Tag Archives: Bath Iron Works

Acceptance Trials

The future USS Rafael Peralta (DDG-115) successfully completed acceptance trials December 16 after spending two days underway off the coast of Maine.

The future USS Rafael Peralta (DDG-115) sets sail for the first time to conduct initial at-sea builder's trials off the coast of Maine (U.S. Navy Photo/Released)
The future USS Rafael Peralta (DDG-115) sets sail for the first time to conduct initial at-sea builder’s trials off the coast of Maine (U.S. Navy Photo/Released)

The U.S. Navy’s Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) reviewed the ship and its crew during a series of demonstrations while underway. INSURV evaluates the ship’s construction and compliance with Navy specifications and is the governing body that recommends the ship be delivered to the U.S. Navy.

The trials were conducted both pier-side and underway. Many of the ship’s onboard systems tested to validate performance, including navigation, damage control, mechanical and electrical systems, combat systems, communications, and propulsion applications, met or exceeded Navy specifications.

«DDG-115 performed exceedingly well during acceptance trials and throughout the test and trials period», said Captain Casey Moton, DDG-51 class program manager, Program Executive Office (PEO) Ships. «This ship is another example of the excellent work performed by our Navy, waterfront, and industry teams. As we continue with serial production of the Arleigh Burke class, I look forward to delivering more of these world-class ships to the fleet».

USS Rafael Peralta (DDG-115) is equipped with the Aegis Baseline 9 Combat System which includes an Integrated Air and Missile Defense (IAMD) capability incorporating Ballistic Missile Defense 5.0 Capability Upgrade and Naval Integrated Fire Control-Counter Air capability. The ship’s IAMD radar will provide increased computing power and radar upgrades that improve detection and reaction capabilities against modern air warfare threats. The Aegis Combat System will enable the ship to link radars with other ships and aircraft to provide a composite picture of the battlespace and effectively increase the theater space.

Following delivery, USS Rafael Peralta (DDG-115) will be the 65th Arleigh Burke class destroyer and the first of the DDG-51 Flight IIA Restart ships to be built at Bath Iron Works. The shipyard is currently in production on future Flight IIA Technology Insertion destroyers USS Thomas Hudner (DDG-116), USS Daniel Inouye (DDG-118) and USS Carl M. Levin (DDG-120) and under contract for three additional ships awarded as part of the five-ship multi-year procurement for FY13-17.

As one of the Defense Department’s largest acquisition organizations, PEO Ships is responsible for executing the development and procurement of all destroyers, amphibious ships, special mission and support ships, and boats and craft.

 

Ship Characteristics

Length Overall 510 feet/156 m
Beam – Waterline 59 feet/18 m
Draft 30.5 feet/9.3 m
Displacement – Full Load 9,217 tons/9,363 metric tons
Power Plant 4 General electric LM 2500-30 gas turbines; 2 shafts; 2 CRP (Contra-Rotating) propellers; 100,000 shaft horsepower/75,000 kW
Speed in excess of 30 knots/34.5 mph/55.5 km/h
Range 4,400 NM/8,149 km at 20 knots/23 mph/37 km/h
Crew 380 total: 32 Officers, 27 CPO (Chief Petty Officer), 321 OEM
Surveillance SPY-1D Phased Array Radar and Aegis Combat System (Lockheed Martin); SPS-73(V) Navigation; SPS-67(V)3 Surface Search; 3 SPG-62 Illuminator; SQQ-89(V)6 sonar incorporating SQS-53C hull mounted and SQR-19 towed array sonars used with Mark-116 Mod 7 ASW fire control system
Electronics/Countermeasures SLQ-32(V)3; Mark-53 Mod 0 Decoy System; Mark-234 Decoy System; SLQ-25A Torpedo Decoy; SLQ-39 Surface Decoy; URN-25 TACAN; UPX-29 IFF System; Kollmorgen Mark-46 Mod 1 Electro-Optical Director
Aircraft 2 embarked SH-60 helicopters ASW operations; RAST (Recovery Assist, Secure and Traverse)
Armament 2 Mark-41 Vertical Launching System (VLS) with 90 Standard, Vertical Launch ASROC (Anti-Submarine Rocket) & Tomahawk ASM (Air-to-Surface Missile)/LAM (Loitering Attack Missile); 5-in (127-mm)/54 (62) Mark-45 gun; 2 (1) CIWS (Close-In Weapon System); 2 Mark-32 triple 324-mm torpedo tubes for Mark-46 or Mark-50 ASW torpedos

 

Flight IIA: Restart

Ship Yard Launched Commissioned Homeport
DDG-113 John Finn HIIIS 03-28-15
DDG-114 Ralph Johnson HIIIS 12-12-15
DDG-115 Rafael Peralta GDBIW 10-31-15

 

Peralta Alpha Trials

The future USS Rafael Peralta (DDG-115) successfully completed alpha trials October 18, after spending two days underway off the coast of Maine. The trials were conducted by shipbuilder, General Dynamics’ Bath Iron Works (BIW).

The future USS Rafael Peralta (DDG-115) sets sail for the first time to conduct initial at-sea builder's trials off the coast of Maine (Photo by General Dynamics, Bath Iron Works)
The future USS Rafael Peralta (DDG-115) sets sail for the first time to conduct initial at-sea builder’s trials off the coast of Maine (Photo by General Dynamics, Bath Iron Works)

Alpha trials, the initial set of builder’s trials, is the first of three underway periods that the ship will conduct to test and demonstrate that ship systems are properly installed and operational. Rafael Peralta successfully conducted a series of test events to demonstrate the operational capability of key communication, damage control, navigation and propulsion systems.

«Rafael Peralta is the first Arleigh Burke destroyer that BIW has taken to sea since the program was restarted in 2010», said Captain Casey Moton, DDG-51 class program manager, Program Executive Office (PEO) Ships. «The ship performed tremendously well, and that’s a testament to the hard work and commitment of our Navy team and industry partners».

Rafael Peralta is equipped with the Aegis Baseline 9 Combat System which includes an Integrated Air and Missile Defense (IAMD) capability incorporating Ballistic Missile Defense 5.0 Capability Upgrade and Naval Integrated Fire Control-Counter Air. The ship’s IAMD radar will provide increased computing power and radar upgrades that improve detection and reaction capabilities against modern air warfare threats. The Aegis Combat System will enable the ship to link radars with other ships and aircraft to provide a composite picture of the battle space and effectively increase the theater space.

USS Rafael Peralta (DDG-115) is the 65th Arleigh Burke (DDG-51) class destroyer and the first of the DDG-51 Flight IIA restart ships to be built at BIW. The shipyard is currently in production on future destroyers USS Thomas Hudner (DDG-116), USS Daniel Inouye (DDG-118) and USS Carl M. Levin (DDG-120) and under contract for three additional ships awarded as part of the five-ship multi-year procurement for fiscal years 2013-2017.

As one of the Defense Department’s largest acquisition organizations, PEO Ships is responsible for executing the development and procurement of all destroyers, amphibious ships, special mission and support ships, and boats and craft.

 

Ship Characteristics

Length Overall 510 feet/156 m
Beam – Waterline 59 feet/18 m
Draft 30.5 feet/9.3 m
Displacement – Full Load 9,217 tons/9,363 metric tons
Power Plant 4 General electric LM 2500-30 gas turbines; 2 shafts; 2 CRP (Contra-Rotating) propellers; 100,000 shaft horsepower/75,000 kW
Speed in excess of 30 knots/34.5 mph/55.5 km/h
Range 4,400 NM/8,149 km at 20 knots/23 mph/37 km/h
Crew 380 total: 32 Officers, 27 CPO (Chief Petty Officer), 321 OEM
Surveillance SPY-1D Phased Array Radar and Aegis Combat System (Lockheed Martin); SPS-73(V) Navigation; SPS-67(V)3 Surface Search; 3 SPG-62 Illuminator; SQQ-89(V)6 sonar incorporating SQS-53C hull mounted and SQR-19 towed array sonars used with Mark-116 Mod 7 ASW fire control system
Electronics/Countermeasures SLQ-32(V)3; Mark-53 Mod 0 Decoy System; Mark-234 Decoy System; SLQ-25A Torpedo Decoy; SLQ-39 Surface Decoy; URN-25 TACAN; UPX-29 IFF System; Kollmorgen Mark-46 Mod 1 Electro-Optical Director
Aircraft 2 embarked SH-60 helicopters ASW operations; RAST (Recovery Assist, Secure and Traverse)
Armament 2 Mark-41 Vertical Launching System (VLS) with 90 Standard, Vertical Launch ASROC (Anti-Submarine Rocket) & Tomahawk ASM (Air-to-Surface Missile)/LAM (Loitering Attack Missile); 5-in (127-mm)/54 (62) Mark-45 gun; 2 (1) CIWS (Close-In Weapon System); 2 Mark-32 triple 324-mm torpedo tubes for Mark-46 or Mark-50 ASW torpedos

 

Guided Missile Destroyers Lineup

 

Flight IIA: Restart

Ship Yard Launched Commissioned Homeport
DDG-113 John Finn HIIIS 03-28-15
DDG-114 Ralph Johnson HIIIS 12-12-15
DDG-115 Rafael Peralta GDBIW 10-31-15

 

Zumwalt Commissioning

The U.S. Navy’s newest and most technologically advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000) was commissioned into active service Saturday, October 15, at North Locust Point in Baltimore.

Navy's most advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000) commissions in Baltimore
Navy’s most advanced warship, USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000) commissions in Baltimore

USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000), the lead ship of a class of next-generation multi-mission destroyers, features a state-of-the-art electric propulsion system, wave-piercing tumblehome hull, stealth design, and the latest warfighting technology and weaponry available.

Secretary of the U.S. Navy, the Honorable Ray Mabus, delivered the ceremony’s principal address.

«This ship is an example of a larger initiative to increase operational stability and give the U.S. a strategic advantage», said Mabus. «Our Navy and our Marine Corps, uniquely, provide presence – around the globe, around the clock – ensuring stability, reassuring allies, deterring adversaries, and providing the nation’s leaders with options in times of crisis».

The ship’s co-sponsors, Ann Zumwalt and Mouzetta Zumwalt-Weathers, are daughters of former Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Elmo R. Zumwalt, Jr., after whom the ship is named. The sisters were an integral part of the ceremony, giving the order to «man our ship and bring her to life», in keeping with naval tradition.

The Zumwalt-class destroyer will be capable of performing a range of deterrence, power projection, sea control, and command and control missions while allowing the U.S. Navy to evolve with new systems and missions. It does all of this while maintaining its stealth – making this visually imposing ship difficult to find whether close to the shore or far out to sea.

«Today’s ceremony marked the culmination of over three years of dedication and hard work by some of the finest Sailors I have had the pleasure to lead», said Captain James A. Kirk, commanding officer of Zumwalt. «The only thing more impressive than the capabilities of the ship are the capabilities of its fine crew».

Captain James A. Kirk, commanding officer of Zumwalt
Captain James A. Kirk, commanding officer of Zumwalt

Zumwalt will challenge adversaries and their way of thinking about how we employ our forces, providing an asymmetric advantage. Working with Arleigh Burke-class destroyers, littoral combat ships, and amphibious ships to form adaptive force packages, Zumwalt-class destroyers will use its computing capabilities to make these groups more lethal through increased range, deception, computer integration, and data analysis from various platforms. With its stealth, size, power, and advanced combat systems, this warship will serve as a centerpiece for deterrence and stability in the maritime environment.

«This destroyer, like the others in our fleet, is capable of projecting power, no doubt», said Mabus. «The Zumwalt-class is much larger than today’s destroyers with a considerably larger flight deck – enough space to operate host Joint Strike Fighters, MV-22 Ospreys, and unmanned systems and a Vertical Launch System second to none».

In addition to its size, the Zumwalt class will be the first Navy warships to utilize an integrated power system that will produce enough power to run current systems, as well as the power required for future weapons, computing, and sensor systems. USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000) generates approximately 78 megawatts of power, almost as much as a nuclear-powered aircraft carrier. This means the ship can operate all of its systems and still generate enough electricity to power a small town, which provides the extra capacity to accommodate future weapons and computing systems. Combined with its size and power, USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000) will be able to integrate emerging technologies and new capabilities as they are delivered to the fleet.

USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000) embodies the legacy of warfighting excellence and innovation of Admiral Elmo R. Zumwalt, Jr., a veteran of World War II and the conflicts in Korea and Vietnam. He exemplified honor, courage and commitment during 32 years of dedicated naval service. Believing it was his job to «modernize and humanize» the U.S. Navy, Zumwalt chose to embrace change and to lead it from within.

«I witnessed as he [Zumwalt] transformed our Navy, one Z-gram at a time… removing demeaning and abrasive regulations and moving to eliminate the scourge of racism and sexism from within our Navy», said Mabus. «Among many initiatives, he opened flight training to women and increased recruiting of under-represented Americans. And, as has always been the case when we open opportunities in our Navy and Marine Corps, we got stronger».

USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000) generates approximately 78 megawatts of power
USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000) generates approximately 78 megawatts of power

As the nineteenth Chief of Naval Operations, Zumwalt embrace of innovation resulted in a number of successful new programs, including the Oliver Hazard Perry-class frigate, the Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine and the F-14 Tomcat, all of which had lasting impacts on the warfighting readiness of the U.S. Navy.

Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Admiral John Richardson, also spoke at the ceremony, commenting on the significance of the ship’s namesake.

«Admiral Zumwalt, especially during his time as CNO, ensured that our institution lived by its values», said Richardson. «He was the ‘The Sailor’s Admiral,’ looking at new ideas, acting to the limit of his authorities, and adjusting along the way to make his Navy ready for combat – but also with full cognizance of the impact on the Sailors that made up that Navy».

Perhaps most importantly, Admiral Zumwalt was a social reformer who recognized the primary force-multiplier of the U.S. Navy continued to be its Sailors, and as such began quality of life improvements throughout the Fleet. He was considered a «thinking officer» who was devoted to Sailors and creating an environment where everyone was treated equally – a legacy that can that can be seen today in the diversity of the fleet. His «one Navy» mentality reminds today’s Sailors that taking care of our warfighters ensures the Navy remains tough, bold and ready.

«To say the Navy was transformed by Admiral Zumwalt is an understatement. Indeed, every leader on this stage and the great crew standing before us has benefited from Bud Zuwalt’s passion to make the Navy even better», said Vice Admiral Tom Rowden, commander, Naval Surface Forces during the ceremony. «So today we welcome this revolutionary warship to the fleet. A ship that demonstrates daring design and cutting-edge capability».

«On behalf of the U.S. Naval Surface Force, I proudly accept ownership of the Navy’s newest ship to the fleet», Rowden said.

USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000) is scheduled to begin her transit to San Diego (California), making several port visits along the way. Upon arrival in San Diego, USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000) will begin installation of her combat systems, testing and evaluation, and operational integration with the fleet.

Once fully integrated, Zumwalt’s stealth, power and lethality will provide a vital link from the Navy’s current needs to its future capabilities.

The ship's co-sponsors, Ann Zumwalt and Mouzetta Zumwalt-Weathers
The ship’s co-sponsors, Ann Zumwalt and Mouzetta Zumwalt-Weathers

 

Features unique to DDG 1000:

  • Eighty peripheral Vertical Launch System (VLS) cells, two Advanced Gun System (AGS) 155-mm guns, and two 30-mm Close In Guns (CIGs);
  • A stern boat ramp for two 7-meter Rigid Hull Inflatable Boats (RHIBs), designed with room for two 11-meter RHIBs;
  • Aviation capacity for two MH-60R or one MH-60R and 3 VT Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs);
  • It will be powered by an Integrated Power System (IPS) with an Integrated Fight Through Power (IFTP). This is created by an Advanced Induction Motor (AIM);
  • A superstructure with integrated apertures and low signature profile;
  • Advanced sensors including a SPY-3 Multi-Function Radar;
  • A wave-piercing «Tumblehome» hull form.
Secretary of the U.S. Navy, the Honorable Ray Mabus
Secretary of the U.S. Navy, the Honorable Ray Mabus

 

Ship Characteristics

Length 610 feet/186 m
Beam 80.7 feet/24.6 m
Draft 27.6 feet/8.4 m
Displacement 15,761 long tonnes/16,014 metric tonnes
Speed 30 knots/34.5 mph/55.5 km/h
Installed Power 104,600 hp/78 MW
Crew Size 158 – Includes Aviation Detachment

 

Next-generation destroyer Zumwalt (DDG-1000) underway for the first time conducting at-sea tests and trials in the Atlantic Ocean on December 7, 2015

 

Ships

Ship Laid down Launched Commissioned Homeport
USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000) 11-17-2011 10-28-2013 10-15-2016 San Diego, California
USS Michael Monsoor (DDG-1001) 05-23-2013 06-21-2016
USS Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG-1002)

 

Christening of Michael

The U.S. Navy christened the newest destroyer, USS Michael Monsoor (DDG-1001), Saturday, June 18 during a 10 a.m. EDT ceremony at the General Dynamics-Bath Iron Works shipyard in Bath, Maine.

A crowd listens to Senator Susan Collins speak at the christening of the Michael Monsoor
A crowd listens to Senator Susan Collins speak at the christening of the Michael Monsoor

The second ship in the Zumwalt-class of destroyers, DDG-1001 is named in honor of Medal of Honor recipient Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class (SEAL) Michael A. Monsoor. Sally Monsoor, petty officer Monsoor’s mother, served as the ship’s sponsor.

Retired Navy Vice Admiral Joseph Maguire served as the principal speaker. Highlighting the event was Mrs. Monsoor breaking a bottle of sparkling wine across the bow to formally christen the ship – a time-honored Navy tradition.

«I’m tremendously honored to be a part of this christening, the next step in getting DDG-1001 to the fleet in order to conduct prompt and sustained maritime operations», said the Honorable Janine Davidson, under secretary of the Navy. «DDG-1001 is an extremely capable and versatile ship with an incredible namesake. I have every confidence that the ship and crew will both live up to and honor Petty Officer Monsoor’s legacy as the ship’s motto implies – You Never Quit».

Retired Vice Admiral Joseph Maguire speaks about the heroism of Michael Monsoor, namesake of the second destroyer in the Zumwalt class
Retired Vice Admiral Joseph Maguire speaks about the heroism of Michael Monsoor, namesake of the second destroyer in the Zumwalt class

On September 29, 2006 in Ar Ramadi, Iraq, Petty Officer Monsoor was part of a sniper overwatch security position with two other SEALs and several Iraqi Army soldiers when an insurgent closed in and threw a fragmentation grenade into the position. The grenade hit Monsoor in the chest before falling to the ground. Positioned next to the single exit, Monsoor was the only one who could have escaped harm. Instead he dropped onto the grenade, smothering it to protect his teammates. The grenade detonated as he came down on top of it, inflicting a mortal wound. Monsoor’s actions that day saved the lives of his two teammates and the accompanying Iraqi soldiers. His Medal of Honor citation reads, «by his undaunted courage, fighting spirit, and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of certain death, Petty Officer Monsoor gallantly gave his life for his country, thereby reflecting great credit upon himself and upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service».

Sally Monsoor, mother of Michael Monsoor and sponsor of the ship named in his honor, christens the vessel on Saturday at General Dynamics Bath Iron Works in Maine
Sally Monsoor, mother of Michael Monsoor and sponsor of the ship named in his honor, christens the vessel on Saturday at General Dynamics Bath Iron Works in Maine

The future USS Michael Monsoor (DDG-1001) includes new technologies and will serve as a multi-mission platform capable of operating as an integral part of naval, joint or combined maritime forces. The ship features two advanced gun systems firing long-range, land-attack projectiles that reach up to 63 nautical miles/72.5 miles/116.7 km These guns will provide precision, high volume and persistent fire support to forces ashore with an approximate five-fold improvement in naval surface fire range. In addition, USS Michael Monsoor (DDG-1001) will be the second U.S. Navy surface combatant to employ an innovative and highly flexible Integrated Power System, providing potentially significant energy savings that are well-suited to enable future high energy weapons and sensors.

Construction on the future USS Michael Monsoor (DDG-1001) commenced in March 2010, with the keel laying ceremony held in May 2013. The Michael Monsoor is 610 feet/186 m long, with a displacement of approximately 15,761 long tonnes/16,014 metric tonnes when fully loaded.

Left to Right: Sara, Martha, Sally and Naomi Monsoor
Left to Right: Sara, Martha, Sally and Naomi Monsoor

 

Features unique to DDG 1000:

  • Eighty peripheral Vertical Launch System (VLS) cells, two Advanced Gun System (AGS) 155-mm guns, and two 30-mm Close In Guns (CIGs);
  • A stern boat ramp for two 7-meter Rigid Hull Inflatable Boats (RHIBs), designed with room for two 11-meter RHIBs;
  • Aviation capacity for two MH-60R or one MH-60R and 3 VT Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs);
  • It will be powered by an Integrated Power System (IPS) with an Integrated Fight Through Power (IFTP). This is created by an Advanced Induction Motor (AIM);
  • A superstructure with integrated apertures and low signature profile;
  • Advanced sensors including a SPY-3 Multi-Function Radar;
  • A wave-piercing «Tumblehome» hull form.
Petty Officer Second Class (SEAL) Michael Monsoor
Petty Officer Second Class (SEAL) Michael Monsoor

 

Ship Characteristics

Length 610 feet/186 m
Beam 80.7 feet/24.6 m
Draft 27.6 feet/8.4 m
Displacement 15,761 long tonnes/16,014 metric tonnes
Speed 30 knots/34.5 mph/55.5 km/h
Installed Power 104,600 hp/78 MW
Crew Size 158 – Includes Aviation Detachment

 

Next-generation destroyer Zumwalt (DDG-1000) underway for the first time conducting at-sea tests and trials in the Atlantic Ocean on December 7, 2015

 

Ships

Ship Laid down Launched Commissioned Homeport
USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000) 11-17-2011 10-28-2013
USS Michael Monsoor (DDG-1001) 05-23-2013  06-21-2016
USS Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG-1002)
The emblem of the USS Michael Monsoor (DDG-1001)
The emblem of the USS Michael Monsoor (DDG-1001)

 

Delivery of Zumwalt

The U.S. Navy accepted delivery of future USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000), the lead ship of the Navy’s next-generation of multimission surface combatants, May 20. USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000) is tailored for sustained operations in the littorals and land attack, and will provide independent forward presence and deterrence, support special operations forces, and operate as an integral part of joint and combined expeditionary forces.

The future guided-missile destroyer USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000) transits the Atlantic Ocean during acceptance trials April 21, 2016 with the Navy's Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) (U.S. Navy/Released)
The future guided-missile destroyer USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000) transits the Atlantic Ocean during acceptance trials April 21, 2016 with the Navy’s Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) (U.S. Navy/Released)

Ship delivery follows extensive tests, trials and demonstrations of the ship’s hull, mechanical, and electrical systems including the ship’s boat handling, anchor and mooring systems as well as major demonstrations of the damage control, ballasting, navigation and communications systems.

«Today represents a significant achievement for not only the DDG-1000 program and shipbuilding team but for the entire U.S. Navy», said Rear Admiral (select) Jim Downey, DDG-1000 program manager, Program Executive Office Ships. «This impressive ship incorporates a new design alongside the integration of sophisticated new technologies that will lead the Navy into the next generation of capabilities».

The 610-foot/186-meter, wave-piercing tumblehome ship design provides a wide array of advancements. The shape of the superstructure and the arrangement of its antennas significantly reduce radar cross section, making the ship less visible to enemy radar at sea.

USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000) is the first U.S. Navy surface combatant to employ an innovative and highly survivable Integrated Power System (IPS) distributing 1000 volts of direct current across the ship. The IPS’ unique architectural capabilities include the ability to allocate all 78 megawatts of installed power to propulsion, ship’s service, and combat system loads from the same gas turbine prime movers based on operational requirements. Each ship in the class features a battery of two Advanced Gun Systems, capable of firing Long-Range Land Attack Projectiles (LRLAP) that reach up to 63 nautical miles/72.5 miles/116.6 km, providing three-fold range improvement in naval surface fires coverage. Each ship is equipped with eighty Advanced Vertical Launch System cells for Tomahawk missiles, Evolved Sea Sparrow Missiles, Standard Missiles, and Vertical Launch Anti-Submarine Rockets (ASROC) (VLA).

The ship will employ active and passive sensors and a Multi-Function Radar (MFR) capable of conducting area air surveillance, including over-land, throughout the extremely difficult and cluttered sea-land interface.

Following delivery and a crew certification period at General Dynamics-Bath Iron Works, the ship will be commissioned in Baltimore October 15. Zumwalt will then transit to her homeport in San Diego in late 2016 where Mission Systems Activation will continue in parallel with a Post Delivery Availability.

«Zumwalt’s crew has diligently trained for months in preparation of this day and they are ready and excited to take charge of this ship on behalf of the U.S. Navy», said Captain James Kirk, commanding officer of future Zumwalt. «These are 143 of our nation’s finest men and women who continue to honor Admiral Zumwalt’s namesake with their dedication to bringing this ship to life».

General Dynamics-Bath Iron Works (BIW) is also constructing follow-on ships, the future USS Michael Monsoor (DDG-1001) and USS Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG-1002).

As one of the Defense Department’s largest acquisition organizations, Program Executive Office (PEO) Ships is responsible for executing the development and procurement of all destroyers, amphibious ships, special mission and support ships, and special warfare craft.

The U.S. Navy continually monitors force readiness and ability to provide the most robust, capable maritime force possible. Stationing destroyers in a West Coast port supports rebalance to the Indo-Asia-Pacific region, placing our most advanced capabilities and greater capacity in that vital theater. By 2020, approximately 60 percent of U.S. Navy ships and aircraft will be based in the region.

The U.S. Navy accepted delivery of DDG-1000, the future guided-missile destroyer USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000) (U.S. Navy/Released)
The U.S. Navy accepted delivery of DDG-1000, the future guided-missile destroyer USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000) (U.S. Navy/Released)

 

Features unique to DDG 1000:

  • Eighty peripheral Vertical Launch System (VLS) cells, two Advanced Gun System (AGS) 155-mm guns, and two 30-mm Close In Guns (CIGs);
  • A stern boat ramp for two 7-meter Rigid Hull Inflatable Boats (RHIBs), designed with room for two 11-meter RHIBs;
  • Aviation capacity for two MH-60R or one MH-60R and 3 VT Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs);
  • It will be powered by an Integrated Power System (IPS) with an Integrated Fight Through Power (IFTP). This is created by an Advanced Induction Motor (AIM);
  • A superstructure with integrated apertures and low signature profile;
  • Advanced sensors including a SPY-3 Multi-Function Radar;
  • A wave-piercing «Tumblehome» hull form.
Following a crew certification period and October commissioning ceremony in Baltimore, Zumwalt will transit to its homeport in San Diego for a Post Delivery Availability and Mission Systems Activation (U.S. Navy/Released)
Following a crew certification period and October commissioning ceremony in Baltimore, Zumwalt will transit to its homeport in San Diego for a Post Delivery Availability and Mission Systems Activation (U.S. Navy/Released)

 

Ship Characteristics

Length 610 feet/186 m
Beam 80.7 feet/24.6 m
Draft 27.6 feet/8.4 m
Displacement 15,761 long tonnes/16,014 metric tonnes
Speed 30 knots/34.5 mph/55.5 km/h
Installed Power 104,600 hp/78 MW
Crew Size 158 – Includes Aviation Detachment

 

Next-generation destroyer Zumwalt (DDG-1000) underway for the first time conducting at-sea tests and trials in the Atlantic Ocean on December 7, 2015

 

Ships

Ship Laid down Launched Commissioned Homeport
USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000) 11-17-2011 10-28-2013 10-15-2016 San Diego
USS Michael Monsoor (DDG-1001) 05-23-2013
USS Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG-1002)
DDG-1000 is the lead ship of the Zumwalt-class destroyers, next-generation, multi-mission surface combatants, tailored for land attack and littoral dominance (U.S. Navy/Released)
DDG-1000 is the lead ship of the Zumwalt-class destroyers, next-generation, multi-mission surface combatants, tailored for land attack and littoral dominance (U.S. Navy/Released)

Sea Trials

General Dynamics Bath Iron Works, the U.S. Navy and other Navy contractors successfully completed its first set of at-sea tests and trials for the future USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000).

USS Zumwalt Sea Trials
USS Zumwalt Sea Trials

According to Sam LaGrone, the editor of USNI News, during this initial at-sea period, representatives from BIW, USS Zumwalt, the Navy’s Program Office, SUPSHIP Bath, and various technical subject matter experts including Raytheon personnel, demonstrated several ship systems including small boat operations, anchors, Integrated Propulsion System (IPS) and auxiliary systems. Primary risk reduction objectives were successfully met and, as with any trials, the Navy learned a great deal about ship performance during the more than 100 hours of extensive testing.

 

Description

DDG-51 and DDG-1000 destroyers are warships that provide multi-mission offensive and defensive capabilities. Destroyers can operate independently or as part of carrier strike groups, surface action groups, amphibious ready groups, and underway replenishment groups.

 

Features

Guided missile destroyers are multi-mission (Anti-Air Warfare, AAW; Anti-Submarine Warfare, ASW; and Anti-Surface Warfare, ASUW) surface combatants. The destroyer’s armament has greatly expanded the role of the ship in strike warfare utilizing the Mark-41 Vertical Launch System (VLS).

The 16,000-ton destroyer is equipped with two high power Rolls Royce MT-30 gas turbines and two smaller Rolls-Royce RR450 gas turbines
The 16,000-ton destroyer is equipped with two high power Rolls Royce MT-30 gas turbines and two smaller Rolls-Royce RR450 gas turbines

 

Features unique to DDG 1000:

  • Eighty peripheral Vertical Launch System (VLS) cells, two Advanced Gun System (AGS) 155-mm guns, and two 30-mm Close In Guns (CIGs);
  • A stern boat ramp for two 7-meter Rigid Hull Inflatable Boats (RHIBs), designed with room for two 11-meter RHIBs;
  • Aviation capacity for two MH-60R or one MH-60R and 3 VT Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs);
  • It will be powered by an Integrated Power System (IPS) with an Integrated Fight Through Power (IFTP). This is created by an Advanced Induction Motor (AIM);
  • A superstructure with integrated apertures and low signature profile;
  • Advanced sensors including a SPY-3 Multi-Function Radar;
  • A wave-piercing «Tumblehome» hull form.
Following the completion of the HM&E trials, the ship will transit to the Pacific to complete the activation of its combat system and is planned to be home-ported initially at Naval Station San Diego
Following the completion of the HM&E trials, the ship will transit to the Pacific to complete the activation of its combat system and is planned to be home-ported initially at Naval Station San Diego

 

Ship Characteristics

Length 610 feet/186 m
Beam 80.7 feet/24.6 m
Draft 27.6 feet/8.4 m
Displacement 15,761 long tonnes/16,014 metric tonnes
Speed 30 knots/34.5 mph/55.5 km/h
Installed Power 104,600 hp/78 MW
Crew Size 158 – Includes Aviation Detachment

Next-generation destroyer Zumwalt (DDG-1000) underway for the first time conducting at-sea tests and trials in the Atlantic Ocean on December 7, 2015

Ships

Ship Laid down Launched Commissioned Homeport
USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000) 11-17-2011 10-28-2013    
USS Michael Monsoor (DDG-1001) 05-23-2013      
USS Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG-1002)        

 

Technology Insertion

The keel of the future USS Thomas Hudner (DDG-116) was authenticated during a ceremony at the Bath Iron Works (BIW) shipyard November 16. The ship’s keel was authenticated by Ms. Barbara Miller, wife of the former superintendent of the Naval Academy, Vice Admiral Michael Miller. The authenticator etched her initials into the keel plate to symbolically recognize the joining of modular components and the ceremonial beginning of the ship.

Thomas Hudner Jr., Georgea Hudner, Thomas Hudner III, Mrs. Barbara Miller and Captain Mark Vandroff with the keel plate of the future USS Thomas Hudner
Thomas Hudner Jr., Georgea Hudner, Thomas Hudner III, Mrs. Barbara Miller and Captain Mark Vandroff with the keel plate of the future USS Thomas Hudner

«We are very honored to have the namesake of DDG-116, Captain Hudner and his family, here to witness this milestone ceremony», said Captain Mark Vandroff, DDG-51 class program manager, Program Executive Office (PEO) Ships. «These ships serve as a lasting reminder of the courage, leadership and intellectual contribution of the very best that the Navy-Marine Corps team has had to offer».

Medal of Honor recipient, Thomas Hudner, crash landed his plane in 1950 in an attempt to save the life of his wingman who was shot down by Chinese ground troops at the battle of Chosin Reservoir during the Korean War.

USS Thomas Hudner (DDG-116) is the second of two Arleigh Burke class destroyers currently under construction at BIW. DDG-115, the future USS Rafael Peralta, was launched at BIW November 1.

As a Flight IIA ship, Thomas Hudner will be equipped with the Navy’s Aegis Combat System, the world’s foremost integrated naval weapon system. This system delivers quick reaction time, high firepower and increased electronic countermeasures capability for Anti-Air Warfare. Arleigh Burke ships enable power projection, forward presence, and escort operations at sea in support of Low Intensity Conflict/Coastal and Littoral Offshore Warfare as well as open ocean conflict.

USS Thomas Hudner (DDG-116) is so-called «technology insertion» destroyer. «Technology insertion» ships (DDG-116-123) are expected to incorporate certain elements of Arleigh Burke class Flight III, which in turn is planned to run from DDG-124 onwards.

USS Thomas Hudner (DDG-116) started fabrication February 15, 2013, and will join the fleet in 2017 where she will serve as an integral player in global maritime security, engaging in air, undersea, surface, strike and ballistic missile defense.

As one of the Defense Department’s largest acquisition organizations, PEO Ships is responsible for executing the development and procurement of all destroyers, amphibious ships, special mission and support ships and special warfare craft.

The future Thomas Hudner 3000 Ultra Unit moved onto the Land Level
The future Thomas Hudner 3000 Ultra Unit moved onto the Land Level

 

Ship Characteristics

Length Overall 510 feet/156 m
Beam – Waterline 59 feet/18 m
Draft 30.5 feet/9.3 m
Displacement – Full Load 9,217 tons/9,363 metric tons
Power Plant 4 General electric LM 2500-30 gas turbines; 2 shafts; 2 CRP (Contra-Rotating) propellers; 100,000 shaft horsepower/75,000 kW
Speed in excess of 30 knots/34.5 mph/55.5 km/h
Range 4,400 NM/8,149 km at 20 knots/23 mph/37 km/h
Crew 380 total: 32 Officers, 27 CPO (Chief Petty Officer), 321 OEM
Surveillance SPY-1D Phased Array Radar and Aegis Combat System (Lockheed Martin); SPS-73(V) Navigation; SPS-67(V)3 Surface Search; 3 SPG-62 Illuminator; SQQ-89(V)6 sonar incorporating SQS-53C hull mounted and SQR-19 towed array sonars used with Mark-116 Mod 7 ASW fire control system
Electronics/Countermeasures SLQ-32(V)3; Mark-53 Mod 0 Decoy System; Mark-234 Decoy System; SLQ-25A Torpedo Decoy; SLQ-39 Surface Decoy; URN-25 TACAN; UPX-29 IFF System; Kollmorgen Mark-46 Mod 1 Electro-Optical Director
Aircraft 2 embarked SH-60 helicopters ASW operations; RAST (Recovery Assist, Secure and Traverse)
Armament 2 Mark-41 Vertical Launching System (VLS) with 90 Standard, Vertical Launch ASROC (Anti-Submarine Rocket) & Tomahawk ASM (Air-to-Surface Missile)/LAM (Loitering Attack Missile); 5-in (127-mm)/54 Mark-45 gun; 2 CIWS (Close-In Weapon System); 2 Mark-32 triple 324-mm torpedo tubes for Mark-46 or Mark-50 ASW torpedos

 

Flight IIA: Technology Insertion

Ship Yard Launched Commissioned Homeport
DDG-116 Thomas Hudner GDBIW
DDG-117 Paul Ignatius HIIIS
DDG-118 Daniel Inouye GDBIW
DDG-119 Delbert D. Black HIIIS
DDG-120 GDBIW
DDG-121 HIIIS
DDG-122 GDBIW
DDG-123 HIIIS

GDBIW – General Dynamics Bath Iron Works

HIIIS – Huntington Ingalls Industries Ingalls Shipbuilding

DDG – Destroyer, Guided Missile

 

Christening of Rafael

The U.S. Navy christened its newest guided-missile destroyer Rafael Peralta, Saturday, October 31, during a 10 a.m. EDT ceremony at General Dynamics Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine. The future USS Rafael Peralta, designated DDG-115, honors Marine Corps Sergeant Rafael Peralta. He was posthumously awarded the Navy Cross for actions during combat operations in Operation Iraqi Freedom. Peralta is credited with saving the lives of fellow Marines during the second battle of Fallujah in 2004.

151031-M-SA716-052 BATH, Maine (Oct. 31, 2015) U.S. Marines, Sailors, and guests honor the American and Navy flag during the USS Rafael Peralta christening ceremony at General Dynamics Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine, Oct. 31, 2015. The destroyer was named after Marine Corps Sgt. Rafael Peralta who was killed during the second battle of Fallujah in 2004. (U.S. Marine Corps photo Sgt. Gabriela Garcia/Released)
U.S. Marines, Sailors, and guests honor the American and Navy flag during the USS Rafael Peralta christening ceremony at General Dynamics Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine, October 31, 2015. The destroyer was named after Marine Corps Sgt. Rafael Peralta who was killed during the second battle of Fallujah in 2004 (U.S. Marine Corps photo Sgt. Gabriela Garcia/Released)

«The tremendous efforts of the highly-skilled men and women of the General Dynamics Bath Iron Works team have brought this ship from an idea to a reality», said Secretary of the U.S. Navy Ray Mabus. «Their work will ensure that the heroism, service and sacrifice of Marine Corps Sergeant Rafael Peralta will be honored and remembered by all who come in contact with DDG-115 long after this great warship is christened».

General Robert B. Neller, commandant of the Marine Corps, will deliver the ceremony’s principal address. Rosa Maria Peralta, Sergeant Peralta’s mother, will serve as ship’s sponsor and officially christen the ship Rafael Peralta.

USS Rafael Peralta (DDG-115) is the third of 14 ships currently under contract for the DDG-51 program. The DDG-51 class provides outstanding combat capability and survivability characteristics while minimizing procurement and lifetime support costs, due to the program’s maturity. DDG-51 destroyers are warships that provide multi-mission offensive and defensive capabilities. Destroyers can operate independently or as part of carrier strike groups, surface action groups, amphibious ready groups, and underway replenishment groups. DDG-113 and follow on DDGs are being built with Integrated Air and Missile Defense (IAMD) capability.

The 9,217 ton Rafael Peralta is being built by General Dynamics Bath Iron Works. The ship is 510 feet/156 m in length, has a waterline beam of 59 feet/18 m, and a navigational draft of 30.5 feet/9.3 m. Four gas turbine engines will power the ship to speeds in excess of 30 knots.

Peralta was killed in action on November 15, 2004, while clearing houses in the Iraqi city of Fallujah
Peralta was killed in action on November 15, 2004, while clearing houses in the Iraqi city of Fallujah

 

Ship Characteristics

Length Overall 510 feet/156 m
Beam – Waterline 59 feet/18 m
Draft 30.5 feet/9.3 m
Displacement – Full Load 9,217 tons/9,363 metric tons
Power Plant 4 General electric LM 2500-30 gas turbines; 2 shafts; 2 CRP (Contra-Rotating) propellers; 100,000 shaft horsepower/75,000 kW
Speed in excess of 30 knots/34.5 mph/55.5 km/h
Range 4,400 NM/8,149 km at 20 knots/23 mph/37 km/h
Crew 380 total: 32 Officers, 27 CPO (Chief Petty Officer), 321 OEM
Surveillance SPY-1D Phased Array Radar and Aegis Combat System (Lockheed Martin); SPS-73(V) Navigation; SPS-67(V)3 Surface Search; 3 SPG-62 Illuminator; SQQ-89(V)6 sonar incorporating SQS-53C hull mounted and SQR-19 towed array sonars used with Mark-116 Mod 7 ASW fire control system
Electronics/Countermeasures SLQ-32(V)3; Mark-53 Mod 0 Decoy System; Mark-234 Decoy System; SLQ-25A Torpedo Decoy; SLQ-39 Surface Decoy; URN-25 TACAN; UPX-29 IFF System; Kollmorgen Mark-46 Mod 1 Electro-Optical Director
Aircraft 2 embarked SH-60 helicopters ASW operations; RAST (Recovery Assist, Secure and Traverse)
Armament 2 Mark-41 Vertical Launching System (VLS) with 90 Standard, Vertical Launch ASROC (Anti-Submarine Rocket) & Tomahawk ASM (Air-to-Surface Missile)/LAM (Loitering Attack Missile); 5-in (127-mm)/54 Mark-45 gun; 2 CIWS (Close-In Weapon System); 2 Mark-32 triple 324-mm torpedo tubes for Mark-46 or Mark-50 ASW torpedos
Maria Peralta, Sergeant Peralta's mother, serves as the ship's sponsor and officially christened the USS Rafael Peralta
Maria Peralta, Sergeant Peralta’s mother, serves as the ship’s sponsor and officially christened the USS Rafael Peralta

 

Flight IIA: Restart

Ship Yard Launched Commissioned Homeport
DDG-113 John Finn HIIIS 03-28-15
DDG-114 Ralph Johnson HIIIS
DDG-115 Rafael Peralta GDBIW 10-31-15

GDBIW – General Dynamics Bath Iron Works

HIIIS – Huntington Ingalls Industries Ingalls Shipbuilding

DDG – Destroyer, Guided Missile

BIW and the Navy are proud to honor the life and courageous service of Sergeant Rafael Peralta while celebrating the christening of the 35th BIW-built DDG 51 class ship and the 65th ship of the class
BIW and the Navy are proud to honor the life and courageous service of Sergeant Rafael Peralta while celebrating the christening of the 35th BIW-built DDG 51 class ship and the 65th ship of the class

Forward Deployed

The guided-missile cruiser USS Chancellorsville (CG-62) departed from San Diego May 28 for Yokosuka, Japan, where the ship will join U.S. 7th Fleet’s Forward Deployed Naval Forces. Chancellorsville will enhance presence in 7th Fleet as part of the U.S. Navy’s long-range plan to send the most advanced and capable units to the Asia-Pacific region.

USS Chancellorsville is named for the Confederate victory over Union forces under Robert E. Lee at the Battle of Chancellorsville, Virginia
USS Chancellorsville is named for the Confederate victory over Union forces under Robert E. Lee at the Battle of Chancellorsville, Virginia

«It is Navy policy to forward deploy our most capable ships and there is no ship more capable than Chancellorsville», said Captain Curt Renshaw, Chancellorsville’s commanding officer. «That capability is not just a result of recent modernization, but is also a function of the readiness of the crew; and this crew has worked very hard to prepare for this day to ensure we are able to arrive immediately prepared for any mission».

USS Chancellorsville (CG-62) completed a combat systems update through the Navy’s Cruiser Modernization program, making her among the most capable ships of her class. She is fitted with the latest Aegis Baseline 9 combat system, and will be the first to be forward deployed with that capability.

The Cruiser Modernization program is designed to upgrade in-service ships to keep pace with evolving threats while enabling ships to meet service life requirements and future operational commitments. Cruiser modernization enhances overall combat systems capability through numerous system improvements.

Future missions will include maritime security operations and cooperative training exercises with allies and partners in the Asia-Pacific region. This ship, along with her counterparts in the Japan Self-Defense Forces, makes up part of the core capabilities needed by the alliance to meet our common strategic objectives.

Chancellorsville carries guided missiles and rapid-fire cannons, with anti-air, anti-surface and anti-subsurface capabilities
Chancellorsville carries guided missiles and rapid-fire cannons, with anti-air, anti-surface and anti-subsurface capabilities

Guided Missile Cruisers – CG

Modern U.S. Navy guided missile cruisers perform primarily in a Battle Force role. These ships are multi-mission [Air Warfare (AW), Undersea Warfare (USW), Naval Surface Fire Support (NSFS) and Surface Warfare (SUW)] surface combatants capable of supporting carrier battle groups, amphibious forces, or of operating independently and as flagships of surface action groups. Cruisers are equipped with Tomahawk cruise missiles giving them additional long range Strike Warfare (STRW) capability. Some Aegis Cruisers have been outfitted with a Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) capability.

Technological advances in the Standard Missile coupled with the Aegis combat system in the Ticonderoga class cruisers have increased the Anti-Air Warfare (AAW) capability of surface combatants to pinpoint accuracy from wave-top to zenith. The addition of Tomahawk in the CG-47 has vastly complicated unit target planning for any potential enemy and returned an offensive strike role to the surface forces that seemed to have been lost to air power at Pearl Harbor.

The Cruiser Modernization program aims to improve the Ticonderoga class by modernizing the computing and display infrastructure, and the Hull, Mechanical and Electrical (HM&E) systems. Weapons and sensor sets will also be improved, in order to upgrade their anti-submarine capabilities, add short-range electro-optical systems that can monitor the ships surroundings without the use of radar emissions, as well as routine machinery upgrades to improve all areas of ship functionality.

Family and friends bid farewell from the pier as the Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Chancellorsville (CG-62) departs Naval Base San Diego bound for Yokosuka, Japan to join the forward-deployed naval forces in the Western Pacific (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Trevor Welsh/Released)
Family and friends bid farewell from the pier as the Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Chancellorsville (CG-62) departs Naval Base San Diego bound for Yokosuka, Japan to join the forward-deployed naval forces in the Western Pacific (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Trevor Welsh/Released)

General Characteristics

Builder Ingalls Shipbuilding: 52-57, 59, 62, 65-66, 68-69, 71-73
Bath Iron Works: 58, 60-61, 63-64, 67, 70
Date Deployed 22 January 1983: USS Ticonderoga (CG-47)
Unit Cost About $1 billion each
Length 567 feet/172.82 m
Beam 55 feet/16.76 m
Displacement 9,600 long tons (9,754 metric tons) full load
Propulsion 4 General Electric LM 2500 gas turbine engines
2 shafts
80,000 shaft horsepower/60 MW total
Speed 30+ knots/34.5 mph/55.5 km/h
Crew 330: 30 Officers, 300 Enlisted
Armament Mk-41 Vertical Launching System Standard Missile (MR)
Vertical Launch ASROC (VLA) Missile
Tomahawk Cruise Missile
Mk-46 torpedoes (from two triple mounts)
2 Mk-45 127-mm/5-inch/54 caliber lightweight guns
2 Phalanx Close-In-Weapons systems
Aircraft 2 SH-60 Seahawk (LAMPS III)
She also carries two Seahawk Light airborne multi-purpose system (LAMPS) helicopters, focused on anti-submarine warfare
She also carries two Seahawk Light airborne multi-purpose system (LAMPS) helicopters, focused on anti-submarine warfare

 

Ships

USS Bunker Hill (CG-52), San Diego, California

USS Mobile Bay (CG-53), San Diego, California

USS Antietam (CG-54), Yokosuka, Japan

USS Leyte Gulf (CG-55), Norfolk, Virginia

USS San Jacinto (CG-56), Norfolk, Virginia

USS Lake Champlain (CG-57), San Diego, California

USS Philippine Sea (CG-58), Mayport, Florida

USS Princeton (CG-59), San Diego, California

USS Normandy (CG-60), Norfolk, Virginia

USS Monterey (CG-61), Norfolk, Virginia

USS Chancellorsville (CG-62), San Diego, California

USS Cowpens (CG-63), San Diego, California

USS Gettysburg (CG-64), Mayport, Florida

USS Chosin (CG-65), Pearl Harbor, Hawaii

USS Hue City (CG-66), Mayport, Florida

USS Shiloh (CG-67), Yokosuka, Japan

USS Anzio (CG-68), Norfolk, Virginia

USS Vicksburg (CG-69), Mayport, Florida

USS Lake Erie (CG-70), Pearl Harbor, Hawaii

USS Cape St. George (CG-71), San Diego, California

USS Vella Gulf (CG-72), Norfolk, Virginia

USS Port Royal (CG-73), Pearl Harbor, Hawaii

 

 

Yet-to-be-named

The U.S. Navy has awarded funding for the construction of DDG-122, the Fiscal Year 2015 Arleigh Burke-class destroyer under contract at General Dynamics Bath Iron Works. This $610.4 million contract modification fully funds this ship, which was awarded in 2013 as part of a multi-ship competition for DDG-51 class destroyers. The total value of the five-ship contract is approximately $3.4 billion. General Dynamics Bath Iron Works is a business unit of General Dynamics (GD).

The Arleigh-Burke class guided-missile destroyer USS William P. Lawrence (DDG-110) transits the Pacific Ocean
The Arleigh-Burke class guided-missile destroyer USS William P. Lawrence (DDG-110) transits the Pacific Ocean

Fred Harris, president of Bath Iron Works (BIW), said, «This announcement allows us to continue efforts associated with planning and construction of DDG-122. We appreciate the leadership of Senators Collins and King and the strong support of our entire delegation in matters of national defense. We are grateful for their recognition of the contributions made by the people of BIW to the U.S. Navy’s important shipbuilding programs».

There are currently three DDG-51 destroyers in production at Bath Iron Works, Rafael Peralta (DDG-115), Thomas Hudner (DDG-116) and Daniel Inouye (DDG-118). The shipyard began fabrication on Rafael Peralta (DDG-115) in November 2011, and delivery to the Navy is scheduled for 2016. Fabrication on Thomas Hudner (DDG-116) began in November 2012, and that ship is scheduled to be delivered to the U.S. Navy in 2017. Fabrication has just begun on Daniel Inouye (DDG-118), the first ship of the 2013 multi-ship award.

Bath Iron Works is also building the three ships in the planned three-vessel Zumwalt-class of destroyers, USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000), Michael Monsoor (DDG-1001) and Lyndon Johnson (DDG-1002).

The Arleigh Burke-class destroyer is a multi-mission combatant that offers defense against a wide range of threats, including ballistic missiles. It operates in support of carrier battle groups, surface action groups, amphibious groups and replenishment groups, providing a complete array of Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW), Anti-Air Warfare (AAW) and Anti-SUrface Warfare (ASUW) capabilities. Designed for survivability, the ships incorporate all-steel construction and have gas turbine propulsion. The combination of the ships’ AEGIS combat system, the Vertical Launching System (VLS), an advanced ASW system, 2 embarked SH-60 helicopters, advanced anti-aircraft missiles and Tomahawk anti-ship and land-attack missiles make the Arleigh Burke class the most powerful surface combatant ever put to sea.

USS Nitze (DDG-94) - Flight IIA: 5"/62, one 20-mm CIWS variant
USS Nitze (DDG-94) – Flight IIA: 5″/62, one 20-mm CIWS variant

SGT Rafael Peralta (1979-2004) is the namesake of DDG-115. Born in Mexico City, he joined the United States Marine Corps as soon as he had a green card in 2000 and later became a U.S. Citizen. In 2008, SGT Rafael Peralta was deployed in Iraq with 1st Platoon, Company A, First Battalion, Third Marines, Regimental Combat Team 7, First Marine Division to participate in Operation Iraqi Freedom. SGT Peralta was killed on November 15, 2004 in house-to-house urban warfare in the second battle of Fallujah and was awarded the Navy Cross for his actions.

CAPT Thomas J. Hudner (Born August 31, 1924) is the living namesake of DDG-116 who currently resides in Concord, Massachusetts. As a former Naval aviator, he received the Medal of Honor for his actions while trying to save the life of his wingman, Ensign Jesse L. Brown, during the Battle of Chosin Reservoir in the Korean War on December 4, 1950. Hudner and Brown were among a group of pilots on patrol near the Chosin Reservoir when Brown’s Corsair was struck by ground fire from Chinese troops and crashed. In an attempt to save Brown from his burning aircraft, Hudner intentionally crash-landed his own aircraft on a snowy mountain in freezing temperatures to help him. Despite these efforts, Brown died of his injuries and Hudner was forced to evacuate, having also been injured in the landing.

The Arleigh Burk-class guided-missile destroyer USS Sampson (DDG-102) departs Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam to support Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2010 exercises
The Arleigh Burk-class guided-missile destroyer USS Sampson (DDG-102) departs Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam to support Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2010 exercises

 

Guided Missile Destroyers Lineup

Ship Yard Launched Commissioned Homeport
DDG-51 Arleigh Burke GDBIW 09-16-89 07-04-91 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-52 Barry HIIIS 06-08-91 12-12-92 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-53 John Paul Jones GDBIW 10-26-91 12-18-93 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-54 Curtis Wilbur GDBIW 05-16-92 03-19-94 Yokosuka, Japan
DDG-55 Stout HIIIS 10-16-92 08-13-94 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-56 John S. McCain GDBIW 09-26-92 07-02-94 Yokosuka, Japan
DDG-57 Mitscher HIIIS 05-07-93 12-10-94 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-58 Laboon GDBIW 02-20-93 03-18-95 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-59 Russell HIIIS 10-20-93 05-20-95 San Diego, California
DDG-60 Paul Hamilton GDBIW 07-24-93 05-27-95 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-61 Ramage HIIIS 02-11-94 07-22-95 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-62 Fitzgerald GDBIW 01-29-94 10-14-95 Yokosuka, Japan
DDG-63 Stethem HIIIS 07-17-94 10-21-95 Yokosuka, Japan
DDG-64 Carney GDBIW 07-23-94 04-13-96 Mayport, Florida
DDG-65 Benfold HIIIS 11-09-94 03-30-96 San Diego, California
DDG-66 Gonzalez GDBIW 02-18-95 10-12-96 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-67 Cole HIIIS 02-10-95 06-08-96 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-68 The Sullivans GDBIW 08-12-95 04-19-97 Mayport, Florida
DDG-69 Milius HIIIS 08-01-95 11-23-96 San Diego, California
DDG-70 Hopper GDBIW 01-06-96 09-06-97 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-71 Ross HIIIS 03-22-96 06-28-97 Rota, Spain
DDG-72 Mahan GDBIW 06-29-96 02-14-98 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-73 Decatur GDBIW 11-10-96 08-29-98 San Diego, California
DDG-74 McFaul HIIIS 01-18-97 04-25-98 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-75 Donald Cook GDBIW 05-03-97 12-04-98 Rota, Spain
DDG-76 Higgins GDBIW 10-04-97 04-24-99 San Diego, California
DDG-77 O’Kane GDBIW 03-28-98 10-23-99 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-78 Porter HIIIS 11-12-97 03-20-99 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-79 Oscar Austin GDBIW 11-07-98 08-19-00 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-80 Roosevelt HIIIS 01-10-99 10-14-00 Mayport, Florida
DDG-81 Winston S. Churchill GDBIW 04-17-99 03-10-01 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-82 Lassen HIIIS 10-16-99 04-21-01 Yokosuka, Japan
DDG-83 Howard GDBIW 11-20-99 10-20-01 San Diego, California
DDG-84 Bulkeley HIIIS 06-21-00 12-08-01 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-85 McCampbell GDBIW 07-02-00 08-17-02 Yokosuka, Japan
DDG-86 Shoup HIIIS 11-22-00 06-22-02 Everett, Washington
DDG-87 Mason GDBIW 06-23-01 04-12-03 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-88 Preble HIIIS 06-01-01 11-09-02 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-89 Mustin HIIIS 12-12-01 07-26-03 Yokosuka, Japan
DDG-90 Chafee GDBIW 11-02-02 10-18-03 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-91 Pinckney HIIIS 06-26-02 05-29-04 San Diego, California
DDG-92 Momsen GDBIW 07-19-03 08-28-04 Everett, Washington
DDG-93 Chung-Hoon HIIIS 12-15-02 09-18-04 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-94 Nitze GDBIW 04-03-04 03-05-05 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-95 James E. Williams HIIIS 06-25-03 12-11-04 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-96 Bainbridge GDBIW 11-13-04 11-12-05 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-97 Halsey HIIIS 01-09-04 07-30-05 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-98 Forrest Sherman HIIIS 10-02-04 01-28-06 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-99 Farragut GDBIW 07-23-05 06-10-06 Mayport, Florida
DDG-100 Kidd HIIIS 01-22-05 06-09-07 San Diego, California
DDG-101 Gridley GDBIW 12-28-05 02-10-07 San Diego, California
DDG-102 Sampson GDBIW 09-16-06 11-03-07 San Diego, California
DDG-103 Truxtun HIIIS 06-02-07 04-25-09 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-104 Sterett GDBIW 05-19-07 08-09-08 San Diego, California
DDG-105 Dewey HIIIS 01-26-08 03-06-10 San Diego, California
DDG-106 Stockdale GDBIW 05-10-08 04-18-09 San Diego, California
DDG-107 Gravely HIIIS 03-30-09 11-20-10 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-108 Wayne E. Meyer GDBIW 10-18-08 10-10-09 San Diego, California
DDG-109 Jason Dunham GDBIW 08-01-09 11-13-10 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-110 William P. Lawrence HIIIS 12-15-09 06-04-11 San Diego, California
DDG-111 Spruance GDBIW 06-06-10 10-01-11 San Diego, California
DDG-112 Michael Murphy GDBIW 05-08-11 10-06-12 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-113 John Finn HIIIS 03-28-15
DDG-114 Ralph Johnson HIIIS
DDG-115 Rafael Peralta GDBIW
DDG-116 Thomas Hudner GDBIW
DDG-117 Paul Ignatius HIIIS
DDG-118 Daniel Inouye GDBIW
DDG-119 Delbert D. Black HIIIS
DDG-120 GDBIW
DDG-121 HIIIS
DDG-122 GDBIW
DDG-123 HIIIS
DDG-124 GDBIW
DDG-125 HIIIS
DDG-126 GDBIW

GDBIW – General Dynamics Bath Iron Works

HIIIS – Huntington Ingalls Industries Ingalls Shipbuilding