Tag Archives: General Dynamics Land Systems

Protection and Mobility

General Dynamics Land Systems – Canada has been awarded a CA$404 million contract amendment by the Government of Canada to upgrade 141 Light Armoured Vehicle (LAV) III vehicles.

General Dynamics Land Systems – Canada to Increase Protection and Mobility for Canadian Army’s LAV Fleet
General Dynamics Land Systems – Canada to Increase Protection and Mobility for Canadian Army’s LAV Fleet

The upgrades will enhance the performance and survivability of these Canadian designed and manufactured vehicles. It also ensures the consistency and availability of equipment for training and deployments. In addition, having a fleet of LAVs of largely the same configuration reduces long-term maintenance costs.

The LAV III Upgrade program delivers vehicles in the new LAV 6.0 configuration. It is the direct result of lessons learned by the Canadian Army in Afghanistan, and was developed with substantial inputs from the Government of Canada. The upgrades include the life-saving double-V hull, protection and mobility enhancements, onboard vetronics and capacity for future growth and modularity.

«We are committed to delivering highly protected, flexible and capable vehicles to our soldiers and the LAV 6.0 provides the Canadian Army with best-in-class protection and mobility», said Danny Deep, vice president of General Dynamics Land Systems – Canada. «This announcement is welcome news to the London area and to our suppliers across Canada whose jobs will be sustained with this additional work».

In October 2011, the Government of Canada awarded General Dynamics Land Systems – Canada a CA$1.064 billion contract to incorporate a comprehensive upgrade package into 550 of the Canadian Army’s fleet of LAV III combat vehicles and extends their life to 2035.

This contract sustains approximately 250 highly skilled jobs in advanced manufacturing in the London, Ontario, region. In addition, it will be of direct economic benefit to General Dynamics’ extensive supplier network located across Canada.

General Dynamics Land Systems – Canada is a defence industry leader in land and amphibious systems development and integration. Based in London, Ontario, the Canadian operations employs more than 2,000 people in the design, manufacture and support of light- and medium-armoured vehicles, and are specialists in machining, materials, electronics, software development, prototyping, logistics support and systems integration.

Nation at war

The first prototype Stryker Infantry Carrier Vehicle, outfitted with a MCT-30-mm cannon, was delivered to the Army Thursday, October 27, 2016. The upgraded Stryker vehicle will be known as the Dragoon, the name of the 2nd Cavalry Regiment, and the Army recently assigned the nomenclature XM1296 Infantry Carrier Vehicle – Dragoon.

The first prototype Stryker Infantry Carrier Vehicle outfitted with a 30-mm cannon was delivered Thursday to the Army (Photo Credit: courtesy of Program Executive Office Ground Combat Systems)
The first prototype Stryker Infantry Carrier Vehicle outfitted with a 30-mm cannon was delivered Thursday to the Army (Photo Credit: courtesy of Program Executive Office Ground Combat Systems)

The upgrade includes the integration of a Kongsberg MCT-30-mm Weapon System with a remotely-operated, unmanned turret; a new fully-integrated commander’s station, upgraded driveline componentry and hull modifications, according to a Program Executive Office Ground Combat Systems (PEO-GCS) press release.

«It’s important to realize the genesis of this event», said Army Vice Chief of Staff General Daniel B. Allyn, speaking at the General Dynamics Land Systems Maneuver Collaboration Center in Sterling Heights, Michigan.

Following the 2015 Russian invasion of Ukraine, Army leaders in Europe «identified a capability gap that threatened our forces in theater», Allyn explained. «The Russians, it turns out, had upgraded and fielded significant capabilities while we were engaged in Iraq and Afghanistan». Army leaders recognized that existing Stryker weaponry placed U.S. forces at «unacceptable risk», he said.

«The Urgent Operational Needs statement submitted in March 2015 resulted in a directed Stryker lethality requirement, one that included an accelerated acquisition effort to integrate the 30-mm canon on the vehicles», he said.

Fielding to the 2nd Cavalry Regiment in Europe will begin in May 2018, which represents «a near-record time from concept to delivery», according to Allyn. «This is an example of what is possible when government, military and industry leaders unite as one team», he continued, describing the collaboration between General Dynamics Land Systems and the Program Executive Office-Ground Combat Systems.

The goal, he noted, is to offer forces on the ground the best equipment and protection possible. «It’s all about the people on the ground, serving and sacrificing on our behalf, each and every day, around the globe», he said.

According to PEO GCS, the Army has provided programmatic direction to initiate the first two elements of the Stryker Fleet Lethality strategy – providing an under-armor Javelin capability for the Stryker and improving the capabilities of the Stryker Anti-Tank Guided Missile vehicle to better locate and engage targets via networked fires.

«It’s important to know we are a nation at war right now, and our Army remains globally engaged», Allyn said. «Today, over 8,000 Soldiers are in Afghanistan, providing enabling support to an emerging force, fighting a persistent insurgent threat». Nearly 5,000 more are in the Middle East, supporting the fight against the Islamic State, «a ruthless force, intent on destabilizing the region and the globe».

More than 33,000 Soldiers are assigned or allocated to Europe «to assure our allies and to deter a potentially grave threat to freedom», he continued.

Nearly 80,000 are assigned to U.S. Pacific Command, including 20,000 in South Korea, prepared «to respond tonight with our (Republic of Korea) allies», he added.

Supporting the fight around the globe means having the best technologies for Soldiers to ensure overmatch against future adversaries in an increasingly complex and dangerous world where the threat is often «elusive and ambiguous», he said.

This environment will place a premium on unmanned systems, lethal technologies and rapid maneuver capabilities that the new Stryker system exemplifies, Allyn concluded.

The first prototype Stryker Infantry Carrier Vehicle outfitted with a 30-mm cannon was delivered October 27, 2016 to the Army. Video courtesy of PEO Ground Combat Vehicles

Field-proven vehicle

General Dynamics Land Systems-UK is demonstrating EAGLE, the internationally field-proven military vehicle, at DVD2016. In partnership with General Dynamics European Land Systems, General Dynamics Land Systems-UK has submitted EAGLE for the UK’s Multi Role Vehicle – Protected (MRV-P) programme.

General Dynamics Land Systems-UK Demonstrates EAGLE at DVD2016
General Dynamics Land Systems-UK Demonstrates EAGLE at DVD2016

EAGLE provides high protection and mobility on- or off-road. It is available in a range of 4×4 and 6×6 configurations and can fulfill roles such as Armoured Personnel Carrier, Ambulance, Recovery, Command, Reconnaissance and Logistics. EAGLE provides logistics commonality across its range of variants, offering lower maintenance and lifecycle costs.

EAGLE is an established product with more than 1,200 in-service with the German, Swiss and Danish Armies. In service with the British Army, there are more than 200 highly mobile and robust DURO vehicles, which, like EAGLE, are part of General Dynamics´ Light Tactical Vehicle Family. Due to recent contract awards, EAGLE platforms are currently in-production and available now for customer trial programmes.

Kevin Connell, vice president of General Dynamics Land Systems-UK, said: «EAGLE is an established and trusted vehicle that is used widely by European armies. Its range of configurations, alongside its high all-terrain mobility and protection levels, makes it the ideal vehicle to meet the British Army’s MRV-P requirement. General Dynamics’ extensive expertise in the delivery and integration of wheeled military vehicle fleets means that the British Army can receive these vehicles within their desired timescales. In addition, we are committed to maximising the manufacture of these vehicles in the UK and supporting further highly-skilled jobs here in the UK».

General Dynamics Land Systems-UK is currently developing AJAX, the British Army’s first fully-digitised platform. The first AJAX platform will be delivered in 2017 from General Dynamics Land Systems-UK’s Assembly, Integration and Test (AIT) facility in Merthyr Tydfil, South Wales.

Worldwide, General Dynamics Land Systems has a long pedigree and experience in delivering tracked and wheeled military vehicles, alongside specialist knowledge in complex, scalable Electronic Architectures. It delivers, amongst others, the Abrams main battle tank, Stryker and the Cougar Mine Resistant Ambush – Protected (MRAP) family of vehicles.

Built for extremes

When Soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan were imperiled by the destructive power of Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs), a variant of the armored Stryker combat vehicle sporting a specially-designed blast-diffusing hull saved countless lives.

Boasting an upgraded chassis and drivetrain along with a variety of mechanical, electrical and digital improvements to enhance its performance, a new variant of the Stryker Combat Vehicle underwent a winter of extreme use at U.S. Army Cold Regions Test Center earlier this year (Photo Credit: Mark Schauer, Army Test and Evaluation Command)
Boasting an upgraded chassis and drivetrain along with a variety of mechanical, electrical and digital improvements to enhance its performance, a new variant of the Stryker Combat Vehicle underwent a winter of extreme use at U.S. Army Cold Regions Test Center earlier this year (Photo Credit: Mark Schauer, Army Test and Evaluation Command)

Particularly suited for transporting infantry in urban environments, the Stryker combat vehicle has become popular among Soldiers in the most dangerous and rugged areas overseas. They know the vehicle to be quiet, reliable, and easy to maintain and repair.

The vehicle’s stellar performance is doubtless related to the extensive evaluation it has undergone at Yuma Proving Ground and its three subsidiary test centers since 2002, including a six-month stint in the jungles of Suriname in 2008. Earlier this year, a new variant of the vehicle wrapped up a winter of extreme use at the Army Cold Regions Test Center.

Boasting an upgraded chassis and drivetrain along with a variety of mechanical, electrical and digital improvements to enhance its performance, the latest Stryker variant was subjected to more than 3,000 miles/4,828 km driving across rugged terrain in extreme cold.

«It looks like a regular Stryker, but it isn’t», said Richard Reiser, test officer. «It has a larger engine that significantly increases horsepower and torque. It has a much greater diagnostic capability that integrates subsystems. This gives operators a greater awareness of vehicle health and potentially improves situational awareness during the actual mission in the vehicle».

In the world’s most frigid environments, cold starts can be harrowing even for the most rudimentary vehicles. For a complex system like the Stryker, each component’s ability to function in extreme cold is crucially important and was subjected to keen evaluation in temperatures far below freezing.

«Like automotive trends in general, we have much greater reliance on computer systems in these vehicles», said Reiser. «Those computer systems and subsystems integrated into the hull depend on a great deal of computer software and hardware».

Though a vehicle’s performance characteristics are similar in cold weather once a vehicle is started and sufficiently warmed up, dramatic fluctuations in temperature can degrade performance of any number of a vehicle’s components.

«Stopping distance and acceleration shouldn’t change profoundly in this environment», explained Reiser. «The real issues tend to be related to rapid temperature differentials. Each sub-zero temperature threshold tends to flush out small anomalies».

Testers went to great lengths to test in potential failure conditions. For example, after a long drive on the range the day before a particularly nasty drop in temperature was forecast, the testers used fans connected to long tubes snaking into the engine compartment and other vital areas of the vehicle to blow frigid air onto the components overnight.

«We adjust to capture things and be ready for those colder temperatures on short notice», said Reiser. «It’s a small crew and it’s easy to make adjustments to the mission profile to take advantage».

Throughout the test, the Army evaluators used the same vehicle that had been subjected to punishing hot weather testing the previous summer at Yuma Test Center, Arizona. Personnel travelled to Yuma to take part in the testing and instrumented the vehicle in a configuration that applied to testing in both climates.

«It provides not only continuity in the instrumentation process, but helped our technician get it done quicker while supporting Yuma’s effort as well», said Reiser.

The test was more than just endless driving. The performances of every special feature the vehicle boasts were scrutinized, from its communications suite to the central tire inflation system that adjusts tire pressure as the vehicle is in motion.

«Cross country miles accumulate slowly in this environment», said Reiser. «We didn’t have consistently cold weather, so we were able to move what sub-test activity we were doing based on its environmental relevance. If it is something that’s not so much impacted by extreme cold, we moved that to the less-cold times».

Soldiers from Fort Wainwright’s 25th Infantry Division also assisted in the testing by entering and exiting hatches of the vehicle while attired in the full complement of armor and Arctic battle dress, ensuring that everything in the vehicle could be reached without snagging their bulky gear.

«It was great coordination between the two tests to pick the appropriate miserable day to get the Soldiers to do some limited ingress-egress testing», said Reiser. «When this vehicle is fielded and the Soldiers have the new body armor, we’ll already know it isn’t an issue for ingress and egress».

The multi-month test was completed ahead of schedule and under budget, which Reiser attributes to the flexibility of the rugged, self-contained six-person crew. The drivers, for instance, were from the testing center’s maintenance shop. They were able to troubleshoot and repair problems that cropped up without lengthy downtime at a maintenance shop many miles from the test range.

«We were able to eliminate delay times when we went into maintenance because maintenance was right here», said Reiser. «If we had a vehicle issue, they just changed hats and researched from a different vantage point what they had to do to solve the problem, which was a huge cost savings».

Combat vehicle

A live-fire demonstration of weapon systems mounted on a ground mobility vehicle prototype and a light armored vehicle combat reconnaissance vehicle prototype took place on Friday, July 15, at Red Cloud Range on Fort Benning.

The ground mobility vehicle 1.1 prototype fires the M230-LF 30-mm cannon during a live fire demonstration on Friday, July 15, at Red Cloud Range on Fort Benning (Photo Credit: Patrick A. Albright)
The ground mobility vehicle 1.1 prototype fires the M230-LF 30-mm cannon during a live fire demonstration on Friday, July 15, at Red Cloud Range on Fort Benning (Photo Credit: Patrick A. Albright)

The event was sponsored by the Capabilities Development and Integration Directorate Mounted Requirements Division at the Maneuver Center of Excellence, and the General Dynamics Land Systems and General Dynamics Ordnance and Tactical Systems.

«We are in an interwar period here. The interwar period is critical because it is a time when you must leverage an opportunity to get ready for the next conflict», said Major General Eric Wesley, commanding general of the Maneuver Center of Excellence. «If you don’t leverage that opportunity you’re throwing away a resource that has strategic implications».

Wesley explained that cooperation between the U.S. Army and industry is paramount to a successful partnership.

«We need to be cooperating and collaborating with industry and that is what you see here today», said Wesley.

Lieutenant General H. R. McMaster, director of the Army Capabilities Integration Center, spoke about the urgency behind the collaboration with the U.S. Army and industry.

«We are facing threats, enemies and adversaries who have watched us very closely in recent years and have adapted their capabilities and developed new capabilities that have resulted in our forces in the future potentially losing our ability to overmatch the enemy in close combat», said McMaster. «What we are endeavoring to do is to ensure that we stay ahead of these determined and adapted enemies».

McMaster stressed that every combat unit has to have the combination of mobility, protection and lethality in order to overmatch the enemy.

«What we need is a combat vehicle that allows that appropriate combination», said McMaster. «Every time you bump into a U.S. Army formation and you’re the enemy, and you make the unwise choice of taking a shot at us, smoke and boots, that is going to be the result on the other end».

The ground mobility vehicle 1.1 prototype fired an M230-LF 30-mm cannon, while the Light Armored Vehicle (LAV) combat reconnaissance vehicle prototype with a Kongsberg turret fired an integrated MK44 30-mm cannon.

Air Portability Trials

General Dynamics Land Systems-UK has completed initial air portability trials for the AJAX family of vehicles at the Joint Air Delivery Test and Evaluation Unit (JADTEU) at Royal Air Force (RAF) Brize Norton.

The trials assessed the loading of the ARES prototype platform into the cargo hold of an RAF C-17A Globemaster III
The trials assessed the loading of the ARES prototype platform into the cargo hold of an RAF C-17A Globemaster III

The trials, which took place at the end of May, assessed the loading of the ARES prototype platform, which will be used to deliver and support specialist troops across the battlefield, into the cargo hold of an RAF C-17A Globemaster III and A400M Atlas aircraft. These aircraft provide the RAF with a long-range, strategic, heavy-lift capability, which enables it to project and sustain an effective force close to a potential area of operations for combat, peacekeeping or humanitarian missions worldwide.

The ARES prototype platform was driven onto real-size mock-ups of each aircraft, in order for JADTEU to develop a tie down scheme. These trials form part of the process, which, combined with additional trials, will ensure that the AJAX family of vehicles, when in-service, can be transported anywhere in the world in rapid time to support the British Army.

Chief of Materiel (Land) for the UK’s Defence Equipment and Support organisation, Lieutenant General Paul Jaques, said: «AJAX is the biggest armoured vehicle programme for a generation for the British Army. These trials mark significant progress in the programme; it is essential that these fully-digitised fighting vehicles, which will sit at the heart of the UK’s agile Strike Brigades, can be deployed at short notice worldwide to protect the UK and our interests».

Kevin Connell, vice president of General Dynamics Land Systems-UK, said: «The AJAX programme continues to make excellent progress during this trials period, with these successful trials following quickly on the back of early live fire trials in April. Thanks to the hard work of the project partners and our supply chain, we have been able to successfully demonstrate that the AJAX family meets a key requirement for air portability».

The range of AJAX variants will allow the British Army to conduct sustained, expeditionary, full-spectrum and network-enabled operations with a reduced logistics footprint. It can operate in combined-arms and multinational situations across a wide-range of future operating environments. The first British Army squadron will be equipped by mid-2019 to allow conversion to begin with a brigade ready to deploy from the end of 2020.

AJAX can operate in combined-arms and multinational situations across a wide-range of future operating environments
AJAX can operate in combined-arms and multinational situations across a wide-range of future operating environments