Tag Archives: Bath Iron Works

Christening of John Basilone

The U.S. Navy christened the future USS John Basilone (DDG-122) during a 10:30 a.m. EDT ceremony on Saturday, June 18, at General Dynamics Bath Iron Works in Bath, Maine.

USS John Basilone (DDG-122)
Navy christened Guided-Missile Destroyer USS John Basilone (DDG-122)

Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps Troy Black delivered the christening ceremony’s principal address. U.S. Senator Susan Collins of Maine; Vice Admiral Francis Morley, principal military deputy to the assistant secretary of the U.S. Navy for research, development, and acquisition; Vice Admiral Scott Conn, deputy chief of naval operations for warfighting requirements and capabilities; Don Basilone, brother of the ship’s namesake; and Charles Krugh, president of General Dynamics Bath Iron Works also provided remarks. The ship’s sponsors are Ryan Manion and Amy Looney Heffernan, president and vice president of the Travis Manion Foundation. Ms. Heffernan was unable to attend the event. In a time-honored Navy tradition, Ms. Manion christened the ship by breaking a bottle of sparkling wine across the bow.

The ship’s namesake, Gunnery Sergeant John Basilone, received the Medal of Honor for heroism displayed in the Battle of Guadalcanal during World War II, where he led his heavy machine gun sections in defense of a critical position and inflicted heavy casualties on the enemy. Basilone later returned to action at the Battle of Iwo Jima in February of 1944, where he single-handedly destroyed an enemy blockhouse and led a Marine tank under fire safely through a minefield. He was killed in action later that day and was posthumously awarded the Navy Cross for his unwavering devotion and valiant spirit of self-sacrifice.

«The future USS John Basilone will serve as a constant reminder of the immense impact that actions taken by any one Sailor or Marine can truly have», said Secretary of the Navy Carlos Del Toro. «Gunnery Sergeant Basilone is a national hero and this ship and crew will honor his legacy for decades to come».

This is the second ship to honor Basilone. The first, USS Basilone (DD-824), was a Gearing-class destroyer in service from 1945 to 1977.

Arleigh Burke-class destroyers are the backbone of the U.S. Navy’s surface fleet, providing protection to America around the globe. These highly capable, multi-mission ships conduct various operations, from peacetime presence to national security, providing a wide range of warfighting capabilities in multi-threat air, surface, and subsurface domains. These elements of seapower enable the Navy to defend American prosperity and prevent future conflict abroad.

 

Ship Characteristics

 

Length Overall 510 feet/156 m
Beam – Waterline 59 feet/18 m
Draft 31 feet/9.5 m
Displacement – Full Load 9,217 tons/9,363 metric tons
Power Plant 4 General Electric LM 2500-30 gas turbines; 2 shafts; 2 CRP (Contra-Rotating) propellers; 100,000 shaft horsepower/75,000 kW
Speed in excess of 30 knots/34.5 mph/55.5 km/h
Range 4,400 NM/8,149 km at 20 knots/23 mph/37 km/h
Crew 380 total: 32 Officers, 27 CPO (Chief Petty Officer), 321 OEM
Surveillance SPY-1D Phased Array Radar (Lockheed Martin)/AN/SPY-6 Air and Missile Defense Radar (Raytheon Company) and Aegis Combat System (Lockheed Martin); SPS-73(V) Navigation; SPS-67(V)3 Surface Search; 3 SPG-62 Illuminator; SQQ-89(V)6 sonar incorporating SQS-53C hull mounted and SQR-19 towed array sonars used with Mark-116 Mod 7 ASW fire control system
Electronics/Countermeasures SLQ-32(V)3; Mark-53 Mod 0 Decoy System; Mark-234 Decoy System; SLQ-25A Torpedo Decoy; SLQ-39 Surface Decoy; URN-25 TACAN; UPX-29 IFF System; Kollmorgen Mark-46 Mod 1 Electro-Optical Director
Aircraft 2 embarked SH-60 helicopters ASW operations; RAST (Recovery Assist, Secure and Traverse)
Armament 2 Mark-41 Vertical Launching System (VLS) with 96 Standard, Vertical Launch ASROC (Anti-Submarine Rocket) & Tomahawk ASM (Air-to-Surface Missile)/LAM (Loitering Attack Missile); 5-in (127-mm)/54 (62) Mark-45 gun; 2 (1) CIWS (Close-In Weapon System); 2 Mark-32 triple 324-mm torpedo tubes for Mark-46 or Mark-50 ASW torpedos

 

Guided Missile Destroyers Lineup

 

Flight IIA: Technology Insertion

Ship Yard Launched Commissioned Homeport
DDG-116 Thomas Hudner GDBIW 04-23-17 12-01-18 Mayport, Florida
DDG-117 Paul Ignatius HIIIS 11-12-16 07-27-19 Mayport, Florida
DDG-118 Daniel Inouye GDBIW 10-27-19 12-08-21 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-119 Delbert D. Black HIIIS 09-08-17 09-26-20 Mayport, Florida
DDG-120 Carl M. Levin GDBIW 05-16-21 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-121 Frank E. Peterson Jr. HIIIS 07-13-18 05-14-22 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-122 John Basilone GDBIW 06-12-22
DDG-123 Lenah H. Sutcliffe Higbee HIIIS 01-27-20
DDG-124 Harvey C. Barnum Jr. GDBIW
DDG-127 Patrick Gallagher GDBIW

 

Daniel Inouye

The U.S. Navy commissioned the future USS Daniel Inouye (DDG-118), an Arleigh Burke-class destroyer, during a ceremony at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickham, December 8.

USS Daniel Inouye (DDG-118) 05
U.S. Navy commissioned guided-missile destroyer USS Daniel Inouye (DDG-118)

The future USS Daniel Inouye (DDG-118) is named in honor of the late U.S. Senator Daniel Inouye, who served as a Hawaii representative in the Senate from 1963 until he died in 2012.

The Honorable Carlos Del Toro, Secretary of the Navy, delivered the keynote address at the ceremony. Remarks were also been provided by The Honorable David Ige, Governor of Hawaii; The Honorable Kaiali’i Kahele, U.S. Representative, Hawaii’s 2nd District; The Honorable Rick Blangiardi, Mayor of Honolulu; Admiral Samuel Paparo, Commander, U.S. Pacific Fleet; Mr. Ken Inouye, Senator Inouye’s son; and Mr. Ed Kenyon, Director of New Construction Programs, General Dynamics Bath Iron Works.

«The late Senator Daniel Inouye spent his entire life in public service, both in uniform and out», said Del Toro. «Senator Inouye’s life is one to be emulated and the crew of this warship will not only be inspired by his legacy, but will stand the watch with the honor and dignity deserving of a ship bearing his name».

The ship’s sponsor Mrs. Irene Hirano Inouye, Senator Inouye’s wife, established a strong bond with the crew before her passing on April 7, 2020. At the keel laying in 2018, she welded her initials into the ship’s keel and, in 2019, she broke a bottle of champagne on the bow in a christening ceremony bestowing the name on the ship. During a «mast stepping» ceremony, she placed items special to Senator Inouye in the ship’s mast. Mrs. Inouye appointed two Matrons of Honor to assist with sponsorship duties: Jessica Inouye, the wife of Senator Inouye’s only son Ken, and Jennifer Sabas, Senator Inouye’s former chief of staff and current executive director of the Daniel Inouye Institute. In a time-honored Navy tradition, Jennifer and Jessica, along with the Maid of Honor, Maggie Inouye, Senator Inouye’s granddaughter, gave the first order to «man our ship and bring her to life», in Mrs. Inouye’s stead.

The commissioning ceremony coincides with the 80th Anniversary of Pearl Harbor Remembrance Commemoration events. On December 7, 1941, Daniel Inouye was a 17-year-old senior at Honolulu’s McKinley High School and rushed to a Red Cross aid station to help civilians and Sailors wounded in the attack.

On April 21, 1945, while serving with the 442nd Infantry Regiment Combat Team in Italy during World War II, an exploding grenade shattered his right arm during an assault. Despite the intense pain, he refused evacuation. He remained at the head of his platoon until they broke the enemy resistance and his troops deployed in defensive positions, continuing to fight until the regiment’s position was secured. Later in life, he received the Medal of Honor for his extraordinary heroism during the assault.

Commander DonAnn Gilmore, of Anniston, Alabama, is the ship’s commanding officer and leads a crew of 329 officers and enlisted Sailors. Gilmore is a graduate of The Pennsylvania State University. She previously commanded Mine Countermeasures Crew Exultant.

«This crew put a tremendous amount of work into preparing to bring USS Daniel Inouye to life on December 8. We all share a deep sense of pride and honor to represent our namesake, the late Senator and U.S. Army Medal of Honor recipient Daniel Inouye and those he represented for 53 years in the House and Senate», said Gilmore. «Through USS Daniel Inouye’s service to our nation, every Sailor aboard will strive to make ours the preeminent ship on the waterfront. We embody the ship’s motto, a battle cry adopted from Senator Inouye’s Army unit, the 442nd Regimental Combat Team. We will ‘Go For Broke!’ as Daniel Inouye did on the battlefield and in halls of the Senate».

The ship is nearly 510 feet/155 meters long and has a navigational draft of 33 feet/10 meters. As a Flight IIA destroyer, Daniel Inouye (DDG-118) is equipped with Aegis Baseline 9, which provides improved Integrated Air and Missile Defense capabilities, increased computing power, and radar capable of quickly detecting and reacting to modern air warfare and Ballistic Missile Defense threats.

Built by General Dynamics Bath Iron Works in Bath, Maine, Daniel Inouye was christened June 22, 2019, and delivered to the Navy on March 8, 2021.

In addition to Daniel Inouye (DDG-118), General Dynamics – Bath Iron Works (BIW) has five additional Arleigh Burke-class destroyers under construction, to include the future: USS John Basilone (DDG-122), the future USS Harvey C. Barnum Jr. (DDG-124), the future USS Patrick Gallagher (DDG-127), the future USS Louis H. Wilson Jr. (DDG-126), and the future USS William Charette (DDG-130). Bath Iron Works is under contract to construct four additional Arleigh Burke-class destroyers with the Flight III configuration that includes enhanced Integrated Air and Missile Defense capabilities.

USS Daniel Inouye (DDG-118) is the 69th Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer commissioned to the U.S. Navy and the first ship to bear her name. Arleigh Burke-class destroyers are the backbone of the U.S. Navy’s surface fleet and critical to the future U.S. Navy. They are highly capable, multi-mission ships and can conduct various operations, from peacetime presence and crisis management to sea control and power projection – all supporting the United States military strategy.

USS Daniel Inouye’s homeport is Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii.

 

CHARACTERISTICS

Length Overall 525 feet/160 m
Beam – Waterline 65.6 feet/20 m
Draft 32.8 feet/10 m
Displacement – Full Load 9,217 tons/9,363 metric tons
Power Plant 4 General electric LM 2500-30 gas turbines; 2 shafts; 2 CRP (Contra-Rotating) propellers; 100,000 shaft horsepower/75,000 kW
Speed in excess of 30 knots/34.5 mph/55.5 km/h
Range 4,400 NM/8,149 km at 20 knots/23 mph/37 km/h
Crew 380 total: 32 Officers, 27 CPO (Chief Petty Officer), 321 OEM
Surveillance AN/SPY-6 Air and Missile Defense Radar (Raytheon Company) and Aegis Combat System (Lockheed Martin); SPS-73(V) Navigation; SPS-67(V)3 Surface Search; 3 SPG-62 Illuminator; SQQ-89(V)6 sonar incorporating SQS-53C hull mounted and SQR-19 towed array sonars used with Mark-116 Mod 7 ASW fire control system
Electronics/Countermeasures SLQ-32(V)3; Mark-53 Mod 0 Decoy System; Mark-234 Decoy System; SLQ-25A Torpedo Decoy; SLQ-39 Surface Decoy; URN-25 TACAN; UPX-29 IFF System; Kollmorgen Mark-46 Mod 1 Electro-Optical Director
Aircraft 2 embarked SH-60 helicopters ASW operations; RAST (Recovery Assist, Secure and Traverse)
Armament 2 Mark-41 Vertical Launching System (VLS) with 96 Standard, Vertical Launch ASROC (Anti-Submarine Rocket) & Tomahawk ASM (Air-to-Surface Missile)/LAM (Loitering Attack Missile); 5-in (127-mm)/54 (62) Mark-45 gun; 2 (1) CIWS (Close-In Weapon System); 2 Mark-32 triple 324-mm torpedo tubes for Mark-46 or Mark-50 ASW torpedos

 

GUIDED MISSILE DESTROYERS LINEUP

 

Flight IIA: Technology Insertion

Ship Yard Launched Commissioned Homeport
DDG-116 Thomas Hudner GDBIW 04-23-17 12-01-18 Mayport, Florida
DDG-117 Paul Ignatius HIIIS 11-12-16 07-27-19 Mayport, Florida
DDG-118 Daniel Inouye GDBIW 10-27-19 12-08-21 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-119 Delbert D. Black HIIIS 09-08-17 09-26-20 Mayport, Florida
DDG-120 Carl M. Levin GDBIW 05-16-21
DDG-121 Frank E. Peterson Jr. HIIIS 07-13-18
DDG-122 John Basilone GDBIW
DDG-123 Lenah H. Sutcliffe Higbee HIIIS 01-27-20
DDG-124 Harvey C. Barnum Jr. GDBIW
DDG-127 Patrick Gallagher GDBIW

 

Builder’s Trials

The future USS Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG-1002) recently conducted Builder’s Trials.

USS Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG-1002)
Future USS Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG-1002) Conducts Builder’s Trials

Builder’s Trials consist of a series of in-port and at-sea demonstrations that allow the shipbuilder, General Dynamics Bath Iron Works and the U.S. Navy to assess the ship’s systems.

«Trials provide an opportunity for the U.S. Navy and industry team to test the capability and readiness of the ship», Capt. Matthew Schroeder, DDG-1000 program manager, Program Executive (PEO) Ships. «DDG-1002 is a warship that is going to equip our fleet with next-generation capability and capacity for the high-end fight».

After completing Builder’s Trials and fully proving out the hull, mechanical, and electrical systems, the ship will complete combat systems installation and activation.

The future USS Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG-1002) is the third and final ship in the Zumwalt-class of guided missile destroyers and will provide multi-mission offensive and defensive capabilities to the fleet.

As one of the Defense Department’s largest acquisition organizations, PEO Ships is responsible for executing the development and procurement of all destroyers, amphibious ships, special mission and support ships, boats and craft.

 

Ship Characteristics

Length 610 feet/186 m
Beam 80.7 feet/24.6 m
Draft 27.6 feet/8.4 m
Displacement 15,761 long tonnes/16,014 metric tonnes
Speed 30 knots/34.5 mph/55.5 km/h
Installed Power 104,600 hp/78 MW
Crew Size 158 – Includes Aviation Detachment

 

Ships

Ship Laid down Launched Commissioned Homeport
USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000) 11-17-2011 10-28-2013 10-15-2016 San Diego, California
USS Michael Monsoor (DDG-1001) 05-23-2013 06-21-2016 01-26-2019 San Diego, California
USS Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG-1002) 01-30-2017 12-09-2018

 

Acceptance Trials

The future USS Daniel Inouye (DDG-118) successfully completed acceptance trials February 4 after spending a day underway off the coast of Maine.

USS Daniel Inouye (DDG-118)
The future USS Daniel Inouye (DDG-118) departs General Dynamics Bath Iron Works (GDBIW) shipyard on February 3 for acceptance trials (Photo by SUPSHIP Bath)

The Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) inspected the ship during a series of demonstrations while pier side and underway. Many of the ship’s onboard systems, including navigation, damage control, mechanical and electrical systems, combat systems, communications, and propulsion applications, were tested to validate performance and met or exceeded U.S. Navy specifications.

«Following an outstanding Combined Alpha and Bravo trials this past December, DDG-118 performed superbly during the ship’s Acceptance Trial earlier this week», said Captain Seth Miller, DDG-51 class program manager, Program Executive Office (PEO) Ships. «The Navy and industry team are ready to deliver a highly capable multi-mission warship to the fleet within the next few weeks».

Daniel Inouye is a Flight IIA destroyer, equipped with the Aegis Baseline 9 Combat System, which includes Integrated Air and Missile Defense capability and enhanced Ballistic Missile Defense capabilities. This system delivers quick reaction time, high firepower, and increased electronic countermeasures capability against a variety of threats.

Following delivery, Daniel Inouye will be the 37th Arleigh Burke (DDG-51) class destroyer to be delivered by BIW. The shipyard is also in production on the future Arleigh Burke-class destroyers USS Carl M. Levin (DDG-120), USS John Basilone (DDG-122), USS Harvey C. Barnum (DDG-124), USS Patrick Gallagher (DDG-127), and Flight III ships, USS Louis H. Wilson, Jr. (DDG-126), and USS William Charette (DDG-130), as well as the future Zumwalt-class destroyer, USS Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG-1002).

As one of the Defense Department’s largest acquisition organizations, Program Executive Office Ships (PEO Ships) is responsible for executing the development and procurement of all destroyers, amphibious ships, special mission and support ships, and special warfare craft.

 

CHARACTERISTICS

Length Overall 525 feet/160 m
Beam – Waterline 65.6 feet/20 m
Draft 32.8 feet/10 m
Displacement – Full Load 9,217 tons/9,363 metric tons
Power Plant 4 General electric LM 2500-30 gas turbines; 2 shafts; 2 CRP (Contra-Rotating) propellers; 100,000 shaft horsepower/75,000 kW
Speed in excess of 30 knots/34.5 mph/55.5 km/h
Range 4,400 NM/8,149 km at 20 knots/23 mph/37 km/h
Crew 380 total: 32 Officers, 27 CPO (Chief Petty Officer), 321 OEM
Surveillance AN/SPY-6 Air and Missile Defense Radar (Raytheon Company) and Aegis Combat System (Lockheed Martin); SPS-73(V) Navigation; SPS-67(V)3 Surface Search; 3 SPG-62 Illuminator; SQQ-89(V)6 sonar incorporating SQS-53C hull mounted and SQR-19 towed array sonars used with Mark-116 Mod 7 ASW fire control system
Electronics/Countermeasures SLQ-32(V)3; Mark-53 Mod 0 Decoy System; Mark-234 Decoy System; SLQ-25A Torpedo Decoy; SLQ-39 Surface Decoy; URN-25 TACAN; UPX-29 IFF System; Kollmorgen Mark-46 Mod 1 Electro-Optical Director
Aircraft 2 embarked SH-60 helicopters ASW operations; RAST (Recovery Assist, Secure and Traverse)
Armament 2 Mark-41 Vertical Launching System (VLS) with 96 Standard, Vertical Launch ASROC (Anti-Submarine Rocket) & Tomahawk ASM (Air-to-Surface Missile)/LAM (Loitering Attack Missile); 5-in (127-mm)/54 (62) Mark-45 gun; 2 (1) CIWS (Close-In Weapon System); 2 Mark-32 triple 324-mm torpedo tubes for Mark-46 or Mark-50 ASW torpedos

 

GUIDED MISSILE DESTROYERS LINEUP

 

Flight IIA: Technology Insertion

Ship Yard Launched Commissioned Homeport
DDG-116 Thomas Hudner GDBIW 04-23-17 12-01-18 Mayport, Florida
DDG-117 Paul Ignatius HIIIS 11-12-16 07-27-19 Mayport, Florida
DDG-118 Daniel Inouye GDBIW 10-27-19 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-119 Delbert D. Black HIIIS 09-08-17 09-26-20 Mayport, Florida
DDG-120 Carl M. Levin GDBIW
DDG-121 Frank E. Peterson Jr. HIIIS 07-13-18
DDG-122 John Basilone GDBIW
DDG-123 Lenah H. Sutcliffe Higbee HIIIS 01-27-20
DDG-124 Harvey C. Barnum Jr. GDBIW
DDG-127 Patrick Gallagher GDBIW

 

Combat Systems

The U.S. Navy accepted delivery of USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000), the lead ship of the Navy’s next-generation of multi-mission surface combatants, on April 24.

Official U.S. Navy file photo of the guided-missile destroyer USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000) arriving at its new homeport in San Diego

Following this delivery, the ship will transition from Combat Systems Activation to the next phase of developmental and integrated at-sea testing. This event marks a major milestone of the dual delivery approach for USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000), which achieved Hull Mechanical & Electrical delivery from shipbuilder General Dynamics’ Bath Iron Works in May 2016. Raytheon Integrated Defense Systems was the prime contractor for the Zumwalt Combat System, and has lead activation and integration for Zumwalt class ships both in Bath, Maine and San Diego.

«Delivery is an important milestone for the Navy, as DDG-1000 continues more advanced at-sea testing of the Zumwalt combat system», said Captain Kevin Smith, DDG-1000 program manager, Program Executive Office, Ships. «The combat test team, consisting of the DDG-1000 sailors, Raytheon engineers, and Navy field activity teams, have worked diligently to get USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000) ready for more complex, multi-mission at-sea testing. I am excited to begin demonstrating the performance of this incredible ship».

With delivery, USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000) joins the U.S. Pacific Fleet battle force and remains assigned to Surface Development Squadron One. In addition to at-sea testing of the Zumwalt combat system, DDG 1000 will also operate as a key enabler in the acceleration of new warfighting capabilities and rapid development and validation of operational tactics, techniques, and procedures.

The 610-foot/186-meter, wave-piercing tumblehome ship design provides a wide array of advancements. Employing an innovative and highly survivable Integrated Power System (IPS), DDG-1000 has the capacity to distribute 1000 volts of direct current across the ships’ entirety, allowing for enhanced power capability for various operational requirements. Additionally, the shape of the superstructure and the arrangement of its antennas significantly reduce radar cross section, making the ship less visible to enemy radars.

«Every day the ship is at sea, the officers and crew learn more about her capability, and can immediately inform the continued development of tactics, techniques, and procedures to not only integrate Zumwalt into the fleet, but to advance the Navy’s understanding of operations with a stealth destroyer», remarked Captain Andrew Carlson, the Commanding Officer of USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000). «After sailing over 9000 miles and 100 days at sea in 2019, we are absolutely looking forward to more aggressive at-sea testing and validation of the combat systems leading to achievement of initial operational capability».

The USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000) is the first ship of the Zumwalt-class destroyers. The USS Michael Monsoor (DDG-1001) is homeported in San Diego and is undergoing combat systems activation. The third and final ship of the class, the future USS Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG-1002), is under construction at BIW’s shipyard in Bath, Maine.

As one of the Defense Department’s largest acquisition organizations, PEO Ships is responsible for executing the development and procurement of all destroyers, amphibious ships, special mission and support ships, and special warfare craft.

 

Ship Characteristics

Length 610 feet/186 m
Beam 80.7 feet/24.6 m
Draft 27.6 feet/8.4 m
Displacement 15,761 long tonnes/16,014 metric tonnes
Speed 30 knots/34.5 mph/55.5 km/h
Installed Power 104,600 hp/78 MW
Crew Size 158 – Includes Aviation Detachment

 

Ships

Ship Laid down Launched Commissioned Homeport
USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000) 11-17-2011 10-28-2013 10-15-2016 San Diego, California
USS Michael Monsoor (DDG-1001) 05-23-2013 06-21-2016 26-01-2019 San Diego, California
USS Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG-1002) 01-30-2017 09-12-2018

 

Christening of Daniel

The Navy christened its newest Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer, the future USS Daniel Inouye (DDG-118), during a 10 a.m. EDT ceremony Saturday, June 22, in Bath, Maine.

Navy christened guided-missile destroyer Daniel Inouye

The future USS Daniel Inouye (DDG-118) is named in honor of Daniel Inouye, who served as a United States Senator for Hawaii from 1963 until his death in 2012. He received the Medal of Honor June 21, 2000 for his extraordinary heroism in action while serving with the 442nd Infantry Regiment Combat Team in Italy during World War II. During an assault April 21, 1945, an exploding grenade shattered his right arm; despite the intense pain, he refused evacuation. He remained at the head of his platoon until they broke the enemy resistance and his men deployed in defensive positions, continuing to fight until the regiment’s position was secured.

U.S. Senator Mazie Hirono of Hawaii delivered the christening ceremony’s principal address. Irene Hirano Inouye, wife of the late Senator, served as the ship’s sponsor. In a time-honored Navy tradition, Mrs. Inouye christened the ship by breaking a bottle of sparkling wine across the bow.

«The future USS Daniel Inouye will serve for decades as a reminder of Senator Inouye’s service to our nation and his unwavering support of a strong Navy and Marine Corps team», said Secretary of the Navy Richard V. Spencer. «This ship honors not only his service but the service of our shipbuilders who help make ours the greatest Navy and Marine Corps team in the world».

The future USS Daniel Inouye (DDG-118) will be the 68th Arleigh Burke-class destroyer, and is one of 21 ships currently under contract for the DDG-51 program. The ship is configured as a Flight IIA destroyer, which enables power projection and delivers quick reaction time, high firepower, and increased electronic countermeasures capability for anti-air warfare. The Daniel Inouye will be 509.5 feet long and 59 feet wide, with a displacement of 9,496 tons. She will be homeported in Pearl Harbor.

 

Ship Characteristics

Length Overall 510 feet/156 m
Beam – Waterline 59 feet/18 m
Draft 30.5 feet/9.3 m
Displacement – Full Load 9,217 tons/9,363 metric tons
Power Plant 4 General electric LM 2500-30 gas turbines; 2 shafts; 2 CRP (Contra-Rotating) propellers; 100,000 shaft horsepower/75,000 kW
Speed in excess of 30 knots/34.5 mph/55.5 km/h
Range 4,400 NM/8,149 km at 20 knots/23 mph/37 km/h
Crew 380 total: 32 Officers, 27 CPO (Chief Petty Officer), 321 OEM
Surveillance SPY-1D Phased Array Radar and Aegis Combat System (Lockheed Martin); SPS-73(V) Navigation; SPS-67(V)3 Surface Search; 3 SPG-62 Illuminator; SQQ-89(V)6 sonar incorporating SQS-53C hull mounted and SQR-19 towed array sonars used with Mark-116 Mod 7 ASW fire control system
Electronics/Countermeasures SLQ-32(V)3; Mark-53 Mod 0 Decoy System; Mark-234 Decoy System; SLQ-25A Torpedo Decoy; SLQ-39 Surface Decoy; URN-25 TACAN; UPX-29 IFF System; Kollmorgen Mark-46 Mod 1 Electro-Optical Director
Aircraft 2 embarked SH-60 helicopters ASW operations; RAST (Recovery Assist, Secure and Traverse)
Armament 2 Mark-41 Vertical Launching System (VLS) with 96 Standard, Vertical Launch ASROC (Anti-Submarine Rocket) & Tomahawk ASM (Air-to-Surface Missile)/LAM (Loitering Attack Missile); 5-in (127-mm)/54 (62) Mark-45 gun; 2 (1) CIWS (Close-In Weapon System); 2 Mark-32 triple 324-mm torpedo tubes for Mark-46 or Mark-50 ASW torpedos

 

Guided Missile Destroyers Lineup

 

Flight IIA: Technology Insertion

Ship Yard Launched Commissioned Homeport
DDG-116 Thomas Hudner GDBIW 04-23-17 12-01-18 Mayport, Florida
DDG-117 Paul Ignatius HIIIS 11-12-16
DDG-118 Daniel Inouye GDBIW
DDG-119 Delbert D. Black HIIIS 09-08-17
DDG-120 Carl M. Levin GDBIW
DDG-121 Frank E. Peterson Jr. HIIIS 07-13-18
DDG-122 John Basilone GDBIW
DDG-123 Lenah H. Sutcliffe Higbee HIIIS
DDG-124 Harvey C. Barnum Jr. GDBIW

 

The third ship

The U.S. Navy christened its newest Zumwalt-class guided missile destroyer, the future USS Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG-1002), during a 10 a.m. EST ceremony Saturday, April 27, at General Dynamics-Bath Iron Works shipyard in Bath, Maine.

BATH, Maine (December 9, 2018) – Following a multi-day process that includes moving the ship from the land level facility to the dry dock, the future USS Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG-1002) is made ready before flooding of the dry dock at General Dynamic-Bath Iron Works shipyard, and subsequent launching of the third Zumwalt-class destroyer (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of General Dynamics-Bath Iron Works)
BATH, Maine (December 9, 2018) – Following a multi-day process that includes moving the ship from the land level facility to the dry dock, the future USS Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG-1002) is made ready before flooding of the dry dock at General Dynamic-Bath Iron Works shipyard, and subsequent launching of the third Zumwalt-class destroyer (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of General Dynamics-Bath Iron Works)

The third ship in the Zumwalt-class, DDG-1002 is named in honor of late President Lyndon B. Johnson, who served in office from 1963-1969, and will be the first ship to bear his name.

Lynda Johnson Robb and Luci Johnson, the two daughters of the former president, served as the ship’s sponsors. In a time-honored Navy tradition, the sisters christened the ship by breaking a bottle of sparkling wine across the bow. Robb also served as the principal speaker.

«The future USS Lyndon B. Johnson will serve for decades as a reminder of President Johnson’s service to our nation and support of a strong Navy and Marine Corps team», said Secretary of the Navy Richard V. Spencer. «This ship honors not only President Johnson’s service, but also the service of our industry partners who are vital in making the Navy the nation needs».

Johnson served as a U.S. Navy Reserve officer before being called to active duty after the attack on Pearl Harbor. He requested a combat assignment and served in the Pacific theater. After returning from active duty, Johnson reported to Navy leaders and Congress what he believed were deplorable living conditions for the warfighters. He continued to fight for better standards for all military members.

Johnson’s time as president was marked by the passage of programs that greatly influenced and affected education, healthcare and civil rights for generations to come. He signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964 into law, enacting comprehensive provisions protecting the right to vote and prohibiting racial discrimination by employers. His work on civil rights continued with the passage of the Voting Rights Act, which guaranteed voting rights for all people, regardless of race.

The multi-mission Zumwalt-class destroyers will be capable of performing a range of deterrence, power projection, sea control, and command and control missions while allowing the Navy to evolve with new systems and missions. Zumwalt ships are 610 feet/186 meters long, have a beam of 80.7 feet/24.6 meter, displace almost 16,000 tons, and are capable of making 30 knots/34.5 mph/55.5 km/h speed.

Michael Monsoor

The U.S. Navy commissioned its newest destroyer, USS Michael Monsoor (DDG-1001), Saturday, January 26 during a 10 a.m. (PST) ceremony at Naval Air Station (NAS) North Island, San Diego, California, where the ship will be homeported.

USS Michael Monsoor (DDG-1001) commissioning ceremony
USS Michael Monsoor (DDG-1001) commissioning ceremony

The second ship in the Zumwalt-class of destroyers, DDG-1001 is named in honor of Medal of Honor recipient Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class (SEAL) Michael A. Monsoor, who was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for his heroic actions in Ramadi, Iraq, September 29, 2006.

Scott Peters, U.S. Representative from California’s 52nd District, delivered the commissioning ceremony’s principal address. Sally Monsoor, Petty Officer Monsoor’s mother, served as the ship’s sponsor. The ceremony was highlighted by a time-honored Navy tradition when Mrs. Monsoor gives the first order to «man our ship and bring her to life»!

«USS Michael Monsoor is one of the most capable warfighting assets our nation has to offer», said Secretary of the Navy Richard V. Spencer. «This ship will provide independent forward presence and deterrence for decades to come and I am confident the crew will operate this vessel with the level of expertise, courage, and strength needed to overcome any challenge».

On September 29, 2006, in Ar Ramadi, Iraq, Monsoor was part of a sniper overwatch security position with two other SEALs and several Iraqi Army soldiers when an insurgent closed in and threw a fragmentation grenade into the position. The grenade hit Monsoor in the chest before falling to the ground. Positioned next to the single exit, Monsoor was the only one who could have escaped harm. Instead he dropped onto the grenade, smothering it to protect his teammates. The grenade detonated as he came down on top of it, inflicting a mortal wound. Monsoor’s actions saved the lives of his two teammates and the accompanying Iraqi soldiers. His Medal of Honor citation reads, «by his undaunted courage, fighting spirit and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of certain death, Petty Officer Monsoor gallantly gave his life for his country, thereby reflecting great credit upon himself and upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service».

The future USS Michael Monsoor (DDG-1001) includes new technologies and will serve as a multi-mission platform capable of operating as an integral part of naval, joint or combined maritime forces. The Zumwalt-class fields a considerably larger flight deck and has capacity for two MH-60R and three Vertical Take-off and landing tactical Unmanned Air Vehicles (VTUAVs) to execute a wider array of surface, aviation, and undersea missions that deliver more manpower, firepower, and computing power to the fight. The future USS Michael Monsoor’s Vertical Launch System (VLS) features cells physically larger than similar cells on today’s ships, allowing this class to fire larger and more advanced land and anti-ship missiles in the future.

The Navy's next generation destroyer, the future USS Michael Monsoor (DDG-1001), successfully completed acceptance. The U.S. Navy's Board of Inspection and Survey reviewed the ship and its crew during a series of demonstrations both pier side and underway, evaluating the ship's construction and compliance with Navy specifications (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of Bath Iron Works/Released)
The Navy’s next generation destroyer, the future USS Michael Monsoor (DDG-1001), successfully completed acceptance. The U.S. Navy’s Board of Inspection and Survey reviewed the ship and its crew during a series of demonstrations both pier side and underway, evaluating the ship’s construction and compliance with Navy specifications (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of Bath Iron Works/Released)

Fifth DDG-51 Destroyer

Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine, is being awarded a $910,723,811 fixed-price incentive firm target modification to previously awarded contract (N00024-18-C-2305) to exercise the fiscal 2019 option for construction of a DDG-51 class ship (DDG-132).

General Dynamics Bath Iron Works awarded contract for fifth DDG-51 destroyer
General Dynamics Bath Iron Works awarded contract for fifth DDG-51 destroyer

This modification also includes options for engineering change proposals, design budgeting requirements, and post-delivery availabilities on the fiscal 2019 option ship which, if exercised, would bring the cumulative value of the fiscal 2019 option ship to $921,990,345.

Work will be performed in

  • Bath, Maine (65 percent);
  • Cincinnati, Ohio (5 percent);
  • Atlanta, Georgia (3 percent);
  • York, Pennsylvania (2 percent);
  • Coatesville, Pennsylvania (2 percent);
  • Falls Church, Virginia (2 percent);
  • South Portland, Maine (1 percent);
  • Walpole, Massachusetts (1 percent);
  • Erie, Pennsylvania (1 percent);
  • Charlottesville, Virginia (1 percent);
  • and other locations below 1 percent (collectively totaling 17 percent),

and is expected to be completed by May 2026.

Fiscal 2019 shipbuilding and conversion (U.S. Navy) funding in the amount of $900,723,811 will be obligated at time of award and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year.

The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, District of Columbia, is the contracting activity.

 

In the most recent multi-year competition, BIW was awarded four ships. The Navy held a separate competition for an option ship as part of its commitment to growing the fleet. The Arleigh Burke class destroyer will be funded in the Fiscal Year 2019 budget.

«Bath Iron Works is privileged to continue producing state-of-the-art surface combatants for the longest running naval shipbuilding program in our nation’s history», said Dirk Lesko, President of Bath Iron Works. «This award demonstrates the vital role the DDG-51 plays in the security posture of the United States and the confidence the Navy has in our shipyard to produce these important assets».

There are currently five DDG-51 destroyers in production at Bath Iron Works: USS Daniel Inouye (DDG-118), USS Carl M. Levin (DDG-120), USS John Basilone (DDG-122), USS Harvey C. Barnum (DDG-124) and USS Patrick Gallagher (DDG-127). The shipyard’s backlog includes USS Louis H. Wilson Jr. (DDG-126) and the five ships that are part of the multi-year contract awarded this fall. BIW also is building the third Zumwalt-class destroyer, USS Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG-1002).

 

Guided Missile Destroyers Lineup

 

Flight III

Ship Yard Launched Commissioned Homeport
DDG-125 Jack H. Lucas HIIIS
DDG-126 Louis H. Wilson, Jr. GDBIW
DDG-128
DDG-129
DDG-130
DDG-131
DDG-132
DDG-133
DDG-134
DDG-135
DDG-136
DDG-137
DDG-138

 

The third and final

The future USSLyndon B. Johnson (DDG-1002) was launched December 9 at General Dynamics-BathIron Works shipyard.

BATH, Maine (December 9, 2018) Following a multi-day process that includes moving the ship from the land level facility to the dry dock, the future USS Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG-1002) is made ready before flooding of the dry dock at General Dynamic-Bath Iron Works shipyard, and subsequent launching of the third Zumwalt-class destroyer (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of General Dynamics-Bath Iron Works/Released)
BATH, Maine (December 9, 2018) Following a multi-day process that includes moving the ship from the land level facility to the dry dock, the future USS Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG-1002) is made ready before flooding of the dry dock at General Dynamic-Bath Iron Works shipyard, and subsequent launching of the third Zumwalt-class destroyer (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of General Dynamics-Bath Iron Works/Released)

The process of launching a ship is a multi-day process that includes moving the ship from the land level facility to the dry dock which is then slowly flooded until the ship is afloat. With the ship in the water, final outfitting and production can commence.

«It’s important for the DDG-1000 program and shipyard to reach this major milestone», said Captain Kevin Smith, DDG-1000 program manager, Program Executive Office (PEO) Ships. «With the first two ships of the class underway, we are excited to continue the next phase of construction of the future USS Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG-1002)».

Zumwalt-class destroyers feature a state-of-the-art electric propulsion system, wave-piercing tumblehome hull, stealth design and are equipped with the most advanced warfighting technology and weaponry. These ships will be capable of performing a range of deterrence, power projection, sea control, and command and control missions while allowing the Navy to evolve with new systems and missions.

«The crew of Lyndon B. Johnson looks forward to bringing this great warship honoring our 36th President to life, and we’re proud to have the opportunity to be present for this important step in the ship’s construction», said Captain Jeremy Gray, prospective commanding officer, USS Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG-1002). «It is truly impressive to see the ship afloat in the Kennebec River for the first time and we look forward to taking her to sea».

The future USS Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG-1002) is the third and final DDG-1000 Zumwalt-class ship, and is scheduled to be christened in the spring of 2019.

As one of the Defense Department’s largest acquisition organizations, PEO Ships is responsible for executing the development and procurement of all destroyers, amphibious ships, special mission and support ships, and special warfare craft.