Tag Archives: Block IV

Vermont

The U.S. Navy commissioned USS Vermont (SSN-792), the 19th Virginia-class attack submarine, today, April 18, 2020.

USS Vermont (SSN-792) becomes latest Virginia-class fast-attack submarine in service

Although the traditional public commissioning ceremony was cancelled due to public health safety and restrictions of large public gatherings, the U.S. Navy commissioned USS Vermont (SSN-792) administratively and transitioned the ship to normal operations. Meanwhile, the Navy is looking at a future opportunity to commemorate the special event with the ship’s sponsor, crew and commissioning committee.

«This Virginia-class fast-attack submarine will continue the proud naval legacy of the state of Vermont and the ships that have borne her name», said Acting Secretary of the Navy James E. McPherson. «I am confident the crew of this cutting edge platform will carry on this tradition and confront the challenges of today’s complex world with the professionalism and dedication our nation depends on from warriors of the silent service».

Vice Admiral Daryl Caudle, commander, Submarine Forces, said Vermont’s entry to service marks a new phase of American undersea warfare dominance for a global Submarine Force that is ready to deter, defend and defeat threats to our nation, allies, and rules-based international order.

«This warship carries on a proud Vermont legacy in naval warfare and unyielding determination stretching back to the birth of our nation», Caudle said. «To her crew, congratulations on completing the arduous readiness training to enter sea trials and prepare this ship for battle. I am proud to serve with each of you! Stand ready to defend our nation wherever we are threatened – honoring your motto – FREEDOM AND UNITY. May God bless our Submarine Force, the people of Vermont, and our families! From the depths, we strike»!

The ship’s sponsor, Ms. Gloria Valdez, former deputy assistant secretary of the U.S. Navy (Ships), offered her gratitude to everyone who played a role in delivering USS Vermont (SSN-792) to service. She said she is proud to represent the crew and the first Block IV Virginia-class submarine to enter service.

«I am very proud of the sailors and families of USS Vermont (SSN-792) who worked so hard to bring her to life, and also feel extremely grateful to everyone who played a role preparing her to defend our nation for generations to come», Valdez said. «I look forward to commemorating this special occasion together with the crew in the future».

Vermont’s commanding officer, Commander Charles W. Phillips III, highlighted Vermont’s accomplishments over the past several weeks getting through initial sea trials. The hard work and dedication of the entire team during the past few years was evident in the successful execution of at-sea testing. He said he is especially thankful to the crew and their families, ship sponsor Ms. Valdez, and the USS Vermont (SSN-792) Commissioning Committee, led by Ms. Debra Martin, for all their hard work and support of the crew.

«We recognize just how important the submarine force is during this era of great power competition. As part of the nation’s maritime asymmetric advantage over our competitors, we are ready to perform whatever duty is most needed. The crew is hungry to hone our skills at-sea and become an effective fighting unit, and we will work tirelessly to justify the nation’s confidence in us. Today marks the culmination of six years of dedicated work by the men and women who constructed the nation’s newest and most capable warship. We are all honored to be part of this historic moment», Phillips said. «We are also grateful for the families who have supported our sailors through the long process of bringing this warship to life and dedicated their time with patriotism and selfless devotion».

USS Vermont (SSN-792) is the third U.S. Navy ship to bear the name of the «Green Mountain State». The first Vermont was one of nine 74-gun warships authorized by Congress in 1816. The second Vermont, Battleship No. 20, was commissioned in 1907 and first deployed in December of that same year as part of the «Great White Fleet». She was decommissioned June 30, 1920.

USS Vermont (SSN-792) is a flexible, multi-mission platform designed to carry out the seven core competencies of the submarine force: anti-submarine warfare; anti-surface warfare; delivery of special operations forces; strike warfare; irregular warfare; intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance; and mine warfare.

The submarine is 377 feet/114.8 m long, has a 34-foot/10.3632-meter beam, and will be able to dive to depths greater than 800+ feet/244+ m and operate at speeds in excess of 25+ knots/28+ mph/46.3+ km/h submerged. The ship’s construction began in May 2014, and it will provide the Navy with the capabilities required to maintain the nation’s undersea superiority well into the 21st century. It is the first the first of 10 Virginia-class Block IV submarines. Block IV submarines incorporate design changes focused on reduced total ownership cost. By making smaller-scale design changes, the U.S. Navy will increase the length of time between maintenance stops and increase the number of deployments.

 

General Characteristics

Builder General Dynamics Electric Boat Division and Huntington Ingalls Industries Inc. – Newport News Shipbuilding
Date Deployed October 3, 2004
Propulsion One GE PWR S9G* nuclear reactor, two turbines, one shaft; 40,000 hp/30 MW
Length 377 feet/114.8 m
Beam 33 feet/10.0584 m
Hull Diameter 34 feet/10.3632 m
Displacement Approximately 7,800 tons/7,925 metric tons submerged
Speed 25+ knots/28+ mph/46.3+ km/h
Diving Depth 800+ feet/244+ m
Crew 132: 15 officers; 117 enlisted
Armament: Tomahawk missiles Two 87-in/2.2 m Virginia Payload Tubes (VPTs), each capable of launching 6 Tomahawk cruise missiles
Armament: MK-48 ADCAP (Advanced Capability) Mod 7 heavyweight torpedoes 4 torpedo tubes
Weapons MK-60 CAPTOR (Encapsulated Torpedo) mines, advanced mobile mines and UUVs (Unmanned Underwater Vehicles)

* – Knolls Atomic Power Laboratories

 

Nuclear Submarine Lineup

 

Block IV

Ship Yard Christening Commissioned Homeport
SSN-792 Vermont EB 10-20-18 04-18-20
SSN-793 Oregon EB 10-05-19
SSN-794 Montana NNS Under Construction
SSN-795 Hyman G. Rickover EB Under Construction
SSN-796 New Jersey NNS Under Construction
SSN-797 Iowa EB Under Construction
SSN-798 Massachusetts NNS Under Construction
SSN-799 Idaho EB Under Construction
SSN-800 Arkansas NNS Under Construction
SSN-801 Utah EB Under Construction

 

Christening of Oregon

The U.S. Navy christened its newest attack submarine, the future USS Oregon (SSN-793), during a 10 a.m. EDT ceremony Saturday, October 5, 2019, at General Dynamics Electric Boat in Groton, Connecticut.

Navy christened submarine USS Oregon (SSN-793)

Representative Greg Walden of Oregon delivered the ceremony’s principal address. The submarine’s sponsor was Mrs. Dana Richardson. The ceremony was highlighted by Mrs. Richardson breaking a bottle of sparkling wine across the bow to formally christen the ship, a time-honored Navy tradition.

«The future USS Oregon will play an important role in the defense of our nation and maritime freedom», said Secretary of the Navy Richard V. Spencer. «She stands as proof of what teamwork – from civilian to contractor to military – can accomplish. I am confident USS Oregon and her crew will ensure our Navy remains safe and strong to proudly serve our nation’s interest for decades to come».

Oregon, a Virginia-class submarine designated SSN-793, is the third U.S. Navy ship to honor the state. The first USS Oregon was a brigantine ship purchased in 1841 and used for exploration until 1845. The second Oregon (Battleship No. 3) was commissioned on July 15, 1896. Known for one of the most dramatic voyages ever undertaken by a ship of the U.S. Navy, Oregon sailed over 14,000 miles in 66 days, leaving San Francisco in 1898 and travelling south through the Straits of Magellan until finally arriving at Jupiter Inlet, Florida, where she reported for battle in the Spanish-American War. While the ship demonstrated the capabilities of a heavy battle ship, it also eliminated any opposition to the construction of the Panama Canal, as the country could not afford two months to send warships from one coast to another in times of emergency. Decommissioned in 1906, she was later recommissioned in 1911, and remained in the reserve, until stricken from the Navy list in 1942.

The USS Oregon (SSN-793) is the 20th Virginia-class attack submarine and the second Virginia-class Block IV submarine. The ship began construction fall of 2014 and is expected to deliver in the fall of 2020. Oregon will provide the Navy with the capabilities required to maintain the nation’s undersea superiority well into the 21st century.

Block IV Virginia-class submarines include design changes to Reduce Total Ownership Cost (RTOC) and increase operational availability by decreasing the planned number of depot availabilities from four to three.

Virginia-class submarines are built to operate in the world’s littoral and deep waters while conducting anti-submarine warfare; anti-surface ship warfare; strike warfare; special operation forces support; intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance; irregular warfare; and mine warfare missions. Their inherent stealth, endurance, mobility and firepower directly enable them to support five of the six maritime strategy core capabilities – sea control, power projection, forward presence, maritime security and deterrence.

Oregon Crest

 

General Characteristics

Builder General Dynamics Electric Boat Division and Huntington Ingalls Industries Inc. – Newport News Shipbuilding
Date Deployed October 3, 2004
Propulsion One GE PWR S9G* nuclear reactor, two turbines, one shaft; 40,000 hp/30 MW
Length 377 feet/114.8 m
Beam 33 feet/10.0584 m
Hull Diameter 34 feet/10.3632 m
Displacement Approximately 7,800 tons/7,925 metric tons submerged
Speed 25+ knots/28+ mph/46.3+ km/h
Diving Depth 800+ feet/244+ m
Crew 132: 15 officers; 117 enlisted
Armament: Tomahawk missiles Two 87-in/2.2 m Virginia Payload Tubes (VPTs), each capable of launching 6 Tomahawk cruise missiles
Armament: MK-48 ADCAP (Advanced Capability) Mod 7 heavyweight torpedoes 4 torpedo tubes
Weapons MK-60 CAPTOR (Encapsulated Torpedo) mines, advanced mobile mines and UUVs (Unmanned Underwater Vehicles)

* – Knolls Atomic Power Laboratories

 

Nuclear Submarine Lineup

 

Block IV

Ship Yard Christening Commissioned Homeport
SSN-792 Vermont EB 10-20-2018
SSN-793 Oregon EB 10-05-2019
SSN-794 Montana NNS Under Construction
SSN-795 Hyman G. Rickover EB Under Construction
SSN-796 New Jersey NNS Under Construction
SSN-797 Iowa EB Under Construction
SSN-798 Massachusetts NNS Under Construction
SSN-799 Idaho EB Under Construction
SSN-800 Arkansas NNS Under Construction
SSN-801 Utah EB Under Construction

 

Keel-laying ceremony

General Dynamics Electric Boat (GDEB) held a keel-laying ceremony for future USS Iowa (SSN-797), the 24th unit in the U.S. Navy’s Virginia-class of nuclear-powered attack submarines. The ceremony took place at General Dynamics Electric Boat Quonset Point facility on August 20, 2019.

Virginia-class attack submarine

The keel laying of a ship is a time-honored tradition. In the days of wooden ships, the start of construction was marked by the laying of the first timber – the backbone of the vessel. Today, this celebration is modified to reflect current manufacturing methods as well as the cylindrical shape of modern submarines. Shipbuilders and sailors refer to the bottom centerline of the submarine as the keel.

The newest USS Iowa (SSN-797) is being built under a teaming agreement between General Dynamics Electric Boat (GDEB) and Huntington Ingalls Industries’ Newport News Shipbuilding division wherein both companies build certain portions of each submarine and then alternate deliveries. Iowa is also the fourth U.S. Navy ship to bear the name. The last ship to bear the name was the lead ship of Iowa-class battleships which saw action in World War II, the Korean and Vietnam Wars and the Gulf War.

USS Iowa (SSN-797) belongs to the Block IV submarines which incorporate improvements that allow them to spend less time undergoing maintenance. They are scheduled to undergo three major maintenance overhauls during their lifetime, compared to their predecessors’ four, enabling them to perform an additional deployment. The submarines are built under a $17.8 billion contract awarded in April 2014 with General Dynamic Electric Boat as the prime contractor.

There are currently eight Virginia-class submarines in various stages of construction at Quonset Point and one Columbia-class hull. Over the next few years, the site will grow considerably, adding an additional 13-acres of hull outfitting space for Virginia and Columbia class submarines.

 

General Characteristics

Builder General Dynamics Electric Boat Division and Huntington Ingalls Industries Inc. – Newport News Shipbuilding
Date Deployed October 3, 2004
Propulsion One GE PWR S9G* nuclear reactor, two turbines, one shaft; 40,000 hp/30 MW
Length 377 feet/114.8 m
Beam 33 feet/10.0584 m
Hull Diameter 34 feet/10.3632 m
Displacement Approximately 7,800 tons/7,925 metric tons submerged
Speed 25+ knots/28+ mph/46.3+ km/h
Diving Depth 800+ feet/244+ m
Crew 132: 15 officers; 117 enlisted
Armament: Tomahawk missiles Two 87-in/2.2 m Virginia Payload Tubes (VPTs), each capable of launching 6 Tomahawk cruise missiles
Armament: MK-48 ADCAP (Advanced Capability) Mod 7 heavyweight torpedoes 4 torpedo tubes
Weapons MK-60 CAPTOR (Encapsulated Torpedo) mines, advanced mobile mines and UUVs (Unmanned Underwater Vehicles)

* – Knolls Atomic Power Laboratories

 

Nuclear Submarine Lineup

 

Block IV

Ship Yard Christening Commissioned Homeport
SSN-792 Vermont EB 10-20-18
SSN-793 Oregon EB Under Construction
SSN-794 Montana NNS Under Construction
SSN-795 Hyman G. Rickover EB Under Construction
SSN-796 New Jersey NNS Under Construction
SSN-797 Iowa EB Under Construction
SSN-798 Massachusetts NNS Under Construction
SSN-799 Idaho EB Under Construction
SSN-800 Arkansas NNS On Order
SSN-801 Utah EB On Order

 

New Jersey

Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Newport News Shipbuilding division hosted a keel authentication ceremony on March 25, 2019, for the Virginia-class attack submarine USS New Jersey (SSN-796).

Jess Batruk, a Newport News Shipbuilding welder originally from New Jersey, displays the welded initials of Susan DiMarco, the sponsor of submarine USS New Jersey (SSN-796). Also pictured (left to right) are Jennifer Boykin, president of Newport News Shipbuilding; DiMarco; and Commander Joseph Spinks, the submarine’s commanding officer (Photo by Ashley Cowan/HII)
Jess Batruk, a Newport News Shipbuilding welder originally from New Jersey, displays the welded initials of Susan DiMarco, the sponsor of submarine USS New Jersey (SSN-796). Also pictured (left to right) are Jennifer Boykin, president of Newport News Shipbuilding; DiMarco; and Commander Joseph Spinks, the submarine’s commanding officer (Photo by Ashley Cowan/HII)

«We enjoy participating in the Navy’s many traditions», said Jennifer Boykin, president of Newport News Shipbuilding. «They offer us an opportunity to pause and reflect on our daily work and remind the talented shipbuilders and the crew of the important role we all play in something much greater than ourselves – our nation’s defense».

«This tradition also begins a journey and lifelong partnership between the sponsor and the ship», Boykin added. «It is said that a sponsor’s spirit becomes part of the ship».

Susan DiMarco, a retired dentist, community volunteer and wife of former Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson, is the ship’s sponsor. She chalked her initials onto a metal plate. Shipbuilder Jess Batruk, who is originally from New Jersey, then traced the initials with a welding torch, signifying the keel of SSN-796 as being «truly and fairly laid». The metal plate will remain affixed to the ship throughout its life.

«I am extremely proud to sponsor the submarine New Jersey, named for my home state», DiMarco said. «My family prides itself on service to our great country, and I am pleased to contribute in this way».

Jeh Johnson and the couple’s son, Jeh Johnson Jr., who serves in the U.S. Coast Guard, attended the ceremony. Other guests included Representative Bobby Scott, D-Virginia, Representative Donald Norcross, D-New Jersey, and the sub’s commanding officer, Commander Joseph Spinks.

USS New Jersey (SSN-796) is the 23rd Virginia-class fast attack submarine. Construction began in March 2016 and is about 42 percent complete. The boat is scheduled for delivery to the U.S. Navy in 2021.

 

General Characteristics

Builder General Dynamics Electric Boat Division and Huntington Ingalls Industries Inc. – Newport News Shipbuilding
Date Deployed October 3, 2004
Propulsion One GE PWR S9G* nuclear reactor, two turbines, one shaft; 40,000 hp/30 MW
Length 377 feet/114.8 m
Beam 33 feet/10.0584 m
Hull Diameter 34 feet/10.3632 m
Displacement Approximately 7,800 tons/7,925 metric tons submerged
Speed 25+ knots/28+ mph/46.3+ km/h
Diving Depth 800+ feet/244+ m
Crew 132: 15 officers; 117 enlisted
Armament: Tomahawk missiles Two 87-in/2.2 m Virginia Payload Tubes (VPTs), each capable of launching 6 Tomahawk cruise missiles
Armament: MK-48 ADCAP (Advanced Capability) Mod 7 heavyweight torpedoes 4 torpedo tubes
Weapons MK-60 CAPTOR (Encapsulated Torpedo) mines, advanced mobile mines and UUVs (Unmanned Underwater Vehicles)

* – Knolls Atomic Power Laboratories

 

Nuclear Submarine Lineup

 

Block IV

Ship Yard Christening Commissioned Homeport
SSN-792 Vermont EB 10-20-18
SSN-793 Oregon EB Under Construction
SSN-794 Montana NNS Under Construction
SSN-795 Hyman G. Rickover EB Under Construction
SSN-796 New Jersey NNS Under Construction
SSN-797 Iowa EB Under Construction
SSN-798 Massachusetts NNS Under Construction
SSN-799 Idaho EB Under Construction
SSN-800 Arkansas NNS On Order
SSN-801 Utah EB On Order