Tag Archives: Huntington Ingalls Industries

Ninth Legend-class NSC

Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division has received a $486 million fixed-price incentive contract from the U.S. Coast Guard to build a ninth National Security Cutter (NSC).

National Security Cutter USCGC Munro (WMSL-755) Successfully Completes Builder's Sea Trials
National Security Cutter USCGC Munro (WMSL-755) Successfully Completes Builder’s Sea Trials

«With the experience and knowledge our shipbuilders bring to this program, I am confident NSC 9 will be another great ship and continue the great success on this program», said Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias. «These ships remain in high demand by our Coast Guard customer, and we look forward to delivering another quality NSC to help them accomplish their vital homeland security missions».

NSCs are the flagships of the Coast Guard’s cutter fleet, designed to replace the 12 Hamilton-class high-endurance cutters, which entered service during the 1960s. Ingalls has delivered six NSCs and has two more under construction: USCGC Kimball (WMSL-756) and USCGC Midgett (WMSL-757). These ships are scheduled to be delivered in 2018 and 2019, respectively.

«We are extremely proud of the quality of the NSCs we’ve built for the U.S. Coast Guard», said Derek Murphy, Ingalls’ NSC program manager. «As we continue to be the sole builder in this class, the benefits of serial production are apparent: technologically advanced, dependable ships that are built at cost and on schedule».

Legend-Class National Security Cutters are the flagships of the U.S. Coast Guard. They are the most technologically advanced ships in the Coast Guard’s fleet, with capabilities for maritime homeland security, law enforcement and national security missions. NSCs are 418 feet/127 m long with a 54-foot/16-meter beam and displace 4,500 tons/4,572 metric tons with a full load. They have a top speed of 28 knots/32 mph/52 km/h, a range of 12,000 NM/13,809 miles/22,224 km, an endurance of 60 days and a crew of 120. The Legend class of cutters plays an important role in enhancing the Coast Guard’s operational readiness, capacity and effectiveness at a time when the demand for their services has never been greater.

 

Facts

Displacement 4,500 long tons/4,572 metric tons
Length 418 feet/127 m
Beam 54 feet/16 m
Speed 28 knots/32 mph/52 km/h
Range 12,000 NM/13,809 miles/22,224 km
Endurance 60 days
Crew 110
Equipped with Mk-110 57-mm turret mounted gun
6 × 12.7-mm/.50 caliber machine guns
3D air search radar
2 level 1, class 1 aircraft hangers
A stern launch ramp for mission boats

 

Ship list

Ship Hull Number Laid down Launched Commissioned
Bertholf WMSL-750 03-29-2005 09-29-2006 08-04-2008
Waesche WMSL-751 09-11-2006 07-12-2008 05-07-2010
Stratton WMSL-752 07-20-2009 07-23-2010 03-31-2012
Hamilton WMSL-753 09-05-2012 08-10-2013 12-06-2014
James WMSL-754 05-17-2013 05-03-2014 08-08-2015
Munro WMSL-755 10-07-2013 09-12-2015
Kimball WMSL-756 03-04-2016 12-17-2016
Midgett WMSL-757
Stone WMSL-758

Translation and launch of U.S. Coast Guard National Security Cutter Kimball

Kimball is Launched

Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division launched the National Security Cutter (NSC) USCGC Kimball (WMSL-756) on Saturday, December 17. Kimball is the seventh NSC Ingalls has built for the U.S. Coast Guard; christening is scheduled for March 4, 2017.

Ingalls Shipbuilding launched the National Security Cutter USCGC Kimball (WMSL-756) on Saturday, December 17. Kimball is the seventh NSC Ingalls has built for the U.S. Coast Guard; christening is scheduled for March 4
Ingalls Shipbuilding launched the National Security Cutter USCGC Kimball (WMSL-756) on Saturday, December 17. Kimball is the seventh NSC Ingalls has built for the U.S. Coast Guard; christening is scheduled for March 4

«This is an important milestone for Kimball and the National Security Cutter program», Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias said. «The hot NSC production line we have at Ingalls, with six ships delivered and two more under construction, is allowing us to build these highly capable ships in the most efficient and cost-effective manner possible».

Kimball was translated via Ingalls’ rail car system to the floating dry dock last week, and the dock was moved away from the pier on Saturday morning. With the assistance of tugboats, Kimball launched off the dock on Saturday afternoon.

«Our crew works hard to make sure these translations and launches go as smoothly as possible, while incorporating lessons learned from previous ships so we become that much more efficient», said Derek Murphy, Ingalls’ NSC program manager. «After a successful launch, there is still much work to be done. We are now focused on the upcoming milestones such as first fuel, generator and engine light-offs, and sea trials».

The ship is named in honor of Sumner Kimball, who organized and directed the U.S. Life Saving Service. He was a pioneer in organizing all of the different facilities associated with the service into what eventually became the U.S. Coast Guard.

NSCs are 418 feet/127 m long with a 54-foot/16-meter beam and displace 4,500 long tons/4,572 metric tons with a full load. They have a top speed of 28 knots/32 mph/52 km/h, a range of 12,000 NM/13,809 miles/22,224 km, an endurance of 60 days and a crew of 110.

The Legend-class NSC is capable of meeting all maritime security mission needs required of the High Endurance Cutter. The cutter includes an aft launch and recovery area for two rigid hull inflatable boats and a flight deck to accommodate a range of manned and unmanned rotary wing aircraft. It is the largest and most technologically advanced class of cutter in the U.S. Coast Guard, with robust capabilities for maritime homeland security, law enforcement, marine safety, environmental protection and national defense missions. This class of cutters plays an important role in enhancing the Coast Guard’s operational readiness, capacity and effectiveness at a time when the demand for their services has never been greater.

USCGC Kimball (WMSL-756) moved across land to the dry dock
USCGC Kimball (WMSL-756) moved across land to the dry dock

 

Facts

Displacement 4,500 long tons/4,572 metric tons
Length 418 feet/127 m
Beam 54 feet/16 m
Speed 28 knots/32 mph/52 km/h
Range 12,000 NM/13,809 miles/22,224 km
Endurance 60 days
Crew 110
Equipped with Mk-110 57-mm turret mounted gun
6 × 12.7-mm/.50 caliber machine guns
3D air search radar
2 level 1, class 1 aircraft hangers
A stern launch ramp for mission boats

 

Ship list

Ship Hull Number Laid down Launched Commissioned
Bertholf WMSL-750 03-29-2005 09-29-2006 08-04-2008
Waesche WMSL-751 09-11-2006 07-12-2008 05-07-2010
Stratton WMSL-752 07-20-2009 07-23-2010 03-31-2012
Hamilton WMSL-753 09-05-2012 08-10-2013 12-06-2014
James WMSL-754 05-17-2013 05-03-2014 08-08-2015
Munro WMSL-755 10-07-2013 09-12-2015
Kimball WMSL-756 03-04-2016 12-17-2016
Midgett WMSL-757
Stone WMSL-758

Translation and launch of U.S. Coast Guard National Security Cutter Kimball

 

Construction of LPD-28

Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) announced today that its Ingalls Shipbuilding division was awarded a $1.46 billion, fixed-price incentive contract for the detail design and construction of the amphibious transport dock USS Fort Lauderdale (LPD-28).

HII's Ingalls Shipbuilding division was awarded a $1.46 billion, fixed-price incentive contract for the detail design and construction of the amphibious transport dock USS Fort Lauderdale (LPD-28) (HII rendering)
HII’s Ingalls Shipbuilding division was awarded a $1.46 billion, fixed-price incentive contract for the detail design and construction of the amphibious transport dock USS Fort Lauderdale (LPD-28) (HII rendering)

«This contract demonstrates the confidence the Navy has in our shipbuilders’ performance in this program», said Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias. «Building LPD-28 allows the entire LPD industrial base to maintain a hot production line so that our sailors and Marines receive quality amphibious warships as efficiently and affordably as possible».

Ingalls has built and delivered 10 ships in the San Antonio class of amphibious warships. The 11th, USS Portland (LPD-27), launched last year and is scheduled for sea trials in mid-2017.

LPD-28 is named Fort Lauderdale to honor the Florida city’s historic ties to the U.S. Navy, which date to the 1830s and include an important naval training center during World War II.

The San Antonio class is a major part of the Navy’s 21st century amphibious assault force. The 684-foot/208-meter-long, 105-foot/32-meter-wide ships are used to embark and land Marines, their equipment and supplies ashore via air cushion or conventional landing craft and amphibious assault vehicles, augmented by helicopters or vertical takeoff and landing aircraft such as the MV-22 Osprey. The ships support a Marine Air Ground Task Force across the spectrum of operations, conducting amphibious and expeditionary missions of sea control and power projection to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief missions throughout the first half of the 21st century.

Munro delivered

Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division delivered the National Security Cutter (NSC) USCGC Munro (WMSL-755) to the U.S. Coast Guard on December 16, 2016. Munro is scheduled to sail away in February and will be commissioned in Seattle on April 1, 2017.

Huntington Ingalls Industries Delivers National Security Cutter USCGC Munro (WMSL-755) to the U.S. Coast Guard
Huntington Ingalls Industries Delivers National Security Cutter USCGC Munro (WMSL-755) to the U.S. Coast Guard

«Three years ago, this ship consisted of nothing more than steel plates, raw pipe and bundled wire», said Derek Murphy, Ingalls’ NSC 6 program manager. «Since then, we’ve seen an amazing transformation, made possible by the thousands of people who poured their heart and soul into this ship. We have a mission statement in the NSC program that says during the construction of each NSC we will provide the men and women of the United States Coast Guard with the finest ship in their fleet. This excellence will be provided by our shipbuilders through working safely, attention to detail and ownership of work».

Munro is the sixth Legend-class National Security Cutter Ingalls has built for the Coast Guard. Ingalls currently has two more NSCs under construction: USCGC Kimball (WMSL-756) and USCGC Midgett (WMSL-757). These ships are scheduled to be delivered in 2018 and 2019, respectively.

«This is a remarkable achievement in my career and the career of the personnel serving on Munro», said Thomas King, commanding officer of Munro. «National Security Cutters are a great benefit to the Coast Guard because they have the capabilities to fulfill missions while acting independently offshore».

Munro is named to honor Signalman First Class Douglas A. Munro, the Coast Guard’s sole recipient of the Medal of Honor. He was mortally wounded on September 27, 1942, while evacuating a detachment of Marines from Guadalcanal.

Legend-class NSCs are the flagships of the Coast Guard’s cutter fleet. Designed to replace the 378‐foot/115-meter Hamilton-class high-endurance cutters that entered service in the 1960s, they are 418 feet/127 m long with a 54-foot/16-meter beam and displace 4,500 long tons/4,572 metric tons with a full load. They have a top speed of 28 knots/32 mph/52 km/h, a range of 12,000 NM/13,809 miles/22,224 km, an endurance of 60 days and a crew of 110.

NSCs are capable of meeting all maritime security mission needs required of the high-endurance cutter. They include an aft launch and recovery area for two rigid hull inflatable boats and a flight deck to accommodate a range of manned and unmanned rotary wing aircraft. The Legend class is the largest and most technologically advanced class of cutter in the Coast Guard, with robust capabilities for maritime homeland security, law enforcement, marine safety, environmental protection and national defense missions. NSCs play an important role enhancing the Coast Guard’s operational readiness, capacity and effectiveness at a time when the demand for their services has never been greater.

Derek Murphy (right), Ingalls’ NSC program manager, presents the key plaque to Captain Thomas King, Munro’s commanding officer, with Christopher Webb, commanding officer of the U.S. Coast Guard’s Project Resident Office Gulf Coast, observing (Photo by Andrew Young/HII)
Derek Murphy (right), Ingalls’ NSC program manager, presents the key plaque to Captain Thomas King, Munro’s commanding officer, with Christopher Webb, commanding officer of the U.S. Coast Guard’s Project Resident Office Gulf Coast, observing (Photo by Andrew Young/HII)

 

Facts

Displacement 4,500 long tons/4,572 metric tons
Length 418 feet/127 m
Beam 54 feet/16 m
Speed 28 knots/32 mph/52 km/h
Range 12,000 NM/13,809 miles/22,224 km
Endurance 60 days
Crew 110
Equipped with Mk-110 57-mm turret mounted gun
6 × 12.7-mm/.50 caliber machine guns
3D air search radar
2 level 1, class 1 aircraft hangers
A stern launch ramp for mission boats
USCGC Kimball (WMSL-756) moved across land to the dry dock
USCGC Kimball (WMSL-756) moved across land to the dry dock

 

Ship list

Ship Hull Number Laid down Launched Commissioned
Bertholf WMSL-750 03-29-2005 09-29-2006 08-04-2008
Waesche WMSL-751 09-11-2006 07-12-2008 05-07-2010
Stratton WMSL-752 07-20-2009 07-23-2010 03-31-2012
Hamilton WMSL-753 09-05-2012 08-10-2013 12-06-2014
James WMSL-754 05-17-2013 05-03-2014 08-08-2015
Munro WMSL-755 10-07-2013 09-12-2015
Kimball WMSL-756 03-04-2016 12-17-2016
Midgett WMSL-757
Stone WMSL-758

 

John Finn delivered

Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division delivered the Arleigh Burke-class (DDG-51) guided missile destroyer USS John Finn (DDG-113) to the U.S. Navy today, the 75th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor. The ship’s namesake helped shoot down Japanese warplanes during the attack and was the first Medal of Honor recipient of World War II.

Ingalls Shipbuilding's 29th Arleigh Burke (DDG-51) destroyer USS John Finn (DDG-113) sails the Gulf of Mexico during Alpha sea trials (Photo by Lance Davis/HII)
Ingalls Shipbuilding’s 29th Arleigh Burke (DDG-51) destroyer USS John Finn (DDG-113) sails the Gulf of Mexico during Alpha sea trials (Photo by Lance Davis/HII)

«Our shipbuilders are patriots who take pride in each and every one of the ships we build at Ingalls», said Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias. «DDG-113 is no exception. John Finn forged a great legacy as he fought valiantly, while wounded, to protect our country. It is an honor for our shipbuilders to build the ship that will carry on that legacy in the U.S. Navy destroyer fleet. Nearly three decades of talented shipbuilders working in the DDG-51 program make me confident DDG-113 will surely honor her namesake».

The signing of the DD 250 document officially transfers custody of the ship from HII to the U.S. Navy. The signing took place during a morning ceremony and included an acknowledgement at 7:38 a.m., remembering the time the attacks began on December 7, 1941.

«This is a very unique moment», said George Nungesser, Ingalls’ DDG-51 program manager. «Years of working with the DDG-51 program has created a team of shipbuilders who truly understand what it means to build these ships. Today they share in the honor of delivering this ship on the 75th anniversary of Pearl Harbor and are able to take a moment to honor the men and women who will continue to carry on the mission that John Finn and his fellow sailors fought so bravely for. It is a memory that will last forever».

Finn received the Medal of Honor for machine-gunning Japanese warplanes for over two hours during the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor, despite being shot in the foot and shoulder and suffering numerous shrapnel wounds. He retired as a lieutenant after 30 years of service and lived to be 100 years old, passing in 2010.

Ingalls has delivered 28 Arleigh Burke-class destroyers to the U.S. Navy. Other destroyers currently under construction at Ingalls include USS Ralph Johnson (DDG-114), USS Paul Ignatius (DDG-117), USS Delbert D. Black (DDG-119) and USS Frank E. Petersen Jr. (DDG-121). Construction of USS Lenah H. Sutcliffe Higbee (DDG-123) is scheduled to begin in 2017.

Delivery of the Aegis guided missile destroyer USS John Finn (DDG-113), named for a Pearl Harbor hero and the Navy’s first World War II Medal of Honor recipient, was officiated on the 75th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor, December 7, 2016. Signing the document are, from left, Freddie Joe O’Brien, Ingalls’ DDG-113 ship program manager; Navy Commander Micheal Wagner, prospective commanding officer of DDG-113; and Commander Ben Wilder, former Navy DDG-51 program manager’s representative (Photo by Lance Davis/HII)
Delivery of the Aegis guided missile destroyer USS John Finn (DDG-113), named for a Pearl Harbor hero and the Navy’s first World War II Medal of Honor recipient, was officiated on the 75th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor, December 7, 2016. Signing the document are, from left, Freddie Joe O’Brien, Ingalls’ DDG-113 ship program manager; Navy Commander Micheal Wagner, prospective commanding officer of DDG-113; and Commander Ben Wilder, former Navy DDG-51 program manager’s representative (Photo by Lance Davis/HII)

 

Ship Characteristics

Length Overall 510 feet/156 m
Beam – Waterline 59 feet/18 m
Draft 30.5 feet/9.3 m
Displacement – Full Load 9,217 tons/9,363 metric tons
Power Plant 4 General electric LM 2500-30 gas turbines; 2 shafts; 2 CRP (Contra-Rotating) propellers; 100,000 shaft horsepower/75,000 kW
Speed in excess of 30 knots/34.5 mph/55.5 km/h
Range 4,400 NM/8,149 km at 20 knots/23 mph/37 km/h
Crew 380 total: 32 Officers, 27 CPO (Chief Petty Officer), 321 OEM
Surveillance SPY-1D Phased Array Radar and Aegis Combat System (Lockheed Martin); SPS-73(V) Navigation; SPS-67(V)3 Surface Search; 3 SPG-62 Illuminator; SQQ-89(V)6 sonar incorporating SQS-53C hull mounted and SQR-19 towed array sonars used with Mark-116 Mod 7 ASW fire control system
Electronics/Countermeasures SLQ-32(V)3; Mark-53 Mod 0 Decoy System; Mark-234 Decoy System; SLQ-25A Torpedo Decoy; SLQ-39 Surface Decoy; URN-25 TACAN; UPX-29 IFF System; Kollmorgen Mark-46 Mod 1 Electro-Optical Director
Aircraft 2 embarked SH-60 helicopters ASW operations; RAST (Recovery Assist, Secure and Traverse)
Armament 2 Mark-41 Vertical Launching System (VLS) with 90 Standard, Vertical Launch ASROC (Anti-Submarine Rocket) & Tomahawk ASM (Air-to-Surface Missile)/LAM (Loitering Attack Missile); 5-in (127-mm)/54 (62) Mark-45 gun; 2 (1) CIWS (Close-In Weapon System); 2 Mark-32 triple 324-mm torpedo tubes for Mark-46 or Mark-50 ASW torpedos

 

Flight IIA: Restart

Ship Yard Launched Commissioned Homeport
DDG-113 John Finn HIIIS 03-28-15
DDG-114 Ralph Johnson HIIIS 12-12-15
DDG-115 Rafael Peralta GDBIW 10-31-15

 

Paul Ignatius launched

Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division launched USS Paul Ignatius (DDG-117), the company’s 31st Arleigh Burke-class (DDG-51) guided missile destroyer, on Saturday, November 12, 2016.

USS Paul Ignatius (DDG-117) launched
USS Paul Ignatius (DDG-117) launched

«The DDG-51 program provides our U.S. Navy customer and our nation a series of highly advanced and capable warships», said Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias. «For 30 years, our talented shipbuilders have been building these much-needed, quality destroyers. Launching DDG-117 is an important milestone in the life of the ship, which will continue building toward fleet readiness in 2018».

USS Paul Ignatius (DDG-117) was translated via Ingalls’ rail car system to a floating dry dock. Once on, the dry dock was moved away from the pier, and it was ballasted to float the ship.

Ingalls has delivered 28 Arleigh Burke-class destroyers to the U.S. Navy. Other destroyers currently under construction at Ingalls include USS John Finn (DDG-113), USS Ralph Johnson (DDG-114), USS Delbert D. Black (DDG-119) and USS Frank E. Petersen Jr. (DDG-121). Construction on USS Lenah H. Sutcliffe Higbee (DDG-123) is scheduled to begin in the second quarter of 2017.

«Ingalls shipbuilders continue to partner with our Navy and Supervisor of Shipbuilding team to conduct these evolutions in a safe and efficient manner», said Kari Wilkinson, Ingalls’ vice president, program management. «This collective team put in a lot of hard work this week, and they should be very proud of their accomplishments».

USS Paul Ignatius (DDG-117) is named in honor of Ignatius, who served as Secretary of the Navy from 1967 to 1969 and was the Assistant Secretary of Defense during President Lyndon B. Johnson’s administration.

Arleigh Burke-class destroyers are capable, multi-mission ships and can conduct a variety of operations, from peacetime presence and crisis management to sea control and power projection, all in support of the United States’ military strategy. The guided missile destroyers are capable of simultaneously fighting air, surface and subsurface battles. The ship contains myriad offensive and defensive weapons designed to support maritime defense needs well into the 21st century.

The Ingalls-built destroyer USS Paul Ignatius (DDG-117) launched at first light Saturday morning, November 12, 2016 (Photo by Andrew Young/HII)
The Ingalls-built destroyer USS Paul Ignatius (DDG-117) launched at first light Saturday morning, November 12, 2016 (Photo by Andrew Young/HII)

 

Ship Characteristics

Length Overall 510 feet/156 m
Beam – Waterline 59 feet/18 m
Draft 30.5 feet/9.3 m
Displacement – Full Load 9,217 tons/9,363 metric tons
Power Plant 4 General electric LM 2500-30 gas turbines; 2 shafts; 2 CRP (Contra-Rotating) propellers; 100,000 shaft horsepower/75,000 kW
Speed in excess of 30 knots/34.5 mph/55.5 km/h
Range 4,400 NM/8,149 km at 20 knots/23 mph/37 km/h
Crew 380 total: 32 Officers, 27 CPO (Chief Petty Officer), 321 OEM
Surveillance SPY-1D Phased Array Radar and Aegis Combat System (Lockheed Martin); SPS-73(V) Navigation; SPS-67(V)3 Surface Search; 3 SPG-62 Illuminator; SQQ-89(V)6 sonar incorporating SQS-53C hull mounted and SQR-19 towed array sonars used with Mark-116 Mod 7 ASW fire control system
Electronics/Countermeasures SLQ-32(V)3; Mark-53 Mod 0 Decoy System; Mark-234 Decoy System; SLQ-25A Torpedo Decoy; SLQ-39 Surface Decoy; URN-25 TACAN; UPX-29 IFF System; Kollmorgen Mark-46 Mod 1 Electro-Optical Director
Aircraft 2 embarked SH-60 helicopters ASW operations; RAST (Recovery Assist, Secure and Traverse)
Armament 2 Mark-41 Vertical Launching System (VLS) with 90 Standard, Vertical Launch ASROC (Anti-Submarine Rocket) & Tomahawk ASM (Air-to-Surface Missile)/LAM (Loitering Attack Missile); 5-in (127-mm)/54 (62) Mark-45 gun; 2 (1) CIWS (Close-In Weapon System); 2 Mark-32 triple 324-mm torpedo tubes for Mark-46 or Mark-50 ASW torpedos

 

Guided Missile Destroyers Lineup

Flight IIA: Restart

Ship Yard Launched Commissioned Homeport
DDG-113 John Finn HIIIS 03-28-15
DDG-114 Ralph Johnson HIIIS 12-12-15
DDG-115 Rafael Peralta GDBIW 10-31-15

 

Flight IIA: Technology Insertion

Ship Yard Launched Commissioned Homeport
DDG-116 Thomas Hudner GDBIW
DDG-117 Paul Ignatius HIIIS 11-12-16
DDG-118 Daniel Inouye GDBIW
DDG-119 Delbert D. Black HIIIS
DDG-120 Carl M. Levin GDBIW
DDG-121 Frank E. Peterson Jr. HIIIS
DDG-122 John Basilone GDBIW
DDG-123 Lenah H. Sutcliffe Higbee HIIIS

 

Flight III

Ship Yard Launched Commissioned Homeport
DDG-124 Harvey C. Barnum, Jr. GDBIW
DDG-125 Jack H. Lucas HIIIS
DDG-126 Louis H. Wilson, Jr. GDBIW

 

The Ingalls-built destroyer USS Paul Ignatius (DDG-117) launched at first light Saturday morning, November 12, 2016 after translating to the dry dock overnight

Acceptance Trials

Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division announced today it successfully completed the third and final round of sea trials for the guided missile destroyer USS John Finn (DDG-113). The Arleigh Burke-class (DDG-51) destroyer spent two days in the Gulf of Mexico testing the ship’s various systems for acceptance trials.

The five-inch Mk-45 naval gun system aboard the destroyer USS John Finn (DDG-113) was tested during the second of three planned sea trials in the Gulf of Mexico (Photo by Andrew Young/HII)
The five-inch Mk-45 naval gun system aboard the destroyer USS John Finn (DDG-113) was tested during the second of three planned sea trials in the Gulf of Mexico (Photo by Andrew Young/HII)

«The success of DDG-113 acceptance trials moves us one step closer to delivering a quality, state-of-the-art surface combatant to the U.S. Navy», said Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias. «For nearly three decades, the DDG-51 program has served as the backbone of our shipyard, and today we are proud to continue that legacy. Our shipbuilders are eager to show our U.S. Navy customer the positive impact of a skilled workforce and a hot production line can have on the DDG-51 program».

The U.S. Navy’s Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) spent time onboard evaluating the ship’s overall performance during the final set of sea trials. The USS Navy required three sea trials as part of the restart effort on the DDG-51 program. Now shipbuilders will put the final finishing touches on the ship for its delivery in December.

«The shipbuilders are ready to get back to work on DDG-113», said George Nungesser, Ingalls’ DDG program manager. «They know acceptance trials are a vital part of the process, but it’s not the end of the road. Our shipbuilders take pride in what they do every day because they know how important these ships are to the defense of the nation and to the safety of sailors serving aboard them».

USS John Finn DDG-113 is named in honor of the U.S. Navy’s first Medal of Honor recipient of World War II. John Finn received the honor for machine-gunning Japanese warplanes for over two hours during the December 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor, despite being shot in the foot and shoulder and suffering numerous shrapnel wounds. He retired as a lieutenant after 30 years of service and died at age 100 in 2010.

Ingalls has delivered 28 Arleigh Burke-class destroyers to the U.S. Navy. Other destroyers currently under construction at Ingalls include USS Ralph Johnson (DDG-114), USS Paul Ignatius (DDG-117), USS Delbert D. Black (DDG-119) and USS Frank E. Petersen Jr. (DDG-121). Construction of USS Lenah H. Sutcliffe Higbee (DDG-123) is scheduled to begin in the second quarter of 2017.

Arleigh Burke-class destroyers are capable, multi-mission ships and can conduct a variety of operations, from peacetime presence and crisis management to sea control and power projection, all in support of the United States’ military strategy. The guided missile destroyers are capable of simultaneously fighting air, surface and subsurface battles. The ship contains myriad offensive and defensive weapons designed to support maritime defense needs well into the 21st century.

During Bravo sea trials on the Aegis destroyer USS John Finn (DDG-113) October 24-26, Ingalls’ test and trial personnel were able to fire one SM-2 missile each from the ship’s forward and after Mk-41 Vertical Launch System (VLS)

 

Ship Characteristics

Length Overall 510 feet/156 m
Beam – Waterline 59 feet/18 m
Draft 30.5 feet/9.3 m
Displacement – Full Load 9,217 tons/9,363 metric tons
Power Plant 4 General electric LM 2500-30 gas turbines; 2 shafts; 2 CRP (Contra-Rotating) propellers; 100,000 shaft horsepower/75,000 kW
Speed in excess of 30 knots/34.5 mph/55.5 km/h
Range 4,400 NM/8,149 km at 20 knots/23 mph/37 km/h
Crew 380 total: 32 Officers, 27 CPO (Chief Petty Officer), 321 OEM
Surveillance SPY-1D Phased Array Radar and Aegis Combat System (Lockheed Martin); SPS-73(V) Navigation; SPS-67(V)3 Surface Search; 3 SPG-62 Illuminator; SQQ-89(V)6 sonar incorporating SQS-53C hull mounted and SQR-19 towed array sonars used with Mark-116 Mod 7 ASW fire control system
Electronics/Countermeasures SLQ-32(V)3; Mark-53 Mod 0 Decoy System; Mark-234 Decoy System; SLQ-25A Torpedo Decoy; SLQ-39 Surface Decoy; URN-25 TACAN; UPX-29 IFF System; Kollmorgen Mark-46 Mod 1 Electro-Optical Director
Aircraft 2 embarked SH-60 helicopters ASW operations; RAST (Recovery Assist, Secure and Traverse)
Armament 2 Mark-41 Vertical Launching System (VLS) with 90 Standard, Vertical Launch ASROC (Anti-Submarine Rocket) & Tomahawk ASM (Air-to-Surface Missile)/LAM (Loitering Attack Missile); 5-in (127-mm)/54 (62) Mark-45 gun; 2 (1) CIWS (Close-In Weapon System); 2 Mark-32 triple 324-mm torpedo tubes for Mark-46 or Mark-50 ASW torpedos
The guided missile destroyer USS John Finn (DDG-113) recently completed the last of three planned sea trials and is scheduled for delivery to the U.S. Navy in December (Photo by Andrew Young/HII)
The guided missile destroyer USS John Finn (DDG-113) recently completed the last of three planned sea trials and is scheduled for delivery to the U.S. Navy in December (Photo by Andrew Young/HII)

 

Guided Missile Destroyers Lineup

 

Flight IIA: Restart

Ship Yard Launched Commissioned Homeport
DDG-113 John Finn HIIIS 03-28-15
DDG-114 Ralph Johnson HIIIS 12-12-15
DDG-115 Rafael Peralta GDBIW 10-31-15

 

Flight IIA: Technology Insertion

Ship Yard Launched Commissioned Homeport
DDG-116 Thomas Hudner GDBIW
DDG-117 Paul Ignatius HIIIS
DDG-118 Daniel Inouye GDBIW
DDG-119 Delbert D. Black HIIIS
DDG-120 Carl M. Levin GDBIW
DDG-121 Frank E. Peterson Jr. HIIIS
DDG-122 John Basilone GDBIW
DDG-123 Lenah H. Sutcliffe Higbee HIIIS

 

Flight III

Ship Yard Launched Commissioned Homeport
DDG-124 Harvey C. Barnum, Jr. GDBIW
DDG-125 Jack H. Lucas HIIIS
DDG-126 Louis H. Wilson, Jr. GDBIW
The 510-foot/156-meter long Paul Ignatius (DDG-117) was translated across land in preparation for launch
The 510-foot/156-meter long Paul Ignatius (DDG-117) was translated across land in preparation for launch

Success at Bougainville

Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced November 9 that the name of the next America-class amphibious assault ship will be USS Bougainville (LHA-8). The naming ceremony took place at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina.

A graphic representation of the future USS Bougainville (LHA-8) (U.S. Navy photo illustration by Petty Officer 1st Class Armando Gonzales/Released)
A graphic representation of the future USS Bougainville (LHA-8) (U.S. Navy photo illustration by Petty Officer 1st Class Armando Gonzales/Released)

USS Bougainville (LHA-8) will be the second ship to be named after Bougainville, an island in the northern Solomons, which was the location of a World War II campaign in 1943-1944 during which allies secured a strategic airfield from Japan. Success at Bougainville isolated all Japanese forces left in the Solomons.

The first USS Bougainville (CVE-100) was an escort carrier that was launched in 1944, a year after the Bougainville campaign began. It was decommissioned for the first time in 1946. It was then brought back into service for five years before earning two battle stars for its service in World War II and being struck from the naval register in 1960.

Amphibious assault ships maintain presence by serving as the cornerstone of amphibious readiness groups/expeditionary strike groups.

Amphibious warships are designed to support the Marine Corps tenets of Operational Maneuver from the Sea (OMFTS) and Ship to Objective Maneuver (STOM). They must be capable of sailing into harm’s way and enable rapid combat power buildup ashore in the face of opposition. Because of their inherent capabilities, these ships have been and will continue to be called upon to also support humanitarian and other contingency missions on short notice. The United States maintains the largest and most capable amphibious force in the world.

USS Bougainville (LHA-8) is the first Flight I ship of the America class and will reincorporate a well deck to increase operational flexibility. Bougainville (LHA-8) will be built by Huntington Ingalls Industries, Inc., in Pascagoula, Mississippi.

Murtha Commissioning

The U.S. Navy commissioned the amphibious transport dock ship USS John P. Murtha (LPD-26), Saturday, October 8, during a 10 a.m. EDT ceremony at Penn’s Landing in Philadelphia.

Navy commissioned amphibious transport dock John P. Murtha
Navy commissioned amphibious transport dock John P. Murtha

The ship is named in honor of John P. Murtha, who served his country both as a Marine and in the halls of congress. Murtha served in the Marine Corps for 37 years and saw service in the Korean War and in Vietnam, a tour that earned him the Bronze Star with Valor device, two Purple Hearts and the Vietnamese Cross of Gallantry. Murtha represented Pennsylvania’s 12th Congressional District from 1974 until his death in 2010.

The Honorable Nancy Pelosi will deliver the ceremony’s principal address. Donna Murtha, daughter of the former congressman and the ship’s sponsor, gave the order to «man our ship and bring her to life!» in accordance with naval tradition.

«This ship honors a man who dedicated his entire adult life to service – service as a Marine and as a member of Congress. This dedication to service will live on in the USS John P. Murtha (LPD-26) as it serves as a symbol of all Chairman Murtha believed in», said the Honorable Ray Mabus, secretary of the U.S. Navy. «This ceremony also represents the dedication to service demonstrated by the men and women who have worked so diligently in building this ship and their efforts will help us to continue to grow the fleet to more than 300 ships by the end of this decade».

Designated LPD-26, John P. Murtha is the tenth amphibious transport dock ship in the San Antonio class. These versatile ships incorporate both a flight deck to accommodate CH-46 Sea Knight helicopters and MV-22 Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft, as well as a well deck that can launch and recover landing craft and amphibious vehicles. The San Antonio class’s increased vehicle space and substantial cargo carrying capacity make it a key element of 21st century amphibious ready groups, expeditionary strike groups, and joint task forces.

USS John P. Murtha (LPD-26) will provide improved warfighting capabilities, including an advanced command-and-control suite, increased lift capability, in vehicle and cargo carrying capacity and advanced ship survivability features. The ship is capable of embarking a landing force of up to 669 troops and a surge capacity of up to 800.

The ship will be crewed by 381 officers, enlisted personnel and Marines. The 24,900-ton USS John P. Murtha (LPD-26) was built at the Huntington Ingalls Industries shipyard in Pascagoula, Mississippi. The ship is 684 feet/208 m in length, has an overall beam of 105 feet/32 m, and a navigational draft of 23 feet/7 m. Four turbo-charged diesel engines power the ship to sustained speeds of 22 knots/24.2 mph/38.7 km/h.

The USS John P. Murtha (LPD-26) conducts builder's trials March 4, 2016 in the Gulf of Mexico (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of Huntington Ingalls/Released)
The USS John P. Murtha (LPD-26) conducts builder’s trials March 4, 2016 in the Gulf of Mexico (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of Huntington Ingalls/Released)

General Characteristics

Builder Huntington Ingalls Industries
Propulsion Four sequentially turbocharged marine Colt-Pielstick Diesels, two shafts, 41,600 shaft horsepower
Length 684 feet/208 m
Beam 105 feet/32 m
Displacement Approximately 24,900 long tons (25,300 metric tons) full load
Draft 23 feet/7 m
Speed In excess of 22 knots/24.2 mph/38.7 km/h
Crew Ship’s Company: 374 Sailors (28 officers, 346 enlisted) and 3 Marines. Embarked Landing Force: 699 (66 officers, 633 enlisted); surge capacity to 800
Armament Two Bushmaster II 30-mm Close in Guns, fore and aft; two Rolling Airframe Missile (RAM) launchers, fore and aft: ten .50 calibre/12.7-mm machine guns
Aircraft Launch or land two CH-53E Super Stallion helicopters or two MV-22 Osprey tilt rotor aircraft or up to four CH-46 Sea Knight helicopters, AH-1 or UH-1 helicopters
Landing/Attack Craft Two LCACs or one LCU; and 14 Expeditionary Fighting Vehicles/Amphibious Assault Vehicles

 

San Antonio-class

Ship Builder Launched Commissioned Homeport
USS San Antonio (LPD-17) Avondale 07-12-2003 01-14-2006 Norfolk, Virginia
USS New Orleans (LPD-18) Avondale 12-11-2004 03-10-2007 San Diego, California
USS Mesa Verde (LPD-19) Ingalls 11-19-2004 12-15-2007 Norfolk, Virginia
USS Green Bay (LPD-20) Avondale 08-11-2006 01-24-2009 San Diego, California
USS New York (LPD-21) Avondale 12-19-2007 11-07-2009 Norfolk, Virginia
USS San Diego (LPD-22) Ingalls 05-07-2010 05-19-2012 San Diego, California
USS Anchorage (LPD-23) Avondale 02-12-2011 05-04-2013 San Diego, California
USS Arlington (LPD-24) Ingalls 11-23-2010 02-08-2013 Norfolk, Virginia
USS Somerset (LPD-25) Avondale 04-14-2012 05-01-2014 San Diego, California
USS John P. Murtha (LPD-26) Ingalls 11-02-2014 10-08-2016 San Diego, California
USS Portland (LPD-27) Ingalls 02-13-2016
USS Fort Lauderdale (LPD-28) Ingalls

 

Construction of
the carrier

Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) announced on September 12 that its Newport News Shipbuilding division placed a 900-ton superlift into dry dock, continuing construction of the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS John F. Kennedy (CVN-79). As Kennedy begins to take shape in the dry dock, the ship’s cost and construction schedule continue on track with significant improvement over its predecessor, the first-of-class Gerald R. Ford (CVN-78).

Newport News Shipbuilding placed a 900-ton superlift into dry dock, continuing construction of the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier John F. Kennedy (CVN-79). Nearly 90 lifts have been placed in the dock and joined together since the ship’s keel was laid in August 2015 (Photo by John Whalen)
Newport News Shipbuilding placed a 900-ton superlift into dry dock, continuing construction of the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier John F. Kennedy (CVN-79). Nearly 90 lifts have been placed in the dock and joined together since the ship’s keel was laid in August 2015 (Photo by John Whalen)

«We continue to focus on reducing cost, and we are pleased with our progress», said Mike Shawcross, Newport News’ vice president, CVN-79 carrier construction. «The incorporation of lessons learned from CVN-78 on to CVN-79 – and major build strategy changes to construct the ship a different way – are having a significant impact on our construction efficiencies, just as we anticipated they would».

Like Ford, Kennedy is being built using modular construction, a process where smaller sections of the ship are welded together to form larger structural units (called «superlifts»). Equipment is then installed, and the large superlifts are lifted into the dry dock using the company’s 1,050-metric ton gantry crane.

Kennedy is on track to be completed with 445 lifts, which is 51 fewer than Ford and 149 less than USS George H.W. Bush (CVN-77), the last Nimitz-class carrier. «Fewer lifts to the dock means we’re building larger superlifts with more outfitting installed prior to erecting the sections in dock», said Mike Butler, Newport News’ Kennedy construction program director. «This translates to man-hour savings because the work is being accomplished off the ship in a more efficient work environment».

Close to 90 lifts have been placed in the dock and joined together since the ship’s keel was laid in August 2015. Kennedy is scheduled to be launched in 2020 and deliver to the Navy in 2022, when it will replace USS Nimitz (CVN-68).

Huntington Ingalls Industries is America’s largest military shipbuilding company and a provider of engineering, manufacturing and management services to the nuclear energy, oil and gas markets. For more than a century, HII’s Newport News and Ingalls shipbuilding divisions in Virginia and Mississippi have built more ships in more ship classes than any other U.S. naval shipbuilder. Headquartered in Newport News, Virginia, HII employs nearly 35,000 people operating both domestically and internationally.

 

General Characteristics

Builder Huntington Ingalls Industries Newport News Shipbuilding, Newport News, Virginia
Propulsion 2 A1B nuclear reactors, 4 shafts
Length 1,092 feet/333 m
Beam 134 feet/41 m
Flight Deck Width 256 feet/78 m
Flight Deck Square 217,796 feet2/20,234 m2
Displacement approximately 100,000 long tons full load
Speed 30+ knots/34.5+ mph/55.5+ km/h
Crew 4,539 (ship, air wing and staff)
Armament ESSM (Evolved Sea Sparrow Missile), RAM (Rolling Airframe Missile), Mk-15 Phalanx CIWS (Close-In Weapon System)
Aircraft 75+