Tag Archives: Ingalls Shipbuilding

Truly and fairly laid

Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division authenticated the keel of the eighth U.S. Coast Guard National Security Cutter, USCGC Midgett (WMSL-757) on January 27, 2017.

Ship Sponsor Jazania O’Neal writes her initials onto a steel plate that will be welded inside USCGC Midgett (WMSL-757), the National Security Cutter named in honor of her grandfather, John Allen Midgett. Pictured with O’Neal are (left to right) Capt. Christopher Webb, commanding officer, U.S. Coast Guard Project Resident Office Gulf Coast; Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias; and Jack Beard, a structural welder at Ingalls (Photo by Lance Davis/HII)
Ship Sponsor Jazania O’Neal writes her initials onto a steel plate that will be welded inside USCGC Midgett (WMSL-757), the National Security Cutter named in honor of her grandfather, John Allen Midgett. Pictured with O’Neal are (left to right) Capt. Christopher Webb, commanding officer, U.S. Coast Guard Project Resident Office Gulf Coast; Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias; and Jack Beard, a structural welder at Ingalls (Photo by Lance Davis/HII)

«The National Security Cutter Program is vital to our Coast Guard, our country and to Ingalls Shipbuilding», said Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias. «Today, we lay the foundation upon which this great ship will be built. The Midgett, like her sister ships, is being built to the highest quality standards with outstanding cost and schedule performance, and the NSC team is energized to make this one the best yet».

The ship is named to honor John Allen Midgett, who was awarded the silver cup by the U.K. Board of Trade in 1918 for the renowned rescue of 42 British sailors aboard the British tanker Mirlo after it was torpedoed by a German U-boat off the coast of North Carolina. He was also awarded the Gold Lifesaving Medal by the U.S. Coast Guard in 1924. Midgett was a senior enlisted member of the U.S. Lifesaving Service when it merged with the U.S. Lighthouse Service and U.S. Revenue Cutter Service to become today’s U.S. Coast Guard.

Jazania O’Neal, Midgett’s granddaughter and the ship’s sponsor, spoke today, proclaiming Midgett’s keel to be «truly and fairly laid». O’Neal’s initials were welded onto a keel plate by Jack Beard, a structural welder at Ingalls.

«For my grandfather to be memorialized as the namesake for this ship, in the company of the seven other Legend-class ship namesakes, surpasses validation of our heritage on a worldwide scale», O’Neal said. «We wish you well throughout the remaining construction of this fine ship, and we look forward to seeing you at the christening».

Ingalls has delivered six NSCs to the U.S. Coast Guard, and two more are currently under construction. In addition to USCGC Midgett (WMSL-757), the seventh NSC, USCGC Kimball (WMSL-756), is scheduled to deliver in 2018. In December 2016, Ingalls received a $486 million fixed-price incentive contract from the U.S. Coast Guard to build a ninth National Security Cutter – USCGC Stone (WMSL-758).

«The entire Coast Guard team is appreciative of the Ingalls Shipbuilding team», said Captain Christopher Webb, commanding officer, U.S. Coast Guard Project Resident Office Gulf Coast. «We rely on your talents, skills and masterful crafts to provide the NSCs we utilize to complete our many missions around the world. NSC 8 reached its start fabrication milestone just over 14 and a half months ago, and remains ahead of production schedule. Most importantly, I look forward to seeing the continued emphasis on quality, while maximizing NSC completeness improvements indicative of the planning, hard work, integration and shipbuilding excellence here».

Legend-Class National Security Cutters are the flagships of the U.S. Coast Guard. They are the most technologically advanced ships in the Coast Guard’s fleet, with capabilities for maritime homeland security, law enforcement and national security missions. NSCs are 418 feet/127 m long with a 54-foot/16-meter beam and displace 4,500 tons with a full load. They have a top speed of 28 knots/32 mph/52 km/h, a range of 12,000 nautical miles/13,809 miles/22,224 km, an endurance of 60 days and a crew of 120. The Legend class of cutters plays an important role in enhancing the Coast Guard’s operational readiness, capacity and effectiveness.

 

Facts

Displacement 4,500 long tons/4,572 metric tons
Length 418 feet/127 m
Beam 54 feet/16 m
Speed 28 knots/32 mph/52 km/h
Range 12,000 NM/13,809 miles/22,224 km
Endurance 60 days
Crew 110
Equipped with Mk-110 57-mm turret mounted gun
6 × 12.7-mm/.50 caliber machine guns
3D air search radar
2 level 1, class 1 aircraft hangers
A stern launch ramp for mission boats

 

Ship list

Ship Hull Number Laid down Launched Commissioned
Bertholf WMSL-750 03-29-2005 09-29-2006 08-04-2008
Waesche WMSL-751 09-11-2006 07-12-2008 05-07-2010
Stratton WMSL-752 07-20-2009 07-23-2010 03-31-2012
Hamilton WMSL-753 09-05-2012 08-10-2013 12-06-2014
James WMSL-754 05-17-2013 05-03-2014 08-08-2015
Munro WMSL-755 10-07-2013 09-12-2015
Kimball WMSL-756 03-04-2016 12-17-2016
Midgett WMSL-757  01-27-2017
Stone WMSL-758

 

The start of fabrication

Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division officially started fabrication of the Arleigh Burke-class (DDG-51) destroyer USS Lenah H. Sutcliffe Higbee (DDG-123) on Wednesday, January 26, 2017. The start of fabrication signifies that the first 100 tons of steel have been cut.

Paul Bosarge, a steel fabrication burner at Ingalls Shipbuilding, presses the button to start fabrication of the Ingalls-built destroyer USS Lenah H. Sutcliffe Higbee (DDG-123). Bosarge has worked at Ingalls for 39 years (Photo by Lance Davis/HII)
Paul Bosarge, a steel fabrication burner at Ingalls Shipbuilding, presses the button to start fabrication of the Ingalls-built destroyer USS Lenah H. Sutcliffe Higbee (DDG-123). Bosarge has worked at Ingalls for 39 years (Photo by Lance Davis/HII)

«Starting fabrication on another destroyer is a great way to start the year», Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias said. «Ingalls has delivered 29 of these ships to the U.S. Navy, and our hot production line continues to improve the construction process. The ships are tremendous assets to our country’s fleet, and we look forward to delivering another quality destroyer to the Navy».

The ship is named in honor of Lenah H. Sutcliffe Higbee, the first woman to receive the Navy Cross. Higbee joined the U.S. Navy in October 1908 as part of the newly established Navy Nurse Corps, a group of women who would become known as «The Sacred Twenty», and became the second superintendent of the Navy Nurse Corps in January 1911.

USS Lenah H. Sutcliffe Higbee (DDG-123) is the fourth of five Arleigh Burke-class destroyers HII was awarded in June 2013. The five-ship contract, part of a multi-year procurement in the DDG-51 program, allows Ingalls to build ships more efficiently by buying bulk material and moving the skilled workforce from ship to ship.

With the start of Lenah H. Sutcliffe Higbee, Ingalls has five destroyers under construction. USS Ralph Johnson (DDG-114) will undergo sea trials later this year and is scheduled to be delivered by the end of the year. USS Paul Ignatius (DDG-117) will be christened on April 8. USS Delbert D. Black (DDG-119) will launch later this year, and USS Frank E. Petersen Jr. (DDG-121) will lay its keel in the first quarter of this year.

 

Ship Characteristics

Length Overall 510 feet/156 m
Beam – Waterline 59 feet/18 m
Draft 30.5 feet/9.3 m
Displacement – Full Load 9,217 tons/9,363 metric tons
Power Plant 4 General electric LM 2500-30 gas turbines; 2 shafts; 2 CRP (Contra-Rotating) propellers; 100,000 shaft horsepower/75,000 kW
Speed in excess of 30 knots/34.5 mph/55.5 km/h
Range 4,400 NM/8,149 km at 20 knots/23 mph/37 km/h
Crew 380 total: 32 Officers, 27 CPO (Chief Petty Officer), 321 OEM
Surveillance SPY-1D Phased Array Radar and Aegis Combat System (Lockheed Martin); SPS-73(V) Navigation; SPS-67(V)3 Surface Search; 3 SPG-62 Illuminator; SQQ-89(V)6 sonar incorporating SQS-53C hull mounted and SQR-19 towed array sonars used with Mark-116 Mod 7 ASW fire control system
Electronics/Countermeasures SLQ-32(V)3; Mark-53 Mod 0 Decoy System; Mark-234 Decoy System; SLQ-25A Torpedo Decoy; SLQ-39 Surface Decoy; URN-25 TACAN; UPX-29 IFF System; Kollmorgen Mark-46 Mod 1 Electro-Optical Director
Aircraft 2 embarked SH-60 helicopters ASW operations; RAST (Recovery Assist, Secure and Traverse)
Armament 2 Mark-41 Vertical Launching System (VLS) with 90 Standard, Vertical Launch ASROC (Anti-Submarine Rocket) & Tomahawk ASM (Air-to-Surface Missile)/LAM (Loitering Attack Missile); 5-in (127-mm)/54 (62) Mark-45 gun; 2 (1) CIWS (Close-In Weapon System); 2 Mark-32 triple 324-mm torpedo tubes for Mark-46 or Mark-50 ASW torpedos

 

Flight IIA: Restart

Ship Yard Launched Commissioned Homeport
DDG-113 John Finn HIIIS 03-28-15
DDG-114 Ralph Johnson HIIIS 12-12-15
DDG-115 Rafael Peralta GDBIW 10-31-15

 

Flight IIA: Technology Insertion

Ship Yard Launched Commissioned Homeport
DDG-116 Thomas Hudner GDBIW
DDG-117 Paul Ignatius HIIIS 11-12-16
DDG-118 Daniel Inouye GDBIW
DDG-119 Delbert D. Black HIIIS
DDG-120 Carl M. Levin GDBIW
DDG-121 Frank E. Peterson Jr. HIIIS
DDG-122 John Basilone GDBIW
DDG-123 Lenah H. Sutcliffe Higbee HIIIS

 

Flight III

Ship Yard Launched Commissioned Homeport
DDG-124 Harvey C. Barnum, Jr. GDBIW
DDG-125 Jack H. Lucas HIIIS
DDG-126 Louis H. Wilson, Jr. GDBIW

 

Ninth Legend-class NSC

Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division has received a $486 million fixed-price incentive contract from the U.S. Coast Guard to build a ninth National Security Cutter (NSC).

National Security Cutter USCGC Munro (WMSL-755) Successfully Completes Builder's Sea Trials
National Security Cutter USCGC Munro (WMSL-755) Successfully Completes Builder’s Sea Trials

«With the experience and knowledge our shipbuilders bring to this program, I am confident NSC 9 will be another great ship and continue the great success on this program», said Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias. «These ships remain in high demand by our Coast Guard customer, and we look forward to delivering another quality NSC to help them accomplish their vital homeland security missions».

NSCs are the flagships of the Coast Guard’s cutter fleet, designed to replace the 12 Hamilton-class high-endurance cutters, which entered service during the 1960s. Ingalls has delivered six NSCs and has two more under construction: USCGC Kimball (WMSL-756) and USCGC Midgett (WMSL-757). These ships are scheduled to be delivered in 2018 and 2019, respectively.

«We are extremely proud of the quality of the NSCs we’ve built for the U.S. Coast Guard», said Derek Murphy, Ingalls’ NSC program manager. «As we continue to be the sole builder in this class, the benefits of serial production are apparent: technologically advanced, dependable ships that are built at cost and on schedule».

Legend-Class National Security Cutters are the flagships of the U.S. Coast Guard. They are the most technologically advanced ships in the Coast Guard’s fleet, with capabilities for maritime homeland security, law enforcement and national security missions. NSCs are 418 feet/127 m long with a 54-foot/16-meter beam and displace 4,500 tons/4,572 metric tons with a full load. They have a top speed of 28 knots/32 mph/52 km/h, a range of 12,000 NM/13,809 miles/22,224 km, an endurance of 60 days and a crew of 120. The Legend class of cutters plays an important role in enhancing the Coast Guard’s operational readiness, capacity and effectiveness at a time when the demand for their services has never been greater.

 

Facts

Displacement 4,500 long tons/4,572 metric tons
Length 418 feet/127 m
Beam 54 feet/16 m
Speed 28 knots/32 mph/52 km/h
Range 12,000 NM/13,809 miles/22,224 km
Endurance 60 days
Crew 110
Equipped with Mk-110 57-mm turret mounted gun
6 × 12.7-mm/.50 caliber machine guns
3D air search radar
2 level 1, class 1 aircraft hangers
A stern launch ramp for mission boats

 

Ship list

Ship Hull Number Laid down Launched Commissioned
Bertholf WMSL-750 03-29-2005 09-29-2006 08-04-2008
Waesche WMSL-751 09-11-2006 07-12-2008 05-07-2010
Stratton WMSL-752 07-20-2009 07-23-2010 03-31-2012
Hamilton WMSL-753 09-05-2012 08-10-2013 12-06-2014
James WMSL-754 05-17-2013 05-03-2014 08-08-2015
Munro WMSL-755 10-07-2013 09-12-2015
Kimball WMSL-756 03-04-2016 12-17-2016
Midgett WMSL-757
Stone WMSL-758

Translation and launch of U.S. Coast Guard National Security Cutter Kimball

HII Launches Portland

On February 13, Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division has launched the company’s 11th amphibious transport dock, USS Portland (LPD-27). The ship, named for Oregon’s largest city, is scheduled to be christened on May 21.

USS Portland (LPD-27) is seen here in the middle of launch early Saturday morning at Ingalls Shipbuilding in Pascagoula. Portland is the 11th San Antonio-class landing platform dock (Photo by Andrew Young/HII)
USS Portland (LPD-27) is seen here in the middle of launch early Saturday morning at Ingalls Shipbuilding in Pascagoula. Portland is the 11th San Antonio-class landing platform dock (Photo by Andrew Young/HII)

«It takes a tremendous effort by all of our crafts personnel to accomplish this big milestone», said Bruce Knowles, Ingalls’ LPD-27 program manager. «The LPD program continues to improve with each ship, and LPD-27 falls into that same line of success proven by a hot production line. Our shipbuilders continue to build these ships more efficiently and affordably».

USS Portland (LPD-27) was translated via Ingalls’ rail car system to the floating dry dock prior to launch. The dock was moved away from the pier and then flooded to float the ship. With the assistance of tugs, Portland came off the dock on Saturday morning.

Ingalls has built and delivered nine ships in the San Antonio class of ships, with USS John P. Murtha (LPD-26) and USS Portland (LPD-27) remaining. Ingalls received a $200 million advance procurement contract for LPD-28, the 12th ship in the class, in December, 2015.

The San Antonio class is the latest addition to the U.S. Navy’s 21st century amphibious assault force. The 684-foot-long/208-meter-long, 105-foot-wide/32-meter-wide ships are used to embark and land Marines, their equipment and supplies ashore via air cushion or conventional landing craft and amphibious assault vehicles, augmented by helicopters or vertical takeoff and landing aircraft such as the MV-22 Osprey. The ships support a Marine Air Ground Task Force across the spectrum of operations, conducting amphibious and expeditionary missions of sea control and power projection to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief missions throughout the first half of the 21st century.

John P. Murtha (LPD-26) is the tenth ship in the San Antonio Class
John P. Murtha (LPD-26) is the tenth ship in the San Antonio Class

 

General Characteristics

Builder Huntington Ingalls Industries
Propulsion Four sequentially turbocharged marine Colt-Pielstick Diesels, two shafts, 41,600 shaft horsepower
Length 684 feet/208 m
Beam 105 feet/32 m
Displacement Approximately 24,900 long tons (25,300 metric tons) full load
Draft 23 feet/7 m
Speed In excess of 22 knots/24.2 mph/38.7 km/h
Crew Ship’s Company: 374 Sailors (28 officers, 346 enlisted) and 3 Marines. Embarked Landing Force: 699 (66 officers, 633 enlisted); surge capacity to 800
Armament Two Bushmaster II 30-mm Close in Guns, fore and aft; two Rolling Airframe Missile (RAM) launchers, fore and aft: ten .50 calibre/12.7-mm machine guns
Aircraft Launch or land two CH-53E Super Stallion helicopters or two MV-22 Osprey tilt rotor aircraft or up to four CH-46 Sea Knight helicopters, AH-1 or UH-1 helicopters
Landing/Attack Craft Two LCACs or one LCU; and 14 Expeditionary Fighting Vehicles/Amphibious Assault Vehicles

 

Ships:

USS San Antonio (LPD-17), Norfolk, VA

USS New Orleans (LPD-18), San Diego, CA

USS Mesa Verde (LPD-19), Norfolk, VA

USS Green Bay (LPD-20), San Diego, CA

USS New York (LPD-21), Norfolk, VA

USS San Diego (LPD-22), San Diego, CA

USS Anchorage (LPD-23), San Diego, CA

USS Arlington (LPD-24), Norfolk, VA

USS Somerset (LPD-25), San Diego, CA

USS John P. Murtha (LPD-26), San Diego, CA

USS Portland (LPD-27), launched

LPD-28, procurement contract

 

Here’s a time lapse video of the amphibious warship USS Portland (LPD-27) being translated and launched at Ingalls Shipbuilding in Pascagoula. This ship first hit water on Saturday, February 13. Portland is the 11th San Antonio-class Landing Platform Dock to be built

 

Christening of Munro

Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division christened the company’s sixth U.S. Coast Guard National Security Cutter (NSC), Munro (WMSL-755), on November 14, in front of nearly 600 guests. Julie Sheehan, the great niece of the ship’s namesake, Signalman First Class Douglas Munro, is the ship’s sponsor. At the culmination of the ceremony, she smashed a bottle across the bow of the ship, proclaiming, «May God bless this ship and all who sail in her».

Ship’s Sponsor Julie Sheehan smashes a bottle of sparkling wine across the bow of the National Security Cutter Munro (WMSL-755). Also pictured (left to right) are Captain Thomas King, the ship’s prospective commanding officer; Coast Guard Commandant Admiral Paul Zukunft; and Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias (Photo by Lance Davis/HII)
Ship’s Sponsor Julie Sheehan smashes a bottle of sparkling wine across the bow of the National Security Cutter Munro (WMSL-755). Also pictured (left to right) are Captain Thomas King, the ship’s prospective commanding officer; Coast Guard Commandant Admiral Paul Zukunft; and Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias (Photo by Lance Davis/HII)

Admiral Paul Zukunft, commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard, was the ceremony’s principal speaker. «I couldn’t help but notice when I drove into the shipyard today the banner that read, ‘What you do today matters,’» he said. «Nothing could be truer than what you do today at Huntington Ingalls, because 45 years from today – if not longer – this ship will continue to serve our nation. Many of us will have crossed the bar by that time, but this ship will live on».

Munro died heroically on September 27, 1942, on Guadalcanal. Having volunteered to evacuate a detachment of U.S. Marines who were facing annihilation by a large and unanticipated enemy force, he succeeded in safely extricating them and in doing so was mortally wounded. For his heroic and selfless actions in the completion of this rescue mission, Munro was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor. He is the Coast Guard’s sole recipient of the award. Ingalls has delivered five NSCs, and three more, including Munro, are currently under construction.

«Our Ingalls/Coast Guard team continues to get stronger, proving that serial production and stable requirements have a direct effect on improving quality, cost and schedule, and this program has been an excellent one», said Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias. «The National Security Cutters are clearly changing the game in how to protect our country. Not only does that make us proud, but more importantly, it makes our enemies nervous. It is our job to build a ship that protects the brave men and women who go into harm’s way. And it is a job our shipbuilders take very seriously».

Legend-class NSCs are the flagships of the Coast Guard’s cutter fleet. Designed to replace the 378‐foot/115-meter Hamilton-class High-Endurance Cutters that entered service during the 1960s, they are 418 feet/127 m long with a 54-foot/16-meter beam and displace 4,500 long tons with a full load. They have a top speed of 28 knots/32 mph/52 km/h, a range of 12,000 nautical miles/13,809 miles/22,224 km, an endurance of 60 days and a crew of 110.

NSCs are capable of meeting all maritime security mission needs required of the High-Endurance Cutter. They include an aft launch and recovery area for two rigid hull inflatable boats and a flight deck to accommodate a range of manned and unmanned rotary wing aircraft. The Legend class is the largest and most technologically advanced class of cutter in the Coast Guard, with robust capabilities for maritime homeland security, law enforcement, marine safety, environmental protection and national defense missions. NSCs play an important role enhancing the Coast Guard’s operational readiness, capacity and effectiveness at a time when the demand for their services has never been greater.

Ingalls Shipbuilding Christens Sixth National Security Cutter, Munro
Ingalls Shipbuilding Christens Sixth National Security Cutter, Munro

 

Facts

Displacement 4,500 long tons
Length 418 feet/127 m
Beam 54 feet/16 m
Speed 28 knots/32 mph/52 km/h
Range 12,000 NM/13,809 miles/22,224 km
Endurance 60 days
Crew 120
Equipped with Mk-110 57-mm turret mounted gun
6 × 12.7-mm/.50 caliber machine guns
3D air search radar
2 level 1, class 1 aircraft hangers
A stern launch ramp for mission boats
The fifth U.S. Coast Guard NSC, James (WMSL 754), has successfully completed acceptance trials in early May 2015. The Ingalls-built NSC spent two full days in the Gulf of Mexico proving the ship’s systems (Photo by Lance Davis/HII)
The fifth U.S. Coast Guard NSC, James (WMSL 754), has successfully completed acceptance trials in early May 2015. The Ingalls-built NSC spent two full days in the Gulf of Mexico proving the ship’s systems (Photo by Lance Davis/HII)

 

Ship list

USCGC Bertholf (WMSL-750)

USCGC Waesche (WMSL-751)

USCGC Stratton (WMSL-752)

USCGC Hamilton (WMSL-753)

USCGC James (WMSL-754)

USCGC Munro (WMSL-755)

USCGC Kimball (WMSL-756)

USCGC Midgett (WMSL-757)

 

The keel authentication

Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division authenticated the keel on October 20, 2015 on the Aegis guided missile destroyer, USS Paul Ignatius (DDG-117). DDG-117 is the 31st ship in the Arleigh Burke (DDG-51) class of destroyers Ingalls is building for the U.S. Navy.

Keel authenticators – ship’s namesake Paul Ignatius, left, and Ingalls hull superintendent Bill Jones – sketch their initials on the keel plate to be affixed to the Arleigh Burke-class destroyer Paul Ignatius (DDG-117) (Photo by Lance Davis/HII)
Keel authenticators – ship’s namesake Paul Ignatius, left, and Ingalls hull superintendent Bill Jones – sketch their initials on the keel plate to be affixed to the Arleigh Burke-class destroyer Paul Ignatius (DDG-117) (Photo by Lance Davis/HII)

«The keel authentication is an important milestone in a ship’s life and it’s really a foundation upon which the ship is made», said Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias. «Paul Ignatius epitomizes the leadership and agility that has propelled our nation forward – I couldn’t think of a better namesake for USS Paul Ignatius (DDG-117). Over the coming years as we build this great ship, our shipbuilders know what we do is important. We are building great ships to defend our nation, to protect the brave men and women who will serve on this ship and come back safely home to their families».

Ingalls welder Reginald Whisenhunt welded the initials of two authenticators – the ship’s namesake Paul Ignatius and 26-year shipbuilder Bill Jones, an Ingalls hull superintendent – onto a steel plate signifying the keel of DDG-117 to be «truly and fairly laid». The plate will remain affixed to the ship throughout the ship’s lifetime.

«It is a pleasure for me to be here with Huntington Ingalls officials and the men and women who are building DDG-117», said Ignatius, former Secretary of the U.S. Navy. «DDG-117 will become part of our country’s proud destroyer tradition. Built tougher than steel by one of America’s leading shipbuilders, constructed by dedicated and skilled shipyard technicians and manned eventually by the world’s finest naval officers and seamen, this new ship will sail for many decades into the future».

Nancy Ignatius, Paul’s wife, is the ship sponsor and was also present at the ceremony. DDG-117 is named in honor of Ignatius, who served as Secretary of the U.S. Navy from 1967 to 1969 and was the Assistant Secretary of Defense during President Lyndon B. Johnson’s administration.

«Every time the men and women of Ingalls craft another destroyer, they build a living, lasting remembrance of either the courage, the leadership or the intellectual contribution of the very best that the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps have to offer», said Captain Mark Vandroff, the U.S. Navy’s DDG-51 program manager.

Ingalls is building three other destroyers – John Finn (DDG-113), which is scheduled to be delivered in 2016, Ralph Johnson (DDG-114), which will launch by the end of the year and Delbert D. Black (DDG-119), which started construction in July.

To date, Ingalls has delivered 28 DDG-51 destroyers to the U.S. Navy. These highly capable, multi-mission ships can conduct a variety of operations, from peacetime presence and crisis management to sea control and power projection, all in support of the United States’ military strategy. DDGs are capable of simultaneously fighting air, surface and subsurface battles. The ships contain myriad offensive and defensive weapons designed to support maritime defense needs well into the 21st century.

Ingalls Shipbuilding launched the Arleigh Burke-class Aegis guided missile destroyer John Finn (DDG-113) on Saturday morning (Photo by Andrew Young/HII)
Ingalls Shipbuilding launched the Arleigh Burke-class Aegis guided missile destroyer John Finn (DDG-113) on Saturday morning (Photo by Andrew Young/HII)

Ship Characteristics

Length Overall 510 feet/156 m
Beam – Waterline 59 feet/18 m
Draft 30.5 feet/9.3 m
Displacement – Full Load 9,217 tons/9,363 metric tons
Power Plant 4 General electric LM 2500-30 gas turbines; 2 shafts; 2 CRP (Contra-Rotating) propellers; 100,000 shaft horsepower/75,000 kW
Speed in excess of 30 knots/34.5 mph/55.5 km/h
Range 4,400 NM/8,149 km at 20 knots/23 mph/37 km/h
Crew 380 total: 32 Officers, 27 CPO (Chief Petty Officer), 321 OEM
Surveillance SPY-1D Phased Array Radar and Aegis Combat System (Lockheed Martin); SPS-73(V) Navigation; SPS-67(V)3 Surface Search; 3 SPG-62 Illuminator; SQQ-89(V)6 sonar incorporating SQS-53C hull mounted and SQR-19 towed array sonars used with Mark-116 Mod 7 ASW fire control system
Electronics/Countermeasures SLQ-32(V)3; Mark-53 Mod 0 Decoy System; Mark-234 Decoy System; SLQ-25A Torpedo Decoy; SLQ-39 Surface Decoy; URN-25 TACAN; UPX-29 IFF System; Kollmorgen Mark-46 Mod 1 Electro-Optical Director
Aircraft 2 embarked SH-60 helicopters ASW operations; RAST (Recovery Assist, Secure and Traverse)
Armament 2 Mark-41 Vertical Launching System (VLS) with 90 Standard, Vertical Launch ASROC (Anti-Submarine Rocket) & Tomahawk ASM (Air-to-Surface Missile)/LAM (Loitering Attack Missile); 5-in (127-mm)/54 Mark-45 gun; 2 CIWS (Close-In Weapon System); 2 Mark-32 triple 324-mm torpedo tubes for Mark-46 or Mark-50 ASW torpedos

 

Flight IIA: Technology Insertion

Ship Yard Launched Commissioned Homeport
DDG-116 Thomas Hudner GDBIW
DDG-117 Paul Ignatius HIIIS
DDG-118 Daniel Inouye GDBIW
DDG-119 Delbert D. Black HIIIS
The Arleigh-Burke class guided-missile destroyer USS William P. Lawrence (DDG-110) transits the Pacific Ocean
The Arleigh-Burke class guided-missile destroyer USS William P. Lawrence (DDG-110) transits the Pacific Ocean

 

Munro in Dry Dock

Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division launched the U.S. Coast Guard’s newest National Security Cutter (NSC), Munro (WMSL-755), on September 12, 2015. Munro is the company’s sixth NSC and is expected to deliver by the end of next year.

The National Security Cutter Munro (WMSL-755) sits in the floating dry dock at Ingalls Shipbuilding prior to its launch on Saturday (Photo by Lance Davis/HII)
The National Security Cutter Munro (WMSL-755) sits in the floating dry dock at Ingalls Shipbuilding prior to its launch on Saturday (Photo by Lance Davis/HII)

«The National Security Cutter program is in a very mature state», said Derek Murphy, Ingalls’ NSC program manager. «NSC 6 is the most complete ship at launch, and we accomplished this a week earlier than scheduled. Our shipbuilders continue to improve the learning curve, and the National Security Cutter program illustrates the cost savings and first-time quality that comes from serial production. Our learning curve is the best it has been on this program, and we look forward to continuing this trend on future Coast Guard ships».

Munro was translated via Ingalls’ rail car system to the floating dry dock one week prior to launch. The dock was moved away from the pier and then flooded to float the ship. With the assistance of tugs, Munro came off the dock on September 12 morning.

«All of the folks working the translation and launch worked diligently to ensure the process was done in the most efficient manner possible, and that’s exactly what happened», said Jason Frioux, Ingalls’ NSC 6 program integration manager. «Now our NSC 6 team will continue this effort so this ship will be ready for sea trials and delivery next year. Everything we are doing on a day-to-day basis matters because we want to ensure the men and women of the Coast Guard will have a safe and quality ship to support their homeland security missions».

Ingalls has delivered the first five NSCs and has three more under construction, including Munro. The seventh ship, Kimball (WMSL-756), is scheduled for delivery in 2018. The eighth NSC, Midgett (WMSL-757), will start fabrication in November.

Munro is named to honor Signalman First Class Douglas A. Munro, the Coast Guard’s sole recipient of the Medal of Honor. He was mortally wounded on September 27, 1942, while evacuating a detachment of Marines on Guadalcanal.

Legend-class NSCs are the flagships of the Coast Guard’s cutter fleet. Designed to replace the 378‐foot/115-meter Hamilton-class high-endurance cutters that entered service in the 1960s, they are 418 feet/127 m long with a 54-foot/16-meter beam and displace 4,500 tons with a full load. They have a top speed of 28 knots/32 mph/52 km/h, a range of 12,000 NM/13,809 miles/22,224 km, an endurance of 60 days and a crew of 110.

NSCs are capable of meeting all maritime security mission needs required of the high-endurance cutter. They include an aft launch and recovery area for two rigid hull inflatable boats and a flight deck to accommodate a range of manned and unmanned rotary wing aircraft.

The Legend class is the largest and most technologically advanced class of cutter in the Coast Guard, with robust capabilities for maritime homeland security, law enforcement, marine safety, environmental protection and national defense missions. NSCs play an important role enhancing the Coast Guard’s operational readiness, capacity and effectiveness at a time when the demand for their services has never been greater.

The fifth U.S. Coast Guard NSC, James (WMSL 754), has successfully completed acceptance trials in early May 2015. The Ingalls-built NSC spent two full days in the Gulf of Mexico proving the ship’s systems (Photo by Lance Davis/HII)
The fifth U.S. Coast Guard NSC, James (WMSL 754), has successfully completed acceptance trials in early May 2015. The Ingalls-built NSC spent two full days in the Gulf of Mexico proving the ship’s systems (Photo by Lance Davis/HII)

 

Facts

Displacement 4,500 long tons
Length 418 feet/127 m
Beam 54 feet/16 m
Speed 28 knots/32 mph/52 km/h
Range 12,000 NM/13,809 miles/22,224 km
Endurance 60 days
Crew 120
Equipped with Mk-110 57-mm turret mounted gun
6 × 12.7-mm/.50 caliber machine guns
3D air search radar
2 level 1, class 1 aircraft hangers
A stern launch ramp for mission boats

 

Ship list

USCGC Bertholf (WMSL-750)

USCGC Waesche (WMSL-751)

USCGC Stratton (WMSL-752)

USCGC Hamilton (WMSL-753)

USCGC James (WMSL-754)

USCGC Munro (WMSL-755)

USCGC Kimball (WMSL-756)

USCGC Midgett (WMSL-757)

 

Munro was translated via Ingalls’ rail car system to the floating dry dock one week prior to launch. The dock was moved away from the pier and then flooded to float the ship

Fabrication of Destroyer

Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division marked the start of fabrication for the Arleigh Burke-class (DDG 51) guided missile destroyer Delbert D. Black (DDG-119) on July 21. The start of fabrication signifies that 100 tons of steel have been cut.

Ima Black reacts after starting a plasma cutter machine at Ingalls Shipbuilding, officially beginning construction of the Arleigh Burke-class destroyer Delbert D. Black (DDG-119), which is named in honor of her late husband (Photo by Andrew Young/HII)
Ima Black reacts after starting a plasma cutter machine at Ingalls Shipbuilding, officially beginning construction of the Arleigh Burke-class destroyer Delbert D. Black (DDG-119), which is named in honor of her late husband (Photo by Andrew Young/HII)

The ship is named in honor of Delbert D. Black, who served as a gunner’s mate in the U.S. Navy and was aboard the battleship USS Maryland during the attack on Pearl Harbor. Black served in three wars and was the first Master Chief Petty Officer of the U.S. Navy.

«Our shipbuilders are very excited about beginning the fabrication process of another DDG 51 destroyer, especially one named after the first Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy», said George Nungesser, Ingalls’ DDG 51 program manager. «Serial production provides the most effective and efficient way to build ships, and this is our fourth ship started in three years. We are committed to building another great warship for the Navy».

Black’s widow, Ima, is the ship’s sponsor and participated in the ceremony. She met Black after World War II, during which she served as a Navy WAVE (Women Accepted for Voluntary Emergency Service). She and Delbert were married 50 years until the time of his death in 2000.

«I want to thank all of the shipbuilders who are building this ship», she said. «Today was very emotional for me. I’m happy they did name the ship for him and that they are building it for him, but it is sad that he was not here to receive these honors. He would be very pleased about it. I know the men and women who serve on this ship will be proud to have the name Delbert D. Black on their uniform».

Delbert D. Black is the 32nd Arleigh Burke-class destroyer to be built at Ingalls. From this point on, shipbuilders will assemble the ship using modular construction, where pre-fabricated units are constructed separately and later lifted in place and integrated with other units.

«I am excited to see DDG-119 production starting off strong», said Captain Mark Vandroff, the Navy’s DDG 51 class program manager. «This ship will not only honor a great Navy leader, it will serve as a testament to all our current and future senior enlisted leaders of the value the Navy places on their service. My team was greatly honored to have Mrs. Black present at the start of fabrication and looks forward to her enthusiasm guiding us during the ship’s construction».

To date, Ingalls has delivered 28 Arleigh Burke-class destroyers to the U.S. Navy. The highly capable, multi-mission ship can conduct a variety of operations, from peacetime presence and crisis management to sea control and power projection, all in support of the United States’ military strategy. Arleigh Burke-class destroyers are capable of simultaneously fighting air, surface and subsurface battles. The ship contains myriad offensive and defensive weapons designed to support maritime defense needs well into the 21st century.

Arleigh Burke Class Flight IIA
Arleigh Burke Class Flight IIA

 

Ship Characteristics

Length Overall 510 feet/156 m
Beam – Waterline 59 feet/18 m
Draft 30.5 feet/9.3 m
Displacement – Full Load 9,217 tons/9,363 metric tons
Power Plant 4 General electric LM 2500-30 gas turbines; 2 shafts; 2 CRP (Contra-Rotating) propellers; 100,000 shaft horsepower/ 75,000 kW
Speed in excess of 30 knots/34.5 mph/ 55.5 km/h
Range 4,400 NM/8,149 km at 20 knots/23 mph/37 km/h
Crew 380 total: 32 Officers, 27 CPO (Chief Petty Officer), 321 OEM
Surveillance SPY-1D Phased Array Radar and Aegis Combat System (Lockheed Martin); SPS-73(V) Navigation; SPS-67(V)3 Surface Search; 3 SPG-62 Illuminator; SQQ-89(V)6 sonar incorporating SQS-53C hull mounted and SQR-19 towed array sonars used with Mark-116 Mod 7 ASW fire control system
Electronics/Countermeasures SLQ-32(V)3; Mark-53 Mod 0 Decoy System; Mark-234 Decoy System; SLQ-25A Torpedo Decoy; SLQ-39 Surface Decoy; URN-25 TACAN; UPX-29 IFF System; Kollmorgen Mark-46 Mod 1 Electro-Optical Director
Aircraft 2 embarked SH-60 helicopters ASW operations; RAST (Recovery Assist, Secure and Traverse)
Armament 2 Mark-41 Vertical Launching System (VLS) with 90 Standard, Vertical Launch ASROC (Anti-Submarine Rocket) & Tomahawk ASM (Air-to-Surface Missile)/LAM (Loitering Attack Missile); 5-in (127-mm)/54 Mark-45 gun; 2 CIWS (Close-In Weapon System); 2 Mark-32 triple 324-mm torpedo tubes for Mark-46 or Mark-50 ASW torpedos
USS Nitze (DDG-94) - Flight IIA: 5"/62, one 20-mm CIWS variant
USS Nitze (DDG-94) – Flight IIA: 5″/62, one 20-mm CIWS variant

 

Guided Missile Destroyers Lineup

Ship Yard Launched Commissioned Homeport
DDG-51 Arleigh Burke GDBIW 09-16-89 07-04-91 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-52 Barry HIIIS 06-08-91 12-12-92 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-53 John Paul Jones GDBIW 10-26-91 12-18-93 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-54 Curtis Wilbur GDBIW 05-16-92 03-19-94 Yokosuka, Japan
DDG-55 Stout HIIIS 10-16-92 08-13-94 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-56 John S. McCain GDBIW 09-26-92 07-02-94 Yokosuka, Japan
DDG-57 Mitscher HIIIS 05-07-93 12-10-94 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-58 Laboon GDBIW 02-20-93 03-18-95 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-59 Russell HIIIS 10-20-93 05-20-95 San Diego, California
DDG-60 Paul Hamilton GDBIW 07-24-93 05-27-95 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-61 Ramage HIIIS 02-11-94 07-22-95 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-62 Fitzgerald GDBIW 01-29-94 10-14-95 Yokosuka, Japan
DDG-63 Stethem HIIIS 07-17-94 10-21-95 Yokosuka, Japan
DDG-64 Carney GDBIW 07-23-94 04-13-96 Mayport, Florida
DDG-65 Benfold HIIIS 11-09-94 03-30-96 San Diego, California
DDG-66 Gonzalez GDBIW 02-18-95 10-12-96 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-67 Cole HIIIS 02-10-95 06-08-96 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-68 The Sullivans GDBIW 08-12-95 04-19-97 Mayport, Florida
DDG-69 Milius HIIIS 08-01-95 11-23-96 San Diego, California
DDG-70 Hopper GDBIW 01-06-96 09-06-97 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-71 Ross HIIIS 03-22-96 06-28-97 Rota, Spain
DDG-72 Mahan GDBIW 06-29-96 02-14-98 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-73 Decatur GDBIW 11-10-96 08-29-98 San Diego, California
DDG-74 McFaul HIIIS 01-18-97 04-25-98 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-75 Donald Cook GDBIW 05-03-97 12-04-98 Rota, Spain
DDG-76 Higgins GDBIW 10-04-97 04-24-99 San Diego, California
DDG-77 O’Kane GDBIW 03-28-98 10-23-99 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-78 Porter HIIIS 11-12-97 03-20-99 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-79 Oscar Austin GDBIW 11-07-98 08-19-00 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-80 Roosevelt HIIIS 01-10-99 10-14-00 Mayport, Florida
DDG-81 Winston S. Churchill GDBIW 04-17-99 03-10-01 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-82 Lassen HIIIS 10-16-99 04-21-01 Yokosuka, Japan
DDG-83 Howard GDBIW 11-20-99 10-20-01 San Diego, California
DDG-84 Bulkeley HIIIS 06-21-00 12-08-01 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-85 McCampbell GDBIW 07-02-00 08-17-02 Yokosuka, Japan
DDG-86 Shoup HIIIS 11-22-00 06-22-02 Everett, Washington
DDG-87 Mason GDBIW 06-23-01 04-12-03 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-88 Preble HIIIS 06-01-01 11-09-02 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-89 Mustin HIIIS 12-12-01 07-26-03 Yokosuka, Japan
DDG-90 Chafee GDBIW 11-02-02 10-18-03 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-91 Pinckney HIIIS 06-26-02 05-29-04 San Diego, California
DDG-92 Momsen GDBIW 07-19-03 08-28-04 Everett, Washington
DDG-93 Chung-Hoon HIIIS 12-15-02 09-18-04 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-94 Nitze GDBIW 04-03-04 03-05-05 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-95 James E. Williams HIIIS 06-25-03 12-11-04 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-96 Bainbridge GDBIW 11-13-04 11-12-05 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-97 Halsey HIIIS 01-09-04 07-30-05 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-98 Forrest Sherman HIIIS 10-02-04 01-28-06 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-99 Farragut GDBIW 07-23-05 06-10-06 Mayport, Florida
DDG-100 Kidd HIIIS 01-22-05 06-09-07 San Diego, California
DDG-101 Gridley GDBIW 12-28-05 02-10-07 San Diego, California
DDG-102 Sampson GDBIW 09-16-06 11-03-07 San Diego, California
DDG-103 Truxtun HIIIS 06-02-07 04-25-09 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-104 Sterett GDBIW 05-19-07 08-09-08 San Diego, California
DDG-105 Dewey HIIIS 01-26-08 03-06-10 San Diego, California
DDG-106 Stockdale GDBIW 05-10-08 04-18-09 San Diego, California
DDG-107 Gravely HIIIS 03-30-09 11-20-10 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-108 Wayne E. Meyer GDBIW 10-18-08 10-10-09 San Diego, California
DDG-109 Jason Dunham GDBIW 08-01-09 11-13-10 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-110 William P. Lawrence HIIIS 12-15-09 06-04-11 San Diego, California
DDG-111 Spruance GDBIW 06-06-10 10-01-11 San Diego, California
DDG-112 Michael Murphy GDBIW 05-08-11 10-06-12 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-113 John Finn HIIIS 03-28-15
DDG-114 Ralph Johnson HIIIS
DDG-115 Rafael Peralta GDBIW
DDG-116 Thomas Hudner GDBIW
DDG-117 Paul Ignatius HIIIS
DDG-118 Daniel Inouye GDBIW
DDG-119 Delbert D. Black HIIIS
DDG-120 GDBIW
DDG-121 HIIIS
DDG-122 GDBIW
DDG-123 HIIIS
DDG-124 GDBIW
DDG-125 HIIIS
DDG-126 GDBIW

GDBIW – General Dynamics Bath Iron Works

HIIIS – Huntington Ingalls Industries Ingalls Shipbuilding

DDG – Destroyer, Guided Missile

The Arleigh Burk-class guided-missile destroyer USS Sampson (DDG-102) departs Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam to support Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2010 exercises
The Arleigh Burk-class guided-missile destroyer USS Sampson (DDG-102) departs Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam to support Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2010 exercises

Forward Deployed

The guided-missile cruiser USS Chancellorsville (CG-62) departed from San Diego May 28 for Yokosuka, Japan, where the ship will join U.S. 7th Fleet’s Forward Deployed Naval Forces. Chancellorsville will enhance presence in 7th Fleet as part of the U.S. Navy’s long-range plan to send the most advanced and capable units to the Asia-Pacific region.

USS Chancellorsville is named for the Confederate victory over Union forces under Robert E. Lee at the Battle of Chancellorsville, Virginia
USS Chancellorsville is named for the Confederate victory over Union forces under Robert E. Lee at the Battle of Chancellorsville, Virginia

«It is Navy policy to forward deploy our most capable ships and there is no ship more capable than Chancellorsville», said Captain Curt Renshaw, Chancellorsville’s commanding officer. «That capability is not just a result of recent modernization, but is also a function of the readiness of the crew; and this crew has worked very hard to prepare for this day to ensure we are able to arrive immediately prepared for any mission».

USS Chancellorsville (CG-62) completed a combat systems update through the Navy’s Cruiser Modernization program, making her among the most capable ships of her class. She is fitted with the latest Aegis Baseline 9 combat system, and will be the first to be forward deployed with that capability.

The Cruiser Modernization program is designed to upgrade in-service ships to keep pace with evolving threats while enabling ships to meet service life requirements and future operational commitments. Cruiser modernization enhances overall combat systems capability through numerous system improvements.

Future missions will include maritime security operations and cooperative training exercises with allies and partners in the Asia-Pacific region. This ship, along with her counterparts in the Japan Self-Defense Forces, makes up part of the core capabilities needed by the alliance to meet our common strategic objectives.

Chancellorsville carries guided missiles and rapid-fire cannons, with anti-air, anti-surface and anti-subsurface capabilities
Chancellorsville carries guided missiles and rapid-fire cannons, with anti-air, anti-surface and anti-subsurface capabilities

Guided Missile Cruisers – CG

Modern U.S. Navy guided missile cruisers perform primarily in a Battle Force role. These ships are multi-mission [Air Warfare (AW), Undersea Warfare (USW), Naval Surface Fire Support (NSFS) and Surface Warfare (SUW)] surface combatants capable of supporting carrier battle groups, amphibious forces, or of operating independently and as flagships of surface action groups. Cruisers are equipped with Tomahawk cruise missiles giving them additional long range Strike Warfare (STRW) capability. Some Aegis Cruisers have been outfitted with a Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) capability.

Technological advances in the Standard Missile coupled with the Aegis combat system in the Ticonderoga class cruisers have increased the Anti-Air Warfare (AAW) capability of surface combatants to pinpoint accuracy from wave-top to zenith. The addition of Tomahawk in the CG-47 has vastly complicated unit target planning for any potential enemy and returned an offensive strike role to the surface forces that seemed to have been lost to air power at Pearl Harbor.

The Cruiser Modernization program aims to improve the Ticonderoga class by modernizing the computing and display infrastructure, and the Hull, Mechanical and Electrical (HM&E) systems. Weapons and sensor sets will also be improved, in order to upgrade their anti-submarine capabilities, add short-range electro-optical systems that can monitor the ships surroundings without the use of radar emissions, as well as routine machinery upgrades to improve all areas of ship functionality.

Family and friends bid farewell from the pier as the Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Chancellorsville (CG-62) departs Naval Base San Diego bound for Yokosuka, Japan to join the forward-deployed naval forces in the Western Pacific (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Trevor Welsh/Released)
Family and friends bid farewell from the pier as the Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Chancellorsville (CG-62) departs Naval Base San Diego bound for Yokosuka, Japan to join the forward-deployed naval forces in the Western Pacific (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Trevor Welsh/Released)

General Characteristics

Builder Ingalls Shipbuilding: 52-57, 59, 62, 65-66, 68-69, 71-73
Bath Iron Works: 58, 60-61, 63-64, 67, 70
Date Deployed 22 January 1983: USS Ticonderoga (CG-47)
Unit Cost About $1 billion each
Length 567 feet/172.82 m
Beam 55 feet/16.76 m
Displacement 9,600 long tons (9,754 metric tons) full load
Propulsion 4 General Electric LM 2500 gas turbine engines
2 shafts
80,000 shaft horsepower/60 MW total
Speed 30+ knots/34.5 mph/55.5 km/h
Crew 330: 30 Officers, 300 Enlisted
Armament Mk-41 Vertical Launching System Standard Missile (MR)
Vertical Launch ASROC (VLA) Missile
Tomahawk Cruise Missile
Mk-46 torpedoes (from two triple mounts)
2 Mk-45 127-mm/5-inch/54 caliber lightweight guns
2 Phalanx Close-In-Weapons systems
Aircraft 2 SH-60 Seahawk (LAMPS III)
She also carries two Seahawk Light airborne multi-purpose system (LAMPS) helicopters, focused on anti-submarine warfare
She also carries two Seahawk Light airborne multi-purpose system (LAMPS) helicopters, focused on anti-submarine warfare

 

Ships

USS Bunker Hill (CG-52), San Diego, California

USS Mobile Bay (CG-53), San Diego, California

USS Antietam (CG-54), Yokosuka, Japan

USS Leyte Gulf (CG-55), Norfolk, Virginia

USS San Jacinto (CG-56), Norfolk, Virginia

USS Lake Champlain (CG-57), San Diego, California

USS Philippine Sea (CG-58), Mayport, Florida

USS Princeton (CG-59), San Diego, California

USS Normandy (CG-60), Norfolk, Virginia

USS Monterey (CG-61), Norfolk, Virginia

USS Chancellorsville (CG-62), San Diego, California

USS Cowpens (CG-63), San Diego, California

USS Gettysburg (CG-64), Mayport, Florida

USS Chosin (CG-65), Pearl Harbor, Hawaii

USS Hue City (CG-66), Mayport, Florida

USS Shiloh (CG-67), Yokosuka, Japan

USS Anzio (CG-68), Norfolk, Virginia

USS Vicksburg (CG-69), Mayport, Florida

USS Lake Erie (CG-70), Pearl Harbor, Hawaii

USS Cape St. George (CG-71), San Diego, California

USS Vella Gulf (CG-72), Norfolk, Virginia

USS Port Royal (CG-73), Pearl Harbor, Hawaii

 

 

Christening of John

Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division christened the company’s 29th Arleigh Burke-class (DDG-51) Aegis guided missile destroyer, USS John Finn (DDG-113), today in front of nearly 1,000 guests.

Ship Sponsor Laura Stavridis smashes a bottle of sparkling wine across the bow of the Ingalls-built Aegis destroyer USS John Finn (DDG-113). Also pictured (left to right) are Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Michael Stevens; Cmdr. Micheal Wagner, prospective commanding, John Finn; and Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias. Photo by Andrew Young/HII
Ship Sponsor Laura Stavridis smashes a bottle of sparkling wine across the bow of the Ingalls-built Aegis destroyer USS John Finn (DDG-113). Also pictured (left to right) are Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Michael Stevens; Cmdr. Micheal Wagner, prospective commanding, John Finn; and Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias. Photo by Andrew Young/HII

DDG-113 is named John Finn after the first Medal of Honor recipient of World War II. Finn received the honor for machine-gunning Japanese warplanes for over two hours during the December 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor despite being shot in the foot and shoulder and suffering numerous shrapnel wounds. He retired as a lieutenant after 30 years of service and died at age 100 in 2010.

«I often speak to the members of the Chief Petty Officer Mess about the characteristics of a leader and, more specifically, the characteristics I expect to see in my chiefs», said Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Michael Stevens, who was the principal speaker. «I tell them that a model chief petty officer is a quiet, humble and servant leader. I believe with all my heart that John Finn exemplified all of these traits through his heroic actions that day».

Laura Stavridis, wife of Admiral James Stavridis (U.S. Navy, Ret.) and DDG-113 ship sponsor, smashed a bottle of sparkling wine across the bow of the ship, officially christening DDG-113 as John Finn. «God bless this ship and all who sail on her», she said.

«Finn outlived 14 fellow sailors who earned the Medal of Honor for their service in World War II», said Mike Petters, HII’s president and CEO. «Unfortunately, he didn’t live long enough to know that a Navy ship would be named after him. I think he would be as humbled by this honor as he was with the title of hero bestowed upon him. Just remember his words: ‘There’s all kinds of heroes.’ And if you ask me, this ship was built for heroes by heroes. All in the name of freedom».

Ingalls Shipbuilding launched the Arleigh Burke-class Aegis guided missile destroyer John Finn (DDG-113) on Saturday morning (Photo by Andrew Young/HII)
Ingalls Shipbuilding launched the Arleigh Burke-class Aegis guided missile destroyer John Finn (DDG-113) on Saturday morning (Photo by Andrew Young/HII)

Ingalls has delivered 28 Arleigh Burke-class destroyers to the U.S. Navy. Destroyers currently under construction at Ingalls are USS John Finn (DDG-113), USS Ralph Johnson (DDG-114), USS Paul Ignatius (DDG-117) and USS Delbert D. Black (DDG-119). Earlier this year, Ingalls received a contract modification funding the construction of the company’s 33nd destroyer, DDG-121.

«Rest assured these shipbuilders – Ingalls shipbuilders – understand their noble calling», said Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias. «To build ships like John Finn safe, strong and proud for the sailors and Marines who sail in her, with strength pride and our deepest gratitude and respect».

«The future USS John Finn is the first destroyer built at Ingalls after the U.S. Navy restarted the program», Cuccias continued. «We hit the ground running with the new program, re-establishing the best destroyer team in the world with many best-in-class achievements, and this is already proven, as DDG-113 was launched three weeks ahead of schedule».

Arleigh Burke-class destroyers are highly capable, multi-mission ships that can conduct a variety of operations, from peacetime presence and crisis management to sea control and power projection, all in support of the United States’ military strategy. They are capable of simultaneously fighting air, surface and subsurface threats. The ship contains myriad offensive and defensive weapons designed to support maritime defense needs well into the 21st century.

«I have said it many times, and I mean it every time I say it … Gulf Coast shipbuilders build the greatest warships the world has ever seen», said Rep. Steven Palazzo, R-Miss. «Your craftsmanship is beyond compare, and I know that you all care very deeply about the work you do, because you know how important your work is to our national security and keeping America and our loved ones safe. No matter how many times I see these ships grow from steel plate into the great ship you see here today, I still believe it is an absolute modern marvel».

Finn received the honor for machine-gunning Japanese warplanes for over two hours during the December 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor
Finn received the honor for machine-gunning Japanese warplanes for over two hours during the December 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor

 

Ship Characteristics

Length Overall 510 feet/156 meters
Beam – Waterline 59 feet/18 meters
Draft 30.5 feet/9.3 meters
Displacement – Full Load 9,496 tons/9,648 metric tons
Power Plant 4 General electric LM 2500-30 gas turbines; 2 shafts; 2 CRP (Contra-Rotating) propellers; 100,000 shaft horsepower/ 75,000 kW
Speed in excess of 30 knots/34.5 mph/ 55.5 km/h
Range 4,400 NM/8.149 km at 20 knots/23 mph/37 km/h
Crew 380 total: 32 Officers, 27 CPO (Chief Petty Officer), 321 OEM
Surveillance SPY-1D Phased Array Radar and Aegis Combat System (Lockheed Martin); SPS-73(V) Navigation; SPS-67(V)3 Surface Search; 3 SPG-62 Illuminator; SQQ-89(V)6 sonar incorporating SQS-53C hull mounted and SQR-19 towed array sonars used with Mark-116 Mod 7 ASW fire control system
Electronics/Countermeasures SLQ-32(V)3; Mark-53 Mod 0 Decoy System; Mark-234 Decoy System; SLQ-25A Torpedo Decoy; SLQ-39 Surface Decoy; URN-25 TACAN; UPX-29 IFF System; Kollmorgen Mark-46 Mod 1 Electro-Optical Director
Aircraft 2 embarked SH-60 helicopters ASW operations; RAST (Recovery Assist, Secure and Traverse)
Armament 2 Mark-41 Vertical Launching System (VLS) with 90 Standard, Vertical Launch ASROC (Anti-Submarine Rocket) & Tomahawk ASM (Air-to-Surface Missile)/ LAM (Loitering Attack Missile); 5-in (127-mm)/54 Mark-45 gun; 2 CIWS (Close-In Weapon System); 2 Mark-32 triple 324-mm torpedo tubes for Mark-46 or Mark-50 ASW torpedos

 

Mrs. Laura Elizabeth Stavridis, Ship Sponsor, christens the guided missile destroyer USS John Finn (DDG-113)