Tag Archives: Damen

Multi-Role
Auxiliary Vessels

On 8 June 2016, during the Oceanographic Survey Vessel Conference in London, Damen Shipyards Group announced the introduction of a new range of Multi-Role Auxiliary Vessels (MRAV). The common theme running through the series is the provision of a basic platform offering reliable and cost-effective multi-role potential and hydrographic survey capabilities to naval clients.

Damen Multi-Role Auxiliary Vessel Series
Damen Multi-Role Auxiliary Vessel Series

With the addition of supplementary modular mission equipment, this new family of Damen vessels can be mobilized in numerous, mainly littoral, naval tasks such as: explosive ordnance clearance and disposal, diving operations, torpedo recovery and overhaul, Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) and Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) deployment, Search and Rescue (SAR), coastal infantry and submarine support. The largest version of the range will be able to operate worldwide, on the ocean as well as in littoral waters. This ship has additional capabilities such as disaster and humanitarian relief, oceanography and naval training support.

The introduction of flexible concepts which allow as many functions as possible to be included into a range of smaller vessels without reducing the effectiveness and capacity of the fleet while maintaining the benefits of modularity; this is Damen’s ambition with this new family of vessels. «To this end, plug-and-play containerized kit for many support tasks contribute considerable adaptability to a particular mission», explains Damen Shipyards Gorinchem’s Principal Naval Advisor Jan van der Burg, a retired Vice Admiral of the Royal Netherlands Navy.

 

One platform – multiple tasks

The idea behind these vessels is to create a basic platform that can assist in a variety of tasks through the selection of the required mission configuration, e.g. coastal transport, submarine support or coastal infantry operations. The stimulus to switch from the traditional one-to-one replacement is to lower the total cost of ownership without losing capability and capacity.

The new range of vessels consists of three different designs: the MRAV 660, MRAV 1600 and MRAV 3600. Designed for different geographic profiles, these vessels are respectively 43, 62 and 85 meters long. Hydrographic capabilities, to map the seabed for safe navigation and as a preparatory action for military operations in particular, are indispensable to navies worldwide. Depending on a naval client’s specific requirements, any type of hydrographic equipment can be integrated into these three vessels.

 

Minimal draught

With a draught of 1.9 meters, the MRAV 660 is suited for very shallow coastal, riverine and inland water operations. In addition to shallow water hydrographic surveys, this vessel is capable of a comprehensive array of duties such as diving operations, EOCD support, ROV and UAV deployment, with a core crew of 8 and capacity for an additional 15 specialists.

Damen Multi-Role Auxiliary Vessel 660
Damen Multi-Role Auxiliary Vessel 660

«Damen has built up a lot of knowledge on shallow draught ship design – this is the reason we strived towards a shallow draught hull for the MRAV 660 with full confidence. The expertise of our Research Department, combined with input from our Workboats Product Group contributed to a design based upon tested design solutions», notes Damen Design and Proposal Engineer Tim Viveen. «The key points are to maximize displacement, minimize resistance and optimize seakeeping characteristics for the area in which the ship will operate. The MRAV 660 has design characteristics that help achieve this: an aluminium superstructure and reduced freeboard section cut down on weight. And tunnel ducts on the underside of the hull ensure enough water reaches the propellers».

 

Additional roles

The MRAV 1600 is designed for littoral and regional offshore operations. Its larger size allows for greater endurance and carrying capacity of both crew, mission modules and cargo. The vessel will be manned by a core crew of 13, with capacity for an additional 30 mission specialists. The main deck can hold six standard 20-foot mission containers and the below-deck cargo hold can store two 20-foot containers and palletized cargo.

Damen Multi-Role Auxiliary Vessel 1600
Damen Multi-Role Auxiliary Vessel 1600

This medium-sized vessel can take on similar hydrographic and auxiliary duties to its smaller sister vessel, with the addition of torpedo recovery and overhaul tasks in support of submarines and anti-submarine warfare units. Small scale coastal transport and infantry support is also possible.

 

Global coverage

Intended for worldwide service, the capacity of the largest vessel in the range – the MRAV 3600 – allows for more than one specific mission during a deployment. Capable of hydrographic operations both in littoral and deeper waters, this vessel also has a helideck and substantial storage capacity for other mission configurations, equipment and cargo. Furthermore, the MRAV 3600 can serve as a base for more extensive operations such as disaster and humanitarian relief. There is accommodation for 14 core and 45 additional mission crew and enough space on board to provide emergency hospital services for 50 to 60 people.

Damen Multi-Role Auxiliary Vessel 3600
Damen Multi-Role Auxiliary Vessel 3600

 

Advantages of modularity

One of Damen’s key aims with this new range of vessels is to reduce the pressure on a navy’s human and financial resources. The modularity of the mission modules also plays a major part in reducing this pressure: «We achieved this by combining the capabilities of specialized ships into one ship by using these add-on equipment modules – these can be fitted inside standard 10-, 20- or 40-foot containers or have the footprint of a standard container», states Damen Design and Proposal Manager Piet van Rooij. «When operating multiple ships of the same family and design, the efficiency of training, crew exchangeability and maintenance programmes are improved».

 

Cost results

A modular platform is inherently flexible: this allows naval clients to better react to changes in the mission environment. Modularity also has implications on the total cost of ownership: the lifetime of an individual vessel can be efficiently extended by upgrading capabilities with new equipment modules that are not integrated into the original design.

Financial advantages are to be found in the fact that the MRAV range is commercially built and also uses commercially available components. This is made possible because of the vessels’ non-combatant role. Mr. Van Rooij: «Using commercial off-the-shelf equipment reduces the total cost of ownership without reducing the quality of the equipment».

 

Complementary design

The ship design itself has a proven background: «Damen has built many ships similar to the MRAV range for the offshore industry. This means that there will not be any unwanted surprises for the first customer of this new range».

Damen has a rich naval shipbuilding heritage; one that goes back more than a century. The new Multi-Role Auxiliary Vessel range serves to expand the company’s naval portfolio that includes larger vessels such as frigates, corvettes, LPDs, AORs and OPVs. «These new MRAV designs are complementary to the range of ships that Damen already offers for the defence and security markets», concludes Mr. Van Rooij. «We are currently at the stage of finalized conceptual design. Considering the next step, being more detailed engineering while taking advantage of COTS equipment and tested designs, we are confident that the actual construction can be swiftly accomplished, with excellent quality and reliability».

Indonesian first SIGMA

PT PAL has launched the first of two SIGMA 10514 Perusak Kawal Rudal (PKR) guided-missile frigates designated for the Indonesian Navy (TNI AL). PT PAL built these ships in collaboration with Damen Schelde Naval Shipbuilding (DSNS). The ceremony was attended by the Guests of Honour, namely the Indonesian Minister of Defense, Ryamizard Rycudu along with Coordinating Minister of Maritime Affairs, Rizal Ramli; ambassadors from neighboring countries; the Governor of East Java, Soekarwo and Chief of the Navy Admiral Ade Supandi.

Indonesian Navy first SIGMA 10514 PKR launched at PT Pal Surabaya Shipyard
Indonesian Navy first SIGMA 10514 PKR launched at PT Pal Surabaya Shipyard

Coordinating Minister for Maritime Affairs, Rizal Ramli said: «The Launching of PKR1 is a great momentum for the development of the Indonesian Shipbuilding and Maritime Industry. This has shown that Indonesia has the human resources and skills to develop naval vessels. However, we must still improve our technology and knowledge in order to compete internationally. Certainly, this is what we hope to achieve from our partner DSNS».

Mr. Firmansyah Arifin, President Director of PT Pal: «The launching of the first PKR went very smoothly. We are confident that the installation of the remaining technical parts of the vessel will be carried out in due time, so that the delivery phase can be achieved on or ahead of schedule».

The SIGMA 10514 PKR frigate was a project initiated in August 2010 by the Indonesian Ministry of Defence. The Ministry awarded a contract to Damen for the construction of the first SIGMA 10514 PKR in December 2015. The first steel was cut by the former Minister of Defence, Mr. Purnomo Yusgiantoro in January 2014 and the keel was laid in April 2014 at PT PAL shipyard in Surabaya. The PKRs are designed and built to endure various missions.

Damen frigate modularly constructed in the Netherlands and Indonesia in collaborative construction project
Damen frigate modularly constructed in the Netherlands and Indonesia in collaborative construction project

 

Purpose

Primarily, the vessel will be operated for Anti-Air Warfare, Anti-Surface Warfare, and Anti-Submarine Warfare. However, it is also compatible with Maritime Security, Search and Rescue, Patrol, and Humanitarian Support tasks. TNI-Al will be strongly empowered by this state-of-the-art maritime capacity.

Damen has extensive experience in the use of composite materials
Damen has extensive experience in the use of composite materials

 

Modular construction

The SIGMA 10514 PKR has a proven design and is uniquely built using a modular approach. SIGMA stands for Ship Integrated Geometrical Modularity Approach. In essence, the PKRs are divided into 6 modules of which 4 were built in PT PAL’s shipyards while the other two modules were built and fully tested at DSNS in the Netherlands. The modular building enables greater flexibility, is more cost effective and allows for building in various locations worldwide. Essentially, it provides a large portion of technological transfer. When the 6 modules were complete, PT PAL had the responsibility of integrating them into one sole vessel.

A study was carried out to evaluate the influence of different ship components on the airflow around a ship's superstructure
A study was carried out to evaluate the influence of different ship components on the airflow around a ship’s superstructure

 

Main characteristics

Technically, the PKR has a length of 345 feet/105.11 metres, a beam of 46.6 feet/14.2 metres and a displacement of 2,365 tons. The vessel features a fully air-conditioned accommodation for up to 120 persons. The helicopter deck is suitable to host a medium sized helicopter hanger with a weight of max 10 tons. The vessel is also equipped with two Rigid Hull Inflatable Boats (RHIBs) for rescue and patrol operations. The frigate has a speed of 28 knots/32 mph/52 km/h, and can sail up to 5,000 NM/5,754 miles/9,260 km at 14 knots/16 mph/26 km/h. The endurance is at least 20 days at sea.

The propulsion system of the PKR vessel utilises a combined diesel or electric (CODOE) which consists of two 10,000 kW Maximum Continuous Rating (MCR) diesel engines, two 1,300 kW electric motors, two double input gearboxes and two 12 feet/3.65 metre controllable pitch propellers. The vessel is equipped with a sophisticated platform management system that enables operating, control and monitoring of the ship’s auxiliary systems. The vessel will naturally be equipped with a complete, state-of-the-art sensor and weapon package to counter air, surface and sub-surface threats. For self-defence, the vessel is also equipped with comprehensive electronic warfare systems.

The sensory aspect of the SIGMA is equipped with 3-D surveillance radar with a range of 135 NM/155 miles/250 km. Furthermore, there is a target indication radar which also has an electro optical fire control system. The sensor array also comprises a Friend or Foe Identification (IFF) system and a hull mounted sonar.

By using Finite Element Analysis, the actual behaviour of a ship’s structure can be simulated. Undesired effects can be found and corrected
By using Finite Element Analysis, the actual behaviour of a ship’s structure can be simulated. Undesired effects can be found and corrected

 

Sharing expertise

Naturally, this strategic project between PT PAL and DSNS also led to a flow of knowledge transfer from Damen to its Indonesian counterpart. In fact, more than 300 people from PT PAL benefitted from the extensive sharing of shipbuilding expertise. PT PAL shipyards also ameliorated its infrastructure as part of the project. Mr. Arifin: «The partnership between PAL and Damen is undoubtedly a great opportunity. In particular, PT PAL has extensively benefitted from a transfer of knowledge and technology. For instance, we have improved our yard standards and trained our workers. Certainly, we would highly recommend the continuation of this strategic partnership for the future».

Damen works alongside world-renowned research institutes such as Delft University of Technology, Maritime Research Institute Netherlands (MARIN) and the Netherlands Organization of Applied Scientific Research (TNO), as well as other reputable universities and leading maritime companies
Damen works alongside world-renowned research institutes such as Delft University of Technology, Maritime Research Institute Netherlands (MARIN) and the Netherlands Organization of Applied Scientific Research (TNO), as well as other reputable universities and leading maritime companies

 

CHARACTERISTICS

GENERAL
Customer Indonesian Navy
Basic functions Naval Patrol Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ), deterrence, Search and Rescue (SAR), Anti-Surface Warfare (ASW), Anti-Air Warfare (AAW), Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASUW), Electronic Warfare (EW)
Hull material Steel grade A/AH36
Standards Naval/Commercial, naval intact/damaged stability, noise reduced, moderate shock
Classification Lloyd’s Register of Shipping (supervision) 100 A1 SSC Mono Patrol, G6, LMC UMS
DIMENSIONS
Length overall (o.a.) 345 feet/105.11 m
Beam Moulded (mld) 46.6 feet/14.2 m
Depth no.1 deck 28.7 feet/8.75 m
Draught (dwl) 12.1 feet/3.7 m
Displacement (dwl) 2,365 tonnes
PERFORMANCE
Speed (Maximum power) 28 knots/32 mph/52 km/h
Range at 14 knots/16 mph/26 km/h 5,000 NM/5,754 miles/9,260 km
Endurance 20 days at sea
PROPULSION SYSTEM
Propulsion type Combined Diesel or Electric (CODOE)
Diesel engines 2 × 10,000 kW Maximum Continuous Rating (MCR) Propulsion type
Electric motors 2 × 1300 kW
Gearbox 2 × double input input/single output
Propellers 2 × Controllable Pitch Propellers (CPP) diameter 12 feet/3.65 m
AUXILIARY SYSTEMS
Generator sets 6 × 715 kWE
Emergency gen. set 1 × 180 kWE
Chilled water system 2 × units, redundant distribution
Fire fighting 4 × main pumps +1 x service pump
Degaussing System
DECK EQUIPMENT
Helicopter deck Max. 10 tons helicopter, with lashing points
Helicopter operations day/night with refueling system
Helicopter hangar
RAS on helicopter deck PS&SB, astern fueling
Boats 2 × Rigid Hull Inflatable Boat (RHIB)
ACCOMMODATION
Fully air-conditioned accommodation for 120 persons
Commanding Officer 1
Officers 26
Chief Petty Officers 10
Petty Officers 36
Junior Ratings 29
Trainee Officers 18
Provisions for Nuclear, Biological and Chemical (NBC) citadel/decontamination
WEAPON & SENSOR SUITE
3D-Surveillance & target indication radar & Friend or Foe Identification (IFF)
Radar/electro optical fire control
Hull Mounted Sonar
Combat management system
Medium calibre gun 76-mm
1 × Close In Weapon System (CIWS)
2 × Surface-to-Surface Missile (SSM) launcher
12 cell Vertical Launching (VL) Short Range Air Defense (SHORADS)
2 × triple Torpedo launcher
Electronic Support Measures (ESM) & Electronic CounterMeasures (ECM)
2 × Decoys/chaff
Integrated internal & external communication system
NAUTICAL EQUIPMENT
Integrated bridge console, 2 × Radar, Electronic Chart Display & Information System (ECDIS), Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS-A3), reference gyro

 

Royal Moroccan

In a third recent construction contract with Damen Shipyards Group, the Royal Moroccan Navy has ordered five Interceptor 1503 vessels. The vessels will be mobilised to combat illegal activities such as terrorism and smuggling in Moroccan waters.

Speeds of 50 to 60 knots are achieved through the combination of raw power, low weight and efficient hull form
Speeds of 50 to 60 knots are achieved through the combination of raw power, low weight and efficient hull form

Designed for ultra-fast operations, the Interceptor 1503 can reach speeds of up to 60 knots/69 mph/111 km/h. This impressive figure is achieved by combining an outstanding propulsion system with cutting edge lightweight composite materials.

The power originates from three diesel engines, each driving a separate stern drive. The hull is constructed from fibre-reinforced plastic in an epoxy resin matrix – renowned for its resistance to impact and fatigue as well as its lightweight properties.

Perfectly suited for tracking down and taking appropriate action on illegal activities, the highly manoeuvrable Interceptors have additional space in the cockpit for search and rescue survivors.

As international security issues have heightened over the last decade, Damen has witnessed growing interest in its range of Interceptor vessels. To respond to this demand, the company is continuing to invest in a substantial Research and Development programme to design and build safe, strong and ultra-fast composite vessels.

Although the Interceptor has been in Damen’s portfolio for some time, this latest order for such a highly valued customer is a prime example of such committed research. The five vessels are in fact the first in a new series of reengineered vessels.

All five Interceptor 1503 vessels will be constructed at Damen’s state-of-the-art shipyard specialising in composite vessel construction. The first vessel will be delivered in June 2016 followed thereafter by one vessel every six weeks.

The dependable hard-chined, non-stepped hull design guarantees predictable and safe operations at high speed
The dependable hard-chined, non-stepped hull design guarantees predictable and safe operations at high speed

 

SPECIFICATION

GENERAL
HULL & DECK MATERIAL Glass & carbon reinforced epoxy
SUPERSTRUCTURE Aluminium 5083 and 6000 series
BASIC FUNCTIONS Anti-smuggling interceptor duties
CLASSIFICATION (OPTIONAL) Bureau Veritas & MCA
Special Service/Interceptor, Coastal area
DIMENSIONS
LENGTH O.A. 47.8 feet/14.57 m
BEAM O.A. 9.55 feet/2.91 m
DRAUGHT (DRIVES UP/DOWN) 2.62/3.94 feet/0.8/1.2 m
HULL TYPE 26º deep-V
DISPLACEMENT 7-9 tonnes
CAPACITIES
FUEL OIL (TOTAL) 317 Gallon/1,200 L
CREW 6 persons
PASSENGERS (SLOW SPEED) 10 persons
ENDURANCE (AT 45 KNOTS/52 MPH/83 KM/H) 155 NM/178 miles/287 km
PERFORMANCE (TRIALS)
CRUISING SPEED 45 knots/52 mph/83 km/h
MAXIMUM SPEED 60 knots/69 mph/111 km/h
PROPULSION SYSTEM
MAIN ENGINES 3 × MDS VGT-32 diesel
TOTAL POWER 3 × 373 kW/3500 rpm
GEARBOXES ZF
STERNDRIVES Konrad 660 DP
PROPELLERS Stainless steel
ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT
NETWORKS 12V DC
DECK LAY-OUT
ANCHOR EQUIPMENT 1 × SHHP
FENDERING Resilient deck fender
SAFETY Operator Protection Zone with 6 saddle seats
AUXILIARY SYSTEMS
BILGE PUMPS 3 × hand operated
2 × electrically driven
CATHODIC PROTECTION Impressed current
STEERING Full power steering, manual back-up
TRIM TABS Twin electro-hydraulic
FIRE EXTINGUISHING Aerosol system in engine room
NAUTICAL, SURVEILLANCE AND COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT
SEARCHLIGHTS 2 × 100W 12V
COMPASS GPS/Magnetic
RADAR Marine type, X-band
VHF’S 2 × watertight IMO
GPS/DGPS Chart plotter with C-Map memory cartridge
CREW INTERCOM Intercom 6-way system
6 voiceducers
2 radio operators
UHF/FM TRANSCEIVER Portable 403-433 MHz
Portable 440-470 MHz
Damen Interceptors are rugged workboats, not upgraded and grey painted pleasure boats
Damen Interceptors are rugged workboats, not upgraded and grey painted pleasure boats

Next generation RHIB

At this year’s Europort event in Rotterdam, the Damen Shipyards Group unveiled the latest addition to its extensive portfolio. The RHIB 1050 represents the next generation in rigid hull inflatable boats. A 34.4 × 11 feet/10.5 × 3.35 metre multi-mission vessel that can serve as an independent platform or as support for a larger patrol vessel, the RHIB 1050 presents a design that leaves no stone unturned. The end result is a robust package fronting safety, comfort and outstanding performance.

RHIB is quick too – able to sail at speeds of over 50 knots/57.5 mph/92.6 km/h
RHIB is quick too – able to sail at speeds of over 50 knots/57.5 mph/92.6 km/h

The RHIB 1050 was developed at Damen Shipyards Hardinxveld – no stranger to such vessels having provided numerous examples to the Royal Netherlands Navy over the years. Newbuild Project Manager at the yard Roel Foolen is happy with a job well done: «This is not your average RHIB», he states. «For starters, it’s Lloyds approved. The hull is made of glass reinforced epoxy as opposed to polyester and provided with Lloyd’s approved closed cell, foam core».

Damen’s use of epoxy for the hull will see the RHIB 1050 produced at the group’s specialist composite yard in Antalya, Turkey. The RHIB will be produced in series with a standard hull, open to flexible, client-specified outfitting requirements.

«Further to this, we are also able to provide training in its use», continues Mr. Foolen. «Damen has many years’ experience in building boats for navies and other defence and security bodies», he explains.

Ergonomics are a strong theme running throughout the design. Damen developed the layout using a mock-up console, constantly tweaking the positioning of instrumentation, seating and controls until completely satisfied with comfort levels. Consequently, the wheel and throttle are perfectly aligned with the suspension seating and handles and grips are located strategically throughout the RHIB.

«We’ve aimed to cover every detail – for example including steps to facilitate easy, fast exit of the RHIB in boarding ops and integration of hoisting eyes into the bollards, simultaneously removing a trip hazard and taking advantage of every available bit of space».

Damen is currently building a second RHIB 1050, which will feature 2 × 400 hp
Damen is currently building a second RHIB 1050, which will feature 2 × 400 hp

Another example of this philosophy at work is the unique use of D-shaped tubing, rather than the conventional cylindrical tubing. «Doing this allows us to combine the console and the engines into a single, space saving unit. Usually this would not be possible as such a unit would impede access to the fore of the vessel. However, with a section of tubing removed, there is still space for on board personnel to pass safely and comfortably fore to aft», explains Mr. Foolen.

This focused planning has also brought about a vessel that is notably easy to maintain. The 2 x 350 litre/2 x 94 gallon fuel tanks are located beneath the 10 deck-based seats. The seats are fitted to a dedicated hatch so, in the event the tanks require removing, the seating is simply lifted clear.

Similarly, the entire console unit is hinged at the aft so that it can be very easily moved clear when access is necessary to the 2 × 370 hp/2 × 276 kW Volvo Penta engines. The mast is also hinged so that it can be quickly folded away for transport height.

«As well as easy maintenance, the RHIB 1050 is also low maintenance», states Mr. Foolen. «We’ve used high-end materials and taken every step to ensure components are protected. Console instrumentation is located behind a heated, watertight window for example. And all electrics are housed in a dedicated, heated and ventilated compartment inside the dry storage area. Furthermore, the stern platform, as well as being perfectly situated for diving and man overboard operations, works in combination with the tube ends to form a protective barrier for the stern drives. At the front of the vessel, the nose is flattened to serve as a fender during boarding operations and the tubing is fitted to the vessel with aluminium extrusions, as opposed to glue. This not only offers a better grip, but also makes it easier to remove and replace when necessary», Mr. Foolen explains.

Of course, with such a vessel, performance is also of fundamental importance. Here too, the RHIB 1050 is not found wanting. «During sea trials, the handling, manoeuvrability and balance have proven to be excellent. It is very safe also, very forgiving and perfect in rough, harsh water. She’s quick too – able to sail at speeds of over 50 knots/57.5 mph/92.6 km/h».

Damen is currently building a second RHIB 1050, which will feature 2 × 400 hp/2 × 298 kW outboard engines.

 

With a cutting-edge, ergonomically designed layout and highly efficient, top quality performance, the Damen RHIB 1050 represents the next generation in rigid hull inflatable boats

 

Joint Support Ship

According to Kate Tringham, Jane’s Defence Weekly correspondent, the Netherlands Defence Material Organisation (DMO) formally handed over the 28,000-ton Joint Logistic Support Ship (JSS) HNLMS Karel Doorman (A833) to the Royal Netherlands Navy (RNLN) on September 24, 2015. The ceremony marked the successful completion of the majority of the ship’s sea acceptance test programme, a DMO spokesperson said. HNLMS Karel Doorman will now start its work-up trajectory, with a view to achieving full operational readiness by mid-2016.

The Joint Logistic Support Ship Karel Doorman (A833) is being built to ensure that the Netherlands armed forces will remain able to conduct operations outside the national boundaries in the future
The Joint Logistic Support Ship Karel Doorman (A833) is being built to ensure that the Netherlands armed forces will remain able to conduct operations outside the national boundaries in the future

Built by Damen Schelde Naval Shipbuilding yard in Vlissingen under a contract signed in December 2009, Karel Doorman was laid down in June 2011 and launched in October 2012. Before completion the ship found itself in 2013 declared surplus to requirements under austerity-driven defence budget cuts. The decision was reversed by the Dutch government and it officially entered service with the RNLN on 24 April 2015.

Following commissioning, the ship embarked on a nine-week deployment to Norway, Canada, the United States, and the Dutch Antilles where it conducted warm weather trials, and underwater and magnetic signature testing under DMO supervision. In addition to the DMO’s test programme, Karel Doorman was used for replenishment at sea operations throughout the nine weeks, transport of equipment to the Dutch Antilles, and successful trials with a Bell-Boeing MV-22 Osprey tiltrotor aircraft. It also participated in the annual «Hurricane Exercise» («HUREX 2015»), demonstrating the versatility and potential of the ship, the spokesperson said.

Prior to commissioning, in November 2014 the ship also completed a three-month deployment to West Africa to deliver aid to Ebola-struck countries.

The JSS will be equipped with a crane and lift to hoist heavy materiel
The JSS will be equipped with a crane and lift to hoist heavy materiel

 

Characteristics

GENERAL
Yard reference 412
Customer Royal Netherlands Navy
Basic functions Replenishment-At-Sea/Fuelling-At-Sea (RAS/FAS), Sea Basing, Strategic Transport, Disaster Relief, Training
Classification Germanischer Lloyd, SOLAS and MARPOL compliant
NAVAL FEATURES
Shock resistant, Blast bulkheads, Nuclear Biological Chemical and Damage (NBCD) citadel, Degaussing system, Radar Cross Section (RCS), Underwater Noise and Magnetic Signature Reduction
DIMENSIONS
Length OverAll (LOA) 671.6 feet/204.7 m
Beam Moulded 99.7 feet/30.4 m
Draft design 25.6 feet/7.8 m
Depth to n°1 deck 61 feet/18.6 m
Displacement full load approximately 27,000 tonnes
PERFORMANCE
Service speed 18 knots/20.7 mph/33.3 km/h
Range at 15 knots/17 mph/28 km/h 10,000 NM/11,508 miles/18,520 km
PROPULSION SYSTEM
Diesel-electric propulsion system
Generator power 24,900 kW/33,391.5 hp
Propulsion power 17,800 kW/23,870.2 hp
Propellers 2 × Fixed-Pitch Propeller (FPP)
Bow-thruster 2 × FPP
Stern-thruster 1 × FPP
TRANSPORT CAPACITY
RoRo space approximately 2,350 m2/ 25,295.2 feet2
Lanemeters approximately 2,000 m
Ammunition. Store 730 m2/ 7,857.6 feet2
Store 1,000 m2/10,763.9 feet2
F76 7,700 m3/271,922.9 feet3
F44 1,000 m3/35,314.6 feet3
FW 400 m3/14,125.9 feet3
Flight deck with 2 spots for a Chinook helicopter
Night Vision Compatible helicopter landing aids
Ground Power Units (Helicopter Start & Service Power)
Hangar space for 2 × Chinook size helicopters in the fully spread condition, space for 6 × Chinook size with blades folded
ACCOMODATION
Air-conditioned spaces for 300 crew and special personnel consisting of cabins, stores, galley, mess rooms and sanitary spaces
A fully equipped role 3 hospital
WEAPONS & SENSOR SUITE
Radar systems Extensive radar suite for both surface-to-surface and surface-to-air surveillance, Identification Friend or Foe (IFF), IO-detection System
Communication LF/MF/HF/VHF/UHF Transceivers, Satcom system, Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS), Message Handling System (MHS), Internal communication system, LAN (secure and civil)
Weapons 2 × Goalkeeper CIWS
4 × Super Rapid Blooming Offboard Chaff (SRBOC) launchers
2 × 30-mm remote controlled force protection gun
4 × 12.7-mm/.50 remote controlled medium caliber gun
NAUTICAL EQUIPMENT
GPS, Integrated Bridge System, echo sounder, power- and ship’s management system with integrated Electronic Chart Display & Information System (ECDIS), Nav-radars I&F (2 ×), Warship Automatic Identification System (W-AIS)
EQUIPMENT
2 × Dual purpose Replenishment-At-Sea (RAS) equipment according to Stanag
Stern quarter ramp 100 ton
3 × 50 m3/day RO-units
2 × Fast Rib
2 × Landing Craft, Vehicle, Personnel (LCVP)
1 × Deck Crane 40 ton
2 × Store elevator
1 × Ammunition elevator
1 × Platform elevator
The ship can transport about 5,000 tonnes of heavy rolling (armoured) materiel. The ship will have a hospital with 2 operating theatres
The ship can transport about 5,000 tonnes of heavy rolling (armoured) materiel. The ship will have a hospital with 2 operating theatres

 

The Damen Joint Support Ship fulfils the operational requirements of the Royal Netherlands Navy for a robust multifunctional platform

 

Damen’s new OPV

On 20 April 2015, Damen Shipyards Group gave a sneak preview of their newly designed 2nd generation Offshore Patrol Vessels (OPVs) during the annual OPVs & Corvettes Asia Pacific conference in Singapore. Damen’s Design & Proposal Manager Piet van Rooij explained how this new OPV has been configured for various missions.

The development of the «Axe Bow Concept» followed, a hull shape with unparalleled seakeeping characteristics: the maximum acceleration ever measured on the bow of an existing Axe-Bow is 1.3 G. Based on this concept, Damen has developed the «Sea Axe» Patrol Boats and Fast Crew Suppliers. Damen has delivered over 150 Axe-Bows since 2006
The development of the «Axe Bow Concept» followed, a hull shape with unparalleled seakeeping characteristics: the maximum acceleration ever measured on the bow of an existing Axe-Bow is 1.3 G. Based on this concept, Damen has developed the «Sea Axe» Patrol Boats and Fast Crew Suppliers. Damen has delivered over 150 Axe-Bows since 2006

This new generation of re-configurable Damen OPVs is highly efficient and incredibly versatile. Damen’s famous Sea Axe hull shape is used for these 2nd generation OPVs. Due to this hull design, these vessels demonstrate superior seakeeping including exceptional low heave accelerations. This makes the vessel very comfortable, even in stormy sea states.

Since the hull is designed to reduce water resistance, the new OPV is also very fuel efficient and capable of speeds up to 25/26 knots/29/30 mph/46/48 km/h.

Versatility has been reinvented by three newly developed multi-mission locations – namely the Bridge, Hangar and Bay. The Multi-Mission Bay (MM Bay) can be equipped with dedicated mission modules (e.g. mission containers) for missions such as counter piracy, counter-drug operations, Anti-Mining Warfare (AMW), Search-And-Rescue (SAR) etc.

The MM Bay is also equipped with a nine-meter Rigid-Hulled Inflatable Boat (RHIB), which can be launched over a dedicated slipway through the rear of the vessel while the OPV is sailing. In the Damen-built Holland Class Ocean Patrol vessels for the Royal Netherlands Navy this system has already proven to be safe in operations up to SS 5 conditions.

Mission modules (dedicated containers) can be lifted into the Multi-Mission Bay, through the helicopter deck
Mission modules (dedicated containers) can be lifted into the Multi-Mission Bay, through the helicopter deck

Unlike other OPVs, the Command-and-Control Centre (C2 Centre) is located directly behind the bridge. Damen calls this development their Multi-Mission Bridge (MM Bridge). Both spaces can be separated by means of a blinded sliding wall. OPVs are less likely to take part in combat situations such as those faced by a frigate.

During a mission, when lowering the sliding wall, situation awareness in the C2 Centre is improved, allowing C2 Centre officers to observe the situation immediately with their own eyes.

Mr. Van Rooij comments: «Today OPVs don’t engage in combat situations as often as frigates do, however, fast and effective coordination during a ‘chase’ is essential for an OPV».

The Multi-Mission Hangar (MM Hangar) is capable of storing an 11-tonne NH-90 helicopter and an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) such as the Boeing ScanEagle. The MM Hangar has been designed so that the OPV crew can deploy either the helicopter or the UAV without having to move either one. Furthermore, there is space for a spare parts store and workshop for both the helicopter and UAV.

The Damen OPV 2nd generation is available as a standard in four series:

  • 75 meter/246 feet – 1,400 tonnes;
  • 85 meter/279 feet – 1,800 tonnes;
  • 95 meter/312 feet – 2,400 tonnes;
  • 103 meter/338 feet – 2,600 tonnes.
Depending on the mission and the situation, the C&C Centre can be separated from the Bridge by means of a blinded sliding door
Depending on the mission and the situation, the C&C Centre can be separated from the Bridge by means of a blinded sliding door

 

MAIN CHARACTERISTICS

Series OPV 1400 OPV 1800 OPV 2400 OPV 2600
Displacement 1,400 tonnes 1,800 tonnes 2,400 tonnes 2,600 tonnes
Length o.a. 75 m/246 feet 85 m/279 feet 95 m/312 feet 103 m/338 feet
Beam moulded 12.7 m/ 41.7 feet 13.7 m/45 feet 14.4 m/47 feet 14.4 m/47 feet
Draft 3.8 m/12.5 feet 4 m/13 feet 4 m/13 feet 4 m/13 feet
Speed maximum (MSR) 23 knots/ 26 mph/42 km/h 25 knots/ 29 mph/46 km/h 26 knots/ 30 mph/48 km/h 26 knots/ 30 mph/48 km/h
Range 4,000 NM/ 7,408 km 5,000 NM/ 9,260 km 6,000 NM/ 11,112 km 7,000 NM/ 12,964 km
Endurance 25 days 30 days 40 days 40 days
Helicopter & UAV hangar telescopic telescopic telescopic telescopic
Helicopter flight deck & refueling standard standard standard standard
Helicopter hangar area, L×B 19.2×6 m/ 63×19.7 feet 19.2×6 m/ 63×19.7 feet 19.2×6 m/ 63×19.7 feet 19.2×6 m/ 63×19.7 feet
Helicopter flight deck area, L×B 25×12.7 m/ 82×41.7 feet 25×13.7 m/ 82×45 feet 25×14.4 m/ 82×47 feet 25×14.4 m/ 82×47 feet
Take-off weight maximum 6 tonnes 11 tonnes 11 tonnes 11 tonnes
Multi-Mission Bridge standard standard standard standard
Multi-Mission Bay standard standard standard standard
Mission Module Containers 2 3 3 5
Number of RHIBs 2 2 2
Length of RHIBs 9 m 9 m 9 m 9 m
Core Complement capacity 40 60 60 60
Additional in Multi-role compartment 12 36 48 48
Multi-role compartment area 130 m2/ 1,399.3 feet2 190 m2/ 2,045.1 feet2 220 m2/ 2,368 feet2 320 m2/ 3,444.4 feet2
A small slipway makes ultrafast RHIB deployment possible, while sailing
A small slipway makes ultrafast RHIB deployment possible, while sailing