Tag Archives: Huntington Ingalls Industries

American Legend

Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division has received a $499.8 million fixed-price incentive contract from the U.S. Coast Guard to build an eighth National Security Cutter, USCGC Midgett (WMSL-757).

The National Security Cutter is the first new design for the service in 20 years, and features enhanced capabilities that will allow the eight-ship class to replace 12 aging high-endurance cutters that have been in service for 40 years
The National Security Cutter is the first new design for the service in 20 years, and features enhanced capabilities that will allow the eight-ship class to replace 12 aging high-endurance cutters that have been in service for 40 years

«We are performing extremely well in this program, proving the point that serial production is the most efficient and effective way to build complex military ships», said Jim French, Ingalls’ National Security Cutter program manager. «We continue to fold in learning for each ship we build, and the three under construction right now are tracking well because of this knowledge».

Ingalls has delivered four National Security Cutters to the Coast Guard and currently has three more under construction: USCGC James (WMSL-754), USCGC Munro (WMSL-755) and USCGC Kimball (WMSL-756). These ships will be delivered in 2015, 2016 and 2018, respectively. Midgett is scheduled to deliver in 2019.

National Security Cutters (NSCs), the flagships of the Coast Guard’s cutter fleet, are designed to replace the 378-foot/115-m Hamilton-class high-endurance cutters, which entered service during the 1960s. NSCs are 418 feet/127 m long with a 54-foot/16-m beam and displace 4,500 long tons with a full load. They have a top speed of 28 knots/32 mph/52 km/h, a range of 12,000 nautical miles/22,224 km, an endurance of 60 days and a crew of 120.

The Legend-class NSC is capable of meeting all maritime security mission needs required of the high-endurance cutter. The cutter includes an aft launch and recovery area for two Rigid Hull Inflatable Boats (RHIBs) and a flight deck to accommodate a range of manned and unmanned rotary-wing aircraft.

It is the largest and most technologically advanced class of cutter in the Coast Guard, with robust capabilities for maritime homeland security, law enforcement, marine safety, environmental protection and national defense missions. The Legend-class of cutters plays an important role in enhancing the Coast Guard’s operational readiness, capacity and effectiveness at a time when the demand for their services has never been greater.

NSCs have several features that enhance overall mission performance, including, CODAG propulsion for faster speeds, stern ramp launch and recovery for a combination of small boats 7 – 11 meters in length, and a very large flight deck with two hangars to accommodate helicopters or VUAVs
NSCs have several features that enhance overall mission performance, including, CODAG propulsion for faster speeds, stern ramp launch and recovery for a combination of small boats 7 – 11 meters in length, and a very large flight deck with two hangars to accommodate helicopters or VUAVs

 

Facts

Displacement:                                4,500 long tons

Length:                                                418 feet/127 m

Beam:                                                   54 feet/16 m

Speed:                                                  28 knots/32 mph/52 km/h

Range:                                                  12,000 NM/22,224 km

Endurance:                                         60 days

Crew:                                                     120

Equipped with:                                  Mk-110 57-mm turret mounted gun; 6 × 12.7-mm/.50 caliber machine guns; 3D air search radar; 2 level 1, class 1 aircraft hangers; A stern launch ramp for mission boats

USCG National Security Cutter Hamilton (WMSL-753) on sea trials, July 18, 2014

The first Destroyer
after restart

Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division launched the company’s 29th Arleigh Burke-class (DDG-51) Aegis guided missile destroyer (Flight IIA, the 63th ship in the series), John Finn (DDG-113), at first light on Saturday, March 28.

Ingalls Shipbuilding launched the Arleigh Burke-class Aegis guided missile destroyer John Finn (DDG-113) on Saturday morning (Photo by Andrew Young/HII)
Ingalls Shipbuilding launched the Arleigh Burke-class Aegis guided missile destroyer John Finn (DDG-113) on Saturday morning (Photo by Andrew Young/HII)

The guided missile destroyer is named after John William Finn, who earned the Medal of Honor for his actions during the attack on Pearl Harbor in World War II. When the attack began, John rushed to the squadron of PBY flying boats he worked on, detached a machine gun and moved to an open position to shoot at Japanese planes for the duration of the attack despite being wounded multiple times.

«It’s exciting to see another Ingalls-built destroyer in the water», said DDG-51 Program Manager George Nungesser. «Our shipbuilders have proven time and time again they can handle whatever it takes to build, test and deliver these extremely complex warships. This launch was no exception. Our hot production line is now in a good state as we have three DDGs under construction and another one in pre-fabrication. What our shipbuilders accomplish every day matters to our quality, cost and schedule, and implementing our learning from ship to ship will allow us to improve in every aspect of destroyer construction».

Ingalls uses a safe and efficient method of launching ships and has been using that process for more than 40 years. John Finn (DDG-113) was moved on rail cars from land to the company’s floating drydock a week prior to launch. Shipbuilders then spent the next week preparing the ship and dry dock for Saturday’s launch.

Arleigh Burke Class Flight IIA
Arleigh Burke Class Flight IIA

«This is the first Arleigh Burke DDG-51-class ship to launch in almost four years, and we’re both proud and excited with the progress the program is making», said Capt. Mark Vandroff, the U.S. Navy’s DDG-51-class program manager. «I look forward to John Finn (DDG-113) joining the fleet and the other ships of her class to continue in the legacy of success that is the Arleigh Burke DDG-51-class destroyer».

Ingalls Shipbuilding has delivered 28 Arleigh Burke DDG-51-class destroyers to the U.S. Navy. Destroyers currently under construction at Ingalls Shipbuilding are John Finn (DDG-113), Ralph Johnson (DDG-114), Paul Ignatius (DDG-117) and Delbert D. Black (DDG-119). Just last week, Ingalls Shipbuilding received a contract modification funding the construction of the company’s 33rd destroyer, DDG-121.

Arleigh Burke DDG-51-class destroyers are highly capable, multi-mission ships that can conduct a variety of operations, from peacetime presence and crisis management to sea control and power projection, all in support of the United States’ military strategy. The guided missile destroyers are capable of simultaneously fighting air, surface and subsurface threats. The ship contains myriad offensive and defensive weapons designed to support maritime defense needs well into the 21st century.

Laura Stavridis (right) and Bob Merchent (second from right) mark their initials on the keel plate for the destroyer John Finn (DDG-113) on Monday, November 4, 2013. Stavridis is the ship’s sponsor; Merchent is Ingalls’ vice president of U.S. Coast Guard and surface combatant programs. Also pictured are (left to right) George Nungesser, Ingalls’ DDG-51 program manager, and Ingalls Shipbuilding President Irwin F. Edenzon (Photo by Lance Davis)
Laura Stavridis (right) and Bob Merchent (second from right) mark their initials on the keel plate for the destroyer John Finn (DDG-113) on Monday, November 4, 2013. Stavridis is the ship’s sponsor; Merchent is Ingalls’ vice president of U.S. Coast Guard and surface combatant programs. Also pictured are (left to right) George Nungesser, Ingalls’ DDG-51 program manager, and Ingalls Shipbuilding President Irwin F. Edenzon (Photo by Lance Davis)

 

Ship Characteristics

Length Overall 510 feet/156 meters
Beam – Waterline 59 feet/18 meters
Draft 30.5 feet/9.3 meters
Displacement – Full Load 9,217 tons/9,363 metric tons
Power Plant 4 General electric LM 2500-30 gas turbines; 2 shafts; 2 CRP (Contra-Rotating) propellers; 100,000 shaft horsepower/ 75,000 kW
Speed in excess of 30 knots/34.5 mph/ 55.5 km/h
Range 4,400 NM/8.149 km at 20 knots/23 mph/37 km/h
Crew 380 total: 32 Officers, 27 CPO (Chief Petty Officer), 321 OEM
Surveillance SPY-1D Phased Array Radar and Aegis Combat System (Lockheed Martin); SPS-73(V) Navigation; SPS-67(V)3 Surface Search; 3 SPG-62 Illuminator; SQQ-89(V)6 sonar incorporating SQS-53C hull mounted and SQR-19 towed array sonars used with Mark-116 Mod 7 ASW fire control system
Electronics/Countermeasures SLQ-32(V)3; Mark-53 Mod 0 Decoy System; Mark-234 Decoy System; SLQ-25A Torpedo Decoy; SLQ-39 Surface Decoy; URN-25 TACAN; UPX-29 IFF System; Kollmorgen Mark-46 Mod 1 Electro-Optical Director
Aircraft 2 embarked SH-60 helicopters ASW operations; RAST (Recovery Assist, Secure and Traverse)
Armament 2 Mark-41 Vertical Launching System (VLS) with 90 Standard, Vertical Launch ASROC (Anti-Submarine Rocket) & Tomahawk ASM (Air-to-Surface Missile)/LAM (Loitering Attack Missile); 5-in (127-mm)/54 Mark-45 gun; 2 CIWS (Close-In Weapon System); 2 Mark-32 triple 324-mm torpedo tubes for Mark-46 or Mark-50 ASW torpedos

Ingalls Shipbuilding Launches Guided Missile Destroyer John Finn (DDG-113)