Tag Archives: DCNS

Australian Barracuda

The Prime Minister of Australia announced on April 26 in Adelaide, that the next generation of 12 submarines will be constructed in Adelaide, with DCNS of France selected as the preferred international partner for the design.

A Shortfin Barracuda Block 1A pre-concept design (90 meters in length and displaces more than 4,000 tons) released as part of the DCNS pitch
A Shortfin Barracuda Block 1A pre-concept design (90 meters in length and displaces more than 4,000 tons) released as part of the DCNS pitch

The AUD50 billion (USD38 billion) Future Submarine Project is the largest and most complex defence acquisition Australia has ever undertaken. It will deliver a regionally-superior submarine that meets Australia’s unique national security requirements, as detailed in the 2016 Defence White Paper.

Today’s announcement follows the comprehensive Competitive Evaluation Process involving DCNS, TKMS (ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems) of Germany and the Government of Japan. Each bidder submitted very high quality proposals and the Australian Government thanked both TKMS and the Government of Japan for their ongoing commitment to Australia and their participation in the process.

The rigorous and independent process was led by Head of the Future Submarine Program, Rear Admiral Greg Sammut, and General Manager Submarines, retired U.S. Navy Rear Admiral Stephen Johnson, who was previously in charge of the program to replace the Ohio Class ballistic missile submarines.

The process was overseen by an independent Expert Advisory Panel, chaired by former Secretary of the United States Navy, Professor Donald Winter. It was peer reviewed by retired U.S. Navy Vice Admiral Paul Sullivan and retired U.S. Navy Rear Admiral Thomas Eccles.

This decision was driven by the French bid’s ability to best meet the unique capability requirements. These included superior sensor performance and stealth characteristics, as well as range and endurance similar to the 3,400-tonne Collins class submarine. The Government’s considerations also included cost, schedule, program execution, through-life support and Australian industry involvement.

Subject to discussions on commercial matters, the design of the Future Submarine with DCNS will begin this year.

Egyptian Corvette

On Saturday, April 16th 2016, Alexandria Shipyard started cutting metal for the first Gowind 2500 corvette built in Egypt, in the presence of high representatives of the Egyptian Navy and of DCNS technical assistance and management teams.

The Gowind 2500 multi-mission corvette is designed for surveillance, surface and subsurface combat, protection and escort naval missions
The Gowind 2500 multi-mission corvette is designed for surveillance, surface and subsurface combat, protection and escort naval missions

The Egyptian Navy chose DCNS to design and build four Gowind 2500 corvettes with a construction technology transfer. The contract, which entered into force in July 2015, provides for the construction of the first ship within 29 months. It is now being built by DCNS in Lorient. The three following units will be built by Egyptian partner Alexandria Shipyard.

DCNS has sent supervision and technical assistance teams to Alexandria for the construction of three corvettes through technology transfer. DCNS also provides training of the Egyptian shipyard staff at DCNS site in Lorient. Finally, DCNS will deliver all technical data required for the construction of the corvettes as well as necessary components.

The Gowind 2500 corvette chosen by the Egyptian Navy is a first rank ship with a displacement of 2,500 tonnes; it incorporates the SETIS multi-mission combat management system developed by DCNS.

 

Gowind 2500 corvette

Missions

Gowind 2500 is DCNS’ response to 21st century defence and security challenges, combining unrivalled stealth features, resilience and high availability at sea with outstanding Anti-Air Warfare (AAW), Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) and Anti-Surface Ship Warfare (ASuW) performances.

With the Ship Enhanced Tactical Information System (SETIS) state-of-the-art Combat System providing the operator with the best management and decision-making aids, Gowind 2500 ensures supremacy against all conventional and asymmetric threats.

The Gowind 2500 can also perform presence, maritime surveillance and policing missions against trafficking and piracy
The Gowind 2500 can also perform presence, maritime surveillance and policing missions against trafficking and piracy

A stealth and multirole combat ship

Gowind 2500 is a resilient and powerful surface combatant designed to perform complex naval operations as well as low intensity maritime security missions.

Through a 360° sensors coverage and deployable assets, Gowind 2500 simultaneously detects, tracks and engages multiple airborne, surface as well as submarine threats, providing the best performance in all warfare domains.

Gowind 2500 offers exceptional stealth capabilities with reduced radiated noise and Radar Cross Section (RCS) significantly improving the tactical advantage compared with other ships of her class.

Integrated operational capabilities

Broad and with excellent seakeeping characteristics, Gowind 2500 operates an organic 10 t class helicopter, which extends the vessel’s warfare capabilities far beyond the horizon.

Gowind 2500 is fitted with SETIS, DCNS’ integrated Combat System to counter multiple, multidomain attacks and threats:

  • long range coordinated surface engagement;
  • point air defence;
  • submarine deterrence and tracking;
  • gradual asymmetric engagement;
  • shared accurate tactical picture through;
  • interoperable data links.

 

Extended performance

Built to address current and emerging threats, Gowind 2500 integrates the latest technologies. Unmanned Aerial Systems such as Airbus Defence and Space Tanan extend the ship’s action range and therefore the tactical advantage.

To improve interoperability during joint or international operations, SETIS also integrates additional command support modules as well as collaborative planning tools.

Resilient and sea proven, SETIS provides a high level of reliability with rapid reconfiguration protocols and back-up modes to return to full operational capability even in case of combat damage.

The radar and other sensors are mounted on a single central mast thus allowing 360° view
The radar and other sensors are mounted on a single central mast thus allowing 360° view

Growth Potential

Mission modules will be integrated on board future Gowind configurations making the ship even more flexible and adaptable to emerging operational requirements.

Forward-thinking Gowind development plans also include innovative close-in defence systems integrated into the NextGen Combat Information Centre (CIC) and Combat Bridge.

User friendly

SETIS’s intuitive Man-Machine Interface (MMI) and integrated command aids improve the crew’s ability to synthetise numerous data and react quickly in extreme and rapidly changing conditions, therefore maximizing the tactical advantage against any kind of threats.

SETIS functionally integrates UAS allowing real time control and data fusion for expanded detection and response capabilities.

 

Ship characteristics

Length 102 m/334.6 feet
Beam 16 m/52.5 feet
Draft 5.4 m/17.7 feet
Displacement 2,500 t
Propulsion Combined diesel and electric
Speed 25+ knots/29+ mph/46 km/h
Range 3,700 NM/6,852 km at 15 knots/17 mph/28 km/h
Crew (+ Pax) 65 (+15)

 

  1. 3D Radar;
  2. Electronic Support Measures (ESM) suite;
  3. Hull mounted sonar;
  4. Variable depth sonar;
  5. Fire control system;
  6. Vertical launching system (16 cells);
  7. Main gun (57- up to 76-mm);
  8. 8 Surface-to-surface missiles;
  9. Short range gun system;
  10. Torpedo launching system;
  11. Decoy launching system;
  12. Helicopter (10 t) and Unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) facilities;
  13. Rigid Hull Inflatable Boats (RHIBs).

DCNS starts the construction of the first Gowind 2500 corvette for the Egyptian Navy

5th FREMM Frigate

On 16 March 2016, DCNS delivered the FREMM frigate D653 Languedoc intended for the French Navy, on the occasion of the acceptance ceremony by OCCAR (L’Organisation Conjointe de Coopération en Matière d’Armement) on behalf of the French DGA (Direction Générale de l’Armement). This event once again demonstrates the industrial success of the largest European naval defence programme. The FREMM frigates are amongst some of the highest-performance latest-generation combat vessels on the market and have already won over three client Navies.

DCNS delivers its 5th FREMM frigate, Languedoc
DCNS delivers its 5th FREMM frigate, Languedoc

FREMM D653 Languedoc is the fifth unit to be built by DCNS and the third intended for the French Navy. The frigate was officially accepted by OCCAR (Organisation for Joint Armament Cooperation), an international organisation for the through-life management of cooperative defence equipment programmes, which has the role of contracting authority for FREMMs intended for France and Italy. The ceremony was presided over by the Director of OCCAR, Timothy Rowntree, and the Armaments Engineer-General, Laurent Sellier, Director of the DGA’s «Armaments Naval Operations» management unit, and in the presence of Pierre Legros, Director of Programmes at DCNS.

The official acceptance of the FREMM Languedoc is a demonstration of the satisfaction of the operational personnel that had the opportunity to test its exceptional military qualities in multiple operations theatres. At the start of the year, the D650 Aquitaine and D652 Provence FREMMs participated in the Task Force 50 actions in the Persian-Arabian Gulf, at the sides of the Charles de Gaulle aircraft carrier, designed, built and maintained by DCNS.

These front-line frigates also won over the Royal Moroccan Navy in 2014 and the Egyptian Navy in 2015.

The operational deployments and international successes of this latest-generation frigate demonstrate the capacity of DCNS to design, build and maintain competitive, high-tech vessels, which are perfectly suited to the needs of its clients.

The FREMMs are the first vessels in Europe to deploy the naval cruise missile (MdCN) for which the first firing took place on 19 May 2015 from the FREMM D650 Aquitaine.

«The delivery of the FREMM D653 Languedoc represents an opportunity to highlight the serial effects of a programme that DCNS clients can take advantage of», notes Anne Bianchi, Director of the FREMM programme at DCNS. «With this fifth unit, DCNS has again improved its industrial and economic performance. It was possible to reduce the duration of the sea acceptance trials for the D653 Languedoc frigate to five weeks, thanks to the experience acquired for the FREMMs already delivered. The DCNS teams and our partners have, in effect, attained an unprecedented level of vessel completion even before its first sea outing», she underlines.

The FREMM programme represents today the construction of ten vessels, of which eight for the French Navy. Six FREMMs will have been delivered to the French Navy before mid-2019, in accordance with the 2015-2019 military programming law. DCNS is currently completing the FREMM D654 Auvergne, which was floated on 2 September 2015, and is pursuing the assembly of the FREMM D655 Bretagne. Work has started on the eighth FREMM in the series, the D656 Normandie. Last but not least, DCNS is finalising the design of two FREMMs with strengthened anti-aircraft capacities, the delivery of which is slated for 2022.

Heavily armed, the FREMMs deploy the most effective weapon systems and equipment, such as the Herakles multifunction radar, the naval cruise missile (MdCN), the Aster and Exocet MM 40 missiles or the MU 90 torpedoes
Heavily armed, the FREMMs deploy the most effective weapon systems and equipment, such as the Herakles multifunction radar, the naval cruise missile (MdCN), the Aster and Exocet MM 40 missiles or the MU 90 torpedoes

 

Overview of the FREMM series

  • D650 Aquitaine, first in the series, delivered in 2012
  • Mohammed VI (701), delivered to the Royal Moroccan Navy in 2014
  • D652 Provence delivered in June 2015
  • Tahya Misr (FFG-1001), delivered to the Egyptian Navy in June 2015
  • D653 Languedoc delivered on 16 March 2016
  • D654 Auvergne, D655 Bretagne and D656 Normandie to be delivered in 2017, 2018 and 2019
  • Two FREMMs with strengthened anti-aircraft capacities to be delivered in 2021 and 2022
Languedoc, the French navy’s third FREMM-class frigate, sails out of Lorient for its initial sea trials, which will test its propulsion and navigations systems. Six of these ships will be delivered by 2019 (DCNS photo)
Languedoc, the French navy’s third FREMM-class frigate, sails out of Lorient for its initial sea trials, which will test its propulsion and navigations systems. Six of these ships will be delivered by 2019 (DCNS photo)

 

Characteristics

Total length 466 feet/142 m
Width 65.6 feet/20 m
Displacement 6,000 tonnes
Maximum speed 27 knots/31 mph/50 km/h
Operation 108 persons (including helicopter detachment)
Accommodation capacity 145 men and women
Cruising range at 15 knots/17 mph/28 km/h 6,000 nautical miles/6,905 miles/11,112 km

 

Future Submarine

Evaluation of Australia’s Future Submarine program proposals will now commence with all three potential international partners submitting their proposals in full, Minister for Defence Senator the Hon Marise Payne announced.

Japan will present three options for building the subs: in Australia, in Japan or in a split arrangement
Japan will present three options for building the subs: in Australia, in Japan or in a split arrangement

«The Government’s Competitive Evaluation Process remains on schedule with Defence receiving submissions from DCNS of France, TKMS of Germany, and the Government of Japan by the 30 November 2015 closing deadline»,’ Senator Payne said. «Since the CEP began in February, all three participants have worked closely with Defence and they should be congratulated for the hard work and significant investment they have made to reach this point».

Defence will now assess the ability of the participants to work closely with us, including how each proposal would meet our capability and sustainment needs, and how cost, schedule and risk would be managed throughout the program.

This program offers a once in a generation opportunity for Australian industry to innovate and be part of Australia’s Future Submarine. That is why the assessment will include the level of Australian industry involvement that will be possible under each option.

«Submarines are Defence’s most complex, sensitive, and expensive capability, so it is important that the evaluation process is thorough and robust»,’ Senator Payne said. «The evaluation process will be overseen by the Expert Advisory Panel to ensure it is conducted fairly and equitably, with advice to be provided to Government in 2016».

DCNS Australia is a subsidiary of DCNS, a French naval shipbuilding company and European leader in naval defence
DCNS Australia is a subsidiary of DCNS, a French naval shipbuilding company and European leader in naval defence

 

DCNS

DCNS on 27 November lodged its final deliverables to the Australian Government’s Competitive Evaluation Process to select an International Program partner for the SEA1000 Future Submarine Program.

The proposal includes a Government to Government Agreement from The French Ministère of Defence’s Direction Générale de l’Armement (DGA) to the Commonwealth of Australia’s Department of Defence and a binding written commitment on key aspects of the deliverables.

This milestone has been achieved on schedule and marks the beginning of the Commonwealth of Australia’s evaluation phase.

Mr. Sean Costello, CEO DCNS Australia, said, «DCNS acknowledges the dedication from hundreds of people in France and Australia to the development of the Shortfin Barracuda Block 1A and a sovereign industry in Australia. We have worked as a team to create the best possible solution for Australia’s future».

HDW Class 216 Submarine is a long-range multi-mission two-deck fuel cell submarine with exceptional endurance
HDW Class 216 Submarine is a long-range multi-mission two-deck fuel cell submarine with exceptional endurance

Egyptian Mistral

On 10 October 2015, DCNS signed a contract with the Ministry of Defence of the Arab Republic of Egypt for the supply of two Mistral-class projection and command ships (BPCs). After the delivery of a FREMM frigate and the construction of four GOWIND 2500 corvettes, currently on-going, this agreement strengthens the strategic relations with the Egyptian Navy, initiated by the Group in 2014. By 2020, the Egyptian Navy will deploy a fleet of at least seven combat ships designed and built by DCNS.

Less than a year after its controversial decision not to deliver two Mistral LHDs to Russia, France has found an alternative buyer in Egypt, and signed the formal sale contract on Saturday October 10
Less than a year after its controversial decision not to deliver two Mistral LHDs to Russia, France has found an alternative buyer in Egypt, and signed the formal sale contract on Saturday October 10

Hervé Guillou, Chairman and CEO of DCNS announced that: «After the contracts for the supply of four GOWIND corvettes and a FREMM frigate, we are proud that the Egyptian Navy continues to place its trust in us today by signing a contract for the delivery of two MISTRAL-class BPCs. With 7 combat ships already ordered to date and a latest-generation frigate already in operation in the Egyptian Navy, DCNS is thus participating in the modernization of the defence infrastructure of this strategic French ally».

The two projection and command ships (BPCs) ordered by the Egyptian Navy from DCNS will join their homeport in the summer of 2016, after the training of the future crews. This training will be given mainly over the 1st half of 2016 in Saint-Nazaire.

With regard to associated BPC support ships, DCNS will supply in particular four new-generation landing crafts (CTM NG), designed by the Group as an integrated system to an amphibious force organized around Mistral ships, and two fast landing crafts (EDAR), designed and built by CNIM.

 

A long-term partnership with the Egyptian Navy

Considering that the first of the four future GOWIND corvettes for the Egyptian Navy is already being built, that the other three will be assembled in Egypt in Alexandria and that the FREMM Tahya Misr frigate was already delivered to the Egyptian Navy on 23 June 2015, the signature of this new contract further strengthens the strategic partnership developed between DCNS and the Egyptian Navy.

It also has an onboard hospital, and can carry out large-scale humanitarian missions
It also has an onboard hospital, and can carry out large-scale humanitarian missions

By 2020, the Group will have supplied at least seven ships to Egypt contributing to the modernization of its defence mechanisms.

This strong partnership between the Arab Republic of Egypt and the French Republic is reinforced by DCNS’ commitment to accompany the Egyptian Navy in the long term, especially with the unfailing support of dedicated service teams for the maintenance of main warships. The Group also states its presence in a wider project of industrial cooperation with the Egyptian party in the field of construction and maintenance of major program units.

Once again, due to this historical agreement, DCNS expects to build a partnership with the Egyptian Navy but also with Egyptian shipyards with which the Group intends to build a long-term cooperation. That is how DCNS has decided to invest in the Egyptian Industry to mutually develop the essential knowledge and means to support a leading Navy.

 

Technical characteristics of the Mistral-class ships

With a length of 653 feet/199 meters, a displacement of 23,000 tonnes and a speed in excess of 18 knots/21 mph/33 km/h, the Mistral-class BPC is defined by its large carrying capacity.

Its highly capable communication system makes it the ideal command ship within a naval force
Its highly capable communication system makes it the ideal command ship within a naval force

The Mistral-class BPC is designed for force-projection, peacekeeping and humanitarian-support operations, and is equipped with a particularly modular command and control centre, featuring efficient communication systems that can be adapted to all shipboard headquarter configurations.

It also has an onboard hospital, and can carry out large-scale humanitarian missions. Its highly capable communication system makes it the ideal command ship within a naval force.

 

TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS

Length overall 653 feet/199 m
Breadth 105 feet/32 m at the helicopter deck level
Maximum speed 18 knots/21 mph/33 km/h
Full load displacement 23,000 tonnes
Complement 160 crew, 450 troops
Range at 15 knots 11,000 NM/12,659 miles/20,372 km
Carrying capacities 16 helicopters

 

The third FREMM

7 October, the FREMM Languedoc, the third frigate of the series for the French Navy, made its first sea outing. This industrial milestone marks the start of the vessel’s sea trials, which will take place off the coast of Brittany. With three FREMM multi-mission frigates currently under construction on the Lorient site, DCNS will have delivered six FREMMs to the French Navy before mid-2019, in accordance with the Military Programming Law 2015-2019, as well as two FREMMs for the export market.

Languedoc, the French navy’s third FREMM-class frigate, sails out of Lorient for its initial sea trials, which will test its propulsion and navigations systems. Six of these ships will be delivered by 2019 (DCNS photo)
Languedoc, the French navy’s third FREMM-class frigate, sails out of Lorient for its initial sea trials, which will test its propulsion and navigations systems. Six of these ships will be delivered by 2019 (DCNS photo)

DCNS has now completed the first sea outing of the FREMM Languedoc on the Lorient site, the third of the series of vessels ordered by OCCAR (l’Organisation Conjointe de Coopération en matière d’Armement – Organization for Joint Armament) on behalf of the DGA (French Defence Procurement Agency) and the French Navy. During this first sea outing, the main objective was to test the performance of the vessel’s propulsion and navigation system.

The FREMM Languedoc will benefit from a significant reduction in the duration of its sea trials compared to the previous FREMMs: six weeks instead of the previous eight. This optimised trial duration illustrates the transition to «series mode» for the multi-mission frigates.

DCNS teams and those of its partners were thus able to capitalise on the experience acquired with the FREMMs already delivered to proceed with the integration of the combat system’s sensors and weapons before the FREMM Languedoc’s first sea outing. This streamlining of the scheduling allows an optimisation of the duration and number of sea outings for the frigate and therefore, in the end, a reduction in the total time required for vessel trials.

«The acceleration of the trial scheduling for the FREMM Languedoc is a demonstration of DCNS capacity to ensure efficient serial production», explains Anne Bianchi, Director of the FREMM Programme at DCNS.

In the medium term, the FREMM programme will involve for DCNS the construction of ten frigates, eight of them for the French Navy
In the medium term, the FREMM programme will involve for DCNS the construction of ten frigates, eight of them for the French Navy

 

Characteristics

Total length 466 feet/142 m
Width 65.6 feet/20 m
Displacement 6,000 tonnes
Maximum speed 27 knots/31 mph/50 km/h
Operation 108 persons (including helicopter detachment)
Accommodation capacity 145 men and women
Cruising range at 15 knots/17 mph/28 km/h 6,000 nautical miles/6,905 miles/11,112 km

 

The Sixth FREMM

DCNS has floated the French Navy’s FREMM multi-mission frigate Auvergne in Lorient. The achievement took place on 2 September and marks an important step in the construction of the most modern front-line ship of the 21st century. The FREMM D654 Auvergne is the sixth frigate in the programme and fourth of the series ordered by OCCAR (l’Organisation Conjointe de Coopération en matière d’Armement – Organization for Joint Armament) on behalf of the DGA (the French defence procurement agency) for the French Navy.

Auvergne, seen here as it floats out of the building hall in Lorient, is the sixth FREMM frigate built by DCNS, which is building another three for the French navy
Auvergne, seen here as it floats out of the building hall in Lorient, is the sixth FREMM frigate built by DCNS, which is building another three for the French navy

With three FREMMs currently under construction in DCNS’ Lorient site, DCNS is accelerating the production speed in order to deliver six FREMMs to the French Navy before mid-2019. Two additional frigates equipped with strengthened anti-aircraft capacities will be delivered before 2022. Two further units have also been sold to international clients: The Royal Moroccan Navy and the Egyptian Navy.

«The floating of the FREMM Auvergne, after the delivery of the FREMM Tahya Misr to the Egyptian Navy and the delivery of the FREMM Provence in June, demonstrate DCNS’s ability to successfully achieve a serial production», explains Anne Bianchi, FREMM Programme Director at DCNS. «DCNS is doing everything in its power to satisfy its clients, the OCCAR, the DGA and the French Navy by delivering these last six frigates before mid-2019».

DCNS commenced construction of the FREMM Auvergne in August 2012. This new-generation frigate will be operated by an optimized crew of 108 (half that required for the frigates of the previous generation). Delivery of the FREMM Aquitaine, the first multi-mission frigate to be built for the French Navy, was taken by OCCAR on 23 November 2012 on behalf of the DGA.

OCCAR: the Organisation for Joint Armaments Operations, is an international organisation whose core-business is the through-life management of cooperative defence equipment programmes entrusted to it by the Member States. It ensures, amongst other things, the project management for the multi-mission frigates intended for France and Italy
OCCAR: the Organisation for Joint Armaments Operations, is an international organisation whose core-business is the through-life management of cooperative defence equipment programmes entrusted to it by the Member States. It ensures, amongst other things, the project management for the multi-mission frigates intended for France and Italy

 

Four surface ships currently being produced at DCNS Lorient

The floating of the FREMM Auvergne is being celebrated while the FREMM programme is progressing at an accelerated speed on the DCNS site in Lorient. Three FREMM frigates are currently under construction for the French Navy. The Lorient teams are also mobilized for the construction of the first GOWIND corvette for the Egyptian Navy.

FREMM technical characteristics

Under the project management of DCNS, the heavily armed FREMM frigates are equipped with the most effective weapon systems and hardware, such as the Héraclès multifunctional radar, the Naval Cruise Missile, the Aster and Exocet MM 40 missiles and the MU 90 torpedoes.

DCNS commenced construction of the FREMM Auvergne in August 2012
DCNS commenced construction of the FREMM Auvergne in August 2012

 

Characteristics

Total length 466 feet/142 m
Width 65.6 feet/20 m
Displacement 6,000 tonnes
Maximum speed 27 knots/31 mph/50 km/h
Operation 108 persons (including helicopter detachment)
Accommodation capacity 145 men and women
Range at 15 knots/17 mph/28 km/h 6,000 nautical miles/6,905 miles/11,112 km

 

For its home port

On Wednesday 22 July, the FREMM FFG-1001 Tahya Misr of the Egyptian navy left the Brest military port to join its homeport in Alexandria, Egypt, six months after the contract for the supply of a multi-mission frigate was signed between DCNS and the Ministry of Defence of the Arab Republic of Egypt.

The Egyptian navy is now the third navy to operate this exceptional latest-generation warship
The Egyptian navy is now the third navy to operate this exceptional latest-generation warship

DCNS quickly initiated the required adaptation and outfitting work and the training of seamen to permit the Egyptian navy to take on the ship. As early as March 2015 DCNS trained the Egyptian seamen making up this frigate’s crew. In order to operate such a highly automated ship safely, DCNS and its partners accompany the crew for a period of 15 months. The programme includes several phases: theoretical modules, on-land training using platforms and simulators and then onboard training both at the quayside and at sea.

On 23 June of this year, the FREMM Tahya Misr was transferred from DCNS to the Egyptian navy during a ceremony attended by the Egyptian and French Defence Ministers. On 22 July, the Egyptian FREMM cast off from Brest and headed to Alexandria, its homeport.

The partnership with DCNS does not, however, stop with the FREMM Tahya Misr leaving France: the contract also includes DCNS providing support services and through life support in Egypt for the next five years.

With the FREMM developed and built by DCNS, the Egyptian navy has the most modern front-line ship of the 21st century
With the FREMM developed and built by DCNS, the Egyptian navy has the most modern front-line ship of the 21st century

 

Second international success for the FREMM

The most technologically advanced and most competitive ship on the market, the FREMM meets the operational requirements of numerous navies due to its versatility and its maneuverability. Capitalizing on its unprecedented success in Europe for the firing of the naval cruise missile on board the FREMM Aquitaine on 19 May 2015, DCNS offers its clients vessels that are global references in terms of their design and construction as well as for the integration of innovative systems.

In addition, the updating of the Military Planning Law will permit DCNS to continue developing its range of ships and services and to accelerate its international development. With the kick-off of the intermediate-size frigate program, DCNS is going to propose a product, which meets the needs of the French Navy and will meet a growing international demand for front-line frigates of approximately 4,000 tons.

Currently, in the surface ship market, DCNS counts among its customers, the Royal Moroccan Navy with the delivery in January 2014 of the FREMM Mohammed VI and the Egyptian Navy with the delivery of the FREMM Tahya Misr (FFG-1001) and four GOWIND corvettes. Moreover, DCNS is building six GOWIND corvettes for the Malaysian Navy. These contracts show the success of DCNS’ products in the international market.

The Gowind 2500 multi-mission corvette is designed for surveillance, surface and subsurface combat, protection and escort naval missions
The Gowind 2500 multi-mission corvette is designed for surveillance, surface and subsurface combat, protection and escort naval missions

 

Technical characteristics of the FREMMs

Equipped with high-tech sensors and weapons, integrated with the SETIS combat system developed by DCNS, the frigate can counter all types of threats, whether air, surface, submarine or land-based. The heavily armed FREMM is equipped with the most effective weapons systems and equipment, such as the Herakles multifunction radar, the Aster and Exocet MM 40 missiles, or the MU 90 torpedoes. It is innovative and offers unequalled levels of interoperability and availability.

 

Characteristics

Total length 466 feet/142 m
Width 65.6 feet/20 m
Displacement 6,000 tonnes
Maximum speed 27 knots/31 mph/50 km/h
Operation 108 persons (including helicopter detachment)
Accommodation capacity 145 men and women
Cruising range at 15 knots/17 mph/28 km/h 6,000 nautical miles/6,905 miles/11,112 km
D651 «Normandie» FREMM multi-mission frigate (front view)
D651 «Normandie» FREMM multi-mission frigate (front view)

The Second FREMM

On June 12th in Brest, DCNS delivered the FREMM multi-mission frigate D652 Provence to the French Navy, as stipulated in the contract. This frigate is the second of the series ordered by OCCAR (l’Organisation Conjointe de Coopération en matière d’Armement – Organisation for Joint Armament) on behalf of the DGA (Direction Générale de l’Armement – French armament procurement agency).

The D652 Provence, the French navy’s second FREMM-class multipurpose frigate, leaves Lorient after being officially handed over. DCNS now has four similar frigates in various stages of completion, and additional orders are planned (DCNS photos)
The D652 Provence, the French navy’s second FREMM-class multipurpose frigate, leaves Lorient after being officially handed over. DCNS now has four similar frigates in various stages of completion, and additional orders are planned (DCNS photos)

Delivery of the FREMM multi-mission frigate Provence is the result of a design and construction process managed by DCNS in close cooperation with the French Navy, DGA and OCCAR teams. All DCNS sites, its partners and subcontractors took part to this technological and industrial success to ensure compliance with the industrial milestones, in particular the launching in September 2013 and the first sea outing in September 2014.

The delivery of the second series to the French Navy took place just a few weeks after the first successful firing in Europe of a naval cruise missile from the first-of-class, the FREMM D650 Aquitaine. The sale of a frigate to the Royal Moroccan Navy and the Egyptian Navy, as well as the announcement of the launch of the intermediate-size frigates programme, boost DCNS ambitions for international development thanks to a broader offer of first of rank surface ships.

«The delivery of the FREMM Provence represents an opportunity to applaud the industrial and technological prowess of DCNS and its subcontractors. It underlines our ability to produce first of rank combat ships that meet our client navies needs, such as those of Morocco and Egypt», stated Anne Bianchi, Director of FREMM programmes. «Today, we are proud to deliver this second ship to the French Navy».

DCNS designs, builds and maintains submarines and surface vessels
DCNS designs, builds and maintains submarines and surface vessels

 

SETIS, one of the most effective sea-proven combat systems on the market

The delivery of the FREMM Provence marks the culmination in the ramping up of SETIS (Ship Enhanced Tactical Information System), the latest-generation combat system developed by DCNS. The ship is now equipped with a cutting-edge solution that is perfectly integrated on board. Indeed, the successful firing of the naval cruise missile on May 19th 2015 from the FREMM Aquitaine is a demonstration of the anti-land warfare capabilities directed at targets located deep in enemy territory. Added to the anti-submarine, anti-surface and anti-air warfare capabilities, the FREMM has now reached its full technological capabilities.

«DCNS has successfully accomplished this essential step for the FREMM SETIS combat system. We are proud to have contributed to the successful firing of a cruise missile from a surface ship, a first in Europe. This result is a demonstration of DCNS expertise in the area of the design and integration of combat systems», stressed Anne Bianchi.

The FREMM D652 Provence delivered on 12 June 2015
The FREMM D652 Provence delivered on 12 June 2015

 

Four FREMM at different stages of construction at DCNS Lorient Shipyard

For DCNS, the FREMM programme currently involves the construction of ten frigates, eight of them for the French Navy. Six of these are to be delivered by 2019 and the remaining two frigates, equipped with extended anti-aircraft capabilities, will be delivered before 2022. Two other were sold for export clients: the Royal Moroccan Navy and the Egyptian Navy.

The delivery of the FREMM Provence takes place at a time when the FREMM programme is powering ahead on the DCNS site in Lorient. To date, three FREMM frigates are under construction and one is being prepared before being delivered:

The FREMM D650 Aquitaine, first in series, delivered in 2012.

The FREMM 701 Mohammed VI, for the Royal Moroccan Navy, delivered in 2014.

The FREMM D652 Provence, delivered on 12 June 2015.

The FREMM intended for the Egyptian Navy, formerly the FREMM D651 Normandie, will be delivered in summer 2015.

The FREMM D653 Languedoc will make its first sea outing in autumn 2015.

The FREMM D654 Auvergne is currently in the final stages of construction and will be launched in September 2015.

The FREMM D656 Bretagne is currently being assembled.

D651 «Normandie» FREMM multi-mission frigate (right side view)
D651 «Normandie» FREMM multi-mission frigate (right side view)

 

Technical characteristics of the FREMMs

The FREMM multi-mission frigate is one of the most technologically advanced and competitive ships on the market. Its versatility and manoeuvrability meet the operational requirements of numerous navies around the world. Equipped with high-tech sensors and weapons, integrated with the SETIS latest-generation combat system developed by DCNS, the frigate can counter all types of threats, whether air, surface, submarine or land-based.

The heavily armed FREMM frigate is equipped with the most effective weapons systems and equipment, such as the Herakles multifunction radar, the Aster and Exocet MM 40 missiles, or the MU 90 torpedoes. It is innovative and offers unequalled levels of interoperability and availability. This combat ship is capable of meeting the expectations of numerous navies.

Total length: 466 feet/142 m

Width: 65.6 feet/20 m

Displacement: 6,000 tonnes

Maximum speed: 27 knots/31 mph/50 km/h

Operation: 108 persons (including helicopter detachment)

Accommodation capacity: 145 men and women

Range: 6,000 nautical miles/6,905 miles/11,112 km at 15 knots/17 mph/28 km/h

Provence 's broader weapons and equipment fit includes: the Thales HERAKLES multifunction radar and ARTEMIS panoramic surveillance system; the Terma Scanter 2001 navigation and surveillance radars; Thales' UMS 4110 CL and CAPTAS 4 hull-mounted and towed sonar systems; the DCNS SETIS combat management system; Sagem's Vigy MM fire-control system; Thales' SIC 21 command-and-control information system; 16 Aster 15 surface-to-air missiles, 16 Missile de Croisiere Naval (MdCN) long-range cruise missiles, and eight Exocet MM 40 Block 3 anti-ship missiles, all from MBDA; Oto Melara's 76/62 Super Rapid gun; 19 Eurotorp MU90 lightweight torpedoes; Sagem's NGDS decoy launchers; and Thales Surfsat-L SATCOM terminals
Provence ‘s broader weapons and equipment fit includes: the Thales HERAKLES multifunction radar and ARTEMIS panoramic surveillance system; the Terma Scanter 2001 navigation and surveillance radars; Thales’ UMS 4110 CL and CAPTAS 4 hull-mounted and towed sonar systems; the DCNS SETIS combat management system; Sagem’s Vigy MM fire-control system; Thales’ SIC 21 command-and-control information system; 16 Aster 15 surface-to-air missiles, 16 Missile de Croisiere Naval (MdCN) long-range cruise missiles, and eight Exocet MM 40 Block 3 anti-ship missiles, all from MBDA; Oto Melara’s 76/62 Super Rapid gun; 19 Eurotorp MU90 lightweight torpedoes; Sagem’s NGDS decoy launchers; and Thales Surfsat-L SATCOM terminals

Egyptian Corvette

On April 16 2015, DCNS has started cutting metal for the very first GOWIND 2500 corvette under construction in Lorient, in the presence of high representatives of the Egyptian Navy. This vessel is the first of a series of four units that will be delivered to Egypt before 2019.

The Gowind 2500 multi-mission corvette is designed for surveillance, surface and subsurface combat, protection and escort naval missions
The Gowind 2500 multi-mission corvette is designed for surveillance, surface and subsurface combat, protection and escort naval missions

The cutting of the first metal sheets for the first GOWIND 2500 corvette built in Lorient symbolises the launch of the ambitious industrial program conducted by DCNS for the Egyptian Navy. It includes the construction of four latest-generation corvettes, both in France and Egypt. The delivery of the first vessel is slated for 2017, i.e., less than four years after the signature of the contract last summer.

In the frame of an international call for tender, DCNS was able to offer the best product at the most attractive cost. The Group was able to comply with the very tight deadlines to adapt the product to the specific needs of this client for the construction of the vessels in France and in Egypt via technology transfer.

With this contract, DCNS has scored another success for the GOWIND 2500 corvette. The Group had already won a first contract for the Royal Malaysian Navy, which covers the design and construction of six corvettes in Malaysia at the Boustead Naval Shipyard through technology transfer.

The first Egyptian GOWIND 2500 corvette will be built on the DCNS site in Lorient, one of the most modern naval shipyards in Europe. The three following units will be built in Alexandria within the frame of a construction technology transfer agreement.

«This industrial milestone is the concrete output of preliminary work to adapt the vessel to the specific needs of the Egyptian Navy, conducted over the last nine months by the DCNS teams. Today, we have started the construction of the very first GOWIND 2500 corvette, the reference product on the corvette market. We are proud to produce this latest-generation vessel for the Egyptian Navy», declares Bruno Chapeland, director of the Egypt GOWIND program at DCNS.

The Gowind 2500 can also perform presence, maritime surveillance and policing missions against trafficking and piracy
The Gowind 2500 can also perform presence, maritime surveillance and policing missions against trafficking and piracy

 

GOWIND 2500 corvette

Missions

GOWIND 2500 is DCNS’ response to 21st century defence and security challenges, combining unrivalled stealth features, resilience and high availability at sea with outstanding Anti-Air Warfare (AAW), Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) and Anti-Surface Ship Warfare (ASuW) performances.

With the Ship Enhanced Tactical information System (SETIS) state-of-the-art Combat System providing the operator with the best management and decision-making aids, GOWIND 2500 ensures supremacy against all conventional and asymmetric threats.

A stealth and multirole combat ship

GOWIND 2500 is a resilient and powerful surface combatant designed to perform complex naval operations as well as low intensity maritime security missions.

Through a 360° sensors coverage and deployable assets, GOWIND 2500 simultaneously detects, tracks and engages multiple airborne, surface as well as submarine threats, providing the best performance in all warfare domains.

GOWIND 2500 offers exceptional stealth capabilities with reduced radiated noise and Radar Cross Section (RCS) significantly improving the tactical advantage compared with other ships of her class.

Integrated operational capabilities

Broad and with excellent seakeeping characteristics, GOWIND 2500 operates an organic 10 t class helicopter, which extends the vessel’s warfare capabilities far beyond the horizon.

GOWIND 2500 is fitted with SETIS, DCNS’ integrated Combat System to counter multiple, multidomain attacks and threats:

  • long range coordinated surface engagement;
  • point air defence;
  • submarine deterrence and tracking;
  • gradual asymmetric engagement;
  • shared accurate tactical picture through;
  • interoperable data links.
1.3D Radar; 2.Electronic Support Measures (ESM) suite; 3.Hull mounted sonar; 4.	Variable depth sonar; 5.	Fire control system; 6.	Vertical launching system (16 cells); 7.	Main gun (57- up to 76-mm); 8.	8 Surface-to-surface missiles; 9.	Short range gun system; 10.	Torpedo launching system; 11.	Decoy launching system; 12.	Helicopter (10 t) and Unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) facilities; 13.	Rigid Hull Inflatable Boats (RHIBs).
1. 3D Radar;
2. Electronic Support Measures (ESM) suite;
3. Hull mounted sonar;
4. Variable depth sonar;
5. Fire control system;
6. Vertical launching system (16 cells);
7. Main gun (57- up to 76-mm);
8. 8 Surface-to-surface missiles;
9. Short range gun system;
10. Torpedo launching system;
11. Decoy launching system;
12. Helicopter (10 t) and Unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) facilities;
13. Rigid Hull Inflatable Boats (RHIBs).

 

Extended performance

Built to address current and emerging threats, GOWIND 2500 integrates the latest technologies. Unmanned Aerial Systems such as Airbus Defence and Space Tanan extend the ship’s action range and therefore the tactical advantage.

To improve interoperability during joint or international operations, SETIS also integrates additional command support modules as well as collaborative planning tools.

Resilient and sea proven, SETIS provides a high level of reliability with rapid reconfiguration protocols and back-up modes to return to full operational capability even in case of combat damage.

Growth Potential

Mission modules will be integrated on board future GOWIND configurations making the ship even more flexible and adaptable to emerging operational requirements.

Forward-thinking GOWIND development plans also include innovative close-in defence systems integrated into the NextGen Combat Information Centre (CIC) and Combat Bridge.

User friendly

SETIS’s intuitive Man-Machine Interface (MMI) and integrated command aids improve the crew’s ability to synthetise numerous data and react quickly in extreme and rapidly changing conditions, therefore maximizing the tactical advantage against any kind of threats.

SETIS functionally integrates UAS allowing real time control and data fusion for expanded detection and response capabilities.

The radar and other sensors are mounted on a single central mast thus allowing 360° view
The radar and other sensors are mounted on a single central mast thus allowing 360° view

 

Ship characteristics

Length 102 m/334.6 feet
Beam 16 m/52.5 feet
Draft 5.4 m/17.7 feet
Displacement 2,600 t
Propulsion Combined diesel and electric
Speed 25+ knots/29+ mph/46 km/h
Range 3,700 NM/6,852 km at 15 knots/ 17 mph/28 km/h
Crew (+ Pax) 65 (+15)

 

DCNS starts the construction of the first GOWIND 2500 corvette for the Egyptian Navy