Tag Archives: HIMARS

Modular Pods

The U.S. Army awarded Lockheed Martin a $10.5 million contract to develop a new modular pod for Guided Multiple Launch Rocket System (GMLRS) rockets. The new pods will replace the depleting inventory of M26 rocket pods and support the increased production of GMLRS rounds.

Lockheed Martin to develop Modular Pods for Guided Multiple Launch Rocket System

The modular pod is designed to allow for reloading of individual rocket tubes as they are expended, whereas the original GMLRS pods are discarded after use. The pod will be able to fire the GMLRS Unitary and Alternative Warhead variants, as well as the developmental Extended-Range GMLRS rockets and future rounds.

«The new pods will be compatible with both the High Mobility Artillery Rocket System (HIMARS) and MLRS M270 family of launchers», said Gaylia Campbell, vice president of Precision Fires and Combat Maneuver Systems at Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control. «These new pods will improve reload operations and assure our warfighters have adequate rounds available to them when they are most needed».

The modular pods will be produced at Lockheed Martin’s Precision Fires Center of Excellence in Camden, Ark. Ground testing will begin this fall, with a planned flight test before the end of the calendar year. The first deliveries of the new modular pod are anticipated in the fall of 2021.

For more than 40 years, Lockheed Martin has been the leading designer and manufacturer of long-range, surface-to-surface precision strike solutions, providing highly reliable, combat-proven systems like MLRS, HIMARS, the Army Tactical Missile System (ATACMS) and GMLRS to global customers.

Dawn Blitz 2017

The High Mobility Artillery Rocket System (HIMARS) was fired from the flight deck of the San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock ship USS Anchorage (LPD-23) during Dawn Blitz 2017 October 22.

The High Mobility Artillery Rocket System (HIMARS) is fired from the flight deck of the amphibious transport dock ship USS Anchorage (LPD-23) during Dawn Blitz 2017 over the Pacific Ocean, October 22, 2017 (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Matthew Dickinson/Released)
The High Mobility Artillery Rocket System (HIMARS) is fired from the flight deck of the amphibious transport dock ship USS Anchorage (LPD-23) during Dawn Blitz 2017 over the Pacific Ocean, October 22, 2017 (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Matthew Dickinson/Released)

The HIMARS is a weapons system made up of the M142, five-ton chassis vehicle and can carry either a launcher pod of six rockets or one MGM-140 Army Tactical Missile System (ATACMS).

It enables Marines to engage targets within minutes after firing and features an advanced targeting system that strikes with an extremely high accuracy rate. The system also features a greater range than traditional artillery, allowing smaller units to cover a larger area.

The demonstration on Anchorage consisted of HIMARS engaging a land-based target with a Guided Multiple Launch Rocket System Unitary (GMLRS-U).

«We had two training objectives for today’s shoot», said Army Major Adam Ropelewski, I Marine Expeditionary Force (MEF), lead planner for sea-based expeditionary fires. «The first training objective was demonstrating this capability and, second, we wanted to have good effects on the target. We achieved both objectives. We destroyed the target at 70 kilometers/43.5 miles while at sea.

Developing sea-based fires alternatives such as the HIMARS afloat and proving them to be effective provides an opportunity for our Navy and Marine Corps team to evaluate, refine and improve processes to be ready for the future fight.

«In an environment where we are operating in contested waters, we are finding a way to be able to support the land force with deeper strike capabilities», said Captain AJ Kowaleuski, an artillery officer with I MEF.

This ability provides flexibility while the Navy and Marine Corps are supporting each other in combined operations.

This portion of Dawn Blitz validated the commander’s ability to integrate HIMARS with ships to conduct a sea-based strike.

«What we demonstrated not only was its capability, but we further demonstrated capabilities from the blue-green team and Amphibious Force 3», said Ropelewski. «They performed very well and were able to come together and work hard to make the mission successful».

The shoot was a success from the operator’s perspective as well. «We shot a rocket off Anchorage to validate that we, as HIMARS operators, can shoot off an LPD and successfully hit the target», said Lance Corporal Ryan Irving, a HIMARS operator assigned to 5th Battalion, 11th Marines.

Exercises like Dawn Blitz are another way to strengthen and continue the interdependent relationship between the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps.

Irving concluded, «It’s nice to have a force integration, where we can work with the Navy and learn from each other in these situations».

Dawn Blitz is a scenario-driven exercise designed to train and integrate U.S. Navy and Marine Corps units by providing a robust training environment where forces plan and execute an amphibious assault, engage in live-fire events and establish expeditionary advanced bases in a land and maritime threat environment to improve naval amphibious core competencies.

HIMARS is launched aboard USS Anchorage (LPD-23)

Poland Selects HIMARS

The Polish Armament Group (PGZ) has selected Lockheed Martin for exclusive further negotiations to develop the Polish Homar program on the basis of the Lockheed Martin High Mobility Artillery Rocket System (HIMARS).

Poland Selects Lockheed Martin's HIMARS Launcher for Homar Program for Exclusive Further Negotiations
Poland Selects Lockheed Martin’s HIMARS Launcher for Homar Program for Exclusive Further Negotiations

The partnership will develop in-country defense technology modernization via transfer of technology, in-country production/manufacturing and future modernization.

Lockheed Martin produces HIMARS launchers for the U.S. Army, Marine Corps and international customers. The highly mobile platform delivers accurate, lethal, quick-strike munitions ranging from 9.3 miles/15 kilometers to 186.4 miles/300 kilometers.

HIMARS carries a six-pack of Guided Multiple Launch Rocket System (GMLRS) rockets or one Tactical Missile System (TACMS) missile, and can be configured to launch other variant munitions. The system can be modified for Air Defense, and has demonstrated medium-range missile defense capability. The latest HIMARS fi re control system provides cutting-edge technology to the user for the most up-to-date fi ring solutions. The system has the capability to receive variable-form messaging of Command, Control, Communications, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (C4ISR) data in order to precisely target and eliminate threats.

The HIMARS solution is a highly reliable fielded system with a 99-percent Operational Availability for maximized combat effectiveness. HIMARS brings interoperability to allies and partners with like capabilities simplifying operations, logistics and training.

HIMARS In Action

Successful in Tests

Lockheed Martin’s modernized Tactical Missile System (TACMS) missile continued its streak of successful flight tests with two recent flights at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico. These tests represent the third and fourth consecutive successful trials of the modernized TACMS.

A TACMS long-range missile takes flight from a Lockheed Martin M270A1 launcher during a test
A TACMS long-range missile takes flight from a Lockheed Martin M270A1 launcher during a test

In December 2016, a modernized TACMS successfully engaged and destroyed a target in a 44-mile/71-kilometer test. And in early February 2017, a fourth modernized TACMS destroyed a target at White Sands at a range of more than 124 miles/200 kilometers. In both tests, the TACMS missiles were launched from a High Mobility Artillery Rocket System (HIMARS) launcher.

«With our third and fourth consecutive successful modernized TACMS flights, I believe we have demonstrated that our production quality and new technology are ready to move forward», said Scott Greene, vice president of Precision Fires & Combat Maneuver Systems at Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control. «These modernized TACMS missiles will allow our warfighters to quickly and accurately address imprecisely located targets on the battlefield».

The missiles used in these two tests were produced at Lockheed Martin’s Precision Fires Production Center of Excellence in Camden, Arkansas.

As part of the U.S. Army’s TACMS Service Life Extension Program, the modernized missile includes new state-of-the-art guidance electronics and added capability to defeat area targets without leaving behind unexploded ordnance. The TACMS modernization process disassembles and demilitarizes TACMS Block 1 and 1A submunition warheads, replacing them with new unitary warheads and bringing them into compliance with Department of Defense policy on cluster munitions and unintended harm to civilians. The modernization process also resets the missile’s 10+ year shelf life.

In December 2014, Lockheed Martin and the U.S. Army signed a $74 million contract to take existing TACMS missiles from inventory and modernize them.

The TACMS platform provides maximum flexibility to quickly integrate new payloads and capabilities to meet current and future demands.

With unsurpassed performance and an unwavering commitment to production excellence, TACMS is the only long-range tactical surface-to-surface missile ever employed by the U.S. Army in combat. TACMS missiles can be fired from the entire family of Multiple Launch Rocket System (MLRS) launchers.

Extreme Accuracy

Lockheed Martin’s first modernized Tactical Missile System (TACMS) missile completed a successful first flight test at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico.

The modernized TACMS missile includes updated guidance electronics and added capability to defeat area targets
The modernized TACMS missile includes updated guidance electronics and added capability to defeat area targets

The missile was launched from a High Mobility Artillery Rocket System (HIMARS) launcher at a target area more than 80.8 miles/130 kilometers away, precisely hitting the target with a proximity sensor-enabled detonation. All test objectives were achieved.

«This was a successful test that proves that the new Modernized TACMS retains the extreme precision this product line is known for», said Scott Greene, vice president of Precision Fires/Combat Maneuver Systems at Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control. «With Modernized TACMS, we are taking existing missiles from inventory and giving our customer an essentially new missile».

As part of the U.S. Army’s TACMS Service Life Extension Program inventory refurbishment effort, the modernized missile includes updated guidance electronics, and added capability to defeat area targets without leaving behind unexploded ordnance. The missile was produced at the Lockheed Martin Precision Fires Production Center of Excellence in Camden, Arkansas.

The TACMS (formerly ATACMS) modernization process disassembles and demilitarizes previous-generation submunition warheads that do not comply with the international Convention on Cluster Munitions, replacing them with new unitary warheads. The modernization process also resets the missile’s 10+ year shelf life.

Additionally, the TACMS platform provides flexibility to quickly integrate novel payloads and new capabilities as required by the warfighter.

With unsurpassed performance and an unwavering commitment to production excellence, TACMS is the only long-range tactical surface-to-surface missile ever employed by the U.S. Army in combat. TACMS missiles can be fired from the entire family of MLRS launchers, including the lightweight HIMARS.

12 more HIMARSs

Lockheed Martin was awarded a $142,750,920 firm-fixed-price, foreign military sales contract for 12 High Mobility Artillery Rocket Systems (HIMARS) with increased crew protection cabs incorporating sapphire transparent armor glass, associated training, spares, software, modernization updates, and planned enhancements and product improvement modifications for the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Procurement also includes synergistic spares purchase for Jordon. Work will be performed in Camden, Arkansas (63.80 percent); and Dallas, Texas (36.20 percent), with an estimated completion date of December 30, 2017.

High Mobility Artillery Rocket System (HIMARS) is the newest member of the MLRS launcher family
High Mobility Artillery Rocket System (HIMARS) is the newest member of the MLRS launcher family

According to Jeremy Binnie, Jane’s Defence Weekly correspondent in London, the U.S. Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA) announced in 2006 that the UAE had requested the sale of 20 HIMARSs with 202 ATACMS pods, 260 GMLRS pods, and 104 M26 pods. The U.S. Army confirmed in October 2013 that the HIMARS systems had been delivered when it released photographs of them being operated by the UAE’s 97th Heavy Artillery Regiment during a training exercise. The DSCA announced in September 2014 that the UAE had requested a second batch of 12 HIMARSs with 100 ATACMS pods and 65 GMLRS pods. The Department of Defense (DoD) announced in May 2015 that Lockheed Martin had been awarded a $174 million contract to produce an unspecified number of ATACMS missiles for the UAE.

 

HIMARS

The High Mobility Artillery Rocket System is a wheeled launcher that delivers a lethal mix of precision munitions on the U.S. Army’s FMTV 5-ton truck. HIMARS carries a single six-pack of MLRS rockets or one ATACMS missile. HIMARS is designed to launch the entire MLRS family of munitions, including the transformational GMLRS and all ATACMS variants. HIMARS became a joint system when the U.S. Marine Corps joined the program in 2000. Approval to enter production was received in March 2003. HIMARS is currently in full-rate production.

The combat-proven HIMARS is C-130 transportable, allowing MLRS firepower to be moved rapidly into areas previously inaccessible
The combat-proven HIMARS is C-130 transportable, allowing MLRS firepower to be moved rapidly into areas previously inaccessible

Under contract to the U.S. Army, Lockheed Martin has delivered more than 400 HIMARS launchers to the Army, Marine Corps and international customers. In May 2005, the 3rd Battalion, 27th Field Artillery Regiment, XVIII Airborne Corps Artillery became the first unit equipped with HIMARS. Since then the U.S. Army has fielded eleven additional battalions, in both active and National Guard units. The U.S. Army plans to field an additional six battalions. Additionally, the Marines have fielded more than 38 launchers. HIMARS has expanded its global presence and has begun to serve the international market, including such countries as Jordan, Singapore and the United Arab Emirates.

HIMARS rolls off a C-130 combat loaded and delivers GMLRS and ATACMS munitions with pinpoint accuracy. The combat-proven HIMARS provides increased responsiveness, increased crew protection and increased effectiveness against time-critical targets, and supports conventional and Special Forces operations around the globe.

The HIMARS launcher fires MLRS rockets and ATACMS missiles
The HIMARS launcher fires MLRS rockets and ATACMS missiles