Tag Archives: Boeing

Egyptian Chinook

The U.S. Army has awarded Boeing a contract to produce 12 new CH-47F Chinooks for the Egyptian Air Force. With this $426 million foreign military sale, Egypt will replace its fleet of CH-47D aircraft with the modern F model, and benefit from its advanced multi-mission capabilities.

CH-47F Chinook
Egypt will replace its fleet of CH-47D Chinook aircraft with the modern F model which offers the Egyptian Air Force advanced multi-mission capabilities (Boeing photo)

«The F-model aircraft will enhance Egypt’s Chinook capabilities and help effectively accomplish its heavy-lift objectives», said Ken Eland, vice president and H-47 program manager. «Boeing’s partnership with the Egyptian Air Force remains strong as we continue to work together to modernize their fleet».

The CH-47F Chinook is an advanced multi-mission helicopter for the U.S. Army and international defense forces. It contains a fully integrated, digital cockpit management system, Common Avionics Architecture System cockpit and advanced cargo-handling capabilities complementing the aircraft’s mission performance and handling characteristics.

«Boeing is committed to supporting the defense modernization mission of the Egyptian armed forces and ensuring the best capability for Egypt’s national defense and security», added Vince Logsdon, vice president, Boeing International Business Development.

Team Chinook is led by the U.S. Army, who with 19 allied international customers, collectively operate a fleet of more than 950 aircraft.

New Zealand Poseidon

New Zealand on December 7, 2022 received the first of four Boeing P-8A Poseidon maritime patrol aircraft in a ceremony at the Museum of Flight.

P-8A Poseidon
New Zealand’s first P-8A Poseidon aircraft (Boeing photo)

«As a maritime nation, delivery of the P-8A Poseidon will ensure New Zealand maintains a patrol and response capability that will protect and support law enforcement in our Exclusive Economic Zone and Southern Ocean», said Sarah Minson, acting Deputy Secretary Capability Delivery, New Zealand Ministry of Defence. «The P-8A Poseidon will also assist our South Pacific neighbors and deliver long-range search and rescue capability».

The milestone comes four years after the New Zealand Government entered into an agreement with the U.S. Navy for the P-8A Poseidon.

«The unmatched, multi-mission maritime patrol capabilities of the P-8A Poseidon will provide New Zealand the ability to extend their reach into the Pacific and beyond», said Philip June, vice president and program manager, P-8 Poseidon Programs. «New Zealand joins eight other global customers including nearby Australia that have selected or already operate the P-8A Poseidon and benefit greatly from its long-range maritime surveillance and warfare capabilities».

Boeing Defence Australia will provide sustainment services for New Zealand’s fleet with the support of the P-8 Poseidon International Program.

New Zealand’s three remaining P-8A Poseidon aircraft are all in advanced stages of production and will be delivered in 2023. The aircraft will replace New Zealand’s current fleet of six P-3K2 Orions and will be based at Royal New Zealand Air Force Base Ohakea.

To date, the global operating P-8 Poseidon fleet has amassed more than 450,000 mishap-free flight hours. The P-8A Poseidon is a long-range anti-submarine warfare, anti-surface warfare, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance aircraft capable of broad-area, maritime and littoral operations. In addition, the P-8 Poseidon performs humanitarian and search and rescue missions around the globe.

 

Technical Specifications

Wing Span 123.6 feet/37.64 m
Height 42.1 feet/12.83 m
Length 129.5 feet/39.47 m
Propulsion 2 × CFM56-7B engines; 27,000 lbs./12,237 kgf/120 kN thrust
Speed 490 knots/564 mph/908 km/h
Range 1,200 NM/1,381 miles/2,222 km with 4 hours on station
Ceiling 41,000 feet/12,496 m
Crew 9
Maximum Take-Off Gross Weight 189,200 lbs./85,820 kg

 

Japan Tankers

Boeing has been awarded a contract to deliver two additional KC-46A Pegasus tankers to the Japan Air Self-Defense Force (JASDF), bringing the total on contract for Japan to six. Boeing delivered the first KC-46A Pegasus tanker to Japan in October 2021, and a second in February 2022.

KC-46A Pegasus
Japan KC-46A Pegasus flies with U.S. KC-46A Pegasus (Boeing photo)

«The unmatched versatility and multi-mission capabilities of the KC-46A Pegasus tanker further support JASDF’s air mobility mission», said James Burgess, vice president and KC-46A Pegasus program manager. «The growing global KC-46A Pegasus fleet increases the interoperability advantages for our customers, ensuring mission readiness as well as value for their investment».

Designed to refuel all allied and coalition military aircraft compatible with international aerial refueling procedures, the proven KC-46A Pegasus has flown more than 10,000 sorties and is delivering millions of pounds of fuel every month to allied forces around the globe. In addition to refueling, the KC-46A Pegasus delivers multi-mission capabilities necessary for the 21st century fleet, including data connectivity and personnel, cargo and aeromedical transportation.

«This additional KC-46A Pegasus acquisition reinforces the U.S.-Japan security alliance to support security and stability throughout the Pacific region», said Will Shaffer, president of Boeing Japan. «Boeing is proud of our enduring partnership with Japan, and we look forward to supporting the nation’s KC-46A Pegasus fleet that will fly for decades to come».

Boeing has delivered 67 KC-46A Pegasus tankers, including 65 to the U.S. Air Force and two to Japan. Built on the proven 767 airframe that has more than 1,200 delivered – and with more KC-46A Pegasus aircraft operational globally than any tanker except the Boeing-built KC-135 Stratotanker – the Pegasus also provides crucial mission reliability for global customers.

The contract was awarded by the U.S. Air Force through the Foreign Military Sales process. Boeing builds KC-46A Pegasus aircraft for the U.S. Air Force, the JASDF and other allied customers on its 767 production line in Everett, Washington. In addition, Boeing’s Japanese partners produce 16 percent of the KC-46A Pegasus airframe structure. The JASDF also operates four earlier generation Boeing-built KC-767 aircraft.

 

General Characteristics

Primary Function Aerial refueling and airlift
Prime Contractor The Boeing Company
Power Plant 2 × Pratt & Whitney 4062
Thrust 62,000 lbs/275.790 kN/28,123 kgf – Thrust per High-Bypass engine (sea-level standard day)
Wingspan 157 feet, 8 inches/48.1 m
Length 165 feet, 6 inches/50.5 m
Height 52 feet, 10 inches/15.9 m
Maximum Take-Off Weight (MTOW) 415,000 lbs/188,240 kg
Maximum Landing Weight 310,000 lbs/140,614 kg
Fuel Capacity 212,299 lbs/96,297 kg
Maximum Transfer Fuel Load 207,672 lbs/94,198 kg
Maximum Cargo Capacity 65,000 lbs/29,484 kg
Maximum Airspeed 360 KCAS (Knots Calibrated AirSpeed)/0.86 M/414 mph/667 km/h
Service Ceiling 43,100 feet/13,137 m
Maximum Distance 7,299 NM/8,400 miles/13,518 km
Pallet Positions 18 pallet positions
Air Crew 15 permanent seats for aircrew, including aeromedical evacuation aircrew
Passengers 58 total (normal operations); up to 114 total (contingency operations)
Aeromedical Evacuation 58 patients (24 litters/34 ambulatory) with the AE Patient Support Pallet configuration; 6 integral litters carried as part of normal aircraft configuration equipment

 

Anti-Submarine Warfare

Boeing’s High Altitude Anti-Submarine Warfare Weapon Capability, or HAAWC, has satisfied all requirements for initial operational capability status from the U.S. Navy.

HAAWC
In an artist’s rendering, a High-Altitude Anti-Submarine Warfare Weapon Capability or HAAWC deploys from a Boeing P-8A Poseidon multi-mission maritime patrol aircraft (Boeing illustration)

The all-weather HAAWC enables the Boeing P-8A Poseidon to deploy MK 54 torpedoes from near or below its cruising altitude.

«The initial operational capability milestone marks the readiness of HAAWC for fleet introduction for the Navy and its international partners», said Dewayne Donley, program manager. «We’re excited to deliver greater flexibility and capability by way of higher-altitude launches from longer distances than previously possible».

The milestone follows the award of a full-rate production contract for the system to Boeing in August, squadron training, and the receipt of low-rate initial production units.

HAAWC consists of a modular Air Launch Accessory, or ALA, kit that attaches to a MK 54 torpedo, transforming it into a precision-guided glide weapon.

«It’s a major achievement for our team in reaching our goal of establishing a new high ground in anti-submarine warfare», said Bob Ciesla, vice president of Boeing Weapons. «We look forward to continuing to work alongside the Navy toward the full deployment and operational capability of the system».

Additional fielding of HAAWC units are scheduled through 2024, with the potential for production to continue into 2030 under the current contract.

The long-range anti-submarine warfare, anti-surface warfare, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance P-8A Poseidon aircraft has amassed more than 450,000 mishap-free flight-hours to date in support of broad-area, maritime and littoral operations, and performs humanitarian and search and rescue missions around the globe.

Orbital Test Vehicle

The Boeing built X-37B Orbital Test Vehicle (OTV) set a new endurance record after spending 908 days on orbit before landing at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida at 5:22 a.m. ET, November 12, 2022. This surpasses its previous record of 780 days on-orbit.

X-37B Orbital Test Vehicle (OTV)
The Boeing-built X-37B Orbital Test Vehicle (OTV) landed at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida at 5:22 a.m. ET, November 12, 2022 (Photo credit: Boeing/U.S. Space Force)

With the successful completion of its sixth mission the reusable spaceplane has now flown over 1.3 billion miles/2,092,147,200 km and spent a total of 3,774 days in space where it conducts experiments for government and industry partners with the ability to return them to Earth for evaluation.

For the first time, the vehicle carried a service module to augment the number of payloads it can haul. The module separated from the OTV prior to de-orbiting ensuring a safe and successful landing.

«This mission highlights the Space Force’s focus on collaboration in space exploration and expanding low-cost access to space for our partners, within and outside of the Department of the Air Force (DAF)», said General Chance Saltzman, Chief of Space Operations.

The sixth mission was launched atop a United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V rocket from Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in May 2020. Hosted experiments included a solar energy experiment designed by the Naval Research Lab, as well as a satellite designed and built by cadets at the U.S. Air Force Academy in partnership with the Air Force Research Laboratory. The satellite, dubbed FalconSat-8, was successfully deployed in October 2021 and remains on orbit today.

This mission also hosted multiple NASA experiments including the Materials Exposure and Technology Innovation in Space (METIS-2), which evaluated the effects of space exposure on various materials to validate and improve the precision of space environment models. This was the second flight for this type of experiment. Mission 6 also hosted a NASA experiment to evaluate the effects of long-duration space exposure on seeds. This experiment informs research aimed at future interplanetary missions and the establishment of permanent bases in space.

«Since the X-37B’s first launch in 2010, it has shattered records and provided our nation with an unrivaled capability to rapidly test and integrate new space technologies», said Jim Chilton, senior vice president, Boeing Space and Launch. «With the service module added, this was the most we’ve ever carried to orbit on the X-37B and we’re proud to have been able to prove out this new and flexible capability for the government and its industry partners».

The X-37B program is a partnership between the U.S Department of the Air Force Rapid Capabilities Office and the U.S. Space Force. Boeing designed and manufactured the spaceplane and continues to provide program management, engineering, test and mission support from sites in Southern California, Florida and Virginia.

In 2020, the X-37B received the Robert J. Collier Trophy for advancing the performance, efficiency and safety of air and space vehicles.

Netherlands Air Force

Boeing has delivered the first AH-64E Apache Version 6, or v6, Apache helicopter featuring improved performance, sensors and software to the Royal Netherlands Air Force (RNLAF).

AH-64E Apache
28 AH-64 Apache D-model Apaches will be upgraded with multiple enhancements to the aircraft’s sensors, software and weapons performance

As part of a Foreign Military Sale through the U.S. Department of Defense, Boeing received a contract in 2019 to remanufacture 28 RNLAF AH-64 Apache D-model Apaches to the advanced AH-64E Apache v6. Delivery for the final E-model Apache to the country is targeted for 2025.

«The Apache is the most advanced and proven attack helicopter, and demand for it continues to increase worldwide», said Kathleen Jolivette, vice president of Attack Helicopter Programs and Senior Mesa Site Executive at Boeing. «By upgrading from the D-model to the E-model Apache, the Royal Netherlands Air Force will gain a significant increase in attack power, versatility and situational awareness for decades to come».

The Dutch have operated D-model Apaches since 1998. Deliveries of remanufactured E-model Apaches represents the next step in the long-term partnership between Boeing and the country. Apaches continue to be an important element of European defense, and are currently operated by several European allied nations.

«It is an honor to receive the first remanufactured Apache Echo. This updated attack helicopter is a great improvement and gives the Royal Netherlands Air Force more combat power and situational awareness. This first delivery is an important step in modernizing our entire Apache fleet», said Vice Admiral Arie Jan de Waard, the Director of the Defence Materiel Organisation.

The AH-64E Apache v6 is the most modern configuration of the Apache attack helicopter. Since 1984, over 2,600 Apaches have been delivered to the U.S. Army and 17 international customers. Currently, there are more than 1,260 Apaches operating worldwide with more than 665 representing the E-model.

Enhanced Chinooks

The U.S. Army is continuing to modernize its heavy-lift helicopter fleet with an order for two more Boeing CH-47F Block II Chinooks and long lead funding for additional aircraft.

CH-47F Block II Chinook
The CH-47F Block II during first flight. The Block II Chinook is powered by cutting-edge technologies – including redesigned fuel tanks, a strengthened fuselage and an enhanced drivetrain (Photo Credit: Fred Troilo)

«Modernizing the Chinook for our Army customer is a priority», said Ken Eland, Boeing vice president and H-47 program manager. «CH-47F Block II improves readiness, limits future sustainment costs and provides commonality across the fleet. We’re dedicated to making CH-47F Block II the best option for the Army’s heavy lift mission, now and well into the future». The CH-47F Block II Chinook is powered by cutting-edge technologies – including redesigned fuel tanks, a strengthened fuselage and an enhanced drivetrain.

Last year, the Army awarded Boeing a $136 million contract for the first four CH-47F Block II aircraft, which began production in April 2022. The Lot 2 order valued at $63 million brings the total number of aircraft under contract to six. The separate Lot 3 advance procurement contract is valued at $29 million.

Boeing’s H-47 Chinook Block II expands upon 60 years of partnership with the U.S. Army. During that time, Boeing has delivered over 1,000 Chinooks to the U.S. Army, continuously modernizing the helicopter to meet evolving needs. The U.S. Army and 19 allied countries around the globe rely on the Chinook for its multi-mission capabilities including equipment and troop transport, humanitarian assistance and disaster relief.

Manned-Unmanned Teaming

Boeing has digitally demonstrated a new open autonomy architecture for MQ-25 Stingray that will allow the U.S. Navy to increase mission effectiveness by integrating Manned-UnManned Teaming (MUM-T) capability at speed and scale.

MQ-25 Stingray
Boeing’s MUM-T demonstration included three different naval aircraft tasking four virtual, autonomous MQ-25s to conduct intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance missions. Here a simulated F/A-18 Super Hornet interacts with a simulated MQ-25 Stingray. The other aircraft tasking MQ-25s in the demo included Northrop Grumman’s E-2D Advanced Hawkeye command and control aircraft and Boeing’s P-8A Poseidon maritime patrol and reconnaissance aircraft

The non-proprietary architecture, based on the government-owned Open Mission System specification, is the foundation for advanced MUM-T. A Boeing-led team virtually demonstrated how other aircraft can use MQ-25’s architecture and task it to conduct tanking and Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) missions – all within the mission airspace and without traditional communications with the ship-based ground control station.

Boeing’s MUM-T demonstration included Northrop Grumman’s E-2D Advanced Hawkeye command and control aircraft, Boeing’s P-8A Poseidon maritime patrol and reconnaissance aircraft and Boeing’s F/A-18 Block III Super Hornet fighter jet. Using their existing operational flight program software and data links, the aircraft safely and efficiently tasked four virtual, autonomous MQ-25s to conduct ISR missions. The F/A-18 Super Hornet also used its advanced tactical data links and Boeing’s conceptual «Project Black Ice» crew vehicle interface, which significantly reduced aircrew workload.

«Large swaths of ocean could be surveilled, identified and targeted when MQ-25 Stingray is teamed with carrier-based assets such as the E-2D Advanced Hawkeye or the land-based P-8A Poseidon patrol aircraft», said Don «BD» Gaddis, director, MQ-25 Stingray Advanced Design. «Through this demonstration, our customers saw how this digital, open approach to MUM-T is key to fielding critical warfighting capability at much lower cost and with greater speed and agility».

For example, the demonstration showed how both the P-8A Poseidon and E-2D Advanced Hawkeye could easily task an MQ-25 Stingray teammate with an ISR mission specifying only the search area and no-fly zones. Using an onboard autonomy framework developed by Boeing subsidiary Aurora Flight Sciences, the MQ-25 Stingray autonomously did the rest – including validating the command against its operational constraints, planning its route and conducting its search pattern, among many other tasks.

Aurora also created and demonstrated a prototype platform abstraction layer – a software boundary that decouples MQ-25’s flight safety and flight critical components from mission software and sensor hardware. This commercial best practice allows third-party «app» integration on MQ-25 Stingray. Using an Aurora-provided software development kit, Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division created a new radar search application for MQ-25 Stingray that was successfully used during the demonstration.

«Aurora’s robust software development kit enables our Navy teammates to rapidly integrate new capabilities», said Graham Drozeski, vice president of Government Programs for Aurora Flight Sciences. «The platform abstraction demonstration met test objectives for resource sharing between multiple onboard systems and supervisors, and these efforts will greatly reduce government test and certification costs as new capabilities are added over time».

The demonstration was aligned to the future warfighting capabilities in the U.S. Navy’s Unmanned Campaign Framework. Boeing will continue to refine the autonomy, sensors, interface exchanges and crew vehicle interfaces required for MUM-T.

Grey Wolf

Boeing has delivered four MH-139A Grey Wolf test aircraft to the U.S. Air Force as the service prepares to replace its aging fleet of UH-1N helicopters.

MH-139A Grey Wolf
MH-139A Grey Wolf will protect intercontinental ballistic missiles and support four Major Air Force Commands and other operating agencies

The Grey Wolf is a multi-mission aircraft – based on the proven commercial AW139 helicopter – designed to protect intercontinental ballistic missiles and transport U.S. government officials and security forces. Boeing was awarded a $2.4 billion contract in September 2018 for 80 helicopters, training systems and associated support equipment.

«The Grey Wolf is a modern, versatile aircraft offering greater range, speed and endurance than the UH-1N Huey it replaces», said Mark Cherry, vice president and general manager of Boeing Vertical Lift. «I am proud of our team who, along with our partner Leonardo, helped us to achieve this milestone – a tremendous first step in a long line of Grey Wolf deliveries».

The delivery milestone follows receipt of the Federal Aviation Administration-issued supplemental type certificate, required to commence deliveries. With aircraft in hand, the Air Force will now proceed with Military Utility Testing as the program progresses toward Milestone C.

«We are thrilled that the first four MH-139As have been accepted by the U.S. Air Force», said Clyde Woltman, chief executive officer, Leonardo Helicopters U.S. «This aircraft is well-positioned to become an important asset in the defense and security of the United States».

Leonardo produces the helicopter at its plant in northeast Philadelphia, while Boeing is responsible for military equipment procurement ad installation, and post-delivery support of the aircraft.

Boeing has the most advanced military rotorcraft in the world, renowned for leading-edge solutions that deliver proven capabilities. With 60 years of expertise and a global fleet over 2,500 strong – comprising the AH-6 Little Bird, AH-64 Apache, V-22 Osprey and H-47 Chinook aircraft, and in-development entrants, including the MH-139A Grey Wolf and DEFIANT X – Boeing advances missions ranging from precision attack and reconnaissance to medium and heavy lift operations.

As a leading global aerospace company, Boeing develops, manufactures and services commercial airplanes, defense products and space systems for customers in more than 150 countries. As a top U.S. exporter, the company leverages the talents of a global supplier base to advance economic opportunity, sustainability and community impact. Boeing’s diverse team is committed to innovating for the future, leading with sustainability, and cultivating a culture based on the company’s core values of safety, quality and integrity.

Long-Range Ramjet

Boeing and Norwegian defense and aerospace company Nammo have successfully test-fired a ramjet-powered artillery projectile, further demonstrating the viability of one of the U.S. Army’s modernization priorities – long-range precision fires.

Boeing Ramjet 155
Boeing, Nammo Complete Long-Range Ramjet Artillery Test

During the June 28 test at the Andøya Test Center in Norway, a Boeing Ramjet 155 projectile was fired out of a cannon and its ramjet engine ignited successfully. It demonstrated flight stability with a well-controlled engine combustion process.

«We believe the Boeing Ramjet 155, with continued technology maturation and testing, can help the U.S. Army meet its long-range precision fires modernization priorities», said Steve Nordlund, Boeing Phantom Works vice president and general manager. «This successful test is evidence that we are making great progress».

«This is a historic moment for Nammo», said Nammo Chief Executive Officer Morten Brandtzæg. «The test results demonstrate that ramjets are viable and can fundamentally change the future of artillery».

«We have great confidence in the ramjet concept», Brandtzæg added. «The test – with all aspects from cannon firing, to the projectile body, fins, and trajectory all functioning perfectly – represents a real technological breakthrough in artillery, and a major success for Boeing, Nammo, and the U.S. Army».

The long-range test at Andøya follows years of research, development and testing by Boeing and Nammo of ramjet technology, including more than 450 static or short-range tests.

Boeing Phantom Works and Nammo have been working together under a strategic partnership to jointly develop and produce the next generation of boosted artillery projectiles. In July 2019, the Boeing-Nammo team was awarded a contract under the U.S. Army’s XM1155 program to develop and mature the Ramjet 155 projectile. In May 2021, the team was awarded a Phase II technology development contract.

Ramjet 155 uses an engine in which the air drawn in for combustion is compressed solely by the forward motion of the projectile at supersonic speeds. Considered a hybrid between guided artillery and missiles, the program has an objective of a common round design that can be used in L39 and L58 cannons.

The team continues to develop and mature the technology, with further testing and demonstrations planned in the coming months.