7-mm/.50 caliber machine guns
3D air search radar
2 level 1, class 1 aircraft hangers
A stern launch ramp for mission boats
Aviation carried (2) MCH, or (4) Vertical-Launch Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (VUAV) or (1) MCH and (2) VUAV
Stern launch Two cutter boats (Long Range Interceptor and/or Short Range Prosecutor)
Electronic Warfare and Decoys AN/SLQ-32 Electronic Warfare System, Two Super Rapid Bloom Offboard Countermeasures (SRBOC)/2 NULKA countermeasures chaff rapid decoy launcher
Communications HF, VHF & UHF
Sensors and Processing Systems X and S band radar, 3D air search radar, AN/SPQ-9 radar, Identification, Friend or Foe (IFF)

 

Ship list

Ship Hull Number Laid down Launched Commissioned
Bertholf WMSL-750 03-29-2005 09-29-2006 08-04-2008
Waesche WMSL-751 09-11-2006 07-12-2008 05-07-2010
Stratton WMSL-752 07-20-2009 07-23-2010 03-31-2012
Hamilton WMSL-753 09-05-2012 08-10-2013 12-06-2014
James WMSL-754 05-17-2013 05-03-2014 08-08-2015
Munro WMSL-755 10-07-2013 09-12-2015 04-01-2017
Kimball WMSL-756 03-04-2016 12-17-2016
Midgett WMSL-757 27-01-2017 22-11-2017
Stone WMSL-758

 

USCGC Midgett (WMSL-757) Christening, Ingalls Shipbuilding, Pascagoula, Mississippi

HII Launches Midgett

Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division launched the National Security Cutter (NSC) USCGC Midgett (WMSL-757) on Wednesday, November 22. Midgett is the eighth NSC Ingalls has built for the U.S. Coast Guard. It will be christened during a ceremony on December 9.

Ingalls Shipbuilding launched the National Security Cutter USCGC Midgett (WMSL-757) on November 22 (Photo by Lance Davis/HII)
Ingalls Shipbuilding launched the National Security Cutter USCGC Midgett (WMSL-757) on November 22 (Photo by Lance Davis/HII)

«As the National Security Cutter program continues to mature, we are providing our Coast Guard customer the best ships in their fleet», said Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias. «Our shipbuilders know and understand the importance of quality in building these highly capable cutters so the men and women of the Coast Guard can perform their important national security missions».

USCGC Midgett (WMSL-757) was translated via Ingalls’ rail car system to the floating dry dock last week, and the dock was moved away from the pier on Tuesday night. With the assistance of tugboats, Midgett launched off the dock early Wednesday morning.

«We’ve become very good at building these ships and continue to improve with the incorporation of lessons learned from previous cutters», said Derek Murphy, Ingalls’ NSC program manager. «Launch is a much-anticipated and exciting event, but it’s still just one step in bringing this cutter to life. Our shipbuilders are ready to get back to work to ensure Midgett is the best NSC to date».

The ship is named to honor John Allen Midgett, who was awarded the Silver Cup by the U.K. Board of Trade in 1918 for the renowned rescue of 42 British sailors aboard the British tanker Mirlo after it was torpedoed by a German U-boat off the coast of North Carolina. He was also awarded the Gold Lifesaving Medal by the U.S. Coast Guard in 1924. Midgett was a senior enlisted member of the U.S. Lifesaving Service when it merged with the U.S. Lighthouse Service and U.S. Revenue Cutter Service to become today’s U.S. Coast Guard.

Legend-class NSCs are the flagships of the Coast Guard’s cutter fleet. Designed to replace the 378-foot/115-meter Hamilton-class high-endurance cutters that entered service in the 1960s, they are 418 feet/127 m long with a 54-foot/16-meter beam and displace 4,500 tons with a full load. They have a top speed of 28 knots/32 mph/52 km/h, a range of 12,000 NM/13,809 miles/22,224 km, an endurance of 60 days and a crew of 110.

NSCs are capable of meeting all maritime security mission needs required of the high-endurance cutter. They include an aft launch and recovery area for two rigid hull inflatable boats and a flight deck to accommodate a range of manned and unmanned rotary wing aircraft. The Legend class is the largest and most technologically advanced class of cutter in the Coast Guard, with robust capabilities for maritime homeland security, law enforcement, marine safety, environmental protection and national defense missions. NSCs play an important role enhancing the Coast Guard’s operational readiness, capacity and effectiveness at a time when the demand for their services has never been greater.

 

Facts

Displacement 4,500 long tons
Length 418 feet/127 m
Beam 54 feet/16 m
Speed 28 knots/32 mph/52 km/h
Range 12,000 NM/13,809 miles/22,224 km
Endurance 60 days
Crew 120
Equipped with Mk-110 57-mm turret mounted gun
6 × 12.7-mm/.50 caliber machine guns
3D air search radar
2 level 1, class 1 aircraft hangers
A stern launch ramp for mission boats

 

Ship list

Ship Hull Number Laid down Launched Commissioned
Bertholf WMSL-750 03-29-2005 09-29-2006 08-04-2008
Waesche WMSL-751 09-11-2006 07-12-2008 05-07-2010
Stratton WMSL-752 07-20-2009 07-23-2010 03-31-2012
Hamilton WMSL-753 09-05-2012 08-10-2013 12-06-2014
James WMSL-754 05-17-2013 05-03-2014 08-08-2015
Munro WMSL-755 10-07-2013 09-12-2015 04-01-2017
Kimball WMSL-756 03-04-2016 12-17-2016
Midgett WMSL-757 27-01-2017 22-11-2017
Stone WMSL-758

 

Navy Accepts Ralph

Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division delivered the guided missile destroyer USS Ralph Johnson (DDG-114) to the U.S. Navy on November 15, 2017, with shipbuilders, ship’s force and representatives of Supervisor of Shipbuilding Gulf Coast in attendance.

Ingalls Shipbuilding completed builder's sea trials for USS Ralph Johnson (DDG-114). The Arleigh Burke (DDG-51) destroyer spent more than three days in the Gulf of Mexico testing the ship’s main propulsion, combat and other ship systems (HII photo)
Ingalls Shipbuilding completed builder’s sea trials for USS Ralph Johnson (DDG-114). The Arleigh Burke (DDG-51) destroyer spent more than three days in the Gulf of Mexico testing the ship’s main propulsion, combat and other ship systems (HII photo)

«Today’s delivery is a culmination of the hard work and dedication of thousands of shipbuilders, industry partners, the Navy and our Gulf Coast shipmates», said George Nungesser, Ingalls’ DDG program manager. «It is a pleasure for our Ingalls team to observe a well-trained crew take ownership of the ship. The shipbuilders of Ingalls will always be watching where you go and celebrating your successes».

The signing of the DD 250 document officially transfers custody of the ship from HII to the U.S. Navy. Ralph Johnson is scheduled to sail away from the shipyard in February and will be commissioned on March 24, 2018, in Charleston, South Carolina.

«This marks an important milestone in this ship’s life with the formal completion of construction», said Commander Jason P. Patterson, the ship’s prospective commanding officer. «I want to thank the shipbuilders for constructing this great ship named after a great man. The crew can sail with confidence that this ship will bring the fight to the enemy and take care of her team just like Ralph did».

USS Ralph Johnson (DDG-114) is named to honor Private First Class (Pfc.) Ralph Henry Johnson, who was awarded the Medal of Honor for his heroic actions that saved lives during the Vietnam War. Johnson shouted a warning to his fellow Marines and hurled himself on an explosive device, saving the life of one Marine and preventing the enemy from penetrating his sector of the patrol’s perimeter. Johnson died instantly. The Charleston native had only been in Vietnam for a little more than two months when he was killed at the age of 19.

Ingalls has now delivered 30 Arleigh Burke-class destroyers to the U.S. Navy. Other destroyers currently under construction at Ingalls include USS Paul Ignatius (DDG-117), USS Delbert D. Black (DDG-119), USS Frank E. Petersen Jr. (DDG-121) and USS Lenah H. Sutcliffe Higbee (DDG-123).

Arleigh Burke-class destroyers are highly capable, multi-mission ships and can conduct a variety of operations, from peacetime presence and crisis management to sea control and power projection, all in support of the United States’ military strategy. The guided missile destroyers are capable of simultaneously fighting air, surface and subsurface battles. The ship contains myriad offensive and defensive weapons designed to support maritime defense needs well into the 21st century.

Ingalls Shipbuilding delivered the guided missile destroyer USS Ralph Johnson (DDG-114) to the U.S. Navy on November 15, 2017. Signing the DD 250 document are (left to right) Commander Jason P. Patterson, the ship’s prospective commanding officer; Commander Scott Williams, program manager representative for Supervisor of Shipbuilding Gulf Coast; and Freddie Joe O’Brien, Ingalls’ DDG-114 ship program manager (Photo by Andrew Young/HII)
Ingalls Shipbuilding delivered the guided missile destroyer USS Ralph Johnson (DDG-114) to the U.S. Navy on November 15, 2017. Signing the DD 250 document are (left to right) Commander Jason P. Patterson, the ship’s prospective commanding officer; Commander Scott Williams, program manager representative for Supervisor of Shipbuilding Gulf Coast; and Freddie Joe O’Brien, Ingalls’ DDG-114 ship program manager (Photo by Andrew Young/HII)

 

Ship Characteristics

Length Overall 510 feet/156 m
Beam – Waterline 59 feet/18 m
Draft 30.5 feet/9.3 m
Displacement – Full Load 9,217 tons/9,363 metric tons
Power Plant 4 General electric LM 2500-30 gas turbines; 2 shafts; 2 CRP (Contra-Rotating) propellers; 100,000 shaft horsepower/75,000 kW
Speed in excess of 30 knots/34.5 mph/55.5 km/h
Range 4,400 NM/8,149 km at 20 knots/23 mph/37 km/h
Crew 380 total: 32 Officers, 27 CPO (Chief Petty Officer), 321 OEM
Surveillance SPY-1D Phased Array Radar and Aegis Combat System (Lockheed Martin); SPS-73(V) Navigation; SPS-67(V)3 Surface Search; 3 SPG-62 Illuminator; SQQ-89(V)6 sonar incorporating SQS-53C hull mounted and SQR-19 towed array sonars used with Mark-116 Mod 7 ASW fire control system
Electronics/Countermeasures SLQ-32(V)3; Mark-53 Mod 0 Decoy System; Mark-234 Decoy System; SLQ-25A Torpedo Decoy; SLQ-39 Surface Decoy; URN-25 TACAN; UPX-29 IFF System; Kollmorgen Mark-46 Mod 1 Electro-Optical Director
Aircraft 2 embarked SH-60 helicopters ASW operations; RAST (Recovery Assist, Secure and Traverse)
Armament 2 Mark-41 Vertical Launching System (VLS) with 90 Standard, Vertical Launch ASROC (Anti-Submarine Rocket) & Tomahawk ASM (Air-to-Surface Missile)/LAM (Loitering Attack Missile); 5-in (127-mm)/54 (62) Mark-45 gun; 2 (1) CIWS (Close-In Weapon System); 2 Mark-32 triple 324-mm torpedo tubes for Mark-46 or Mark-50 ASW torpedos

 

Guided Missile Destroyers Lineup

 

Flight IIA: Restart

Ship Yard Launched Commissioned Homeport
DDG-113 John Finn HIIIS 03-28-15 07-15-17 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-114 Ralph Johnson HIIIS 12-12-15
DDG-115 Rafael Peralta GDBIW 10-31-15 07-29-2017 San Diego, California

 

Christening of Delbert

The U.S. Navy christened the newest guided-missile destroyer, the future USS Delbert D. Black (DDG-119), Saturday, November 4, during a 10 a.m. CST ceremony at Huntington Ingalls Industries Shipbuilding in Pascagoula, Mississippi.

Mrs. Ima Black, MCPON Black's widow and a World War II Navy veteran herself, broke a bottle of sparkling wine across the bow to formally christen the ship, a time-honored Navy tradition
Mrs. Ima Black, MCPON Black’s widow and a World War II Navy veteran herself, broke a bottle of sparkling wine across the bow to formally christen the ship, a time-honored Navy tradition

The future USS Delbert D. Black (DDG-119) is the first ship to bear the name of a Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON) and is named for the first person to hold that office. Black began his 30-year Navy career in the spring of 1941. After completing recruit training, he reported to his first assignment, USS Maryland (BB-46) in Pearl Harbor, where he witnessed the Japanese attack that drew the United States into World War II. Over the next 26 years, he rose through the ranks to Gunner’s Mate Master Chief before his selection in 1967 to serve as the first MCPON. The MCPON is the senior enlisted leader in the Navy and serves as an advisor to the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) and to the Chief of Naval Personnel (CNP) in matters dealing with enlisted Sailors and their families.

MCPON Steven S. Giordano, 14th and current Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy, served as the principal speaker during the ceremony. During the event, Mrs. Ima Black, MCPON Black’s widow and a World War II Navy veteran herself, served as the ship’s sponsor and broke a bottle of sparkling wine across the bow to formally christen the ship, a time-honored Navy tradition.

«It is a fitting tribute to the master chief who set the tone for all of us to follow as authentic, competent and courageous leaders», Giordano said. «This ship represents the enlisted force perhaps more than any other ship in the Navy».

USS Delbert D. Black (DDG-119) will be the 69th Arleigh Burke-class destroyer and is currently the fifth of 13 ships currently under contract for the DDG-51 program. The ship will be configured as a Flight IIA destroyer, which enables power projection, forward presence and escort operations at sea in support of low intensity conflict/coastal and littoral offshore warfare, as well as open ocean conflict.

USS Delbert D. Black (DDG-119) will be equipped with the Navy’s Aegis Combat System, the world’s foremost integrated naval weapon. The ship will also incorporate Cooperative Engagement Capability that when combined with the Aegis Combat System, will permit groups of ships and aircraft to link radars to provide a composite picture of the battle space-effectively increasing the theater space. The capability is designed to provide the U.S. Navy with a 21st Century fighting edge.

The nearly 9,500-ton Delbert D. Black is 510 feet/156 m in length, has a waterline beam of 59 feet/18 m and a navigational draft of 30.5 feet/9.3 m. Four gas turbine engines will power the ship to speeds in excess of 30 knots/34.5 mph/55.5 km/h.

MCPON Steven S. Giordano, 14th and current master chief petty officer of the Navy, served as the principal speaker during the ceremony
MCPON Steven S. Giordano, 14th and current master chief petty officer of the Navy, served as the principal speaker during the ceremony

 

Ship Characteristics

Length Overall 510 feet/156 m
Beam – Waterline 59 feet/18 m
Draft 30.5 feet/9.3 m
Displacement – Full Load 9,217 tons/9,363 metric tons
Power Plant 4 General electric LM 2500-30 gas turbines; 2 shafts; 2 CRP (Contra-Rotating) propellers; 100,000 shaft horsepower/75,000 kW
Speed in excess of 30 knots/34.5 mph/55.5 km/h
Range 4,400 NM/8,149 km at 20 knots/23 mph/37 km/h
Crew 380 total: 32 Officers, 27 CPO (Chief Petty Officer), 321 OEM
Surveillance SPY-1D Phased Array Radar and Aegis Combat System (Lockheed Martin); SPS-73(V) Navigation; SPS-67(V)3 Surface Search; 3 SPG-62 Illuminator; SQQ-89(V)6 sonar incorporating SQS-53C hull mounted and SQR-19 towed array sonars used with Mark-116 Mod 7 ASW fire control system
Electronics/Countermeasures SLQ-32(V)3; Mark-53 Mod 0 Decoy System; Mark-234 Decoy System; SLQ-25A Torpedo Decoy; SLQ-39 Surface Decoy; URN-25 TACAN; UPX-29 IFF System; Kollmorgen Mark-46 Mod 1 Electro-Optical Director
Aircraft 2 embarked SH-60 helicopters ASW operations; RAST (Recovery Assist, Secure and Traverse)
Armament 2 Mark-41 Vertical Launching System (VLS) with 90 Standard, Vertical Launch ASROC (Anti-Submarine Rocket) & Tomahawk ASM (Air-to-Surface Missile)/LAM (Loitering Attack Missile); 5-in (127-mm)/54 (62) Mark-45 gun; 2 (1) CIWS (Close-In Weapon System); 2 Mark-32 triple 324-mm torpedo tubes for Mark-46 or Mark-50 ASW torpedos

 

Guided Missile Destroyers Lineup

 

Flight IIA: Technology Insertion

Ship Yard Launched Commissioned Homeport
DDG-116 Thomas Hudner GDBIW 04-01-17
DDG-117 Paul Ignatius HIIIS 11-12-16
DDG-118 Daniel Inouye GDBIW
DDG-119 Delbert D. Black HIIIS 09-08-17
DDG-120 Carl M. Levin GDBIW
DDG-121 Frank E. Peterson Jr. HIIIS
DDG-122 John Basilone GDBIW
DDG-123 Lenah H. Sutcliffe Higbee HIIIS

 

Navy Accepts Portland

Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division delivered the amphibious transport dock USS Portland (LPD-27) to the U.S. Navy on September 18.

(Left to right) Captain J.R. Hill, Commander Jon Letourneau and Mike Pruitt sign the DD 250 document officially transferring custody of the amphibious transport dock USS Portland (LPD-27) from HII to the U.S. Navy. Hill is Portland’s prospective commanding officer; Letourneau is the Navy’s LPD 17-class program manager, and Pruitt is Ingalls’ LPD 27 program manager (Photo by Michael Duhe/HII)
(Left to right) Captain J.R. Hill, Commander Jon Letourneau and Mike Pruitt sign the DD 250 document officially transferring custody of the amphibious transport dock USS Portland (LPD-27) from HII to the U.S. Navy. Hill is Portland’s prospective commanding officer; Letourneau is the Navy’s LPD 17-class program manager, and Pruitt is Ingalls’ LPD 27 program manager (Photo by Michael Duhe/HII)

«Today is a great day for this collective industry and customer team», said Kari Wilkinson, Ingalls’ vice president, program management. «For many of the shipbuilders, Supervisor of Shipbuilding representatives and members of the U.S. Navy program office, this is the 11th ship they have built and delivered together. Their personal commitment to excellence has become the hallmark of the LPD program, and we are positioned to continue that tradition on future ships».

USS Portland (LPD-27) was delivered during an afternoon ceremony with shipbuilders, ship’s force and representatives of Supervisor of Shipbuilding Gulf Coast together in attendance. The signing of the DD 250 document officially transfers custody of the ship from HII to the U.S. Navy.

«I am amazed with the shipbuilders here at Ingalls», said Captain J.R. Hill, Portland’s prospective commanding officer. «There are thousands of them who have been working to build this ship and put it into service, and they’ve really done a great job. I’m very impressed with the team Ingalls has put together as well as the 370 crew members present today who are ecstatic about taking control of this ship. We look forward to what she can do in the future».

USS Portland (LPD-27) is named for the largest city in the state of Oregon. The state has a long history with the U.S. Navy, going back to the construction of hundreds of World War II Liberty and Victory ships at three Portland-area shipyards.

Ingalls has delivered 11 San Antonio-class ships to the U.S. Navy and currently has one more, USS Fort Lauderdale (LPD-28), under construction. In June, Ingalls received an advance procurement contract from the Navy to provide long-lead-time material and advance construction activities for LPD-29, the 13th ship of the San Antonio class.

The San Antonio class is the latest addition to the U.S. Navy’s 21st century amphibious assault force. The 684-foot-long, 105-foot-wide ships are used to embark and land Marines, their equipment and supplies ashore via air cushion or conventional landing craft and amphibious assault vehicles, augmented by helicopters or vertical takeoff and landing aircraft such as the MV-22 Osprey. The ships support a Marine Air Ground Task Force across the spectrum of operations, conducting amphibious and expeditionary missions of sea control and power projection to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief missions throughout the first half of the 21st century.

USS Portland (LPD-27), sails through the Gulf of Mexico during her acceptance sea trials (Photo by Lance Davis/HII)
USS Portland (LPD-27), sails through the Gulf of Mexico during her acceptance sea trials (Photo by Lance Davis/HII)

 

General Characteristics

Builder Huntington Ingalls Industries
Propulsion Four sequentially turbocharged marine Colt-Pielstick Diesels, two shafts, 41,600 shaft horsepower
Length 684 feet/208 m
Beam 105 feet/32 m
Displacement Approximately 24,900 long tons (25,300 metric tons) full load
Draft 23 feet/7 m
Speed In excess of 22 knots/24.2 mph/38.7 km/h
Crew Ship’s Company: 374 Sailors (28 officers, 346 enlisted) and 3 Marines. Embarked Landing Force: 699 (66 officers, 633 enlisted); surge capacity to 800
Armament Two Bushmaster II 30-mm Close in Guns, fore and aft; two Rolling Airframe Missile (RAM) launchers, fore and aft: ten .50 calibre/12.7-mm machine guns
Aircraft Launch or land two CH-53E Super Stallion helicopters or two MV-22 Osprey tilt rotor aircraft or up to four CH-46 Sea Knight helicopters, AH-1 or UH-1 helicopters
Landing/Attack Craft Two LCACs or one LCU; and 14 Expeditionary Fighting Vehicles/Amphibious Assault Vehicles

 

San Antonio-class

Ship Builder Launched Commissioned Homeport
USS San Antonio (LPD-17) Avondale 07-12-2003 01-14-2006 Norfolk, Virginia
USS New Orleans (LPD-18) Avondale 12-11-2004 03-10-2007 San Diego, California
USS Mesa Verde (LPD-19) Ingalls 11-19-2004 12-15-2007 Norfolk, Virginia
USS Green Bay (LPD-20) Avondale 08-11-2006 01-24-2009 San Diego, California
USS New York (LPD-21) Avondale 12-19-2007 11-07-2009 Norfolk, Virginia
USS San Diego (LPD-22) Ingalls 05-07-2010 05-19-2012 San Diego, California
USS Anchorage (LPD-23) Avondale 02-12-2011 05-04-2013 San Diego, California
USS Arlington (LPD-24) Ingalls 11-23-2010 02-08-2013 Norfolk, Virginia
USS Somerset (LPD-25) Avondale 04-14-2012 05-01-2014 San Diego, California
USS John P. Murtha (LPD-26) Ingalls 11-02-2014 10-08-2016 San Diego, California
USS Portland (LPD-27) Ingalls 02-13-2016
USS Fort Lauderdale (LPD-28) Ingalls
LPD-29

 

Acceptance Sea Trials

Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) announced on August 21 the successful completion of acceptance sea trials for the amphibious transport dock USS Portland (LPD-27). The San Antonio-class ship, built at HII’s Ingalls Shipbuilding division, spent last week with the U.S. Navy’s Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV), performing more than 200 trial events that included both in-port and underway portions.

USS Portland (LPD-27), sails through the Gulf of Mexico during her acceptance sea trials (Photo by Lance Davis/HII)
USS Portland (LPD-27), sails through the Gulf of Mexico during her acceptance sea trials (Photo by Lance Davis/HII)

«These sea trials provide an opportunity to showcase the ship’s tremendous capabilities and the build and test skills of our shipbuilders», Ingalls President Brian Cuccias said. «The success of these milestones is important as we continue to remain competitive and keep our supplier base and production lines active in the construction of these quality amphibious warships».

Key demonstrations performed during acceptance trials for INSURV by the Ingalls’ test and trials team included: the anchor-handling demonstration, ballast/de-ballast demonstration, detect-to-engage exercise, running the ship at full power and steering. Now Ingalls’ shipbuilders will put their final touches on the ship in preparation for delivery this year.

«Our team puts in a lot of hard work and effort to make these sea trials successful», said George Jones, Ingalls’ vice president of operations. «We get better with every LPD we build, and we look forward to delivering a very complex and capable ship to our sailors and Marines. As always, this success was a joint effort between our shipbuilders, test and trials team and our partners at Supervisor of Shipbuilding, Gulf Coast».

USS Portland (LPD-27) is named for the largest city in the state of Oregon. The state has a long history with the U.S. Navy, going back to the construction of hundreds of World War II Liberty and Victory ships at three Portland-area shipyards.

Ingalls has delivered 11 San Antonio-class ships to the U.S. Navy, including USS John P. Murtha (LPD-26) in 2016. In June, Ingalls received an advance procurement contract from the U.S. Navy to provide long-lead-time material and advance construction activities for LPD-29, the 13th amphibious transport dock of the San Antonio class. Ingalls will lay the keel of the 12th San Antonio-class ship, USS Fort Lauderdale (LPD-28), this fall.

«Portland’s successful sea trial proves the dedication and quality of work our shipbuilders continue to provide to the LPD program», said Steve Sloan, Ingalls’ LPD program manager. «I’m proud of the performance of the shipbuilders and the ship during acceptance trials, and now we will continue to work the final fit-and-finish touches before LPD 27’s delivery this fall».

The San Antonio class is a major part of the U.S. Navy’s 21st century amphibious assault force. The 684-foot-long/208-meter-long, 105-foot-wide/32-meter-wide ships are used to embark and land Marines, their equipment and supplies ashore via air cushion or conventional landing craft and amphibious assault vehicles, augmented by helicopters or vertical takeoff and landing aircraft such as the MV-22 Osprey. The ships support a Marine Air Ground Task Force across the spectrum of operations, conducting amphibious and expeditionary missions of sea control and power projection to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief missions throughout the first half of the 21st century.

 

General Characteristics

Builder Huntington Ingalls Industries
Propulsion Four sequentially turbocharged marine Colt-Pielstick Diesels, two shafts, 41,600 shaft horsepower
Length 684 feet/208 m
Beam 105 feet/32 m
Displacement Approximately 24,900 long tons (25,300 metric tons) full load
Draft 23 feet/7 m
Speed In excess of 22 knots/24.2 mph/38.7 km/h
Crew Ship’s Company: 374 Sailors (28 officers, 346 enlisted) and 3 Marines. Embarked Landing Force: 699 (66 officers, 633 enlisted); surge capacity to 800
Armament Two Bushmaster II 30-mm Close in Guns, fore and aft; two Rolling Airframe Missile (RAM) launchers, fore and aft: ten .50 calibre/12.7-mm machine guns
Aircraft Launch or land two CH-53E Super Stallion helicopters or two MV-22 Osprey tilt rotor aircraft or up to four CH-46 Sea Knight helicopters, AH-1 or UH-1 helicopters
Landing/Attack Craft Two LCACs or one LCU; and 14 Expeditionary Fighting Vehicles/Amphibious Assault Vehicles

 

San Antonio-class

Ship Builder Launched Commissioned Homeport
USS San Antonio (LPD-17) Avondale 07-12-2003 01-14-2006 Norfolk, Virginia
USS New Orleans (LPD-18) Avondale 12-11-2004 03-10-2007 San Diego, California
USS Mesa Verde (LPD-19) Ingalls 11-19-2004 12-15-2007 Norfolk, Virginia
USS Green Bay (LPD-20) Avondale 08-11-2006 01-24-2009 San Diego, California
USS New York (LPD-21) Avondale 12-19-2007 11-07-2009 Norfolk, Virginia
USS San Diego (LPD-22) Ingalls 05-07-2010 05-19-2012 San Diego, California
USS Anchorage (LPD-23) Avondale 02-12-2011 05-04-2013 San Diego, California
USS Arlington (LPD-24) Ingalls 11-23-2010 02-08-2013 Norfolk, Virginia
USS Somerset (LPD-25) Avondale 04-14-2012 05-01-2014 San Diego, California
USS John P. Murtha (LPD-26) Ingalls 11-02-2014 10-08-2016 San Diego, California
USS Portland (LPD-27) Ingalls 02-13-2016
USS Fort Lauderdale (LPD-28) Ingalls
LPD-29

 

Portland Completes Acceptance Sea Trials

Builder’s Trials

Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division announced on July 25 the successful completion of builder’s sea trials on the guided missile destroyer USS Ralph Johnson (DDG-114). The Arleigh Burke (DDG-51) destroyer spent more than three days in the Gulf of Mexico testing the ship’s main propulsion, combat and other ship systems.

Ingalls Shipbuilding completed builder's sea trials for USS Ralph Johnson (DDG-114). The Arleigh Burke (DDG-51) destroyer spent more than three days in the Gulf of Mexico testing the ship’s main propulsion, combat and other ship systems (HII photo)
Ingalls Shipbuilding completed builder’s sea trials for USS Ralph Johnson (DDG-114). The Arleigh Burke (DDG-51) destroyer spent more than three days in the Gulf of Mexico testing the ship’s main propulsion, combat and other ship systems (HII photo)

«It’s always a great accomplishment when our shipbuilders successfully take a ship to sea for the first time», Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias said. «DDG-114’s sea trials showcase the skill of our shipbuilders and our large, national DDG-51 supplier base. We look forward to acceptance trials, and to delivering our 30th Aegis destroyer to our U.S. Navy customer later this year».

Ingalls has delivered 29 Arleigh Burke-class destroyers to the U.S. Navy, most recently delivering USS John Finn (DDG-113), which was commissioned on July 15 in Pearl Harbor. Other destroyers currently under construction at Ingalls include USS Paul Ignatius (DDG-117), USS Delbert D. Black (DDG-119), USS Frank E. Petersen Jr. (DDG-121) and USS Lenah H. Sutcliffe Higbee (DDG-123). In June, Ingalls received a contract modification to incorporate the «Flight III» upgrades to USS Jack H. Lucas (DDG-125) which will start fabrication in 2018.

«Our test and trials personnel, craftsmen and Supervisor of Shipbuilding team continue to show their dedication to delivering quality ships to the Navy every time they go to sea on these trials», said George S. Jones, Ingalls’ vice president of operations. «The shipbuilders at Ingalls take pride in their work and in the missions that these ships will be doing for our country».

DDG-114 is named to honor Private First Class Ralph Henry Johnson, who was awarded the Medal of Honor for his heroic actions that saved others during the Vietnam War. Johnson shouted a warning to his fellow Marines and hurled himself on an explosive device, saving the life of one Marine and preventing the enemy from penetrating his sector of the patrol’s perimeter. Johnson died instantly. The Charleston, South Carolina, native had only been in Vietnam for two months and a few days when he was killed at the age of 19.

«There is still work to be done», said George Nungesser, Ingalls’ DDG-51 program manager. «Completing another successful sea trial puts us one step closer to delivering the Navy another state-of-the art guided missile destroyer to help in our nation’s defense. Now it’s time for our team to get back to work so they can have USS Ralph Johnson (DDG-114) ready for acceptance trials and then ready for the fleet».

Arleigh Burke-class destroyers are highly capable, multi-mission ships and can conduct a variety of operations, from peacetime presence and crisis management to sea control and power projection, all in support of the United States’ military strategy. The guided missile destroyers are capable of simultaneously fighting air, surface and subsurface battles. The ship contains myriad offensive and defensive weapons designed to support maritime defense needs well into the 21st century.

 

Ship Characteristics

Length Overall 510 feet/156 m
Beam – Waterline 59 feet/18 m
Draft 30.5 feet/9.3 m
Displacement – Full Load 9,217 tons/9,363 metric tons
Power Plant 4 General electric LM 2500-30 gas turbines; 2 shafts; 2 CRP (Contra-Rotating) propellers; 100,000 shaft horsepower/75,000 kW
Speed in excess of 30 knots/34.5 mph/55.5 km/h
Range 4,400 NM/8,149 km at 20 knots/23 mph/37 km/h
Crew 380 total: 32 Officers, 27 CPO (Chief Petty Officer), 321 OEM
Surveillance SPY-1D Phased Array Radar and Aegis Combat System (Lockheed Martin); SPS-73(V) Navigation; SPS-67(V)3 Surface Search; 3 SPG-62 Illuminator; SQQ-89(V)6 sonar incorporating SQS-53C hull mounted and SQR-19 towed array sonars used with Mark-116 Mod 7 ASW fire control system
Electronics/Countermeasures SLQ-32(V)3; Mark-53 Mod 0 Decoy System; Mark-234 Decoy System; SLQ-25A Torpedo Decoy; SLQ-39 Surface Decoy; URN-25 TACAN; UPX-29 IFF System; Kollmorgen Mark-46 Mod 1 Electro-Optical Director
Aircraft 2 embarked SH-60 helicopters ASW operations; RAST (Recovery Assist, Secure and Traverse)
Armament 2 Mark-41 Vertical Launching System (VLS) with 90 Standard, Vertical Launch ASROC (Anti-Submarine Rocket) & Tomahawk ASM (Air-to-Surface Missile)/LAM (Loitering Attack Missile); 5-in (127-mm)/54 (62) Mark-45 gun; 2 (1) CIWS (Close-In Weapon System); 2 Mark-32 triple 324-mm torpedo tubes for Mark-46 or Mark-50 ASW torpedos

 

Guided Missile Destroyers Lineup

 

Flight IIA: Restart

Ship Yard Launched Commissioned Homeport
DDG-113 John Finn HIIIS 03-28-15 07-15-17 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-114 Ralph Johnson HIIIS 12-12-15
DDG-115 Rafael Peralta GDBIW 10-31-15  07-29-2017  San Diego, California

 

John Commissioned

The Navy commissioned its newest guided-missile destroyer, the future USS John Finn (DDG-113), during a 10 a.m. HAST ceremony Saturday, July 15, at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii.

John Finn is named in honor of Lt. John William Finn, a chief aviation ordnanceman and the first member of the armed services to earn the Medal of Honor during World War II for heroism during the attack on Pearl Harbor
John Finn is named in honor of Lt. John William Finn, a chief aviation ordnanceman and the first member of the armed services to earn the Medal of Honor during World War II for heroism during the attack on Pearl Harbor

The new destroyer honors Chief Aviation Ordnanceman John Finn, who received the Medal of Honor for heroism during the first attack by Japanese airplanes at Pearl Harbor. While under heavy machine gun fire, Finn manned a .50-caliber/12.7-mm machine gun mounted on an instruction stand in a completely exposed section of the parking ramp. Wounded multiple times, he had to be convinced to leave his post. After receiving first aid treatment, he overcame the effects of his injuries and returned to the squadron area to supervise the rearming of returning planes. Finn served throughout the war, earning a commission and eventually being promoted to the rank of lieutenant. He passed away in May 2010 at the age of 100.

Admiral Harry Harris, commander, U.S. Pacific Command, delivered the ceremony’s principal address. Mrs. Laura Stavridis, wife of retired Admiral James Stavridis, served as the ship’s sponsor.

«The commissioning of USS John Finn marks the beginning of what will be decades of exceptional service for this ship», said the Honorable Sean Stackley, acting secretary of the Navy. «During World War II, Chief Finn distinguished himself through heroic service to his fellow Sailors and our nation. I know the men and women who make up the crew of USS John Finn will carry his legacy forward with the same selfless service he distinguished more than 75 years ago».

Designated DDG-113, John Finn is the 63rd Arleigh Burke-class destroyer and the first of her class commissioned since USS Michael Murphy (DDG-112) joined the fleet October 6, 2012. John Finn will be able to conduct a variety of operations, from peacetime presence and crisis management to sea control and power projection. John Finn will be capable of engaging in air, surface and subsurface battles simultaneously and will contain a myriad of offensive and defensive weapons designed to support maritime warfare, including Integrated Air and Missile Defense (IAMD) capabilities.

 

Ship Characteristics

Length Overall 510 feet/156 m
Beam – Waterline 59 feet/18 m
Draft 30.5 feet/9.3 m
Displacement – Full Load 9,217 tons/9,363 metric tons
Power Plant 4 General electric LM 2500-30 gas turbines; 2 shafts; 2 CRP (Contra-Rotating) propellers; 100,000 shaft horsepower/75,000 kW
Speed in excess of 30 knots/34.5 mph/55.5 km/h
Range 4,400 NM/8,149 km at 20 knots/23 mph/37 km/h
Crew 380 total: 32 Officers, 27 CPO (Chief Petty Officer), 321 OEM
Surveillance SPY-1D Phased Array Radar and Aegis Combat System (Lockheed Martin); SPS-73(V) Navigation; SPS-67(V)3 Surface Search; 3 SPG-62 Illuminator; SQQ-89(V)6 sonar incorporating SQS-53C hull mounted and SQR-19 towed array sonars used with Mark-116 Mod 7 ASW fire control system
Electronics/Countermeasures SLQ-32(V)3; Mark-53 Mod 0 Decoy System; Mark-234 Decoy System; SLQ-25A Torpedo Decoy; SLQ-39 Surface Decoy; URN-25 TACAN; UPX-29 IFF System; Kollmorgen Mark-46 Mod 1 Electro-Optical Director
Aircraft 2 embarked SH-60 helicopters ASW operations; RAST (Recovery Assist, Secure and Traverse)
Armament 2 Mark-41 Vertical Launching System (VLS) with 90 Standard, Vertical Launch ASROC (Anti-Submarine Rocket) & Tomahawk ASM (Air-to-Surface Missile)/LAM (Loitering Attack Missile); 5-in (127-mm)/54 (62) Mark-45 gun; 2 (1) CIWS (Close-In Weapon System); 2 Mark-32 triple 324-mm torpedo tubes for Mark-46 or Mark-50 ASW torpedos
The future Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS John Finn (DDG-113) is pierside at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam in preparation for its commissioning ceremony (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Justin R. Pacheco/Released)
The future Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS John Finn (DDG-113) is pierside at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam in preparation for its commissioning ceremony (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Justin R. Pacheco/Released)

 

Guided Missile Destroyers Lineup

 

Flight IIA: Restart

Ship Yard Launched Commissioned Homeport
DDG-113 John Finn HIIIS 03-28-15 07-15-17 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-114 Ralph Johnson HIIIS 12-12-15
DDG-115 Rafael Peralta GDBIW 10-31-15
The future Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS John Finn (DDG-113) arrives at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam in preparation for its commissioning ceremony (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Randi Brown/Released)
The future Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS John Finn (DDG-113) arrives at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam in preparation for its commissioning ceremony (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Randi Brown/Released)

Builder’s trials

Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division announced on July 3, that the amphibious transport dock USS Portland (LPD-27) has completed her first set of sea trials. Ingalls’ test and trials team spent four days in the Gulf of Mexico operating the 11th San Antonio-class ship and demonstrating its systems.

The amphibious transport dock USS Portland (LPD-27) has completed her first set of sea trials. The test and trials team at Ingalls Shipbuilding spent four days in the Gulf of Mexico operating the 11th San Antonio-class ship and demonstrating its systems (Photo by Lance Davis/HII)
The amphibious transport dock USS Portland (LPD-27) has completed her first set of sea trials. The test and trials team at Ingalls Shipbuilding spent four days in the Gulf of Mexico operating the 11th San Antonio-class ship and demonstrating its systems (Photo by Lance Davis/HII)

«This successful sea trial is another testament to the quality work our shipbuilders continue to provide in the LPD program», said Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias. «These are complex vessels, and I’m proud of our workforce, who have the skills and knowledge it takes to design, build and test these American warships».

Major testing conducted during builder’s trials include anchor-handling, ballast/de-ballast of the ship’s well deck, detect-to-engage, full power ahead and astern and steering demonstrations.

«We place great importance on our relationships with our customers and the responsibility we have to the sailors and Marines who will own this ship», said Kari Wilkinson, Ingalls’ vice president of program management. «The LPD team is strong and very prepared to continue providing these capable assets to our country».

Ingalls’ shipbuilders are now preparing Portland for acceptance trials in August, when the U.S. Navy’s Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) will conduct inspections and witness final demonstrations before the ship is delivered to the U.S. Navy.

«Our shipbuilders continue to work in concert with one another, and this ship is another example of their successes», said George Jones, Ingalls’ vice president of operations. «We have the best construction team in our industry today, and this team, along with the nationwide supplier base, will continue to see more successes with their winning behaviors and team spirit».

LPD-27 will be the third U.S. Navy ship named Portland, honoring both the Oregon seaport and Maine’s largest city.

Ingalls has delivered 10 San Antonio-class ships to the Navy, including USS John P. Murtha (LPD-26) in 2016. Ingalls will lay the keel of the 12th San Antonio-class ship, USS Fort Lauderdale (LPD-28), this fall. Last Friday, Ingalls was awarded an advance procurement contract for LPD-29.

The San Antonio class is a major part of the Navy’s 21st century amphibious assault force. The 684-foot-long/208-meter-long, 105-foot-wide/32-meter-wide ships are used to embark and land Marines, their equipment and supplies ashore via air cushion or conventional landing craft and amphibious assault vehicles, augmented by helicopters or vertical takeoff and landing aircraft such as the MV-22 Osprey. The ships support a Marine Air Ground Task Force across the spectrum of operations, conducting amphibious and expeditionary missions of sea control and power projection to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief missions throughout the first half of the 21st century.

USS Portland (LPD-27) completes builder’s sea trials

 

General Characteristics

Builder Huntington Ingalls Industries
Propulsion Four sequentially turbocharged marine Colt-Pielstick Diesels, two shafts, 41,600 shaft horsepower
Length 684 feet/208 m
Beam 105 feet/32 m
Displacement Approximately 24,900 long tons (25,300 metric tons) full load
Draft 23 feet/7 m
Speed In excess of 22 knots/24.2 mph/38.7 km/h
Crew Ship’s Company: 374 Sailors (28 officers, 346 enlisted) and 3 Marines. Embarked Landing Force: 699 (66 officers, 633 enlisted); surge capacity to 800
Armament Two Bushmaster II 30-mm Close in Guns, fore and aft; two Rolling Airframe Missile (RAM) launchers, fore and aft: ten .50 calibre/12.7-mm machine guns
Aircraft Launch or land two CH-53E Super Stallion helicopters or two MV-22 Osprey tilt rotor aircraft or up to four CH-46 Sea Knight helicopters, AH-1 or UH-1 helicopters
Landing/Attack Craft Two LCACs or one LCU; and 14 Expeditionary Fighting Vehicles/Amphibious Assault Vehicles

 

San Antonio-class

Ship Builder Launched Commissioned Homeport
USS San Antonio (LPD-17) Avondale 07-12-2003 01-14-2006 Norfolk, Virginia
USS New Orleans (LPD-18) Avondale 12-11-2004 03-10-2007 San Diego, California
USS Mesa Verde (LPD-19) Ingalls 11-19-2004 12-15-2007 Norfolk, Virginia
USS Green Bay (LPD-20) Avondale 08-11-2006 01-24-2009 San Diego, California
USS New York (LPD-21) Avondale 12-19-2007 11-07-2009 Norfolk, Virginia
USS San Diego (LPD-22) Ingalls 05-07-2010 05-19-2012 San Diego, California
USS Anchorage (LPD-23) Avondale 02-12-2011 05-04-2013 San Diego, California
USS Arlington (LPD-24) Ingalls 11-23-2010 02-08-2013 Norfolk, Virginia
USS Somerset (LPD-25) Avondale 04-14-2012 05-01-2014 San Diego, California
USS John P. Murtha (LPD-26) Ingalls 11-02-2014 San Diego, California
USS Portland (LPD-27) Ingalls 02-13-2016
USS Fort Lauderdale (LPD-28) Ingalls
LPD-28

 

Contract for LPD-29

On June 30, 2017, Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) announced that its Ingalls Shipbuilding division has received a $218 million, cost-plus-fixed-fee advance procurement contract from the U.S. Navy to provide long-lead-time material and advance construction activities for LPD-29, the 13th amphibious transport dock of the San Antonio (LPD-17) class.

Ingalls Shipbuilding division received a $218 million contract from the U.S. Navy to provide long-lead-time material and advance construction activities for LPD-29, the 13th amphibious transport dock of the San Antonio (LPD-17) class (HII rendering)
Ingalls Shipbuilding division received a $218 million contract from the U.S. Navy to provide long-lead-time material and advance construction activities for LPD-29, the 13th amphibious transport dock of the San Antonio (LPD-17) class (HII rendering)

The funds will be used to purchase long-lead-time material and major equipment, including main engines, diesel generators, deck equipment, shafting, propellers, valves and other long-lead systems.

«This contract is important for us, and for our 400 LPD suppliers in 30 states across the country, as we continue to build these high-quality, complex amphibious warships for the U.S. Navy», Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias said. «This contract enables us to align our material, processes and people to build LPD-29 efficiently and affordably and to leverage our hot production line».

Ingalls’ 11th LPD, USS Portland (LPD-27), returned from builder’s sea trials on June 30 and will be delivered later this year. USS Fort Lauderdale (LPD-28) began construction last December and will have its keel laid this fall.

The San Antonio class is a key element of the U.S. Navy’s 21st century amphibious assault force. The 684-foot-long/208-meter-long, 105-foot-wide/32-meter-wide ships are used to embark and land Marines, their equipment and supplies ashore via air cushion or conventional landing craft and amphibious assault vehicles, augmented by helicopters or vertical takeoff and landing aircraft such as the MV-22 Osprey. The ships support a Marine Air Ground Task Force across the spectrum of operations, conducting amphibious and expeditionary missions of sea control and power projection, along with humanitarian assistance and disaster relief missions throughout the first half of the 21st century.