Tag Archives: General Dynamics

Keel laying ceremony

The U.S. Navy held a keel laying ceremony for the Virginia-class submarine Pre-Commissioning Unit Hyman G. Rickover (SSN-795) at General Dynamics Electric Boat, May 11.

U.S. Navy & GDEB Laid Keel of Future USS Hyman G. Rickover (SSN-795)
U.S. Navy & GDEB Laid Keel of Future USS Hyman G. Rickover (SSN-795)

The initials of the submarine’s sponsor, Darleen Greenert, were welded onto a steel plate that will be permanently affixed to the submarine. She is the wife of former Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Jonathan Greenert (retired).

Admiral Frank Caldwell, Jr., director of the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program, stated, «Admiral Rickover’s gift to our Nation’s defense – safe, reliable, and militarily superior naval nuclear propulsion – is as vital to our warfighting edge today as it was at the beginning of the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program 70 years ago. The U.S. Navy and our nation are proud to honor his achievements and legacy with this submarine».

The submarine began construction on September 30, 2015 and is on track to continue the Virginia-class program’s trend of delivering quality submarines within budget and ready for tasking by the fleet.

This will be the second submarine to be named after Admiral Hyman G. Rickover to honor the pioneer of the nuclear navy. The first submarine named for the admiral was the Los Angeles-Class submarine USS Hyman G. Rickover (SSN-709), which served from 1984 to 2006.

Admiral Rickover served for 63 years on active duty service, making him the longest serving member of the U.S. armed forces in history. In the late 1940’s, Admiral Rickover was made director of the Naval Reactors Branch of the Bureau of Ships and he subsequently led the efforts to develop what would become the USS Nautilus, the world’s first nuclear-powered submarine. Admiral Rickover also established and enforced strict safety standards, leading to the U.S. Navy’s safety record of over 162,000,000 miles safely steamed on nuclear power.

Other Virginia-class milestones this year include the commissioning of the USS Indiana (SSN-789) and the combined keel laying and christening of USS Vermont (SSN-792), both currently projected to occur in the fall.

This next-generation attack submarine provides the U.S. Navy with the capabilities required to maintain the nation’s undersea superiority well into the 21st century.

Virginia-class submarines are built to operate in the world’s littoral and deep waters while conducting anti-submarine warfare; anti-surface ship warfare; strike warfare; special operation forces support; intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance; and mine warfare missions. Their inherent stealth, endurance, mobility and firepower directly enable them to support five of the six maritime strategy core capabilities-sea control, power projection, forward presence, maritime security, and deterrence.

Badge of the future Virginia-Class submarine USS Hyman G. Rickover (SSN-795)
Badge of the future Virginia-Class submarine USS Hyman G. Rickover (SSN-795)

 

General Characteristics

Builder General Dynamics Electric Boat Division and Huntington Ingalls Industries Inc. – Newport News Shipbuilding
Date Deployed October 3, 2004
Propulsion One GE PWR S9G* nuclear reactor, two turbines, one shaft; 40,000 hp/30 MW
Length 377 feet/114.8 m
Beam 33 feet/10.0584 m
Hull Diameter 34 feet/10.3632 m
Displacement Approximately 7,800 tons/7,925 metric tons submerged
Speed 25+ knots/28+ mph/46.3+ km/h
Diving Depth 800+ feet/244+ m
Crew 132: 15 officers; 117 enlisted
Armament: Tomahawk missiles Two 87-in/2.2 m Virginia Payload Tubes (VPTs), each capable of launching 6 Tomahawk cruise missiles
Armament: MK-48 ADCAP (Advanced Capability) Mod 7 heavyweight torpedoes 4 torpedo tubes
Weapons MK-60 CAPTOR (Encapsulated Torpedo) mines, advanced mobile mines and UUVs (Unmanned Underwater Vehicles)

* – Knolls Atomic Power Laboratories

 

Nuclear Submarine Lineup

 

Block IV

Ship Yard Christening Commissioned Homeport
SSN-792 Vermont EB Under Construction
SSN-793 Oregon EB Under Construction
SSN-794 Montana NNS Under Construction
SSN-795 Hyman G. Rickover EB On Order
SSN-796 New Jersey NNS On Order
SSN-797 Iowa EB On Order
SSN-798 Massachusetts NNS On Order
SSN-799 Idaho EB On Order
SSN-800 Arkansas NNS On Order
SSN-801 Utah EB On Order

 

Delivery of Monsoor

On April 24, 2018, the U.S. Navy accepted Hull, Mechanical and Electrical (HM&E) delivery of the future USS Michael Monsoor (DDG-1001) from shipbuilder General Dynamics Bath Iron Works (BIW).

Navy Accepts Delivery of Future USS Michael Monsoor (DDG-1001)
Navy Accepts Delivery of Future USS Michael Monsoor (DDG-1001)

Delivery of USS Michael Monsoor (DDG-1001) follows extensive tests, trials and demonstrations of the ship’s HM&E systems including the boat handling, anchor and mooring systems as well as major demonstrations of the damage control, ballasting, navigation and communications systems.

«Delivery of DDG-1001 marks the culmination of years of dedication and hard work from our Navy and industry team», said Captain Kevin Smith, DDG-1000 program manager, Program Executive Office, Ships. «We have incorporated many lessons learned from DDG 1000 and are proud of the end result. DDG-1001 will be a tremendous asset to the Navy».

The 610-foot, wave-piercing tumblehome ship design provides a wide array of advancements. The shape of the superstructure and the arrangement of its antennas significantly reduce radar cross section, making the ship less visible to enemy radars.

Like the first ship of the class, USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000), DDG-1001 employs an innovative and highly survivable Integrated Power System (IPS), distributing 1000 volts of direct current across the ship. The IPS’ unique architectural capabilities include the ability to allocate all 78 megawatts of installed power to propulsion, ship’s service, and combat system loads from the same gas turbine prime movers based on operational requirements.

DDG-1000 class ships are delivered through a two-phase approach in which combat systems are installed and activated subsequent to HM&E delivery. Following HM&E delivery, Michael Monsoor will transit to its homeport in San Diego, California for commissioning in January 2019 and to begin Combat Systems Activation, testing and trials.

USS Michael Monsoor (DDG-1001) is the second ship of the Zumwalt class. The third and final ship of the class, the future USS Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG-1002), is currently in construction at BIW’s shipyard along with Arleigh Burke class destroyers USS Daniel Inouye (DDG-118), USS Carl M. Levin (DDG-120) and USS John Basilone (DDG-122).

As one of the Defense Department’s largest acquisition organizations, Program Executive Office (PEO) Ships is responsible for executing the development and procurement of all destroyers, amphibious ships, special mission and support ships, and special warfare craft.

Commander John Bauer, DDG-1000 program manager's representative, signs paperwork accepting delivery of the future USS Michael Monsoor (DDG-1001). Following a crew certification period, Michael Monsoor will transit to its homeport in San Diego, California, for commissioning in January 2019 (Photo by U.S. Navy photo courtesy of Bath Iron Works/Released)
Commander John Bauer, DDG-1000 program manager’s representative, signs paperwork accepting delivery of the future USS Michael Monsoor (DDG-1001). Following a crew certification period, Michael Monsoor will transit to its homeport in San Diego, California, for commissioning in January 2019 (Photo by U.S. Navy photo courtesy of Bath Iron Works/Released)

 

Features unique to DDG 1000:

  • Eighty peripheral Vertical Launch System (VLS) cells, two Advanced Gun System (AGS) 155-mm guns, and two 30-mm Close In Guns (CIGs);
  • A stern boat ramp for two 7-meter Rigid Hull Inflatable Boats (RHIBs), designed with room for two 11-meter RHIBs;
  • Aviation capacity for two MH-60R or one MH-60R and 3 VT Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs);
  • It will be powered by an Integrated Power System (IPS) with an Integrated Fight Through Power (IFTP). This is created by an Advanced Induction Motor (AIM);
  • A superstructure with integrated apertures and low signature profile;
  • Advanced sensors including a SPY-3 Multi-Function Radar;
  • A wave-piercing «Tumblehome» hull form.

 

Ship Characteristics

Length 610 feet/186 m
Beam 80.7 feet/24.6 m
Draft 27.6 feet/8.4 m
Displacement 15,761 long tonnes/16,014 metric tonnes
Speed 30 knots/34.5 mph/55.5 km/h
Installed Power 104,600 hp/78 MW
Crew Size 158 – Includes Aviation Detachment

 

Ships

Ship Laid down Launched Commissioned Homeport
USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000) 11-17-2011 10-28-2013 10-15-2016 San Diego, California
USS Michael Monsoor (DDG-1001) 05-23-2013 06-21-2016 San Diego, California
USS Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG-1002) 01-30-2017

 

Naval Guns

The fully automatic Mk110 gun system, known internationally as the Bofors 57Mk3, is the deck gun of choice for the LCS.

Additional Mk110 Naval Guns set to board U.S. Navy Littoral Combat Ships
Additional Mk110 Naval Guns set to board U.S. Navy Littoral Combat Ships

BAE Systems has been awarded a contract by General Dynamics to provide two additional Mk110 Naval Gun Systems for the Independence variant of the U.S. Navy’s Littoral Combat Ship (LCS). The additional guns are part of a follow-on to a current contract, bringing the total number of Mk110 systems to 15 for the Independence variant.

The fully automatic Mk110 gun system, known internationally as the Bofors 57Mk3, is the deck gun of choice for the LCS. It is a multi-mission, medium-caliber shipboard weapon, effective against air, surface, or ground threats without requiring multiple round types. The system is capable of firing up to 220 rounds per minute at a range of more than 9 nautical miles/10.4 miles/16.7 km using BAE Systems’ six-mode programmable, pre-fragmented, and proximity-fused (3P) ammunition.

«BAE Systems’ Mk110 Naval Gun, together with our advanced 3P programmable multi-purpose ammunition, provides a unique capability to address multiple air, sea, and land threats», said Lena Gillström, general manager of Weapon Systems Sweden at BAE Systems. «This additional Mk 110 order for the LCS is evidence that this system is among the best medium-caliber naval guns in the world. Sailors benefit from its adaptability, robust endurance, and pointing accuracy, even in high wind waves and swells».

Deliveries are expected to take place during 2019 and 2020. The 57-millimeter Mk110 is currently in service with the U.S. Navy’s LCS and the U.S. Coast Guard’s National Security Cutter. Also selected for the Coast Guard’s new Offshore Patrol Cutter, the Mk 110 has been proposed for the Navy’s future frigate FFG(X) program. To date, BAE Systems has 28 Mk110 guns contracted to the U.S. Navy and 11 to the Coast Guard. Worldwide, there are 86 Mk110/57Mk3 naval gun systems under contract with eight nations.

Terra Marique Indomita

The U.S. Navy commissioned its newest fast attack submarine, the future USS Colorado (SSN-788), during an 11 a.m. EDT ceremony Saturday, March 17, at Naval Submarine Base New London in Groton, Connecticut.

Navy commissioned submarine Colorado
Navy commissioned submarine Colorado

The principal speaker was U.S. Senator Cory Gardner of Colorado. Annie Mabus, daughter of 75th Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus, served as the ship’s sponsor. In a time-honored Navy tradition, she gave the order to «man our ship and bring her to life»!

«USS Colorado is a true marvel of technology and innovation, and it shows the capability that our industrial partners bring to the fight», said Secretary of the U.S. Navy Richard V. Spencer. «Today’s world requires undersea platforms designed for dominance across a broad spectrum of regional and littoral missions, and I am confident Colorado will proudly serve in defense of our nation’s interests for decades to come».

The future Colorado, which began construction in 2012, is the 15th Virginia-class fast attack submarine and the fifth Virginia-class Block III submarine. Colorado will be the fourth U.S. Navy ship to be commissioned with a name honoring the state of Colorado. The first Colorado was a three-masted steam screw frigate that participated in the Union Navy’s Gulf Blockading Squadron and fought in the Second Battle of Fort Fisher with then-Lt. George Dewey serving as her executive officer. In the early years of the 20th century, the second Colorado (ACR-7) was a Pennsylvania-class armored cruiser that escorted convoys of men and supplies to England during World War I. The third ship of her name, the lead ship of the Colorado class of battleships (BB-45), supported operations in the Pacific theater throughout World War II, surviving two kamikaze attacks and earning seven battle stars.

This next-generation attack submarine provides the U.S. Navy with the capabilities required to maintain the nation’s undersea superiority well into the 21st century. Block III Virginia-class submarines feature a redesigned bow, which replaces 12 individual launch tubes with two large-diameter Virginia Payload Tubes, each capable of launching six Tomahawk cruise missiles.

Virginia-class submarines are built to operate in the world’s littoral and deep waters while conducting anti-submarine warfare; anti-surface ship warfare; strike warfare; special operation forces support; intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance; irregular warfare; and mine warfare missions. Their inherent stealth, endurance, mobility and firepower directly enable them to support five of the six maritime strategy core capabilities-sea control, power projection, forward presence, maritime security, and deterrence.

Nuclear attack boat USS Colorado (SSN-788) sits pierside on March 17, 2018 (U.S. Navy Photo)
Nuclear attack boat USS Colorado (SSN-788) sits pierside on March 17, 2018 (U.S. Navy Photo)

 

General Characteristics

Builder General Dynamics Electric Boat Division and Huntington Ingalls Industries Inc. – Newport News Shipbuilding
Date Deployed October 3, 2004
Propulsion One GE PWR S9G nuclear reactor, two turbines, one shaft; 40,000 hp/30 MW
Length 377 feet/114.8 m
Beam 33 feet/10.06 m
Hull Diameter 34 feet/10.36 m
Displacement Approximately 7,800 tons/7,925 metric tons submerged
Speed 25+ knots/28+ mph/46.3+ km/h
Diving Depth 800+ feet/244+ m
Crew 132: 15 officers; 117 enlisted
Armament: Tomahawk missiles 2 × 87-in/2.2 m Virginia Payload Tubes (VPTs), each capable of launching 6 Tomahawk cruise missiles
Armament: MK-48 ADCAP (Advanced Capability) Mod 7 heavyweight torpedoes 4 torpedo tubes
Weapons MK-60 CAPTOR (Encapsulated Torpedo) mines, advanced mobile mines and UUVs (Unmanned Underwater Vehicles)
USS Colorado (SSN-788) Commanding Officer, Commander Reed Koepp (left) and Executive Officer, Lieutenant Commander Stephen Col stand in the boat’s sail on January 12, 2018 (U.S. Navy Photo)
USS Colorado (SSN-788) Commanding Officer, Commander Reed Koepp (left) and Executive Officer, Lieutenant Commander Stephen Col stand in the boat’s sail on January 12, 2018 (U.S. Navy Photo)

 

Block III

Ship Yard Christening Commissioned Homeport
SSN-784 North Dakota EB 11-2-13 10-25-14 Groton, Connecticut
SSN-785 John Warner NNS 09-06-14 08-01-15 Norfolk, Virginia
SSN-786 Illinois EB 10-10-15 10-29-16 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
SSN-787 Washington NNS 03-05-16 10-07-17 Norfolk, Virginia
SSN-788 Colorado EB 12-03-16 03-17-18
SSN-789 Indiana NNS 04-29-17
SSN-790 South Dakota EB Under Construction
SSN-791 Delaware NNS Under Construction

 

Contract Announcement

General Dynamics Electric Boat, Groton, Connecticut, is being awarded a $696,246,000 cost-plus-fixed-fee modification to previously awarded contract N00024-17-C-2100 for additional long lead time material associated with the fiscal 2019 Virginia-class submarines (SSNs 802 and 803); and the fiscal 2020 Virginia-class submarines (SSNs 804 and 805).

GD Wins $696M for Virginia-class SSNs
GD Wins $696M for Virginia-class SSNs

This contract provides long lead time material for steam and electric plant components; the main propulsion unit efforts and ship service turbine generator efforts; and miscellaneous hull, mechanical and electrical system components to support SSNs 802, 803, 804 and 805 ship construction commencing in fiscal 2019.

Work will be performed in:

  • Sunnyvale, California (35 percent);
  • Newport News, Virginia (5 percent);
  • Quonset Point, Rhode Island (5 percent);
  • Depew, New York (3 percent);
  • Stoughton, Massachusetts (3 percent);
  • Bethlehem, Pennsylvania (3 percent);
  • Florence, New Jersey (3 percent);
  • Windsor Locks, Connecticut (3 percent);
  • Mount Vernon, Indiana (2 percent);
  • Cajon, California (2 percent);
  • Cheswick, Pennsylvania (2 percent);
  • Arvada, Colorado (2 percent);
  • Coatesville, Pennsylvania (2 percent);
  • York, Pennsylvania (1 percent);
  • Mossville, Illinois (1 percent);
  • Spring Grove, Illinois (1 percent);
  • Linden, New Jersey (1 percent);
  • Jacksonville, Florida (1 percent);
  • Tucson, Arizona (1 percent);
  • Tacoma, Washington (1 percent);
  • Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (1 percent);
  • Charleston, South Carolina (1 percent);
  • Orrville, Ohio (1 percent);
  • Louisville, Kentucky (1 percent);
  • Tempe, Arizona (1 percent);
  • Westfield, Massachusetts (1 percent);
  • Manassas, Virginia (1 percent);
  • South El Monte, California (1 percent);
  • Pewaukee, Wisconsin (1 percent);
  • Loanhead, United Kingdom (1 percent);

and other efforts performed at various sites throughout the U.S. (13 percent), and is expected to be completed by January 2019.

Fiscal 2018 shipbuilding and conversion (Navy) funding in the amount of $696,246,000 will be obligated at time of award and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year.

The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, District of Columbia, is the contracting activity.

Navy Accepts Woody

The Navy accepted delivery of its second Expeditionary Sea Base (ESB) ship, USNS Hershel «Woody» Williams (T-ESB 4), February 22.

An undated artist rendering of the future expeditionary sea base USNS Hershel «Woody» Williams (T-ESB-4) (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of General Dynamics/Released)
An undated artist rendering of the future expeditionary sea base USNS Hershel «Woody» Williams (T-ESB-4) (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of General Dynamics/Released)

The delivery marks the official transfer of the ship from the shipbuilder to the Navy. USNS Hershel «Woody» Williams (T-ESB 4) will be owned and operated by Military Sealift Command.

«The delivery of this ship marks an enhancement in the Navy’s forward presence and ability to execute a variety of expeditionary warfare missions», said Captain Scot Searles, Strategic and Theater Sealift program manager, Program Executive Office (PEO) Ships. «Like the ship’s namesake, USNS Hershel ‘Woody’ Williams will exemplify the Navy’s commitment to service».

USNS Hershel «Woody» Williams (T-ESB 4) is named for Medal of Honor recipient, Hershel Williams. During the battle of Iwo Jima, then-Corporal Williams bravely went forward alone against enemy machine gun fire to open a lane for the infantry. Williams continues to serve his fellow men and women in uniform through his foundation, the Hershel Woody Williams Medal of Honor Foundation, established to honor families who have lost a loved one in service to their country.

ESBs are highly flexible, modular platforms that are optimized to support a variety of maritime based missions including Special Operations Force, Airborne Mine Counter Measures operations, humanitarian support and command and control of traditional military missions. The ESBs include a four-spot flight deck, hangar, and a versatile mission deck; and are designed around four core capabilities: aviation facilities, berthing, equipment staging support, and command and control assets. The ESBs will operate as the component commanders require, providing the fleet with a critical access infrastructure that supports the flexible deployment of forces and supplies.

USNS Hershel «Woody» Williams (T-ESB 4) was constructed by General Dynamics NASSCO shipyard in San Diego. NASSCO is also constructing the future USNS Miguel Keith (T-ESB-5).

As one of the Defense Department’s largest acquisition organizations, PEO Ships is responsible for executing the development and procurement of all destroyers, amphibious ships, special mission and support ships, and boats and craft.

Acceptance Trials

The Navy’s next generation destroyer, the future USS Michael Monsoor (DDG-1001), successfully completed acceptance trials on February 1.

Future USS Michael Monsoor Successfully Completes Acceptance Trials
Future USS Michael Monsoor Successfully Completes Acceptance Trials

The U.S. Navy’s Board of Inspection and Survey reviewed the ship and its crew during a series of demonstrations both pier side and underway, evaluating the ship’s construction and compliance with Navy specifications.

Many of the ship’s onboard systems including navigation, damage control, mechanical, electrical, combat, communications, and propulsion systems were tested to validate performance met or exceeded Navy specifications.

«DDG-1001 performed exceedingly well during acceptance trials», said Captain Kevin Smith, DDG-1000 class program manager, Program Executive Office (PEO) Ships. «The industry and Navy team worked together to incorporate lessons learned from DDG-1000. The trials once again demonstrated how truly powerful and exceptional these ships are».

Zumwalt class destroyers feature a state-of-the-art electric propulsion system, wave-piercing tumblehome hull, stealth design and are equipped with some of the most advanced warfighting technology. These ships will be capable of performing a range of deterrence, power projection, sea control, and command and control missions while allowing the Navy to evolve with new systems and missions.

USS Michael Monsoor (DDG-1001) was christened in June 2016, and is scheduled to deliver in the coming months. General Dynamics Bath Iron Works (BIW) is currently in production on the future USS Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG-1002), as well as future Arleigh Burke class destroyers USS Thomas Hudner (DDG-116), USS Daniel Inouye (DDG-118), USS Carl M. Levin (DDG-120) and USS John Basilone (DDG-122).

As one of the Defense Department’s largest acquisition organizations, PEO Ships is responsible for executing the development and procurement of all destroyers, amphibious ships, special mission and support ships, and special warfare craft.

The Navy's next generation destroyer, the future USS Michael Monsoor (DDG-1001), successfully completed acceptance. The U.S. Navy's Board of Inspection and Survey reviewed the ship and its crew during a series of demonstrations both pier side and underway, evaluating the ship's construction and compliance with Navy specifications (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of Bath Iron Works/Released)
The Navy’s next generation destroyer, the future USS Michael Monsoor (DDG-1001), successfully completed acceptance. The U.S. Navy’s Board of Inspection and Survey reviewed the ship and its crew during a series of demonstrations both pier side and underway, evaluating the ship’s construction and compliance with Navy specifications (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of Bath Iron Works/Released)

Keel Laid

The future USNS Miguel Keith (T-ESB-5) held a keel laying ceremony January 30, at the General Dynamics NASSCO shipyard, San Diego.

An artist rendering of the future Expeditionary Sea Base (ESB) ship, T-ESB-5 named in honor of Marine Corps Vietnam veteran and Medal of Honor recipient Miguel Keith (U.S. Navy photo illustration/Released)
An artist rendering of the future Expeditionary Sea Base (ESB) ship, T-ESB-5 named in honor of Marine Corps Vietnam veteran and Medal of Honor recipient Miguel Keith (U.S. Navy photo illustration/Released)

A keel laying is the formal recognition of the start of a ship’s construction. It is the joining together of a ship’s modular components and the authentication or etching of the ship sponsors initials into a ceremonial plate.

«A keel laying is the first major milestone in the construction of a new ship», said Captain Scot Searles, Strategic Sealift and Theater Sealift program manager, Program Executive Office (PEO) Ships. «The keel is the symbolic backbone of the ship. Over the next several months ESB-5 will begin to take shape and I look forward to seeing its progress as we continue constructing this versatile ship».

ESBs are highly flexible, modular platforms that are optimized to support a variety of maritime based missions including Special Operations Force and Airborne Mine Counter Measures support operations in addition to humanitarian support and sustainment of traditional military missions. The ESBs include a four-spot flight deck and hangar and a versatile mission deck and are designed around four core capabilities: aviation facilities, berthing, equipment staging support, and command and control assets. The ESBs will operate as the component commander requires providing the U.S. Navy fleet with a critical access infrastructure that supports the flexible deployment of forces and supplies.

The Montford Point class is comprised of five ships across two variants in support of the Maritime Prepositioning Force. USNS Montford Point (T-ESD-1) and USNS John Glenn (T-ESD-2) have been delivered and are currently in service. The first of the ESB variant, USS Lewis B. Puller (ESB-3), was delivered to the fleet in 2015 as a USNS ship. In August 2017, the ship was commissioned as an USS ship on station in Bahrain. The USNS Hershel «Woody» Williams (ESB-4) was christened in October and is expected to deliver to Military Sealift Command at the end of February.

As one of the Defense Department’s largest acquisition organizations, PEO Ships is responsible for executing the development and procurement of all destroyers, amphibious ships, special mission and support ships and boats and craft.

Integrated Trials

USNS Hershel ‘Woody’ Williams (T-ESB-4), successfully completed the first Integrated Trials for an Expeditionary Sea Base (ESB) ship January 19, sailing from and returning to General Dynamics National Steel and Shipbuilding Co. (NASSCO) shipyard in San Diego.

USNS Hershel Williams Completes Integrated Trials
USNS Hershel Williams Completes Integrated Trials

Integrated Trials combine Builder’s and Acceptance Trials, allowing for the shipyard to demonstrate to the U.S. Navy’s Board of Inspection and Survey the operational capability and mission readiness of all the ship’s systems during a single underway period. During trials, the shipbuilder conducted comprehensive tests to demonstrate the performance of all of the ship’s major systems.

«During the trials we were able to conduct a number of tests including full power propulsion, steering and anchoring», said Captain Scot Searles, strategic and theater sealift program manager, Program Executive Office (PEO), Ships. «ESBs are versatile platforms, and the ship handled extremely well demonstrating its readiness for delivery».

USNS Hershel ‘Woody’ Williams (T-ESB-4) is the second platform of the ESB variant. ESBs have a maximum speed of 15 knots/17 mph/28 km/h and range of 9,500 nautical miles/10,932 miles/17,594 km. The ship can hold 100,000 gallons/378,541 liters of potable water and 350,000 gallons/1,324,894 liters of JP-5 jet fuel. Acting as an expeditionary sea base, ESB-4 is optimized to support a variety of maritime based missions including special operations force and airborne mine counter measures. The ESBs include a four-spot flight deck and hangar and are designed around four core capabilities: aviation facilities, berthing, equipment staging support, and command and control assets.

The ship USNS Miguel Keith (T-ESB-5) is also under construction at NASSCO and plans to hold its ceremonial keel laying ceremony with a representative of the namesake’s family January 30.

As one of the Defense Department’s largest acquisition organizations, Program Executive Office Ships (PEO Ships) is responsible for executing the development and procurement of all destroyers, amphibious ships, special mission and support ships, and boats and craft.

Romanian Piranha

On January 12, 2018, General Dynamics European Land Systems signed a contract to deliver up to 227 PIRANHA 5 wheeled armored vehicles in six different configurations to the Romanian Armed Forces. The contract has a total value exceeding $1 billion. It is part of the Romanian Army’s plan to modernize its legacy wheeled armored vehicle fleet.

General Dynamics European Land Systems Awarded $1 Billion Contract to Deliver PIRANHA 5 Wheeled Armored Vehicles to Romanian Army
General Dynamics European Land Systems Awarded $1 Billion Contract to Deliver PIRANHA 5 Wheeled Armored Vehicles to Romanian Army

Prime Minister Mihai Tudose and Deputy Prime Minister Marcel Ciolacu attended the signing ceremony held at the National Defense Ministry headquarters.

The modern PIRANHA 5 vehicles will be produced in Romania under a strategic cooperation and transfer of technology project between General Dynamics European Land Systems – Mowag and the Romanian company Uzina Mecanică București (UMB).

Since 2006, the Romanian Armored Forces has fielded variants of PIRANHA vehicles which have been deployed in various missions in-country and abroad, demonstrating its reliability and performance.

«The Romanian Army is one of the most important PIRANHA users in Europe. We are very honored by this contract award as it reflects the high confidence and satisfaction the Romanian Army has in our vehicles», said Oliver Dürr, Vice President Wheeled Vehicles and Managing Director of General Dynamics European Land Systems – Mowag.

«With this step, we have established a sustainable collaboration with a trusted partner which has a significant industrial footprint in Romania», said Thomas Kauffmann, General Dynamics European Land Systems Vice President International Business & Services. «The transfer of technology and the local production of these vehicles present an enormous opportunity to the Romanian industry».

With more than 11,000 systems fielded, the PIRANHA is one of the most successful 8×8 wheeled armored vehicles in the world.