Tag Archives: Independence-variant LCS

Christening of
Charleston

The U.S. Navy christened its newest Independence-variant Littoral Combat Ship (LCS), the future USS Charleston (LCS-18), during a 10 a.m. CDT ceremony Saturday, August 26, in Mobile, Alabama.

Navy christened Littoral Combat Ship Charleston
Navy christened Littoral Combat Ship Charleston

The future USS Charleston, designated LCS-18, honors Charleston, the second-largest city in South Carolina. She will be the sixth ship to be named for Charleston.

The Honorable Richard V. Spencer, Secretary of the U.S. Navy, delivered the ceremony’s principal address. Charlotte Riley, the wife of ten-term, former Mayor of Charleston Joe Riley, served as the ship’s sponsor. The ceremony was highlighted by Mrs. Riley breaking a bottle of sparkling wine across the bow to formally christen the ship, a time-honored Navy tradition.

«I am honored to be here as we christen the newest LCS, the future USS Charleston», said the Honorable Richard V. Spencer, Secretary of the U.S. Navy. «Charleston, like the other ships in the LCS program, is going to be highly maneuverable, able to operate where other ships cannot, and will project power through forward presence. The ship and her crew will serve our nation for decades to come, but let us not forget our industrial force whose service makes this great ship possible. I am grateful for the men and women of Austal for their dedication, and to the citizens of Mobile for their support, as we continue to make our Navy stronger».”

The name Charleston has a long and storied history in the U.S. Navy. The first U.S. Navy ship to bear the name Charleston was a row galley that defended the coast of South Carolina during the Quasi-War with France. The second Charleston (C-2) was a protected cruiser that received the surrender of Guam during the Spanish-American War. The third Charleston (C-22) was a St. Louis-class protected cruiser that performed escort and troop transport duties in World War I. The ship named Charleston (PG-51) was an Erie-class patrol gunboat that earned the Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal with one battle star for her service in the northern Pacific during World War II. The fifth Charleston (AKA-113/LKA-113) was an amphibious cargo ship that served during the Vietnam War.

The future USS Charleston (LCS-18) is a fast, agile, focused-mission platform designed for operation in near-shore environments yet capable of open-ocean operation. It is designed to defeat asymmetric «anti-access» threats such as mines, quiet diesel submarines and fast surface craft.

The LCS class consists of two variants, the Freedom variant and the Independence variant, designed and built by two industry teams. The Freedom variant team is led by Lockheed Martin (for the odd-numbered hulls, e.g. LCS-1). The Independence variant team is led by Austal USA (for LCS-6 and the subsequent even-numbered hulls).

Each LCS seaframe will be outfitted with a single mission package made up of mission modules containing warfighting systems and support equipment. A dedicated ship crew will combine with aviation assets to deploy manned and unmanned vehicles and sensors in support of mine countermeasures, anti-submarine warfare or surface warfare missions.

Ship's Crest
Ship’s Crest

 

The Independence Variant of the LCS Class

PRINCIPAL DIMENSIONS
Construction Hull and superstructure – aluminium alloy
Length overall 421 feet/128.3 m
Beam overall 103 feet/31.4 m
Hull draft (maximum) 14.8 feet/4.5 m
PAYLOAD AND CAPACITIES
Complement Core Crew – 40
Mission crew – 36
Berthing 76 in a mix of single, double & quad berthing compartments
Maximum mission load 210 tonnes
Mission Bay Volume 118,403 feet3/11,000 m3
Mission packages Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW)
Surface Warfare (SUW)
Mine Warfare (MIW)
PROPULSION
Main engines 2 × GE LM2500
2 × MTU 20V 8000
Waterjets 4 × Wartsila steerable
Bow thruster Retractable azimuthing
PERFORMANCE
Speed 40 knots/46 mph/74 km/h
Range 3,500 NM/4,028 miles/6,482 km
Operational limitation Survival in Sea State 8
MISSION/LOGISTICS DECK
Deck area >21,527.8 feet2/2,000 m2
Launch and recovery Twin boom extending crane
Loading Side ramp
Internal elevator to hanger
Launch/Recover Watercraft Sea State 4
FLIGHT DECK AND HANGER
Flight deck dimensions 2 × SH-60 or 1 × CH-53 or multiple Unmanned Aerial Vehicles/Vertical Take-off and Land Tactical Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs/VTUAVs)
Hanger Aircraft stowage & maintenance for 2 × SH-60
Launch/Recover Aircraft Sea State 5
WEAPONS AND SENSORS
Standard 1 × 57-mm gun
4 × 12.7-mm/.50 caliber guns
1 × Surface-to-Air Missile (SAM) launcher
3 × weapons modules

 

Independence-class

Ship Laid down Launched Commissioned Homeport
USS Independence (LCS-2) 01-19-2006 04-26-2008 01-16-2010 San Diego, California
USS Coronado (LCS-4) 12-17-2009 01-14-2012 04-05-2014 San Diego, California
USS Jackson (LCS-6) 08-01-2011 12-14-2013 12-05-2015 San Diego, California
USS Montgomery (LCS-8) 06-25-2013 08-06-2014 09-10-2016 San Diego, California
USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS-10) 04-16-2014 02-25-2015 06-10-2017 San Diego, California
USS Omaha (LCS-12) 02-18-2015 11-20-2015
USS Manchester (LCS-14) 06-29-2015 05-12-2016
USS Tulsa (LCS-16) 01-11-2016
USS Charleston (LCS-18) 06-28-2016
USS Cincinnati (LCS-20) 04-10-2017
USS Kansas City (LCS-22)
USS Oakland (LCS-24)

 

Navy held a keel

The U.S. Navy held a keel laying and authentication ceremony for the future USS Cincinnati (LCS-20) at Austal USA’s shipyard in Mobile, Alabama, April 10.

The U.S. Navy and held a keel laying and authentication ceremony for the future USS Cincinnati (LCS-20) at Austal USA’s shipyard in Mobile, Alabama, April 10. LCS is a modular, reconfigurable ship designed to host interchangeable mission packages onto the seaframe in support of surface warfare, mine countermeasures, and anti-submarine warfare (Photo by Austal USA/Released)
The U.S. Navy and held a keel laying and authentication ceremony for the future USS Cincinnati (LCS-20) at Austal USA’s shipyard in Mobile, Alabama, April 10. LCS is a modular, reconfigurable ship designed to host interchangeable mission packages onto the seaframe in support of surface warfare, mine countermeasures, and anti-submarine warfare (Photo by Austal USA/Released)

Former U.S. Secretary of Commerce and ship’s sponsor Penny Pritzker authenticated the keel for the 10th Independence variant of the littoral combat ship class during the ceremony. While keel laying traditionally represents the formal start of a ship’s construction, advanced modular shipbuilding allows fabrication of the ship to begin months in advance. Today, keel laying continues to symbolically recognize the joining of the ship’s components and the ceremonial beginning of the ship.

LCS (Littoral Combat Ship) seaframe program manager’s representative, Navy Commander Chris Addington, commended the Austal USA shipbuilders at the event. «Through the hard work and dedication of the men and women of Austal, this keel will be built up to a highly capable Navy ship», he said. «Thanks to all of you for your efforts to complete a great ship that will exemplify its namesake city».

Cincinnati will be approximately 417 feet/127.1 m in length, with a width of nearly 103 feet/31.4 m. LCS is a modular, reconfigurable ship designed to host interchangeable mission packages onto the seaframe in support of surface warfare, mine countermeasures, and anti-submarine warfare. The Navy’s LCS class consists of the Freedom variant and the Independence variant, designed and built by two industry teams. The Independence variant team is led by Austal USA and the Freedom variant team is led by Lockheed Martin. Both variants are being purchased under an innovative block-buy acquisition strategy. There are currently 13 LCSs under construction.

Program Executive Office Littoral Combat Ships is responsible for delivering and sustaining littoral mission capabilities to the fleet.

 

The Independence Variant

PRINCIPAL DIMENSIONS
Construction Hull and superstructure – aluminium alloy
Length overall 417 feet/127.1 m
Beam overall 103 feet/31.4 m
Hull draft (maximum) 14.8 feet/4.5 m
PAYLOAD AND CAPACITIES
Complement Core Crew – 40
Mission crew – 36
Berthing 76 in a mix of single, double & quad berthing compartments
Maximum mission load 210 tonnes
Mission Bay Volume 118,403 feet3/11,000 m3
Mission packages Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW)
Surface Warfare (SUW)
Mine Warfare (MIW)
PROPULSION
Main engines 2 × GE LM2500
2 × MTU 20V 8000
Waterjets 4 × Wartsila steerable
Bow thruster Retractable azimuthing
PERFORMANCE
Speed 40 knots/46 mph/74 km/h
Range 3,500 NM/4,028 miles/6,482 km
Operational limitation Survival in Sea State 8
MISSION/LOGISTICS DECK
Deck area >21,527.8 feet2/2,000 m2
Launch and recovery Twin boom extending crane
Loading Side ramp
Internal elevator to hanger
Launch/Recover Watercraft Sea State 4
FLIGHT DECK AND HANGER
Flight deck dimensions 2 × SH-60 or 1 × CH-53 or multiple Unmanned Aerial Vehicles/Vertical Take-off and Land Tactical Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs/VTUAVs)
Hanger Aircraft stowage & maintenance for 2 × SH-60
Launch/Recover Aircraft Sea State 5
WEAPONS AND SENSORS
Standard 1 × 57-mm gun
4 × 12.7-mm/.50 caliber guns
1 × Surface-to-Air Missile (SAM) launcher
3 × weapons modules

 

Independence-class

Ship Laid down Launched Commissioned Homeport
USS Independence (LCS-2) 01-19-2006 04-26-2008 01-16-2010 San Diego, California
USS Coronado (LCS-4) 12-17-2009 01-14-2012 04-05-2014 San Diego, California
USS Jackson (LCS-6) 08-01-2011 12-14-2013 12-05-2015 San Diego, California
USS Montgomery (LCS-8) 06-25-2013 08-06-2014 09-10-2016 San Diego, California
USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS-10) 04-16-2014 02-25-2015
USS Omaha (LCS-12) 02-18-2015 11-20-2015
USS Manchester (LCS-14) 06-29-2015 05-12-2016
USS Tulsa (LCS-16) 01-11-2016
USS Charleston (LCS-18) 06-28-2016
USS Cincinnati (LCS-20) 04-10-2017
USS Kansas City (LCS-22)
USS Oakland (LCS-24)

 

Final Contract Trials

Littoral combat ship USS Montgomery (LCS-8) completed final contract trials, March 17, marking the completion of the construction and initial operating testing of the Navy’s eighth LCS.

Official U.S. Navy file photo of littoral combat ship USS Montgomery (LCS-8) completing its maiden voyage from Mobile, Alabama, to San Diego, November 8, 2016
Official U.S. Navy file photo of littoral combat ship USS Montgomery (LCS-8) completing its maiden voyage from Mobile, Alabama, to San Diego, November 8, 2016

The trials, administered by the Navy’s Board of Inspection and Survey, are part of a series of post-delivery test and trial events through which the ship and its major systems are exercised.

The five-day trials began with pre-underway and material condition checks followed by at-sea demonstrations. Trial highlights included combat systems air and surface detect-to-engage scenarios, 57-mm gun firing exercises, maneuvering testing and operation of the twin boom extendable crane.

«I am exceptionally proud of the USS Montgomery (LCS-8) team and the combined efforts of the blue and gold crews, Program Executive Office Littoral Combat Ships (PEO LCS), Littoral Combat Ship Squadron 1, and all of the other contributors who worked to create this successful outcome», said Commander Mark Stefanik, Montgomery’s commanding officer. «Montgomery has continued to raise the bar and we are looking forward to her next challenge and a successful introduction to fleet operations».

Several government and private agencies supported the trials led by PEO LCS; industry partners included Austal USA and General Dynamics Mission Systems, and Southwest Regional Maintenance Center provided logistical support. Additionally, in a move to the blue and gold crewing construct, Montgomery Blue Crew, currently in an off-hull status, successfully demonstrated the support a Blue-Gold model provides.

«Montgomery is our ship, both blue and gold crews, and we continue that legacy even while off-hull», said Commander Daniel Straub, Montgomery Blue Crew commanding officer. «We put a lot of hard work and sweat equity into the ship during the pre-commissioning phase, commissioning, and sail-around to homeport San Diego. Our commitment to the ship remains constant whether on-hull or off-hull, and we are excited and motivated that we knocked these final contract trials out of the park».

Constructed by Austal USA in Mobile, Alabama, the Independence-class vessel is the fourth vessel of the trimaran design. Montgomery is preceded by USS Independence (LCS-2), USS Coronado (LCS-4), and USS Jackson (LCS-6). Montgomery was christened November 8, 2014, and commissioned September 10, 2016, in Mobile.

LCS is a high-speed, agile, shallow draft, mission-focused surface combatant designed for operations in the littoral environment, yet fully capable of open ocean operations. LCS is complementary to the surface fleet, with the ability to counter and outpace evolving threats independently or within a network of surface combatants. Paired with advanced sonar and mine hunting capabilities, LCS provides a major contribution, as well as a more diverse set of options to commanders, across the spectrum of operations.

 

Independence Variant of the LCS Class

PRINCIPAL DIMENSIONS
Construction Hull and superstructure – aluminium alloy
Length overall 417 feet/127.1 m
Beam overall 103 feet/31.4 m
Hull draft (maximum) 14.8 feet/4.5 m
PAYLOAD AND CAPACITIES
Complement Core Crew – 40
Mission crew – 36
Berthing 76 in a mix of single, double & quad berthing compartments
Maximum mission load 210 tonnes
Mission Bay Volume 118,403 feet3/11,000 m3
Mission packages Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW)
Surface Warfare (SUW)
Mine Warfare (MIW)
PROPULSION
Main engines 2 × GE LM2500
2 × MTU 20V 8000
Waterjets 4 × Wartsila steerable
Bow thruster Retractable azimuthing
PERFORMANCE
Speed 40 knots/46 mph/74 km/h
Range 3,500 NM/4,028 miles/6,482 km
Operational limitation Survival in Sea State 8
MISSION/LOGISTICS DECK
Deck area >21,527.8 feet2/2,000 m2
Launch and recovery Twin boom extending crane
Loading Side ramp
Internal elevator to hanger
Launch/Recover Watercraft Sea State 4
FLIGHT DECK AND HANGER
Flight deck dimensions 2 × SH-60 or 1 × CH-53 or multiple Unmanned Aerial Vehicles/Vertical Take-off and Land Tactical Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs/VTUAVs)
Hanger Aircraft stowage & maintenance for 2 × SH-60
Launch/Recover Aircraft Sea State 5
WEAPONS AND SENSORS
Standard 1 × 57-mm gun
4 × 12.7-mm/.50 caliber guns
1 × Surface-to-Air Missile (SAM) launcher
3 × weapons modules

 

Independence-class

Ship Laid down Launched Commissioned Homeport
USS Independence (LCS-2) 01-19-2006 04-26-2008 01-16-2010 San Diego, California
USS Coronado (LCS-4) 12-17-2009 01-14-2012 04-05-2014 San Diego, California
USS Jackson (LCS-6) 08-01-2011 12-14-2013 12-05-2015 San Diego, California
USS Montgomery (LCS-8) 06-25-2013 08-06-2014 09-10-2016 San Diego, California
USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS-10) 04-16-2014 02-25-2015
USS Omaha (LCS-12) 02-18-2015 11-20-2015
USS Manchester (LCS-14) 06-29-2015 05-12-2016
USS Tulsa (LCS-16) 01-11-2016
USS Charleston (LCS-18) 06-28-2016
USS Cincinnati (LCS-20)
USS Kansas City (LCS-22)
USS Oakland (LCS-24)

 

Gabrielle delivered

Austal Limited (Austal) is pleased to announce the future USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS-10) has been delivered to the United States Navy (USN) during a ceremony held aboard the ship at Austal USA’s shipyard in Mobile, Alabama.

The future USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS-10) is the fifth Independence-variant Littoral Combat Ship to be delivered by Austal to the U.S. Navy (Photo: Austal)
The future USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS-10) is the fifth Independence-variant Littoral Combat Ship to be delivered by Austal to the U.S. Navy (Photo: Austal)

The future USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS-10) is the fifth Independence-variant Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) delivered to the USN since 2009 and the fourth naval vessel delivered to the USN by Austal USA in 2016; including 2 × Littoral Combat Ships (USS Montgomery LCS-8 and USS Gabrielle Giffords LCS-10) and 2 × Expeditionary Fast Transport (USNS Brunswick T-EPF-6 and USNS Carson City T-EPF-7).

Designed in Australia by the team bidding for the Commonwealth of Australia’s Offshore Patrol Vessel (SEA1180) program, the 417-foot/127-meter frigate-sized Littoral Combat Ships are constructed in Mobile, Alabama utilizing Austal’s Module Manufacturing Facility (MMF), which offers production-line efficiencies and industry leading productivity.

Announcing the delivery, Austal Chief Executive Officer David Singleton said: «Gabrielle Giffords joins Independence, Coronado, Jackson and Montgomery as the fifth Littoral Combat Ship Austal USA has delivered to the U.S. Navy. This vessel further demonstrates our capability to successfully deliver large, complex naval programs and reinforces our ability to transition an innovative, effective design not just across shipyards but continents».

«The Independence-variant LCS platform has gone from strength to strength, as the first LCS variant to be fitted with a Harpoon Anti-ship Missile System and the first U.S. Navy class of vessel to successfully pass shock testing since 2008», Singleton added.

Six additional Independence-variant LCS are under construction at Austal USA under an 11 ship contract worth approximately US$4 billion. The future USS Omaha (LCS-12) and USS Manchester (LCS-14) are preparing for sea-trials, USS Tulsa (LCS-16) and USS Charleston (LCS-18) are in Assembly and modules for USS Cincinnati (LCS-20) and USS Kansas City (LCS-22) are underway in the MMF. Austal delivered USS Jackson (LCS-6) in August 2015 and USS Montgomery (LCS-8) in June 2016.

LCS10 Completes Acceptance Trials with Dolphins in tow

 

The Independence Variant of the LCS Class

PRINCIPAL DIMENSIONS
Construction Hull and superstructure – aluminium alloy
Length overall 417 feet/127.1 m
Beam overall 103 feet/31.4 m
Hull draft (maximum) 14.8 feet/4.5 m
PAYLOAD AND CAPACITIES
Complement Core Crew – 40
Mission crew – 36
Berthing 76 in a mix of single, double & quad berthing compartments
Maximum mission load 210 tonnes
Mission Bay Volume 118,403 feet3/11,000 m3
Mission packages Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW)
Surface Warfare (SUW)
Mine Warfare (MIW)
PROPULSION
Main engines 2 × GE LM2500
2 × MTU 20V 8000
Waterjets 4 × Wartsila steerable
Bow thruster Retractable azimuthing
PERFORMANCE
Speed 40 knots/46 mph/74 km/h
Range 3,500 NM/4,028 miles/6,482 km
Operational limitation Survival in Sea State 8
MISSION/LOGISTICS DECK
Deck area >21,527.8 feet2/2,000 m2
Launch and recovery Twin boom extending crane
Loading Side ramp
Internal elevator to hanger
Launch/Recover Watercraft Sea State 4
FLIGHT DECK AND HANGER
Flight deck dimensions 2 × SH-60 or 1 × CH-53 or multiple Unmanned Aerial Vehicles/Vertical Take-off and Land Tactical Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs/VTUAVs)
Hanger Aircraft stowage & maintenance for 2 × SH-60
Launch/Recover Aircraft Sea State 5
WEAPONS AND SENSORS
Standard 1 × 57-mm gun
4 × 12.7-mm/.50 caliber guns
1 × Surface-to-Air Missile (SAM) launcher
3 × weapons modules

 

Independence-class

Ship Laid down Launched Commissioned Homeport
USS Independence (LCS-2) 01-19-2006 04-26-2008 01-16-2010 San Diego, California
USS Coronado (LCS-4) 12-17-2009 01-14-2012 04-05-2014 San Diego, California
USS Jackson (LCS-6) 08-01-2011 12-14-2013 12-05-2015 San Diego, California
USS Montgomery (LCS-8) 06-25-2013 08-06-2014 09-10-2016 San Diego, California
USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS-10) 04-16-2014 02-25-2015
USS Omaha (LCS-12) 02-18-2015 11-20-2015
USS Manchester (LCS-14) 06-29-2015 05-12-2016
USS Tulsa (LCS-16) 01-11-2016
USS Charleston (LCS-18) 06-28-2016
USS Cincinnati (LCS-20)
USS Kansas City (LCS-22)
USS Oakland (LCS-24)
USS Mobile (LCS-26)

 

Fast, agile platform

The U.S. Navy commissioned its newest Independence-variant Littoral Combat Ship (LCS), USS Montgomery (LCS-8), during a 10 a.m. CST ceremony Saturday, September 10 in Mobile, Alabama.

The Independence variant team is led by Austal USA
The Independence variant team is led by Austal USA

Montgomery, designated LCS-8, honors the city of Montgomery, Alabama, and is the second U.S. ship in our nation’s history to be named in honor of the capital of Alabama. Montgomery, Alabama was named for Richard Montgomery, a major general in the Continental Army.

U.S. Representative Bradley Byrne, Alabama’s 1st Congressional District, will deliver the ceremony’s principal address. Mary Sessions, wife of Senator Jeff Sessions of Alabama and a Montgomery native, is serving as the ship’s sponsor.

«The commissioning of USS Montgomery is not only a celebration of the partnership we share with the people of a great southern capital, but also of our nation’s highly skilled shipbuilders who, in building ships like Montgomery – the U.S. Navy’s eighth littoral combat ship – will help us continue to grow the fleet to more than 300 ships by the end of this decade», said the Honorable Ray Mabus, secretary of the U.S. Navy. «This great ship, and the sailors who serve aboard her, will represent the city of Montgomery, Alabama, and our nation around the world for years to come».

While the second to be named for the Alabama capital, a total of four Navy ships have previously borne the name Montgomery. The first USS Montgomery was a sloop, or schooner, that was in service on Lake Champlain from 1813 to 1815. The second USS Montgomery was a wooden screw steamer in the Union Navy during the U.S. Civil War. USS Montgomery (C-9), the third of her name and the lead ship of her class, was an unprotected cruiser that served during the Spanish-American War and in World War I. USS Montgomery (DD-121) was a Wickes-class destroyer commissioned in 1918 and later converted to a minelayer that saw service during World War II, where she earned four battle stars for meritorious participation in battle.

Montgomery is a fast, agile, focused-mission platform designed for operation in near-shore environments yet capable of open-ocean operation. LCS provides the required war fighting capabilities and operational flexibility to execute a variety of missions in areas such as mine warfare, anti-submarine warfare and surface warfare.

The LCS class consists of two variants, the Freedom-variant and the Independence-variant – designed and built by two industry teams. The Freedom-variant team is led by Lockheed Martin (for the odd-numbered hulls, e.g. LCS-1) while the Independence variant team is led by Austal USA (for LCS-6 and the subsequent even-numbered hulls).

The LCS seaframes will be outfitted with reconfigurable payloads, called mission modules (made up of mission systems and support equipment), which can be changed quickly. These modules combine with crew detachments and aviation assets to become complete mission packages, which will deploy manned and unmanned vehicles and sensors in support of mine countermeasures, anti-submarine warfare, or surface warfare missions.

 

The Independence Variant of the LCS Class

PRINCIPAL DIMENSIONS
Construction Hull and superstructure – aluminium alloy
Length overall 417 feet/127.1 m
Beam overall 103 feet/31.4 m
Hull draft (maximum) 14.8 feet/4.5 m
PAYLOAD AND CAPACITIES
Complement Core Crew – 40
Mission crew – 36
Berthing 76 in a mix of single, double & quad berthing compartments
Maximum mission load 210 tonnes
Mission Bay Volume 118,403 feet3/11,000 m3
Mission packages Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW)
Surface Warfare (SUW)
Mine Warfare (MIW)
PROPULSION
Main engines 2 × GE LM2500
2 × MTU 20V 8000
Waterjets 4 × Wartsila steerable
Bow thruster Retractable azimuthing
PERFORMANCE
Speed 40 knots/46 mph/74 km/h
Range 3,500 NM/4,028 miles/6,482 km
Operational limitation Survival in Sea State 8
MISSION/LOGISTICS DECK
Deck area >21,527.8 feet2/2,000 m2
Launch and recovery Twin boom extending crane
Loading Side ramp
Internal elevator to hanger
Launch/Recover Watercraft Sea State 4
FLIGHT DECK AND HANGER
Flight deck dimensions 2 × SH-60 or 1 × CH-53 or multiple Unmanned Aerial Vehicles/Vertical Take-off and Land Tactical Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs/VTUAVs)
Hanger Aircraft stowage & maintenance for 2 × SH-60
Launch/Recover Aircraft Sea State 5
WEAPONS AND SENSORS
Standard 1 × 57-mm gun
4 × 12.7-mm/.50 caliber guns
1 × Surface-to-Air Missile (SAM) launcher
3 × weapons modules

 

Independence-class

Ship Laid down Launched Commissioned Homeport
USS Independence (LCS-2) 01-19-2006 04-26-2008 01-16-2010 San Diego, California
USS Coronado (LCS-4) 12-17-2009 01-14-2012 04-05-2014 San Diego, California
USS Jackson (LCS-6) 08-01-2011 12-14-2013 12-05-2015 San Diego, California
USS Montgomery (LCS-8) 06-25-2013 08-06-2014 09-10-2016 San Diego, California
USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS-10) 04-16-2014 02-25-2015
USS Omaha (LCS-12) 02-18-2015 11-20-2015
USS Manchester (LCS-14) 06-29-2015
USS Tulsa (LCS-16) 01-11-2016
USS Charleston (LCS-18)
USS Cincinnati (LCS-20)
USS Kansas City (LCS-22)
USS Oakland (LCS-24)

 

Survivability Test

USS Coronado (LCS-4) successfully completed the U.S. Navy’s Total Ship Survivability Trial (TSST) off the coast of California, January 28. During the test event, the crew handled realistic damage simulations, including fire, smoke, electrical failure, flooding, ruptured piping, and structural failure. The scenarios benefited the crew by offering realistic damage control training in preparation for Coronado’s maiden deployment later this year.

Austal’s Trimaran LCS Completes Survivability Test
Austal’s Trimaran LCS Completes Survivability Test

«Initial indications are that Coronado’s performance met, and in multiple cases exceeded, the survivability requirements for this small surface combatant», said Captain Tom Anderson, Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) program manager. «I commend the crew for their exceptional performance and dedication while conducting this important test».

The purpose of the TSST is to evaluate the ship’s systems and procedures following a simulated conventional weapon hit. The primary areas that are evaluated include the ship’s ability to contain and control damage, restore and continue mission capability, and care for personnel casualties. The test is also designed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the survivability features inherent in a ship’s design.

«The experience provided the crew, through realistic scenarios, an appreciation for what it would take to operate following battle damage on board an Independence-variant warship», said Commander Troy A. Fendrick, commanding officer of Coronado. «It also provided Sailors, from the deckplate level, the opportunity to provide critical input to the LCS program office, which will result in the improvement of overall ship survivability».

The TSST, along with the Full Ship Shock Trial scheduled June 2016, is a component of the Live-Fire Test and Evaluation program. Coronado is the second LCS of the Independence-variant built by Austal USA and is homeported in San Diego.

LCS is a modular, reconfigurable ship, with three types of mission packages including surface warfare, mine countermeasures, and anti-submarine warfare. The Program Executive Office Littoral Combat Ships (PEO LCS) is responsible for delivering and sustaining littoral mission capabilities to the fleet. Delivering high-quality warfighting assets while balancing affordability and capability is key to supporting the nation’s maritime strategy.

Six additional Independence-variant LCS are at various stages of construction at Austal’s shipyard in Mobile, Alabama
Six additional Independence-variant LCS are at various stages of construction at Austal’s shipyard in Mobile, Alabama

 

The Independence Variant of the LCS Class

PRINCIPAL DIMENSIONS
Construction Hull and superstructure – aluminium alloy
Length overall 417 feet/127.1 m
Beam overall 103 feet/31.4 m
Hull draft (maximum) 14.8 feet/4.5 m
PAYLOAD AND CAPACITIES
Complement Core Crew – 40
Mission crew – 36
Berthing 76 in a mix of single, double & quad berthing compartments
Maximum mission load 210 tonnes
Mission Bay Volume 118,403 feet3/11,000 m3
Mission packages Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW)
Surface Warfare (SUW)
Mine Warfare (MIW)
PROPULSION
Main engines 2 × GE LM2500
2 × MTU 20V 8000
Waterjets 4 × Wartsila steerable
Bow thruster Retractable azimuthing
PERFORMANCE
Speed 40 knots/46 mph/74 km/h
Range 3,500 NM/4,028 miles/6,482 km
Operational limitation Survival in Sea State 8
MISSION/LOGISTICS DECK
Deck area >21,527.8 feet2/2,000 m2
Launch and recovery Twin boom extending crane
Loading Side ramp
Internal elevator to hanger
Launch/Recover Watercraft Sea State 4
FLIGHT DECK AND HANGER
Flight deck dimensions 2 × SH-60 or 1 × CH-53 or multiple Unmanned Aerial Vehicles/Vertical Take-off and Land Tactical Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs/VTUAVs)
Hanger Aircraft stowage & maintenance for 2 × SH-60
Launch/Recover Aircraft Sea State 5
WEAPONS AND SENSORS
Standard 1 × 57-mm gun
4 × 12.7-mm/.50 caliber guns
1 × Surface-to-Air Missile (SAM) launcher
3 × weapons modules
The Independence variant team is led by Austal USA (for LCS-6 and the subsequent even-numbered hulls) and was originally led by General Dynamics, Bath Iron Works (LCS-2 and LCS-4)
The Independence variant team is led by Austal USA (for LCS-6 and the subsequent even-numbered hulls) and was originally led by General Dynamics, Bath Iron Works (LCS-2 and LCS-4)

 

Independence-class

Ship Laid down Launched Commissioned Homeport
USS Independence (LCS-2) 01-19-2006 04-26-2008 01-16-2010 San Diego, California
USS Coronado (LCS-4) 12-17-2009 01-14-2012 04-05-2014 San Diego, California
USS Jackson (LCS-6) 08-01-2011 12-14-2013 12-05-2015 San Diego, California
USS Montgomery (LCS-8) 06-25-2013 08-06-2014
USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS-10) 04-16-2014 02-25-2015
USS Omaha (LCS-12) 02-18-2015 11-20-2015
USS Manchester (LCS-14) 06-29-2015
USS Tulsa (LCS-16) 01-11-2016
USS Charleston (LCS-18)
USS Cincinnati (LCS-20)
USS Kansas City (LCS-22)
USS Oakland (LCS-24)
Launch of USS Omaha (LCS 12) at Austal USA facility - Mobile, Alabama
Launch of USS Omaha (LCS 12) at Austal USA facility – Mobile, Alabama

Christening of Omaha

Austal is pleased to announce that Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) 12 was christened at Austal USA’s Mobile, Alabama shipyard on Saturday 19th December 2015.

The Independence Variant of the LCS Class is a high speed, agile, shallow draft and networked surface ship
The Independence Variant of the LCS Class is a high speed, agile, shallow draft and networked surface ship

Austal USA officials joined Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus and the ship sponsor of the future USS Omaha, Susan Buffett, in celebrating the christening of the nation’s 12th Littoral Combat Ship.

The Omaha is the fourth LCS in Austal’s 10-ship, $3.5 billion block-buy contract. With its shallow draft of 14.8 feet/4.5 m, the Austal designed and built Independence-variant LCS is an advanced high-speed and agile 417 feet/127.1 m combat ship designed to operate in near-shore environments, yet capable of open-ocean operation.

«On behalf of Austal’s entire shipbuilding team, we are proud to design and build a ship that will carry the great name of Omaha as she defends our nation», said Austal USA President Craig Perciavalle. «We’re equally proud to honour a tremendous American in Susan Buffett who has given so much to so many people through her philanthropic work, and now gives her spirit as the sponsor to this amazing ship».

Buffett, a philanthropist and current resident and native of Omaha, will serve as the sponsor to the ship. She chairs of The Sherwood Foundation, The Buffett Early Childhood Fund, and the Susan Thompson Buffett Foundation. She also serves on several national non-profit boards, including ONE, Girls Inc., and the Fulfillment Fund.

According to the Society of Sponsors of the United States Navy, «The sponsor will participate in all or some of the milestones in the life of her ship … far beyond participation in ceremonial milestones, sponsorship represents a lifelong relationship with the ship and her crew».

The aluminium hulled trimaran was officially named after Nebraska’s largest city during an announcement by Secretary Mabus, February 15, 2012. He said the name was «to honour the patriotic, hard-working citizens of Omaha and the state of Nebraska for their support of and contributions to the military». She will be the fourth U.S. Navy ship named «Omaha».

The future USS Omaha (LCS-12), launched in November 20 and scheduled for delivery in 2016, has a maximum speed of more than 40 knots/46 mph/74 km/h. The Independence-variant combines superior seakeeping, endurance, and speed with the volume and payload capacity needed to support emerging missions – today and in the future.

«I’m also proud to honour Austal’s workforce today – a group of some of the most dedicated and hard-working professionals I have ever worked with», said Perciavalle. «Their expertise and commitment to excellence is evident in the construction of these incredible warships».

Austal’s LCS program is in full swing with three ships delivered and six ships under construction at this time. USS Jackson (LCS-6) was delivered this past summer and was recently commissioned in Gulfport, Mississippi. USS Montgomery (LCS-8) and USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS-10) are preparing for trials and delivery in 2016.

Final assembly is well underway on USS Manchester (LCS-14) and recently began on USS Tulsa (LCS-16). Modules for USS Charleston (LCS-18) are under construction in Austal’s Module Manufacturing Facility.

The ships are open ocean capable but are designed to defeat growing littoral threats and provide access and dominance in the coastal water battlespace
The ships are open ocean capable but are designed to defeat growing littoral threats and provide access and dominance in the coastal water battlespace

 

The Independence Variant of the LCS Class

PRINCIPAL DIMENSIONS
Construction Hull and superstructure – aluminium alloy
Length overall 417 feet/127.1 m
Beam overall 103 feet/31.4 m
Hull draft (maximum) 14.8 feet/4.5 m
PAYLOAD AND CAPACITIES
Complement Core Crew – 40
Mission crew – 36
Berthing 76 in a mix of single, double & quad berthing compartments
Maximum mission load 210 tonnes
Mission Bay Volume 118,403 feet3/11,000 m3
Mission packages Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW)
Surface Warfare (SUW)
Mine Warfare (MIW)
PROPULSION
Main engines 2 × GE LM2500
2 × MTU 20V 8000
Waterjets 4 × Wartsila steerable
Bow thruster Retractable azimuthing
PERFORMANCE
Speed 40 knots/46 mph/74 km/h
Range 3,500 NM/4,028 miles/6,482 km
Operational limitation Survival in Sea State 8
MISSION/LOGISTICS DECK
Deck area >21,527.8 feet2/2,000 m2
Launch and recovery Twin boom extending crane
Loading Side ramp
Internal elevator to hanger
Launch/Recover Watercraft Sea State 4
FLIGHT DECK AND HANGER
Flight deck dimensions 2 × SH-60 or 1 × CH-53 or multiple Unmanned Aerial Vehicles/Vertical Take-off and Land Tactical Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs/VTUAVs)
Hanger Aircraft stowage & maintenance for 2 × SH-60
Launch/Recover Aircraft Sea State 5
WEAPONS AND SENSORS
Standard 1 × 57-mm gun
4 × 12.7-mm/.50 caliber guns
1 × Surface-to-Air Missile (SAM) launcher
3 × weapons modules
LCS delivers combat capability from core self-defense systems in concert with rapidly interchangeable, modular mission packages and an open architecture command and control system
LCS delivers combat capability from core self-defense systems in concert with rapidly interchangeable, modular mission packages and an open architecture command and control system

 

Ship list

USS Independence (LCS-2)

USS Coronado (LCS-4)

USS Jackson (LCS-6)

USS Montgomery (LCS-8)

USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS-10)

USS Omaha (LCS-12)

USS Manchester (LCS-14)

USS Tulsa (LCS-16)

USS Charleston (LCS-18)

USS Cincinnati (LCS-20)

USS Kansas City (LCS-22)

Modularity maximizes the flexibility of LCS and enables commanders to meet changing warfare needs, while also supporting faster, easier technological updates
Modularity maximizes the flexibility of LCS and enables commanders to meet changing warfare needs, while also supporting faster, easier technological updates

Jackson Commissioned

The crew of USS Jackson (LCS-6) ushered in a new era in naval warfare, December 5, as the ship was brought to life before a crowd of nearly 10,000. «I hereby place United States Ship Jackson in commission. May God bless and guide this warship and all who sail in it», said Secretary of the U.S. Navy Ray Mabus, who helped name the ship in 2011. «This certainly ranks right up there with great days that I’ve had».

USS Jackson (LCS-6) during its christening ceremony at Austal USA shipyard in Mobile, Alabama in 2014 (U.S. Navy Photo)
USS Jackson (LCS-6) during its christening ceremony at Austal USA shipyard in Mobile, Alabama in 2014 (U.S. Navy Photo)

Mississippi Senator Thad Cochran’s daughter, Dr. Kate Cochran, was the ship’s sponsor. It is the first ship to bear the name of Mississippi’s capital city. The name held a special meaning for many of those at the commissioning.

«For it to be named after the city, the capital of the state in which you were born, is even more of a phenomenal feeling», said Command Senior Chief Ken Ballard. Ballard and 52 other crewmembers will man missions aboard the Jackson, one of the fastest and most technologically advanced warships in the world.

«They’re providing incredible presence. They are providing lethality. They’re providing a lot of things that the United States Navy needs today and is going to need for years in the future», said Mabus. For the crew, the commissioning was the culmination of three years of hard work.

A fast, agile, and high-technology surface combatant, Freedom will act as a platform for launch and recovery of manned and unmanned vehicles. Its modular design will support interchangeable mission packages, allowing the ship to be reconfigured for antisubmarine warfare, mine warfare, or surface warfare missions on an as-needed basis.

The littoral combat ship (LCS) will be able to swap out mission packages, adapting as the tactical situation demands. These ships will also feature advanced networking capability to share tactical information with other Navy aircraft, ships, submarines and joint units.

The brand new 417-foot/127-meter ship weighs in at 3,100 tons. It can travel at speeds in excess of 40 knots/46 mph/74 km/h. The USS Jackson will be home ported at Naval Base San Diego.

The Independence variant team is led by Austal USA (for LCS-6 and the subsequent even-numbered hulls) and was originally led by General Dynamics, Bath Iron Works (LCS-2 and LCS-4)
The Independence variant team is led by Austal USA (for LCS-6 and the subsequent even-numbered hulls) and was originally led by General Dynamics, Bath Iron Works (LCS-2 and LCS-4)

 

The Independence Variant of the LCS Class

PRINCIPAL DIMENSIONS
Construction Hull and superstructure – aluminium alloy
Length overall 417 feet/127.1 m
Beam overall 103 feet/31.4 m
Hull draft (maximum) 14.8 feet/4.5 m
PAYLOAD AND CAPACITIES
Complement Core Crew – 40
Mission crew – 36
Berthing 76 in a mix of single, double & quad berthing compartments
Maximum mission load 210 tonnes
Mission Bay Volume 118,403 feet3/11,000 m3
Mission packages Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW)
Surface Warfare (SUW)
Mine Warfare (MIW)
PROPULSION
Main engines 2 × GE LM2500
2 × MTU 20V 8000
Waterjets 4 × Wartsila steerable
Bow thruster Retractable azimuthing
PERFORMANCE
Speed 40 knots/46 mph/74 km/h
Range 3,500 NM/4,028 miles/6,482 km
Operational limitation Survival in Sea State 8
MISSION/LOGISTICS DECK
Deck area >21,527.8 feet2/2,000 m2
Launch and recovery Twin boom extending crane
Loading Side ramp
Internal elevator to hanger
Launch/Recover Watercraft Sea State 4
FLIGHT DECK AND HANGER
Flight deck dimensions 2 × SH-60 or 1 × CH-53 or multiple Unmanned Aerial Vehicles/Vertical Take-off and Land Tactical Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs/VTUAVs)
Hanger Aircraft stowage & maintenance for 2 × SH-60
Launch/Recover Aircraft Sea State 5
WEAPONS AND SENSORS
Standard 1 × 57-mm gun
4 × 12.7-mm/.50 caliber guns
1 × Surface-to-Air Missile (SAM) launcher
3 × weapons modules
Six additional Independence-variant LCS are at various stages of construction at Austal’s shipyard in Mobile, Alabama
Six additional Independence-variant LCS are at various stages of construction at Austal’s shipyard in Mobile, Alabama