Tag Archives: BAE Systems

For sea trials

The Right Honourable Michael Fallon MP, Secretary of State for Defence, visited BAE Systems on July 10 and toured the latest Astute class submarine. HMS Artful is the third of seven highly sophisticated Astute class submarines being built by the Company for the UK Royal Navy. The remaining four are under construction at its site in Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria.

HMS Artful, the third of the Royal Navy’s seven Astute-class attack submarines, is currently preparing to leave the construction yard in Barrow-in-Furness for sea trials, before joining the Royal Navy fleet around the end of this year
HMS Artful, the third of the Royal Navy’s seven Astute-class attack submarines, is currently preparing to leave the construction yard in Barrow-in-Furness for sea trials, before joining the Royal Navy fleet around the end of this year

The 7,400-tonne nuclear-powered attack submarine is undergoing final preparations before leaving for its operational base at Her Majesty’s Naval Base Clyde, in Faslane, Scotland. From there, it will undergo sea trials, when its full range of capabilities will be tested under the control of its Commanding Officer, Commander Scott Bower. Artful’s sister submarines, HMS Astute (S119) and HMS Ambush (S120), are already operating out of Faslane.

Mr. Fallon, who also visited BAE Systems’ giant build hall in which final assembly of each 318-feet-long/97-meter-long submarine takes place, said: «The Astute submarine programme is a key part of our £163 billion plan to ensure that our armed forces have the equipment they need. HMS Artful (S121) will now join HMS Astute (S119) and HMS Ambush (S120), helping to keep Britain safe. The next four boats are already under construction, securing thousands of jobs and showing our commitment to increase defence spending each year for the rest of the decade».

BAE Systems, which now employs more than 7,000 people at its Submarines facility, is responsible for designing, building, testing and commissioning the Astute class – the most capable attack submarines ever built for the UK Royal Navy. Each submarine packs a range of world-class technologies and is armed with Spearfish heavyweight torpedoes and Tomahawk land attack missiles.

The seven Astute class nuclear powered submarines (SSNs) will have the capability to circumnavigate the globe without surfacing, limited only by their food storage capacity. Able to deploy rapidly, they are powered by a nuclear reactor that can run for their 25 year lifespan without refuelling
The seven Astute class nuclear powered submarines (SSNs) will have the capability to circumnavigate the globe without surfacing, limited only by their food storage capacity. Able to deploy rapidly, they are powered by a nuclear reactor that can run for their 25 year lifespan without refuelling

Tony Johns, Managing Director of BAE Systems Submarines, said: «It was a pleasure to welcome the Secretary of State to BAE Systems and to accompany him on a tour of Artful and our world-class submarine building facilities. The design and build of a nuclear powered submarine is the pinnacle of technology, engineering and manufacturing excellence. It is a hugely complex programme of enormous national significance. When Artful was launched, it was done so in a more advanced state of build than any other submarine we have built, so it was a proud moment to be able showcase the progress we are making across the Astute programme and we will continue to look for ways of improving our efficiency and effectiveness. Today’s visit is recognition of the hard work by everyone at BAE Systems, our submarine partners, the Royal Navy crew and the hundreds of businesses in our supply chain network».

This is an exciting time for BAE Systems in Barrow. As well as Astute, the Company is undertaking £300 million-plus of facilities investment in readiness for the start of construction on Successor – the programme to replace the current fleet of Vanguard submarines, which carry the UK’s strategic national deterrent. BAE Systems is leading the design phase of this programme and has more than 1,500 people currently working on it.

  1. HMS Astute (S119)
  2. HMS Ambush (S120)
  3. HMS Artful (S121)
  4. Audacious (S122)
  5. Anson (S123)
  6. Agamemnon (S124)
  7. Ajax (S125)
The Astute class is designed and engineered to be the stealthiest submarine of her type, equipped with the latest and most powerful sonar suite and secure communications facilities, while exhibiting a low noise signature and optimum detection avoidance characteristics
The Astute class is designed and engineered to be the stealthiest submarine of her type, equipped with the latest and most powerful sonar suite and secure communications facilities, while exhibiting a low noise signature and optimum detection avoidance characteristics

 

 

 

American HERCULES

The U.S. Army has awarded BAE Systems a contract worth $110.4 million to convert 36 M88A1 Recovery Vehicles to the M88A2 Heavy Equipment Recovery Combat Utility Lift Evacuation Systems (HERCULES) configuration.

BAE Systems will convert M88A1 recovery vehicles to the M88A2 Heavy Equipment Recovery Combat Utility Lift Evacuation System configuration
BAE Systems will convert M88A1 recovery vehicles to the M88A2 Heavy Equipment Recovery Combat Utility Lift Evacuation System configuration

«The HERCULES is an integral part of the U.S. Army’s Armored Brigade Combat Team (ABCT) and essential to its recovery missions as the fleet becomes heavier», said John Tile, director of Recovery Programs at BAE Systems. «This award continues the Army’s stated objective to pure-fleet its M88s to the more capable HERCULES configuration».

The fleet of ABCT vehicles is getting heavier, making it increasingly important that the recovery fleet is upgraded to support it. The HERCULES, which provides recovery support to soldiers in the field, is the only vehicle able to recover the M1 Abrams tank and the heaviest Mine-Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) variants in a combat environment.

The M88 plays a critical role in the company’s efforts to maintain the Combat Vehicle Industrial Base by supporting a team of highly skilled professionals and protecting the affordability of the Army’s combat vehicles. The support of Congress and the Army to protect these vital capabilities through M88 upgrades helps sustain the workforce at BAE Systems’ facilities and ensures that they will be available for future programs.

Work on the contract is expected to begin immediately by the existing workforce and will take place primarily at the company’s York, Pennsylvania, and Aiken, South Carolina, facilities. Deliveries will begin in January 2017 and continue through October 2017.

BAE Systems is under contract for 770 army vehicles and 100 for the US Marine Corps. So far it has completed 680 for the army, which has a pure fleet objective of 933 M88A2s
BAE Systems is under contract for 770 army vehicles and 100 for the US Marine Corps. So far it has completed 680 for the army, which has a pure fleet objective of 933 M88A2s

 

M88A2 HERCULES

The M88A2 Heavy Equipment Recovery Combat Utility Lift and Evacuation System (HERCULES) improved Recovery Vehicle is the recovery system of choice for today’s 70-ton combat vehicles. With the lowest acquisition, operational and maintenance cost of any 70-ton capable recovery system, HERCULES answers the need for cost-effective, self-supporting heavy recovery performance.

The HERCULES was the primary 70-ton recovery system during Operation Iraqi Freedom. And, U.S. troops found a few other creative uses for its capabilities when they used it to pull down the Saddam Hussein statue in Baghdad on April 9, 2003. HERCULES utilizes a hull designed for the recovery mission and thoroughly proven by U.S. Army testing. Stability and performance are unmatched by any alternate tank-based design.

HERCULES offers operational and logistics commonality with the existing M88A1 fleet, simplifying training and parts availability. Key upgrades include improved power-assisted braking, improved steering, improved electrical system and increased engine horsepower.

HERCULES features overlay armor protection, ballistic skirts, a longer 35-ton boom, a 140,000-pound/63,504-kg constant pull main winch with 280 feet/85 m of cable, and an auxiliary three-ton winch to aid main winch cable deployment. The M88A2 HERCULES is built and equipped to be the world’s recovery champion.

Travelling to Sydney

NUSHIP Adelaide, one of two Landing Helicopter Dock (LHD) ships being built for the Royal Australian Navy (RAN), left BAE Systems Williamstown (17 June) to begin sea trials. After some initial trials in Port Phillip Bay, HMAS Adelaide (L01) will spend ten days on the water travelling to Sydney.

The second ship, HMAS Adelaide, is planned to commission in 2016
The second ship, HMAS Adelaide, is planned to commission in 2016

The current testing precedes a second period of sea trials in August, ahead of delivery to the Royal Australian Navy later this year. The sea trials are conducted under a number of scenarios; some require the ship in certain conditions and/or water depths while others require the ship’s systems in specific configurations.

In Sydney, HMAS Adelaide (L01) will be dry docked so her hull and flight deck can be cleaned and painted. NUSHIP Adelaide will then set sail and undertake more sea trials on the return voyage to Williamstown, arriving in mid-July. The August sea trials will focus on communication and combat systems.

BAE Systems Director of Maritime, Bill Saltzer said: «We will undertake approximately 240 hours of testing over 20 days to ensure all systems perform to their capability. Some of the trials will run concurrently and cover everything from basic systems operations such as alarms, to the ship’s manoeuvrability while at sea. We are on track to deliver NUSHIP Adelaide at the end of September this year. The ship is even more ready than HMAS Canberra (L02) was for her first sea trials, reinforcing that we have implemented lessons learned from the first of class and we have continued to improve our productivity».

The LHDs are the largest warships ever to be built for the RAN. As the prime contractor, BAE Systems has worked closely with the Defence Materiel Organization to deliver the project with subcontractors Navantia, which constructed the hulls in Spain, SAAB and L3, which supplied the combat and communications systems respectively.

These 27,000-tonne ships will be able to land a force of over 1,000 personnel by helicopter and watercraft, along with all their weapons, ammunition, vehicles and stores
These 27,000-tonne ships will be able to land a force of over 1,000 personnel by helicopter and watercraft, along with all their weapons, ammunition, vehicles and stores

 

Platform Characteristics

Length Overall                                                                          757 feet/230.8 m

Length Waterline                                                                     680 feet/207.2 m

Beam                                                                                               105 feet/32 m

Design Draft                                                                                23.5 feet/7.18 m

Full Load Displacement                                                         27,831 tonnes

Crew and Embarked Forced Accommodation         1,403

 

Machinery

Propulsion                 2 × Siemens 11,000 kW PODs

Bowthruster             2 × 1,500 kW Brunvoll/Siemens motors

Stabilisers                   2 × Fincantieri

Generators                         1 × 22,000 kW GE LM2500 Gas Turbine and                                                      2 × 7,680 kW Diesel

Integrated Platform Management System              Navantia – Sistemas

Fresh Water              6 × Reverse Osmosis Plants (each 25 tonnes/day)

Sewage                         2 × Treatment Plants

The largest ships ever built for the Royal Australian Navy, the LHDs are being built as a collaboration between Navantia and BAE Systems – Maritime
The largest ships ever built for the Royal Australian Navy, the LHDs are being built as a collaboration between Navantia and BAE Systems – Maritime

 

Performance

Maximum Speed                                   20+ knots/23+ mph/37+ km/h

Economic Speed                                    15 knots/17 mph/28 km/h

Maximum Range                                   9,250 NM/10,644 miles/17,131 km

Endurance                                                45+ days

 

Capacity

Flight Deck                                                            4,750 m²/51,128.57 feet²

Dock (including ramp)                                    1,165 m²/12,540 feet²

Heavy Cargo Garage                                       1,410 m²/12,270.86 feet²

Light Cargo Garage                                          1,880 m²/20,236 feet²

Hangar                                                                      990 m²/10,656.27 feet²

Garages, Hangar and Well Dock               1,350 lane metre (2.9 m wide)

General Store Rooms                                       1,079 m²/11,614.26 feet²

Future Growth Margin                                    672 tonnes

The flight deck has been configured with six spots on the port side for medium sized aircraft such as the NRH 90 or Blackhawk, which allows for simultaneous take-off and landing operations; alternatively it can support simultaneous take-off and landing operations of four CH-47 Chinooks
The flight deck has been configured with six spots on the port side for medium sized aircraft such as the NRH 90 or Blackhawk, which allows for simultaneous take-off and landing operations; alternatively it can support simultaneous take-off and landing operations of four CH-47 Chinooks

Mighty engine

The 65,000-tonne future flagship of the Royal Navy has undergone months of preparation work by the Aircraft Carrier Alliance (ACA) to start the first of her four diesel engines, which are directly coupled to the generators. Together, each power unit weighs approximately 200 tonnes – the weight of two medium size passenger jets.

The first, HMS Queen Elizabeth, was named on 4 July 2014, with her ship commissioning planned for 2017, and an initial operating capability expected in 2020
The first, HMS Queen Elizabeth, was named on 4 July 2014, with her ship commissioning planned for 2017, and an initial operating capability expected in 2020

Minister of State for Defence Procurement, Philip Dunne, officially started the first of the ship’s four diesel generators at the home of the UK’s aircraft carrier programme in Rosyth, Scotland on June 25, bringing the ship to life for the first time.

He also announced that BAE Systems has been awarded a £5.5 million contract to install a new Vessel Traffic Management System (VTMS) to assist in the controlling and monitoring of all ship movements within Portsmouth Harbour and the Eastern Solent to prepare for the arrival of the carrier, around the end of 2016, beginning of 2017.

Mr. Dunne said: «It is a real pleasure to be back in Scotland, home of the UK’s shipbuilding industry, to witness the impressive progress that is being made on our new aircraft carriers. Powering up the diesel generator today marks an important milestone on the journey to bring these highly versatile ships into service with our Armed Forces. They will be the largest, most capable and effective surface warships ever constructed in the United Kingdom. The build programme is supporting thousands of jobs across the country, with over 4,000 of those jobs at Rosyth and the Clyde».

The diesel generator sets will provide sufficient electrical power to drive the ship at cruise speeds (25 knots/29 mph/46.3 km/h), but when higher speed is required, two Gas Turbine Alternators will also be used. Together they will produce 109 MW of power, enough to power a medium-sized town.

Rear Admiral Henry Parker, DE&S Director of Ship Acquisition, said: «Every milestone achieved on HMS Queen Elizabeth brings us a step closer to her becoming an operational warship. A great deal of hard work has taken place to bring us to this stage and, with good progress also being made on HMS Prince Of Wales, we are moving ever closer towards these magnificent ships joining the Fleet and becoming the centerpiece of Britain’s future military capability».

The separation and distribution of power generation machinery on the QE Class increases the survivability of the ships, while the electric propulsion system enables the prime movers to operate more efficiently, reducing less fuel consumption and running costs
The separation and distribution of power generation machinery on the QE Class increases the survivability of the ships, while the electric propulsion system enables the prime movers to operate more efficiently, reducing less fuel consumption and running costs

To the end of May 2015, the Ministry of Defence had paid around £3.12 billion to BAE Systems on the Clyde (c. £1.925 billion) and to Babcock at Rosyth (c £1.194 billion) on the Queen Elizabeth Carrier (QEC) programme. Our estimates for the level of remaining work in Scottish yards are currently being updated. QEC work is estimated to support directly some 4,000 jobs and hundreds of apprentices at the Rosyth and Clyde-based shipyards.

The VTMS contract is the latest development in the partnering agreement between BAE Systems, the Royal Navy and Ministry of Defence (MoD) to modernise HM Naval Base Portsmouth and prepare for the arrival of HMS Queen Elizabeth (R08).

The new system installation, which is to be completed early 2016, is designed to provide the Queen’s Harbour Master and the Vessel Traffic Service team with the situational awareness they require to control the vessels in their operational area.

Following sea trials (from 2017) and First of Class Flying Trials for helicopters and the F-35B Lightning II (starting in 2018), HMS Queen Elizabeth (R08) will undertake a coherent build up towards achieving an Initial Carrier Strike Capability in 2020.

Second of class HMS Prince Of Wales (R09) is now almost half-complete at 30,000 tonnes, the forward island was installed in May 2015 forming the iconic carrier shape of the vessel. Initial Operating Capability (IOC) of HMS Prince Of Wales (R09) is expected in 2023.

The aircraft carriers HMS Queen Elizabeth (R08) and HMS Prince Of Wales (R09) are being delivered by the Aircraft Carrier Alliance, a unique partnering relationship between BAE Systems, Thales UK, Babcock and the Ministry of Defence.

Main Diesel Generator Installation
Main Diesel Generator Installation

 

Weapons and sensors

Mission systems complex

Artisan 3D medium range radar

S1850m long-range radar

Navigation radar

Highly mechanized weapon handling system

Phalanx automated close-in weapons systems

30-mm guns & mini guns to counter seaborne threats

 

Mission capability

Capacity to accommodate up to 40 aircraft

280-m flight deck, capable of landing Chinook and Merlin helicopters

Aviation store

Hangar, capable of accommodating and maintaining fixed and rotary wing aircraft

Aircraft lifts (forward and aft)

Diesel generator on board HMS Queen Elizabeth
Diesel generator on board HMS Queen Elizabeth

 

Propulsion

2 × Rolls Royce MT30 gas turbines (36 MW/48,000 hp)

4 × Wartsila diesel generator sets (2× 9 MW/12,000 hp & 2 × 11 MW/15,000 hp)

2 × 33 tonne propellers

4 × advanced induction motors

 

Accommodation

Accommodation for 1,600 personnel

Dedicated accommodation and facilities for embarked forces

Hospital area incorporating eight bed medical suite, operating theatre and dental surgery

Recreational facilities including fitness suites and cinema

HMS Queen Elizabeth (R08)
HMS Queen Elizabeth (R08)

 

Main dimensions

Displacement                                65,000 tonnes

Length                                               280 m/918.63 feet

Maximum beam                           70 m/229.66 feet

Crew size                                         679

Embarked forces up to            921

 

Performance

Top speed                                        25 knots/29 mph/46 km/h

Range                                                 10,000 NM/11,508 miles/18,520 km

 

Minister of State for Defence Procurement, Philip Dunne, officially started the first of the ship’s four diesel generators at the home of the UK’s aircraft carrier programme in Rosyth, Scotland today bringing the ship to life for the first time

 

Offshore Patrol Vessel

The United Kingdom Secretary of State formally started construction of HMS Medway, the second of three River Class Batch 2 vessels (Offshore Patrol Vessel – OPV), by operating the plasma steel-cutting machine at an event attended by representatives from the Royal Navy, the local community and BAE Systems employees.

Construction of the first of class vessel HMS Forth is now well underway with its first unit transferred into the Ship Build Outfit Hall in Glasgow
Construction of the first of class vessel HMS Forth is now well underway with its first unit transferred into the Ship Build Outfit Hall in Glasgow

Defence Secretary, Michael Fallon, said: «These new ships are an important part of the £160 billion we are investing over the next decade in the equipment our armed forces need. The contract will benefit the dedicated workers of the Clyde, their families and the local economy in Glasgow. And the investment will ensure these shipyards continue to develop into world class engineering facilities at the heart of a thriving British naval shipbuilding capability».

Mick Ord, Managing Director at BAE Systems Naval Ships, said: «This is a proud day for everyone working on this important programme to deliver three new ships to the Royal Navy. The pace of progress on the River Class vessels reinforces the naval design, engineering and manufacturing skills we have in the UK. We are working closely with our Trade Unions, the Ministry of Defence and partners in the supply chain as we continue to build on our proud shipbuilding heritage. With investments in new technologies, cutting-edge processes, new ways of working and improved facilities we are transforming the way we design and build warships. This will enable us to deliver equipment of the highest quality at the lowest possible cost, helping to secure the long-term future of our highly skilled industry in the UK».

Construction of the first of class vessel HMS Forth is now well underway with its first unit transferred into the Ship Build Outfit Hall in Glasgow last week. The vessel is now being assembled alongside the final sections of the second Queen Elizabeth Class aircraft carrier, which will be delivered to Rosyth during the course of this year.

BAE Systems completed the delivery of three OPVs to the Brazilian Navy in 2013 based on a similar design to those now under construction for the Royal Navy
BAE Systems completed the delivery of three OPVs to the Brazilian Navy in 2013 based on a similar design to those now under construction for the Royal Navy

The 90.5-meter Offshore Patrol Vessel is based on a proven BAE Systems design, which is already in service with the Brazilian Navy and Royal Thai Navy. Engineers at BAE Systems have modified the design to meet the requirements of the Royal Navy in support of UK interests both at home and abroad. The OPVs will be globally deployable and capable of ocean patrol with a range of in excess of 5,500 nautical miles/6,329 miles/10,186 km and a maximum speed of 24 knots/27.6 mph/44.4 km/h.

The vessels will include a modified flight deck capable of operating the latest Merlin helicopters, larger stores and more accommodation for embarked troops. They will also be the first ships to be built with a BAE Systems designed operating system called Shared Infrastructure, which will be rolled out across the Royal Navy’s surface fleet over the next 10 years. Shared Infrastructure is a state-of-the-art system that will revolutionize the way ships operate by using virtual technologies to host and integrate the sensors, weapons and management systems that complex warships require. Replacing multiple large consoles dedicated to specific tasks with a single hardware solution, reduces the amount of spares required to be carried onboard and will significantly decrease through-life costs.

The manufacturing contract for the three 2,000-tonne ships was announced in August 2014 and construction of first of class HMS Forth began in October 2014. The production of HMS Trent, the third River Class ship, is expected to begin by the end of this year. The first ship is due to be delivered to the Royal Navy in 2017.

The three vessels are ideal for performing maritime security in British territorial waters
The three vessels are ideal for performing maritime security in British territorial waters

 

As the first steel is cut for HMS Medway, take a look back at the progress across the River Class Batch 2 Offshore Patrol Vessel programme

Bofors for Macae

BAE Systems has been awarded a contract to produce and deliver five Bofors 40 Mk-4 Naval Guns for the Brazilian Navy’s 500T «Macae» Class Patrol Vessels. The 40 Mk-4 gun is the latest naval version of the successful Bofors 40-mm Gun that is used by many Navies and Coast Guards around the world.

The system is vital for defence against hostile ships, attack aircraft, anti-ship missiles and shore targets
The system is vital for defence against hostile ships, attack aircraft, anti-ship missiles and shore targets

«The versatility of our new 40-mm Naval Gun and Ammunition System is attractive to customers around the world», said Lena Gillström, managing director of Weapon Systems, Sweden at BAE Systems. «This award illustrates our strong position as a leading naval gun provider in the Americas».

Series production for the guns starts immediately with deliveries beginning in 2016 and continuing through 2018. A portion of the manufacturing of parts, subsystems, as well as final assembly and test will take place in Brazil through BAE Systems’ new and long-term partners. The company recently teamed with Ares Aeroespacial e Defensa S.A. of Rio de Janeiro for manufacturing, assembly, and installation, as well as after-sales activities for the 40 Mk-4 guns.

«This local production for the naval guns illustrates our commitment to establishing mutually beneficial partnerships with Brazilian industry», said Llyr Jones, vice president for Latin America and Canada at BAE Systems. «We’re applying similar principles with our other Brazilian programs».

In the last 40 years, BAE Systems has delivered close to one hundred 40-mm Guns to the Brazilian Navy, Marine Corps, and Army, as well as many thousands of rounds of 40-mm ammunition. The company’s programmable, multi-purpose 3P round has been manufactured in Brazil since 1999.

In addition to Brazil, countries currently using BAE Systems’ 40-mm Guns include Japan, Sweden, Finland, Iceland, Estonia, Uruguay, Indonesia, and Malaysia.

The weapon is equipped with a superior level of target capability, beyond the engagement ability of conventional gun systems
The weapon is equipped with a superior level of target capability, beyond the engagement ability of conventional gun systems

 

Bofors 40 Mk-4

Its low weight and compact dimensions combine with a long range and a high rate of fire. It has the capability to rapidly switch between optimized ammunition types, including programmable 40-mm 3P all-target ammo. This delivers high tactical and operational flexibility alongside outstanding survivability, giving ships the advantage in conflicts of any kind.

The Bofors 40 Mk-4 can go from warning to destruction in less than 0.5 seconds. The 3P ammo can be programmed for optimized effect against any target, including airburst patterns for new threats that were previously impossible to engage. The automatically loaded, remotely controlled weapon can also be locally controlled as a backup, equipping the operator for any scenario.

The system’s lightweight and modest size is made possible by innovative features including its electric drive system. It also has a fully digitised modular architecture, providing weapon synergies and future flexibility. Programmable 3P ammo means less round types are needed, reducing transport, storage, weight and space. These aspects combine to provide straightforward, cost-effective integration.

Dimensions
Dimensions

 

TECHNICAL DATA

STANDARD SPECIFICATIONS
Calibre 40-mm L/70
Weight excluding ammunition <2,500 kg/5,511.56 lbs
Height <2.0 m/6.56 feet
Elevation limits -20 to +80 degrees
Training limits unlimited (slip ring)
Remote control with gyro-stabilised local control back-up
PERFORMANCE
Maximum range 12,500 m/7.77 miles/6.75 NM
Rate of fire 300 rounds/min
Muzzle velocity 1012 m/s/3,643 km/h/2,264 mph (3P)
From warning to destruction <0.5 seconds
Number of rounds available in gun ≥100
Barrel life up to 5,000 rounds
OPTIONS
On-mount TV camera
On-mount muzzle velocity radar
6-mode programmable all-target 3P ammunition
Computer-controlled burst pattern
Air burst capability for small boat defence and engagement of concealed targets

100 rounds ready to fire with the possibility to shift between different types of ammunition

Formula One

Engineers at BAE Systems have applied the new upgrade «Active Damping» system to current variants of the CV90 combat vehicle family; breaking speed records in rough terrain and increasing the CV90’s agility by reducing the vehicle’s pitch acceleration by approximately 40 per cent – taking a world class system to the next level, and leaving competitors behind.

In a world first, tracked military vehicles are being upgraded with technology adapted from Formula One to improve handling and speed across the battlefield
In a world first, tracked military vehicles are being upgraded with technology adapted from Formula One to improve handling and speed across the battlefield

First introduced into Formula One in the 1990s, the «Active Damping» system works by sensing the speed of the vehicle and lay-out of the terrain ahead and responding by pressurising the suspension to keep the vehicle on a level plane at all times.

This increased stability across all terrain is helping to reduce the wear and tear on the armoured vehicles and subsequently reduce through-life repair costs for each vehicle, despite seeing each able to travel 30 – 40 per cent faster on rough terrain.

For the crew of a CV90, the technology means a smoother ride and a reduction in fatigue; an important factor on the battlefield. The reduced vertical motion also increases the gunner’s probability of finding and hitting targets.

F1 technology adapted to Armoured Combat Vehicles by BAE Systems
F1 technology adapted to Armoured Combat Vehicles by BAE Systems

The suspension system usually operates on carbon fibre racing cars weighing no more than 700 kg, but engineers at BAE Systems have cleverly adapted it to use on heavy tracked vehicles, some weighing as much as 35 tonnes. In recent trials a CV90 fitted with active damping set a new speed record on a rough terrain course, beating the Main Battle Tanks (MBTs).

Dan Lindell, CV90 Platform Manager at BAE Systems, said: «Adapting the Active Damping system for the first time from a light weight car to a heavy tracked vehicle such as CV90 was a unique challenge for us, but this advanced technology will deliver results to our customers in terms of vehicle performance and savings on the through life costs, as well as providing real benefits to the front line solider».

The CV90 is designed and built by BAE Systems in Sweden and is one of the largest families of armoured combat vehicles. CV90 is currently used in countries such as Norway, Finland and Denmark and has successfully performed in global operations including UN and NATO collaborations.

CV90 Active Damping
CV90 Active Damping

 

Specifications

Top speed:                                           43.5 mph/70 km/h

Range:                                                    559 miles/900 km

Payload:                                                16 tonnes

Ballistic:                                                 > 5

Mine:                                                        > 4a/4b

Trench crossing:                                 2.6 m/8.5 feet

Step climbing:                                      1.1 m/3.6 feet

Fording:                                                   1.5 m/4.9 feet

Remote Weapon Station (RWS):      7.62 – 40 mm Automatic Grenade Launcher (AGL)

Turret:                                                        25-120 mm/0.98-4.72 inch

No. of operators:                                   3 + 7

Gradient:                                                    60 %

Power to weight ratio:                        17.1-24.2 kW/ton

Electrical power:                                     570 A

Engine:                                                           Scania V8

Operating temperature:                      C2-A1

Driveline

Steel or rubber tracks:      ≤ 28 tonnes

Steel:                                            > 28 tonnes

Semi active dampening

F1 technology adapted to CV90
F1 technology adapted to CV90

 

Prince of Wales

The most iconic section of the second Queen Elizabeth Class aircraft carrier is setting sail on April 24, 2015 from Glasgow on its first sea voyage to Rosyth. Upper Block 07 is where HMS Prince of Wales (R09) will be commanded atop the flight deck and is known as the «Forward Island». As the main hub of the ship, it contains the bridge and approximately 100 vital mission systems compartments.

Three times the size of the Invincible Class Aircraft Carriers, these huge ships use the latest technology and equipment, enabling them to operate with a streamlined crew of 679
Three times the size of the Invincible Class Aircraft Carriers, these huge ships use the latest technology and equipment, enabling them to operate with a streamlined crew of 679

Mick Ord, Managing Director at BAE Systems Naval Ships, said: «This Forward Island is a remarkable feat of engineering designed to command one of the UK’s largest ever warships for more than half a century to come so the last Commanding Officer who will take the helm is not even born yet. I’d like to congratulate everyone involved in building and delivering this iconic aircraft carrier section ahead of schedule and to an incredibly high standard».

The tug delivering the Forward Island will blast its horn passing Ferguson Marine Engineering in Greenock as a final farewell to Glasgow and a salute to BAE Systems’ fellow shipbuilders along the Clyde. Due to stormy weather expected around the north coast of Scotland, the Forward Island will travel around the south coast of the UK on a nine-day voyage before entering the Firth of Forth.

Construction of the Forward Island began in December 2013. It left its dock hall in Govan for the first time last weekend before being driven onto a barge using a single remote control and 144 wheels beneath it.

The Queen Elizabeth Class are the first aircraft carriers to use an innovative twin island design. The second «Aft Island» operates as an airport control tower to co-ordinate aircraft movements, but both islands are designed with the ability to incorporate the other’s role in an emergency, thus increasing the survivability of the ship.

The Forward Island has deck-to-deck windows, which are up to two metres tall to ensure a level of visibility far beyond previous aircraft carriers and are designed to withstand a significant impact, such as a helicopter’s spinning rotor blade.

The 65,000 tonne Queen Elizabeth Class aircraft carriers will be the centre piece of the UK’s military capability.

A key driver is the carriers’ cutting-edge weapons handling system, which can move armaments to the flight deck six times faster, bringing the number of people required to operate the system down from 160 to just 48 crew members
A key driver is the carriers’ cutting-edge weapons handling system, which can move armaments to the flight deck six times faster, bringing the number of people required to operate the system down from 160 to just 48 crew members

 

Weapons and sensors

Mission systems complex

Artisan 3D medium range radar

S1850m long-range radar

Navigation radar

Highly mechanised weapon handling system

Phalanx automated close-in weapons systems

30-mm guns & mini guns to counter seaborne threats

 

Mission capability

Capacity to accommodate up to 40 aircraft

280-m flight deck, capable of landing Chinook and Merlin helicopters

Aviation store

Hangar, capable of accommodating and maintaining fixed and rotary wing aircraft

Aircraft lifts (forward and aft)

The separation and distribution of power generation machinery on the QE Class increases the survivability of the ships, while the electric propulsion system enables the prime movers to operate more efficiently, reducing less fuel consumption and running costs
The separation and distribution of power generation machinery on the QE Class increases the survivability of the ships, while the electric propulsion system enables the prime movers to operate more efficiently, reducing less fuel consumption and running costs

 

Propulsion

2 × Rolls Royce MT30 gas turbines (36 MW/48,000 hp)

4 × Wartsila diesel generator sets (2× 9 MW/12,000 hp; 2 × 11 MW/ 15,000 hp)

2 × 33 tonne propellers

4 × advanced induction motors

 

Accommodation

Accommodation for 1,600 personnel

Dedicated accommodation and facilities for embarked forces

Hospital area incorporating eight bed medical suite, operating theatre and dental surgery

Recreational facilities including fitness suites and cinema

The first, HMS Queen Elizabeth, was named on 4 July 2014, with her ship commissioning planned for 2017, and an initial operating capability expected in 2020
The first, HMS Queen Elizabeth, was named on 4 July 2014, with her ship commissioning planned for 2017, and an initial operating capability expected in 2020

 

Main dimensions

Displacement                                  65,000 tonnes

Length                                                 280 metres/918.63 feet

Maximum beam                             70 metres/229.66 feet

Crew size                                           679

Embarked forces up to              921

 

Performance

Top speed                                          25 knots/29 mph/46 km/h

Range                                                   10,000 NM/18,520 km

 

Delivering HMS Prince of Wales’ bridge

American Paladin

According to Daniel Wasserbly, Jane’s Defence Weekly correspondent, the U.S. Army has begun receiving its first production-model M109A7 Paladin Integrated Management (called PIM) Self-Propelled Howitzers (SPHs) and held a ceremony on 9 April to mark the new system’s arrival.

Extended range: 30 km/18.6 miles with High Explosive – Rocket Assisted Projectile (HE RAP) and M203 propellant
Extended range: 30 km/18.6 miles with High Explosive – Rocket Assisted Projectile (HE RAP) and M203 propellant

The army and prime contractor BAE Systems are in the process of finalising a Low-Rate Initial Production (LRIP) plan that is expected to include 66 vehicle sets (a set is one SPH and one M992A3 CAT, Carrier, Ammunition, Tracked vehicle) plus an extra SPH for testing, Mark Signorelli, BAE Systems’ vice-president and general manager of combat vehicles, told IHS Jane’s on 8 April. The army could buy as many as 580 sets, but the actual procurement quantity could be slightly lower and depends on funding.

For fiscal year 2016 (FY 2016) the service requested Paladin PIM programme funding to support final developmental testing with $152.3 million and to buy 30 PIM LRIP systems with $273.9 million. Mark Signorelli said a full-rate production decision is expected in February 2017 after qualification and reliability testing is completed, and following an operational test slated for the second half of 2016.

PIM is to replace the legacy M109A6 Paladin howitzers and M992A2 ammunition carriers with a more advanced system, while incorporating drive train and suspension components common to the M2 Bradley Infantry Fighting Vehicle (IFV). The programme was approved to begin initial production in October 2014 following an extended testing period after the first seven prototypes were delivered in 2011.

Mark Signorelli described those prototypes as «generation one» and noted that several upgrades and capabilities were added to change the configuration over time, including new armour designs for heightened protection and design changes around the gun drives and rammer. «Very few of them were individually significant», Signorelli said, although the changes took time and added testing qualifications.

The PIM retains the legacy 155-mm Paladin’s cannon, but it is fitted on a new chassis based on the Bradley. The two vehicles share a 600 hp Cummins V903 diesel engine, a suspension, and other components.

Aside from the chassis, the PIM models also have a new electric ramming system and a 600 V on-board power system that builds on technologies developed during the Non-Line-of-Sight Cannon (NLOS-C) programme and is intended to ensure the PIM will have enough space, weight, and power-cooling growth potential for future upgrades.

Max rate of fire: 4 rounds/minute for three minutes
Max rate of fire: 4 rounds/minute for three minutes

 

Paladin Integrated Management

M109A7 Self-Propelled Howitzer

The new M109A7 Self-Propelled Howitzer and its associated M992A3 Carrier, Ammunition, Tracked (CAT) vehicle enhance their combat-proven successors’ – the M109A6 Paladin and M992A2 Field Artillery Ammunition Support Vehicle’s (FAASV) – reliability, maintainability, performance, responsiveness, and lethality. Additionally, they provide increased commonality with the Bradley Fighting Vehicle (BFV) of the Armored Brigade Combat Team (ABCT) with significant built-in growth potential in terms of available space, weight and electrical power.

 

Commonality

The M109A7 chassis features a power pack, drive train, track, and suspension components common with the BFV, improving supportability and reducing the ABCT’s logistical footprint.

 

Responsiveness

The M109A7’s «shoot and scoot» capability protects the crew from counterbattery fire by means of an onboard position navigation system and fire control system capable of executing missions digitally and via secure voice command. With an upgraded, 675 hp/503 kW electronically controlled version of the BFV standard V903 engine, coupled with an improved HMPT-800 transmission, the M109A7 has faster acceleration for rapid displacement, and the ability to keep pace with the maneuver forces it supports.

From the move, the M109A7 can receive a fire mission, compute firing data, select and occupy a firing position, transition from traveling configuration to firing configuration, and point its cannon, and fire within 60 seconds – all with first round fire-for-effect accuracy. The M109A7 operates day or night, in all weather conditions, providing timely and accurate fires with a range in excess of 30 km/18.6 miles.

 

Survivability

The M109A7 offers increased survivability, because the crew remains inside the vehicle throughout the mission. Along with the «shoot and scoot» capability, the M109A7 features an Automatic Fire Extinguishing System (AFES), Common Remote Operated Weapons System (CROWS), and enhanced applique armor.

 

Operational Availability

Hull, turret, suspension, and automotive system upgrades increase system reliability. The M109A7 incorporates an onboard computer with comprehensive diagnostics programs that rapidly pinpoint equipment issues early for ease of maintenance while improving system availability.

Sustained rate of fire: 1 round/minute (dependent on thermal warning devices)
Sustained rate of fire: 1 round/minute (dependent on thermal warning devices)

 

Specifications

Gross vehicle weight 80,000 lbs/36,288 kg
Crew 4
Engine 675 hp/503 kW
Fuel tank 143 gallons/541 liters
Speed 38 mph/61 km/h
Estimated cruising range 186 miles/300 km
Slope 60%
Side slope 40%
Trench crossing 72 inches/1.8 m
Maximum fording depth 42 inches/1.0 m
Overall length 382 inches/9.7 m
Width 154 inches/3.9 m
Height 129 inches/3.3 m
Howitzer/gun mount M284 cannon/M182A1 mount
Main generator 70 kW; 600 vdc/28 vdc
Reserve power >50%

 

Cummins VTA903

A key design consideration is the ability to operate with rapid, easy movement across almost any terrain, displaying much of the mobility of a main battle tank.

While the engine needs to be powerful and compact to meet this requirement, it also needs to offer exceptional reliability to ensure maximum availability of these high-value battlefield assets. The heavy-duty V903 engine is purpose developed by Cummins for these highly demanding applications – and during combat situations the outstanding abilities of this unique engine have been fully proven.

The V903 has also proved an ideal power solution for one of the most important elements on the battlefield – the tracked Infantry Fighting Vehicle (IFV), typified by the M2 Bradley together with derivatives such as the M3 Bradley Cavalry Fighting Vehicle (CVF).

Equipped with 600 hp (447 kW) of Cummins heavy-duty power, the Bradley can maintain progress with main battle tanks right at the forefront of the action. Very high power-toweight ratio enables these vehicles to incorporate heavier armour and more firepower, while the inherent reliability of the engine is a major advantage during high intensity operations.

 

Engine Specifications

Model V903
Cylinders V8
Capacity 14.8 L
Valves 32
Maximum Power 800 hp @ 2800 rpm/597 kW
Max Torque 2362 Nm @ 2200 rpm
Weight (dry) 1,271kg
Engine Cummins VTA903
Engine Cummins VTA903

Tactical Mobility

BAE Systems has handed over the first CV9030 Infantry Fighting Vehicle (IFV) in serial production to the Norwegian Defence Logistics Organisation (FLO) on time and on budget. A rollout ceremony was held in Moelv, Norway, at the facilities of BAE Systems Hägglunds’ business partner CHSnor AS. More than 200 guests attended, representing FLO and the Norwegian Armed Forces, as well as BAE Systems Hägglunds and its Norwegian industrial partners.

The CV90 platform is engineered to provide optimum mobility and agility
The CV90 platform is engineered to provide optimum mobility and agility

BAE Systems Hägglunds’ contract, signed in 2012, includes the upgrade of the Norwegian Army’s existing fleet of 103 CV9030s and 41 new-build vehicles, giving the Army a total of 144 state-of-the-art CV90s in varying configurations. They will all include enhanced capabilities for future battlefield and conflict scenarios, such as in the areas of protection, survivability, situational awareness, intelligence, and interoperability.

«I’m really pleased that we are able to reach this key milestone», said Colonel Ragnar Wennevik, Norwegian Army CV90 project leader. «BAE Systems Hägglunds is an impressive supplier, and with the new CV9030, we are buying the world’s most advanced armored combat vehicle family. Already proven in combat, we are now taking it to the next generation with state-of-the-art survivability, lethality, digitalization, and mobility».

This program is a key element of the modernization of the Norwegian Army, providing them with the next-generation CV90, one of the world’s most advanced IFV and a low-risk proven solution. The Norwegian Army will incorporate five different configurations of the CV90 from 2015 onwards: 74 infantry fighting, 21 reconnaissance, 15 command, 16 engineering, and 16 multi-role and tow driver-training vehicles. The multi-role vehicles can fulfill different functions, including mortar carrier and logistics roles.

In 2014, BAE Systems rolled out three variants of the Norwegian vehicles in Sweden, which were subsequently handed over to Norwegian industry for completion, as part of in-country partnerships.

Both the Norwegian customer and BAE Systems Hägglunds have been extremely focused on meeting every milestone in the contract from the outset. This focus has ensured that the two parties have developed a strong relationship based on mutual respect and openness, which has ensured project success.

BAE Systems Hägglunds is working closely with Norwegian industry in a comprehensive industrial cooperation contract, which is part of the main vehicle contract. Companies such as Kongsberg Defence & Aerospace, Nammo Raufoss AS, CHSnor AS, Moelv, and Ritek AS Levanger are key parties to the contract. The turret upgrade work, for example, takes place at CHSnor AS, and yesterday’s handover was the first in a series of vehicle deliveries from CHSnor AS and Ritek through 2018.

«The Norwegian industrial cooperation is extensive and important to us, especially when industrial cooperation is one of the major factors for international success», said Tommy Gustafsson-Rask, managing director for BAE Systems Hägglunds. «We want to thank all industry partners for their commitment and dedication, and also our professional and supportive customer».

With a full range of armament options, the CV90 can be developed or configured to match any situation, from patrol to combat
With a full range of armament options, the CV90 can be developed or configured to match any situation, from patrol to combat

 

CV9030 Infantry Fighting Vehicle

Protection

The CV9030 has the most advanced protection kits available in the world, providing flexible solutions for any mission requirements. The platform utilises a modular approach to armour. Its base structure is designed to carry any add-on armour without adding parasitic weight to the overall vehicle.

It provides crew protection from the latest heavy weaponry including:

  • Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs);
  • Anti-tank mines.

It also protects occupants from Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear (CBRN) threats with a specialised filter system.

To meet modern day battlefield threats, the vehicle can be fitted with further protection including:

  • Different types of armour to protect against diverse threats, such as shaped charge warheads and RPG-7s;
  • A Defensive Aid Suite (DAS) that classifies targets, gives threat warnings via the Vehicle Information System (VIS) and supports the driver with speed corrections to reduce the risk of being hit;
  • Adaptive camouflage, which offers an active multi-spectral defence system, rendering the vehicle appearance to match its environment.

The technology also takes on the textures of other objects, minimising the vehicle’s radar and IR signature and further increasing crew survivability.

The CV90120 is also equipped with a modern 120-mm anti-tank gun and adaptive armour
The CV90120 is also equipped with a modern 120-mm anti-tank gun and adaptive armour

 

Mobility

Powered by a high torque V8 diesel engine, the CV9030 can reach speeds of 70 km/h/43.5 mph. The vehicle’s road range is also constantly improving, with new variants capable of travelling up to 900 km/559 miles.

While upgrades to the CV90’s armour have seen the platform’s curb weight rise from 23 to 35 tonnes, power-to-weight ratio has remained approximately the same thanks to stronger diesel engines.

The CV90’s track suspension has also been improved. The new track system allows the vehicle to travel effortlessly through both snow and sand, enabling:

  • Quieter movement and improved stealth;
  • Greater speed over rough terrain;
  • Higher ground clearance for protection against mines and improvised explosive devices.

The platform’s semi-active damping reduces the pitch accelerations of the vehicle by approximately 40 percent. For the crew this means:

  • A smoother ride for reduced fatigue;
  • Reduced vertical motion (increasing the gunner’s hit probability and ability to find targets);
  • Higher all-terrain speeds;
  • Increased life expectancy for components in the drive line.
The CV90’s C4I capability provides the crew with decision superiority, enabling your forces to stay one step ahead of the enemy
The CV90’s C4I capability provides the crew with decision superiority, enabling your forces to stay one step ahead of the enemy

 

Armament

As a first class combat vehicle, the CV9030 is compatible with a range of armaments to suit any mission requirements.

The vehicle is normally fitted with a two-man turret, which is equipped with the well-proven 30-mm Bushmaster II cannon. This can be supplied in different configurations, including unmanned and uses programmable ammunition to meet precise lethality performance needs.

The CV90 Mk-III incorporates a Munition Programmer for Air Burst Munition (ABM) and has a target-driven gunner Man Machine Interface (MMI). The Fire Control System also has the ability to choose:

  • The type of ammunition;
  • Offset;
  • Fuse setting;
  • Burst pattern.

This significantly decreases operator workload allowing the gunner to focus on the type of target that he wants to engage.

The vehicle’s hunter-killer function features an independent sight system for the commander, enabling him to search, engage or hand over targets to the gunner. The CV90’s state-of-the-art systems allow the crew to rapidly discover and identify targets in minimal time. This enables them to be the first to shoot, whether the target is on the ground or in the air.

Its advanced Human Machine Interfaces and ergonomics make the vehicle’s operation as easy and efficient as possible
Its advanced Human Machine Interfaces and ergonomics make the vehicle’s operation as easy and efficient as possible

 

Specifications

Top speed:                                        70 km/h/43.5 mph

Range:                                                 900 km/559 miles

Payload:                                             16 tonnes

Protection level:                            Standardization Agreement (STANAG)

Ballistic:                                              > 5

Mine:                                                    > 4a/4b

Trench crossing:                            2.6 m/8.5 feet

Step climbing:                                 1.1 m/3.6 feet

Fording:                                              1.5 m/4.9 feet

Remote Weapon Station (RWS):      7.62 – 40 mm Automatic Grenade Launcher (AGL)

Turret:                                                  25-120 mm/0.98-4.72 inch

No. of operators:                            3 + 7

Gradient:                                            60 %

Power to weight ratio:                17.1-24.2 kW/ton

Electrical power:                            570 A

Engine:                                                 Scania V8

Operating temperature:           C2-A1

Driveline

Steel or rubber tracks:     ≤ 28 tonnes

Steel:                                           > 28 tonnes

Semi active dampening

 

BAE Systems designed the CV9030 with a clear vision: to create a vehicle that provides high tactical and strategic mobility, air defense, anti-tank capability, high survivability and protection in any terrain or tactical environment