Tag Archives: Hobart Class

Brisbane Joins the Fleet

HMAS Brisbane (DDG-41) is the second of three ships of the Hobart Class guided missile destroyers. Her sister ships will be HMAS Hobart (DDG-39) and HMAS Sydney (DDG-42). The keel of HMAS Brisbane (DDG-41) was laid down on 3 February 2014 and was launched by Mrs. Robyn Shackleton on 15 December 2016.

HMAS Brisbane (DDG-41) at sea during builders trials viewed from her sister ship, HMAS Hobart (DDG-39)
HMAS Brisbane (DDG-41) at sea during builders trials viewed from her sister ship, HMAS Hobart (DDG-39)

HMAS Brisbane (DDG-41) is based on the Navantia designed F100 frigate and is coupled it with the Aegis Combat System. HMAS Sydney (DDG-42) is currently under construction in Australia by the Air Warfare Destroyer Alliance.

HMAS Brisbane (DDG-41) will provide air defence for accompanying ships in addition to land forces and infrastructure in coastal areas, and for self-protection against missiles and aircraft. The Aegis Combat System incorporating the state-of-the-art phased array radar, AN/SPY 1D(V), in combination with the SM-2 missile, will provide an advanced air defence system capable of engaging enemy aircraft and missiles at ranges in excess of 150 km/93 miles.

Brisbane will carry a helicopter for surveillance and response to support key warfare areas. The surface warfare function will include long range anti-ship missiles and a naval gun capable of firing extended range munitions in support of land forces.

Brisbane will also conduct Undersea Warfare and be equipped with modern sonar systems, decoys, surface-launched torpedoes and an array of effective close-in defensive weapons.

These capabilities ensure that the Hobart Class DDGs have the layered defensive and offensive capability required to counter conventional and asymmetric threats.

 

Characteristics

Length 481.3 feet/146.7 m
Beam 61 feet/18.6 m
Draft 23.6 feet/7.2 m
Full load displacement 7,000 tonnes
Main Engine 36 MW/48,276 hp
Top speed 28+ knots/32 mph/52 km/h
Range at 18+ knots/21 mph/33 km/h 5,000+ NM/5,779 miles/9,300 km
Crew 186
Accommodation 234
Combat System Aegis Weapon System Baseline 7.1
AN/SPY-1D(V) Phased Array Radar (81 NM/93 miles/150 km)
AN/SPQ-9B Horizon Search Radar
Mk-41 Vertical Launch System (48 VLS cells: RIM-162 Evolved SeaSparrow Missile (ESSM)/Standard Missile-2 (SM-2)/SM-6)
Mk-45 Mod.4 5” (127-mm) 62 Calibre Gun (Range: 20 NM/23 miles/37 km)
Advanced Harpoon Weapon Control (2 × 4 launchers)
Electronic Warfare (EW) Suite
Very Short-Range Air and Surface Defence
Nulka Active Missile Decoy system
Integrated Sonar System incorporating a hull mounted and towed array sonar
Communications Suite
Aviation Flightdeck and hangar for one helicopter
Boats Two Rigid Hulled Inflatable Boats (RHIBs)

 

Destroyer key weapon

A key weapon system training platform for the Royal Australian Navy’s new Hobart class destroyers has reached the final stage of certification. Leading Seaman Electronics Technician Jacob Ward took to the firing panel recently during a weapons certification firing trial of the Mk-25 25-mm Typhoon at West Head Gunnery Range, Flinders Victoria.

Mk-25 Mod 2 25-mm Typhoon Certification firing at West Head Gunnery Range, Flinders, Victoria
Mk-25 Mod 2 25-mm Typhoon Certification firing at West Head Gunnery Range, Flinders, Victoria

The event marked the final stage of the acceptance of the Air Warfare Destroyer Close Range Defence System part task trainer comprising of the Mk-25 Mod 2 Typhoon, operating console and simulator. On completion of the firing certification process, the system will be available to provide initial training to weapon system operators and maintainers posted to the HOBART Class guided missile destroyer (DDG).

Leading Seaman Ward said being part of a project for the most advanced destroyer Australia has ever built was a great experience. «As an electronics technician I am much more used to maintenance and fault diagnosis than I am to testing a brand new capability», he said. «It was a pretty good experience to be part of the team certifying a key weapons system and knowing that it will be used for years to come in sailor training».

The Royal Australian Navy is planned to have three Hobart Class destroyers to provide air defence for accompanying ships in addition to land forces and infrastructure in coastal areas, and for self-protection against missiles and aircraft.

The West Head Gunnery Range occupies an area of approximately 16 hectares on the Mornington Peninsula, and is located approximately 43.5 miles/70 km south of Melbourne. The Range was originally used by the Army in the 1890s as a shore battery and was taken over by the Royal Australian Navy in 1958.

Leading Seaman Electronics Technician Jacob Ward at the firing panel of the Mk-25 Mod 2 25-mm Typhoon during the weapons certification firing with the radar and Electro Optical Tracking System (EOTS) infrared on display at West Head Gunnery Range, Flinders, Victoria
Leading Seaman Electronics Technician Jacob Ward at the firing panel of the Mk-25 Mod 2 25-mm Typhoon during the weapons certification firing with the radar and Electro Optical Tracking System (EOTS) infrared on display at West Head Gunnery Range, Flinders, Victoria

 

Hobart Class

The Hobart Class Air Warfare Destroyers (AWDs) will be capable across the full spectrum of joint maritime operations, from area air defence and escort duties, right through to peacetime national tasking and diplomatic missions. The AWD project will provide the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) with one of the world’s most capable multi-mission warships.

The AWDs, equipped with the SM-2 missile, will provide air defence for accompanying ships in addition to land forces and infrastructure in coastal areas, and for self-protection against missiles and aircraft. They will also be equipped with the SM-6 long-range anti-aircraft missile, the most advanced weapon of its type, with a range of more than 200 NM/230 miles/370 kilometers.

The missiles combined with the Aegis Weapon System, incorporating the state-of-the-art phased array radar AN/SPY 1D(V), will effectively extend the air defence protection offered by these superior ships.

The AWDs will carry a helicopter for surveillance and response to support key warfare areas. The surface warfare function will include long-range anti-ship missiles and a naval gun capable of firing extended range munitions in support of land forces.

As they enter service, the AWDs will be equipped with a sophisticated Cooperative Engagement Capability (CEC), which will enable each vessel to act as a part of a wider «grid» of sensor and weapon platforms that can share surveillance and targeting information.

The Hobart Class AWDs will also conduct undersea warfare and be equipped with modern sonar systems, decoys, surface-launched torpedoes and an array of effective close-in defensive weapons.

These capabilities will ensure the AWDs have the layered defensive and offensive capability required to counter conventional and asymmetric threats. When the Hobart Class AWDs (HMAS Hobart 39, HMAS Brisbane 41 and HMAS Sydney 42) enter service, there will be around 100 Aegis equipped ships operating across the globe.

The AWD program is the most complex surface combatant construction project ever undertaken in Australia
The AWD program is the most complex surface combatant construction project ever undertaken in Australia

 

Characteristics

Length 481.3 feet/146.7 m
Beam 61 feet/18.6 m
Draft 23.6 feet/7.2 m
Full load displacement 7,000 tonnes
Main Engine 36 MW/48,276 hp
Top speed 28+ knots/32 mph/52 km/h
Range at 18+ knots/21 mph/33 km/h 5,000+ NM/5,779 miles/9,300 km
Crew 186
Accommodation 234
Combat System Aegis Weapon System Baseline 7.1
AN/SPY-1D(V) Phased Array Radar (81 NM/93 miles/150 km)
AN/SPQ-9B Horizon Search Radar
Mk-41 Vertical Launch System (48 VLS cells: RIM-162 Evolved SeaSparrow Missile (ESSM)/Standard Missile-2 (SM-2)/SM-6)
Mk-45 Mod.4 5” (127-mm) 62 Calibre Gun (Range: 20 NM/23 miles/37 km)
Advanced Harpoon Weapon Control (2 × 4 launchers)
Electronic Warfare (EW) Suite
Very Short Range Air and Surface Defence
Nulka Active Missile Decoy system
Integrated Sonar System incorporating a hull mounted and towed array sonar
Communications Suite
Aviation Flightdeck and hangar for one helicopter
Boats Two Rigid Hulled Inflatable Boats (RHIBs)
The original contract cost was A$8 billion for the three ships
The original contract cost was A$8 billion for the three ships

Australia lays keel

Last week (November 19) marks significant progress on the Air Warfare Destroyer (AWD) program, as the keel was laid for the third destroyer, Sydney, and initial combat systems activation has commenced on the first destroyer, Hobart. Sydney is the last of three AWDs currently under construction on this program, which will deliver the most capable warships ever possessed by the Royal Australian Navy.

The keel for the third air warfare destroyer (AWD) on order for the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) was laid down on 19 November
The keel for the third air warfare destroyer (AWD) on order for the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) was laid down on 19 November

AWD Alliance CEO, Rod Equid, said that the keel-laying for the third ship is the latest in a series of important achievements across the project, with the start of the hull consolidation phase for Sydney, as well as the progression to the system activation phase for Hobart in advance of sea trials next year. Mr. Equid said the second destroyer, Brisbane, is also on track towards meeting the completion of hull consolidation next month.

«We are proud of this further progress. Production is now more than 70% complete across the project and significant productivity improvements are being realised from ship to ship. We have come a long way since our first keel-laying ceremony was held three years ago. We recognise the importance of the work being done on the third ship, as this is where we will achieve the highest levels of productivity, based on the lessons from Sydney’s sister ships», said Mr. Equid.

AWD Program Manager Peter Croser commended the work accomplished by the AWD Alliance over the course of the last year. «We have achieved a number of critical milestones this year, from launching our first ship Hobart in May, to achieving 70 per cent completion on our second ship, Brisbane, and now commencing the hull consolidation phase for our third ship, Sydney», said Mr. Croser.

The AWD Alliance is responsible for delivering three Hobart Class DDG destroyers and their support systems to the Navy. The Alliance is made up of shipbuilder ASC, mission systems integrator Raytheon Australia and the Government’s Department of Defence.

The vessel, which will be the future HMAS Sydney, is the last of three 6,350-tonne Hobart-class ADWs ordered under a contract signed in October 2007
The vessel, which will be the future HMAS Sydney, is the last of three 6,350-tonne Hobart-class ADWs ordered under a contract signed in October 2007

 

Characteristics

Length 481.3 feet/146.7 m
Beam 61 feet/18.6 m
Draft 23.6 feet/7.2 m
Full load displacement 7,000 tonnes
Main Engine 36 MW/48,276 hp
Top speed 28+ knots/32 mph/52 km/h
Range at 18+ knots/21 mph/33 km/h 5,000+ NM/5,779 miles/9,300 km
Crew 186
Accommodation 234
Combat System Aegis Weapon System Baseline 7.1
AN/SPY-1D(V) Phased Array Radar (81 NM/93 miles/150 km)
AN/SPQ-9B Horizon Search Radar
Mk-41 Vertical Launch System (48 VLS cells: RIM-162 Evolved SeaSparrow Missile (ESSM)/Standard Missile-2 (SM-2)/SM-6)
Mk-45 Mod.4 5” (127-mm) 62 Calibre Gun (Range: 20 NM/23 miles/37 km)
Advanced Harpoon Weapon Control (2 × 4 launchers)
Electronic Warfare (EW) Suite
Very Short Range Air and Surface Defence
Nulka Active Missile Decoy system
Integrated Sonar System incorporating a hull mounted and towed array sonar
Communications Suite
Aviation Flightdeck and hangar for one helicopter
Boats Two Rigid Hulled Inflatable Boats (RHIBs)

 

This computer-generated animation highlights the multi-mission capability of the three naval destroyers being built as part of the Air Warfare Destroyer Project

 

Air Warfare Destroyer

A crowd of nearly 6,000 people is gathering at Techport Australia in Adelaide on May 23 to celebrate a major milestone – the launch of the first destroyer built as part of the Air Warfare Destroyer (AWD) program. The AWD workforce and their families were joined by dignitaries and industry leaders for the launch ceremony, which saw the first destroyer Hobart, lowered into the water until it floats for the first time.

The United States Navy and Lockheed Martin have provided support through our AWD Foreign Military Sales case which has been vital to delivering this next-generation capability to the Australian Defence Force
The United States Navy and Lockheed Martin have provided support through our AWD Foreign Military Sales case which has been vital to delivering this next-generation capability to the Australian Defence Force

AWD Alliance CEO Rod Equid said today’s event is the culmination of the efforts of thousands of Australians and other members of the AWD enterprise, reaching back more than 10 years. The launch ceremony celebrated the transition of the ship from the hardstand to the water. «As shipbuilders and systems integrators, we are undertaking one of the most complex projects of its type in Australia’s history», Mr. Equid said. «Our teams take enormous pride in the work we are doing, which is why this launch is such a big day and I wouldn’t be surprised to see a tear in the eyes of many of our workers when HMAS Hobart floats for the first time. It is hard to believe that the AWD Shipyard was opened just five years ago following considerable investment by State and Federal Government and ASC. Australia now has a highly skilled and professional naval shipbuilding capability».

Hobart’s launch is a big step forward in the delivery of three next-generation warships to the Royal Australian Navy (RAN). Over the coming months, progress will be accelerated as the second destroyer, Brisbane, takes the place of Hobart on the hardstand to undergo final block consolidation, and the keel for the third destroyer, Sydney, is laid. The AWD Alliance is responsible for delivering three Hobart Class DDG destroyers and their support systems to the Navy. The Alliance is made up of shipbuilder ASC, mission systems integrator Raytheon Australia and the Government’s Defence Materiel Organisation.

Along with her sister ships, Brisbane and Sydney, Hobart will provide superior interoperability for the ADF and Coalition forces – capable of carrying out multi-mission operations ranging from high-intensity conflict to border protection
Along with her sister ships, Brisbane and Sydney, Hobart will provide superior interoperability for the ADF and Coalition forces – capable of carrying out multi-mission operations ranging from high-intensity conflict to border protection

AWD Program Manager Peter Croser said: «Hobart has a strong and important lineage with many who have served in the previous Hobart who take a keen interest in their name-sake ship which now sits in the waters south of Adelaide. They have watched the progress of this ship and some of them will be represented today at the launch. Many members of the RAN future crew are already here working at Osborne contributing expertise for the launch and the next phase of the program. We look forward to setting to work Hobart and proving her capabilities at sea in the coming two-year period, whilst maintaining a focus on the construction of the next two DDGs».

ASC Shipbuilding CEO Mark Lamarre said the launch of the first destroyer is a momentous occasion when masses of steel, pipe, wire and machinery come to life. It is an emotional and solemn moment for those who build ships and for those that take them to sea. «The highly skilled workforce at ASC have consolidated and outfitted a ship, they are learning and improving every day contributing to the nation’s shipbuilding capability», Mr. Lamarre said. «The construction of Hobart and the other ships under construction at our shipyard represent the dedication and determination of all who are involved in this important national program. It is a project of which the whole of Australia should be incredibly proud».

Raytheon Australia Managing Director Michael Ward congratulated the AWD Alliance on the launch of Hobart. «As the AWD mission systems integrator it is a source of pride for Raytheon that we have applied our unique engineering and project management skills to delivering a project that is integrated in Australia», Mr. Ward said. «The AWD’s combat system integration activities represent some of the most advanced engineering accomplishments yet undertaken in such a project in this country and will contribute to making the AWD the most sophisticated warship ever operated by the Royal Australian Navy».

The destroyers’ combination of endurance, offensive and defensive weapons, flexibility and versatility make the Hobart class one of the most capable surface combatants ever operated by the RAN
The destroyers’ combination of endurance, offensive and defensive weapons, flexibility and versatility make the Hobart class one of the most capable surface combatants ever operated by the RAN

 

Hobart Class

The Hobart Class Air Warfare Destroyers (AWDs) will be capable across the full spectrum of joint maritime operations, from area air defence and escort duties, right through to peacetime national tasking and diplomatic missions. The AWD project will provide the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) with one of the world’s most capable multi-mission warships.

The AWDs, equipped with the SM-2 missile, will provide air defence for accompanying ships in addition to land forces and infrastructure in coastal areas, and for self-protection against missiles and aircraft. They will also be equipped with the SM-6 long-range anti-aircraft missile, the most advanced weapon of its type, with a range of more than 370 kilometers/230 miles/200 NM.

The missiles combined with the Aegis Weapon System, incorporating the state-of-the-art phased array radar AN/SPY 1D(V), will effectively extend the air defence protection offered by these superior ships.

The original contract cost was A$8 billion for the three ships
The original contract cost was A$8 billion for the three ships

The AWDs will carry a helicopter for surveillance and response to support key warfare areas. The surface warfare function will include long-range anti-ship missiles and a naval gun capable of firing extended range munitions in support of land forces.

As they enter service, the AWDs will be equipped with a sophisticated Cooperative Engagement Capability (CEC), which will enable each vessel to act as a part of a wider «grid» of sensor and weapon platforms that can share surveillance and targeting information.

The Hobart Class AWDs will also conduct undersea warfare and be equipped with modern sonar systems, decoys, surface-launched torpedoes and an array of effective close-in defensive weapons.

These capabilities will ensure the AWDs have the layered defensive and offensive capability required to counter conventional and asymmetric threats. When the Hobart Class AWDs (HMAS Hobart 39, HMAS Brisbane 41 and HMAS Sydney 42) enter service, there will be around 100 Aegis equipped ships operating across the globe.

The AWD program is the most complex surface combatant construction project ever undertaken in Australia
The AWD program is the most complex surface combatant construction project ever undertaken in Australia

 

Characteristics

Length 481.3 feet/146.7 m
Beam 61 feet/18.6 m
Draft 23.6 feet/7.2 m
Full load displacement 7,000 tonnes
Main Engine 36 MW/48,276 hp
Top speed 28+ knots/32 mph/52 km/h
Range at 18+ knots/21 mph/33 km/h 5,000+ NM/5,779 miles/9,300 km
Crew 186
Accommodation 234
Combat System Aegis Weapon System Baseline 7.1
AN/SPY-1D(V) Phased Array Radar (81 NM/93 miles/150 km)
AN/SPQ-9B Horizon Search Radar
Mk-41 Vertical Launch System (48 VLS cells: RIM-162 Evolved SeaSparrow Missile (ESSM)/ Standard Missile-2 (SM-2)/SM-6)
Mk-45 Mod.4 5” (127-mm) 62 Calibre Gun
Advanced Harpoon Weapon Control (2 × 4 launchers)
Electronic Warfare (EW) Suite
Very Short Range Air and Surface Defence
Nulka Active Missile Decoy system
Integrated Sonar System incorporating a hull mounted and towed array sonar
Communications Suite
Aviation Flightdeck and hangar for one helicopter
Boats Two Rigid Hulled Inflatable Boats (RHIBs)

 

This computer-generated animation highlights the multi-mission capability of the three naval destroyers being built as part of the Air Warfare Destroyer Project