Tag Archives: Austal

Ninth Cape class

Austal is pleased to announce the successful roll out prior to launch of Hull 380, the ninth Cape-class patrol boat designed and constructed by Austal and the first of two to be delivered to the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) in 2017.

Austal’s Cape-class patrol boat program for the Royal Australian Navy has directly engaged 348 Australian suppliers and directly employed 350 people over the past 12 months of construction (Photo: Austal)
Austal’s Cape-class patrol boat program for the Royal Australian Navy has directly engaged 348 Australian suppliers and directly employed 350 people over the past 12 months of construction (Photo: Austal)

Australian Defence Industry Minister, The Honourable Christopher Pyne Member of Parliament, Senator Chris Back and Federal Member for Canning, Andrew Hastie Member of Parliament joined Austal Chief Executive Officer David Singleton and Austal Chairman, John Rothwell at the official roll out, completed at Austal’s Henderson Western Australia shipyard.

Mr. Singleton said: «It is with great pride we welcome the Defence Industry Minister here today (December 8, 2016) to celebrate not only the continuing success of Cape-class as an effective maritime border protection solution, but Austal’s proven shipbuilding capability. Austal delivered eight Capes to the Australian Border Force over 2013 – 2015 and we will hand over Capes 9 and 10 to the Royal Australian Navy in the first half of 2017. To date, we have directly engaged 348 Australian suppliers and created and sustained 350 jobs in the delivery of the Cape program».

Austal’s Cape-class patrol boat is a 190 feet/58 meter all aluminium monohull vessel, designed to perform border protection and maritime security tasks, with a top speed of 26 knots/30 mph/48 km/h and a range of up to 4,000 nautical miles/4,603 miles/7,408 km. With a crew of 22, the vessel is capable of undertaking 28 day patrols in (up to) sea state 4 and the ability to launch two boats simultaneously.

New, enhanced maritime security and anti-mine warfare variants of the Cape were announced at Euronaval 2016, which offer even greater capability and feature mission packages that include Unmanned Aerial Vehicle’s (UAV’s), Unmanned Surface Vessel (USV’s) and Unmanned Underwater Vehicles (UUV’s).

Hull 380 is due to be launched later this week and will undergo final fitout before sea trials commencing in January 2017. Delivery to the RAN is on schedule for April 2017.

The second Cape for the RAN, Hull 381, is due for launch in February 2017.

The Cape-class patrol boat is an effective maritime border protection capability, in service with the Australian Border Force and Royal Australian Navy (Photo: Austal)
The Cape-class patrol boat is an effective maritime border protection capability, in service with the Australian Border Force and Royal Australian Navy (Photo: Austal)

Remediation program

Austal Limited (Austal) is pleased to announce that Austal Australia will deliver an important mid-life remediation program to the Royal Australian Navy’s Armidale Class Patrol Boat (ACPB) fleet.

HMAS Glenelg prior to launch from the Austal shipyard in Henderson, Western Australia 2007 (Picture: Austal)
HMAS Glenelg prior to launch from the Austal shipyard in Henderson, Western Australia 2007 (Picture: Austal)

Austal will undertake a number of hull remediation and configuration changes as well as planned and corrective maintenance work on up to seven (7) ACPB’s at the company’s Henderson, Western Australia shipyard from October 2016.

The activity, won in a domestic and international environment, will provide immediate, ongoing work for over 120 Austal employees and provides continuity of work between the completion of two Cape-class Patrol Boats for the Royal Australian Navy and a major export contract for Mols Linien, commencing April 2017.

The work on the ACPB’s adds to the company’s growing service and sustainment business. Austal is already delivering in-service support to the Australian Border Force’s fleet of eight Cape-class patrol boats (designed and constructed by Austal) and has been contracted to provide in service support for nineteen steel Pacific Patrol Boat Replacement (PPB-R) vessels, as they enter service from late 2018.

Austal Chief Executive Officer David Singleton commented «As the original designer and builder of the Armidale Class, Austal is in an ideal position to deliver this important, mid-life enhancement work to a proven naval platform. Our inherent knowledge base and practical experience building and servicing the hard working Armidale fleet will ensure the vessels depart Austal in 2017 as a fully operational and effective capability. This order is indeed timely for Austal and ensures that key skills in naval shipbuilding and repair are maintained in Henderson during the lead up to the placement of the Offshore Patrol Vessel contract. Once again, by winning this competitively bid contract, we have demonstrated that Australian shipbuilding can be internationally competitive».

The Armidale Class Patrol Boat (ACPB) is a 184-foot/56-meter all-aluminium monohull patrol boat designed and constructed by Austal for the Royal Australian Navy. Fourteen ACPB’s were delivered from 2005 to 2007 and the vessels continue to play an integral role in Australia’s naval capability in the lead up to the arrival of the new Offshore Patrol Vessel fleet from 2020.

HMAS Larrakia during sea trials off Henderson, Western Australia, 2005 (Picture: Austal)
HMAS Larrakia during sea trials off Henderson, Western Australia, 2005 (Picture: Austal)

Christening of Yuma

Austal Limited is pleased to announce the christening of Expeditionary Fast Transport vessel USNS Yuma (T-EPF-8) at a ceremony held at Austal USA’s Mobile, Alabama shipyard on Saturday, 20th August 2016.

Ship sponsor Mrs. Janet Napolitano christens USNS Yuma (T-EPF-8) (Photo: Austal USA)
Ship sponsor Mrs. Janet Napolitano christens USNS Yuma (T-EPF-8) (Photo: Austal USA)

Ship sponsor Mrs. Janet Napolitano, former Governor of Arizona and current President of the University of California, joined distinguished guests from the U.S. Navy, State and Local Government, Austal USA management and employees for the christening ceremony, held beneath the hull of the ship in the final assembly bay.

USNS Yuma (T-EPF-8) is the eighth of 10 Expeditionary Fast Transport vessels (EPF) that Austal USA is delivering under a contract with the U.S. Navy valued in excess of US$1.6 billion.

«On behalf of Austal USA’s shipbuilding team – one of the most talented that I’ve ever worked with – we are proud to provide our Navy with an incredible vessel that will honour the great city of Yuma as she supports humanitarian efforts the world over», said Austal USA President Craig Perciavalle. «The EPF program has matured very well and we are confident that the EPF fleet will continue to serve our Navy as a highly flexible platform», Mr. Perciavalle added.

EPF-8, a 337.9 feet/103 meter, shallow draft all-aluminium catamaran, is a multi-mission, non-combatant transport vessel characterized by its high volume, high speed, and flexibility. It is the fourth U.S. Navy ship to be named Yuma as a tribute to the residents of the Arizona city and their close ties with the military.

USNS Yuma (T-EPF-8) will ultimately join her sister EPF’s that have been delivered over the last three years, including USNS Spearhead (T-EPF-1) which has logged over 100,000 nautical miles/115,078 miles/185,200 km at sea and is currently on her fifth deployment since she was delivered in 2012.

Three more EPF’s and seven Independence variant Littoral Combat Ships (LCS) are currently under construction at Austal USA. Next month, the shipyard is scheduled to launch USNS Yuma (T-EPF-8), while the future USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS-10) will undergo builder’s sea trials.

Guests gathered to attend the christening of USNS Yuma (T-EPF-8) (Photo: Austal USA)
Guests gathered to attend the christening of USNS Yuma (T-EPF-8) (Photo: Austal USA)

 

SPECIFICATIONS

PRINCIPAL DIMENSIONS
Material Hull and superstructure – aluminium alloy
Length overall 103 m/337.9 feet
Beam overall 28.5 m/93.5 feet
Hull draft (maximum) 3.83 m/12.57 feet
MISSION BAY
Area (with tie-downs) 1,863 m2/20,053 feet2
Clear Height 4.75 m/15.6 feet
Turning diameter 26.2 m/86.0 feet
ISO TEU (Twenty Equivalent Units) Stations 6 Interface Panels
ACCOMMODATIONS
Crew 41
Single SR 2
Double SR 6
Quad SR 7
Troop Seats 312
Troop Berths Permanent: 104
Temporary: 46
Galley and Messing 48
PROPULSION
Main Engines 4 × MTU 20V8000 M71L Diesel Engines 4 × 9.1 MW
Gear boxes 4 × ZF 60000NR2H Reduction Gears
Waterjets 4 × Wartsila WLD 1400 SR
PERFORMANCE
Average Speed 35 knots/40 mph/65 km/h @ 90% MCR with 635 mt (700 st) payload
Maximum Speed 43 knots/50 mph/80 km/h without payload
Maximum Transit Range 1,200 NM/1,381 miles/2,222 km
Self-Deployment Range 5,600 NM/6,444 miles/10,371 km
Survival Through SS-7
AVIATION FACILITIES
NAVAIR Level 1 Class 2 Certified Flight Deck for one helicopter
Centreline parking area for one helicopter
NAVAIR Level 1 class 4 Type 2 Certified VERTREP (Vertical Replenishment)
Helicopter Control Station
AUXILIARY SYSTEMS
Active Ride Control Transcom Interceptors
Foils: 3.24 m2/34.9 feet2 each, forward on inboard sides of demi-hulls
Vehicle Ramp Articulated Slewing Stern Ramp
Straight aft to 45 Starboard
Telescoping Boom Crane 12.3 mt @ 15 m, 18.2 mt @ 10 m/13.6 Lt @ 49.2 feet, 20.1 Lt @ 32.8 feet

 

Ships

USNS Spearhead (EPF-1), Delivered

USNS Choctaw County (EPF-2), Delivered

USNS Millinocket (EPF-3), Delivered

USNS Fall River (EPF-4), Delivered

USNS Trenton (EPF-5), Delivered

USNS Brunswick (EPF-6), Delivered

USNS Carson City (EPF-7), Delivered

Yuma (EPF-8), under construction

Bismark (EPF-9), under construction

Burlington (EPF-10), under construction

EPF-11

EPF-12

 

Pacific Patrol Boats

Austal Limited (Austal) is pleased to announce it has been awarded preferred tenderer status by the Commonwealth of Australia for the Pacific Patrol Boats Replacement (PPBR) Project.

Austal Pacific Patrol Boat Replacement Design
Austal Pacific Patrol Boat Replacement Design

The PPBR project involves the construction of up to 21 steel-hulled patrol vessels and through life sustainment over 30 years in a total Government expenditure of up to $900 million. Austal’s share of the PPBR program will include the construction of the vessels and short to medium term maintenance components of the project.

Austal will now work with the Commonwealth of Australia to complete documentation and finalise the contract over the coming weeks. Full details will be provided to the market when the contract is finalised.

Austal plans to construct the Pacific Patrol Boats in its shipyard in Henderson, Western Australia, with through-life support to be performed at Austal’s existing facility in Cairns, Queensland. The vessels will replace the existing Pacific Patrol Boat fleet, which is approaching the end of its service life, and will assist Pacific Island countries to continue to take an active part in securing their own extensive Exclusive Economic Zones.

Austal Chief Executive Officer David Singleton said: «I am delighted that we have been selected as preferred tenderer, adding to our long history of constructing patrol boats at our shipyard in Henderson, Western Australia. Austal has delivered Australia’s entire border patrol capability – comprising 30 vessels delivered over the past 17 years – and we look forward to extending this by constructing and servicing vessels that will be used by many of our neighbours in the South Pacific. Construction of the Pacific Patrol Boats also extends Austal’s shipbuilding capability into steel-hulled vessels, which will be important for the future construction of Offshore Patrol Vessels. This project will add to our existing work at our Henderson shipyard, where two High Speed Support Vessels are being constructed for the Royal Navy of Oman this year as well as two additional Cape Class Patrol Boats».

Austal Selected as Preferred Tenderer for Pacific Patrol Boat Replacement Project
Austal Selected as Preferred Tenderer for Pacific Patrol Boat Replacement Project

Survivability Test

USS Coronado (LCS-4) successfully completed the U.S. Navy’s Total Ship Survivability Trial (TSST) off the coast of California, January 28. During the test event, the crew handled realistic damage simulations, including fire, smoke, electrical failure, flooding, ruptured piping, and structural failure. The scenarios benefited the crew by offering realistic damage control training in preparation for Coronado’s maiden deployment later this year.

Austal’s Trimaran LCS Completes Survivability Test
Austal’s Trimaran LCS Completes Survivability Test

«Initial indications are that Coronado’s performance met, and in multiple cases exceeded, the survivability requirements for this small surface combatant», said Captain Tom Anderson, Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) program manager. «I commend the crew for their exceptional performance and dedication while conducting this important test».

The purpose of the TSST is to evaluate the ship’s systems and procedures following a simulated conventional weapon hit. The primary areas that are evaluated include the ship’s ability to contain and control damage, restore and continue mission capability, and care for personnel casualties. The test is also designed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the survivability features inherent in a ship’s design.

«The experience provided the crew, through realistic scenarios, an appreciation for what it would take to operate following battle damage on board an Independence-variant warship», said Commander Troy A. Fendrick, commanding officer of Coronado. «It also provided Sailors, from the deckplate level, the opportunity to provide critical input to the LCS program office, which will result in the improvement of overall ship survivability».

The TSST, along with the Full Ship Shock Trial scheduled June 2016, is a component of the Live-Fire Test and Evaluation program. Coronado is the second LCS of the Independence-variant built by Austal USA and is homeported in San Diego.

LCS is a modular, reconfigurable ship, with three types of mission packages including surface warfare, mine countermeasures, and anti-submarine warfare. The Program Executive Office Littoral Combat Ships (PEO LCS) is responsible for delivering and sustaining littoral mission capabilities to the fleet. Delivering high-quality warfighting assets while balancing affordability and capability is key to supporting the nation’s maritime strategy.

Six additional Independence-variant LCS are at various stages of construction at Austal’s shipyard in Mobile, Alabama
Six additional Independence-variant LCS are at various stages of construction at Austal’s shipyard in Mobile, Alabama

 

The Independence Variant of the LCS Class

PRINCIPAL DIMENSIONS
Construction Hull and superstructure – aluminium alloy
Length overall 417 feet/127.1 m
Beam overall 103 feet/31.4 m
Hull draft (maximum) 14.8 feet/4.5 m
PAYLOAD AND CAPACITIES
Complement Core Crew – 40
Mission crew – 36
Berthing 76 in a mix of single, double & quad berthing compartments
Maximum mission load 210 tonnes
Mission Bay Volume 118,403 feet3/11,000 m3
Mission packages Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW)
Surface Warfare (SUW)
Mine Warfare (MIW)
PROPULSION
Main engines 2 × GE LM2500
2 × MTU 20V 8000
Waterjets 4 × Wartsila steerable
Bow thruster Retractable azimuthing
PERFORMANCE
Speed 40 knots/46 mph/74 km/h
Range 3,500 NM/4,028 miles/6,482 km
Operational limitation Survival in Sea State 8
MISSION/LOGISTICS DECK
Deck area >21,527.8 feet2/2,000 m2
Launch and recovery Twin boom extending crane
Loading Side ramp
Internal elevator to hanger
Launch/Recover Watercraft Sea State 4
FLIGHT DECK AND HANGER
Flight deck dimensions 2 × SH-60 or 1 × CH-53 or multiple Unmanned Aerial Vehicles/Vertical Take-off and Land Tactical Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs/VTUAVs)
Hanger Aircraft stowage & maintenance for 2 × SH-60
Launch/Recover Aircraft Sea State 5
WEAPONS AND SENSORS
Standard 1 × 57-mm gun
4 × 12.7-mm/.50 caliber guns
1 × Surface-to-Air Missile (SAM) launcher
3 × weapons modules
The Independence variant team is led by Austal USA (for LCS-6 and the subsequent even-numbered hulls) and was originally led by General Dynamics, Bath Iron Works (LCS-2 and LCS-4)
The Independence variant team is led by Austal USA (for LCS-6 and the subsequent even-numbered hulls) and was originally led by General Dynamics, Bath Iron Works (LCS-2 and LCS-4)

 

Independence-class

Ship Laid down Launched Commissioned Homeport
USS Independence (LCS-2) 01-19-2006 04-26-2008 01-16-2010 San Diego, California
USS Coronado (LCS-4) 12-17-2009 01-14-2012 04-05-2014 San Diego, California
USS Jackson (LCS-6) 08-01-2011 12-14-2013 12-05-2015 San Diego, California
USS Montgomery (LCS-8) 06-25-2013 08-06-2014
USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS-10) 04-16-2014 02-25-2015
USS Omaha (LCS-12) 02-18-2015 11-20-2015
USS Manchester (LCS-14) 06-29-2015
USS Tulsa (LCS-16) 01-11-2016
USS Charleston (LCS-18)
USS Cincinnati (LCS-20)
USS Kansas City (LCS-22)
USS Oakland (LCS-24)
Launch of USS Omaha (LCS 12) at Austal USA facility - Mobile, Alabama
Launch of USS Omaha (LCS 12) at Austal USA facility – Mobile, Alabama

Christening of
Carson City

Austal celebrated the christening of Expeditionary Fast Transport USNS Carson City (EPF-7) with a ceremony on January 15 at its state-of-the-art shipyard, Mobile, Alabama. USNS Carson City is the seventh of 10 Expeditionary Fast Transport vessels (EPF), formerly Joint High Speed Vessels (JHSV), that Austal has under contract with the U.S. Navy as part of a $1.6 billion 10-ship block-buy contract.

USNS Carson City (EPF-7) christening ceremony participants
USNS Carson City (EPF-7) christening ceremony participants

EPF-7, a 338-foot/103-meter shallow draft aluminum catamaran, is a multi-mission, non-combatant transport vessel characterized by its high volume, high speed, and flexibility. It is the second U.S. Navy ship to be named Carson City after the capital city of Nevada.

When Secretary of the U.S. Navy Ray Mabus officially named EPF-7 «USNS Carson City» in April 2013 he proclaimed, «Carson City displays American values of community, ingenuity and perseverance at their best». He said he chose to name the ship after Carson City to honor those values and the men and women of the community as well as the state of Nevada.

Carson City will soon join her sister EPF’s that have been delivered over the last three years including USNS Spearhead (T-EPF-1) which has over 100,000 nautical miles/115,078 miles/185,200 km at sea and is currently on her fifth deployment since she was delivered in 2012.

«We’re very excited to christened Carson City, and at how well this ship is coming together». Austal USA president Craig Perciavalle said. «The EPF program has really matured very well thanks to the incredible shipbuilding team we have here at Austal, including our U.S. Navy teammates».

The ship’s sponsor, Susan Asbury Crowell is the daughter of U.S. Air Force Colonel Robert Asbury and wife of Captain Robert Crowell, USN (Retired). Susan and her husband have called Carson City home since the early 1970s. Active in her community, Susan has been a long-standing member of the Nevada Opera Association as well as president of the Brewery Arts Board of Directors and a member of the Mile High Jazz Band board, two of the premier organizations promoting all art forms in Nevada’s capital city. She has also served on the Carson Tahoe Hospital Foundation board of directors and is currently a member of the Carson Tahoe Hospital advisory board.

More than 300 naval guests, civic leaders, community members and Austal employees attended the ceremony held beneath the hull of the ship in Austal’s final assembly bay.

Three EPFs and six Littoral Combat Ships (LCS) are currently under construction in Austal’s Mobile, Alabama shipyard. The company is scheduled to launch EPF-7 before the end of the month, while the future USS Montgomery (LCS-8) prepares for its acceptance sea trials later this spring.

Austal USA operates a full-service shipyard offering design, construction and high-speed vessel service and repair. As Austal continues to expand its service and repair capabilities, the company is well-positioned for new business with advanced engineering, test and trials capabilities, a west coast operations office in San Diego and a state-of-the-art waterfront facility located in the Port of Mobile on Mobile Bay.

Susan Asbury Crowell christens USNS Carson City
Susan Asbury Crowell christens USNS Carson City

 

SPECIFICATIONS

PRINCIPAL DIMENSIONS
Material Hull and superstructure – aluminium alloy
Length overall 103 m/337.9 feet
Beam overall 28.5 m/93.5 feet
Hull draft (maximum) 3.83 m/12.57 feet
MISSION BAY
Area (with tie-downs) 1,863 m2/20,053 feet2
Clear Height 4.75 m/15.6 feet
Turning diameter 26.2 m/86.0 feet
ISO TEU (Twenty Equivalent Units) Stations 6 Interface Panels
ACCOMMODATIONS
Crew 41
Single SR 2
Double SR 6
Quad SR 7
Troop Seats 312
Troop Berths Permanent: 104
Temporary: 46
Galley and Messing 48
PROPULSION
Main Engines 4 × MTU 20V8000 M71L Diesel Engines 4 × 9.1 MW
Gear boxes 4 × ZF 60000NR2H Reduction Gears
Waterjets 4 × Wartsila WLD 1400 SR
PERFORMANCE
Average Speed 35 knots/40 mph/65 km/h @ 90% MCR with 635 mt (700 st) payload
Maximum Speed 43 knots/50 mph/80 km/h without payload
Maximum Transit Range 1,200 NM/1,381 miles/2,222 km
Self-Deployment Range 5,600 NM/6,444 miles/10,371 km
Survival Through SS-7
AVIATION FACILITIES
NAVAIR Level 1 Class 2 Certified Flight Deck for one helicopter
Centreline parking area for one helicopter
NAVAIR Level 1 class 4 Type 2 Certified VERTREP (Vertical Replenishment)
Helicopter Control Station
AUXILIARY SYSTEMS
Active Ride Control Transcom Interceptors
Foils: 3.24 m2/34.9 feet2 each, forward on inboard sides of demi-hulls
Vehicle Ramp Articulated Slewing Stern Ramp
Straight aft to 45 Starboard
Telescoping Boom Crane 12.3 mt @ 15 m, 18.2 mt @ 10 m/13.6 Lt @ 49.2 feet, 20.1 Lt @ 32.8 feet

 

Ships

USNS Spearhead (EPF-1), Delivered

USNS Choctaw County (EPF-2), Delivered

USNS Millinocket (EPF-3), Delivered

USNS Fall River (EPF-4), Delivered

USNS Trenton (EPF-5), Delivered

USNS Brunswick (EPF-6), Delivered

Carson City (EPF-7), under construction

Yuma (EPF-8), under construction

Bismark (EPF-9), under construction

Burlington (EPF-10), under construction

EPF-11

EPF-12

 

Brunswick to the Navy

Austal Limited (Austal) is pleased to announce that Expeditionary Fast Transport 6 (EPF-6) was delivered to the U.S. Navy on January 14 during a ceremony aboard the ship at Austal USA’s shipyard in Mobile, Alabama, USA. The delivery of the USNS Brunswick (EPF-6) marks the first ship in its class Austal has delivered to the Navy in 2016.

Rollout of USNS Brunswick (EPF-6)
Rollout of USNS Brunswick (EPF-6)

Austal Chief Executive Officer Andrew Bellamy said it’s a testament to the dedication and skill of Austal’s work force. «The EPF program is now mature and stable. The entire team at Austal USA has much to be proud of in achieving this. It’s a great ship and a great program», Mr. Bellamy said.

Three additional EPF, formerly Joint High Speed Vessels (JHSV), remain under construction in Mobile as part of a 10-ship, US$1.6 billion block-buy contract from the U.S. Navy. The future USNS Carson City (EPF-7) will be christened in January 2016 and will launch soon after, while modules for Yuma (EPF-8) and Bismarck (EPF-9) are under construction in Austal’s module manufacturing facility. Construction of Burlington (EPF-10) is expected to begin later in 2016.

EPF-11 and EPF-12 were fully funded by Congress in the 2015 and 2016 Omnibus Appropriations Bills. Shipbuilding contracts for EPF-11 and EPF-12 have not yet been finalised however the U.S. Navy awarded Austal a $54 million contract in October 2015 to fund long lead materials for EPF-11.

The ships can operate in shallow-draft ports and waterways, interface with roll-on/roll-off discharge facilities, and on/off-load a combat-loaded Abrams Main Battle Tank (M1A2)
The ships can operate in shallow-draft ports and waterways, interface with roll-on/roll-off discharge facilities, and on/off-load a combat-loaded Abrams Main Battle Tank (M1A2)

 

SPECIFICATIONS

PRINCIPAL DIMENSIONS
Material Hull and superstructure – aluminium alloy
Length overall 103 m/337.9 feet
Beam overall 28.5 m/93.5 feet
Hull draft (maximum) 3.83 m/12.57 feet
MISSION BAY
Area (with tie-downs) 1,863 m2/20,053 feet2
Clear Height 4.75 m/15.6 feet
Turning diameter 26.2 m/86.0 feet
ISO TEU (Twenty Equivalent Units) Stations 6 Interface Panels
ACCOMMODATIONS
Crew 41
Single SR 2
Double SR 6
Quad SR 7
Troop Seats 312
Troop Berths Permanent: 104
Temporary: 46
Galley and Messing 48
PROPULSION
Main Engines 4 × MTU 20V8000 M71L Diesel Engines 4 × 9.1 MW
Gear boxes 4 × ZF 60000NR2H Reduction Gears
Waterjets 4 × Wartsila WLD 1400 SR
PERFORMANCE
Average Speed 35 knots/40 mph/65 km/h @ 90% MCR with 635 mt (700 st) payload
Maximum Speed 43 knots/50 mph/80 km/h without payload
Maximum Transit Range 1,200 NM/1,381 miles/2,222 km
Self-Deployment Range 5,600 NM/6,444 miles/10,371 km
Survival Through SS-7
AVIATION FACILITIES
NAVAIR Level 1 Class 2 Certified Flight Deck for one helicopter
Centreline parking area for one helicopter
NAVAIR Level 1 class 4 Type 2 Certified VERTREP (Vertical Replenishment)
Helicopter Control Station
AUXILIARY SYSTEMS
Active Ride Control Transcom Interceptors
Foils: 3.24 m2/34.9 feet2 each, forward on inboard sides of demi-hulls
Vehicle Ramp Articulated Slewing Stern Ramp
Straight aft to 45 Starboard
Telescoping Boom Crane 12.3 mt @ 15 m, 18.2 mt @ 10 m/13.6 Lt @ 49.2 feet, 20.1 Lt @ 32.8 feet
The JHSV program is procuring 10 high-speed transport vessels for the US Army and the US Navy
The JHSV program is procuring 10 high-speed transport vessels for the US Army and the US Navy

 

Ships

USNS Spearhead (EPF-1), Delivered

USNS Choctaw County (EPF-2), Delivered

USNS Millinocket (EPF-3), Delivered

USNS Fall River (EPF-4), Delivered

USNS Trenton (EPF-5), Delivered

USNS Brunswick (EPF-6), Delivered

Carson City (EPF-7), under construction

Yuma (EPF-8), under construction

Bismark (EPF-9), under construction

Burlington (EPF-10), under construction

EPF-11

EPF-12

The JHSV includes a flight deck for helicopter operations and an off-load ramp that allows vehicles to quickly drive off the ship
The JHSV includes a flight deck for helicopter operations and an off-load ramp that allows vehicles to quickly drive off the ship

Keel-laying for Tulsa

Austal hosted a keel-laying ceremony for the future USS Tulsa (LCS-16) at the Mobile, Alabama shipyard on January 11, marking the first significant milestone in the ship’s construction. This ship is the sixth Independence-variant Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) built at Austal under the 10-ship, $3.5 billion block buy contract awarded to Austal in 2010.

LCS-16 Keel Authentication
LCS-16 Keel Authentication

Ship sponsor Kathy Taylor, former Tulsa mayor and CEO of Impact Tulsa, authenticated the keel by welding her initials onto an aluminum plate that will be placed in the hull of the ship.

«It amazes me how fast this ship is coming together», Austal USA President Craig Perciavalle said. «The speedy construction of this amazing ship is evidence of the rapid maturity of Austal’s LCS program, a testament to the extreme level of talent and experience displayed by Austal’s shipbuilding team».

Austal’s LCS program delivered USS Independence (LCS-2) in 2009, USS Coronado (LCS-4) in 2013, and USS Jackson (LCS-6) in 2015. Six additional LCS are under construction at the Mobile, Alabama shipyard. Montgomery (LCS-8) and Gabrielle Giffords (LCS-10) are preparing for builders trials later this year. Omaha (LCS-12) was christened December 19, and Manchester (LCS-14) will complete final assembly and prepare for launch later this year. Modules for Charleston (LCS-18) are under construction as well.

Austal is also building 10 Expeditionary Fast Transports (EPF) for the U.S. Navy under a $1.6 billion block-buy contract. USNS Trenton (EPF-5) marked the fifth vessel in this class to be delivered since the inception of the program. Both USNS Spearhead (EPF-1) and USNS Millinocket (EPF-3) are currently deployed supporting Naval fleet operations.

LCS delivers combat capability from core self-defense systems in concert with rapidly interchangeable, modular mission packages and an open architecture command and control system
LCS delivers combat capability from core self-defense systems in concert with rapidly interchangeable, modular mission packages and an open architecture command and control system

 

The Independence Variant of the LCS Class

PRINCIPAL DIMENSIONS
Construction Hull and superstructure – aluminium alloy
Length overall 417 feet/127.1 m
Beam overall 103 feet/31.4 m
Hull draft (maximum) 14.8 feet/4.5 m
PAYLOAD AND CAPACITIES
Complement Core Crew – 40
Mission crew – 36
Berthing 76 in a mix of single, double & quad berthing compartments
Maximum mission load 210 tonnes
Mission Bay Volume 118,403 feet3/11,000 m3
Mission packages Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW)
Surface Warfare (SUW)
Mine Warfare (MIW)
PROPULSION
Main engines 2 × GE LM2500
2 × MTU 20V 8000
Waterjets 4 × Wartsila steerable
Bow thruster Retractable azimuthing
PERFORMANCE
Speed 40 knots/46 mph/74 km/h
Range 3,500 NM/4,028 miles/6,482 km
Operational limitation Survival in Sea State 8
MISSION/LOGISTICS DECK
Deck area >21,527.8 feet2/2,000 m2
Launch and recovery Twin boom extending crane
Loading Side ramp
Internal elevator to hanger
Launch/Recover Watercraft Sea State 4
FLIGHT DECK AND HANGER
Flight deck dimensions 2 × SH-60 or 1 × CH-53 or multiple Unmanned Aerial Vehicles/Vertical Take-off and Land Tactical Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs/VTUAVs)
Hanger Aircraft stowage & maintenance for 2 × SH-60
Launch/Recover Aircraft Sea State 5
WEAPONS AND SENSORS
Standard 1 × 57-mm gun
4 × 12.7-mm/.50 caliber guns
1 × Surface-to-Air Missile (SAM) launcher
3 × weapons modules
Modularity maximizes the flexibility of LCS and enables commanders to meet changing warfare needs, while also supporting faster, easier technological updates
Modularity maximizes the flexibility of LCS and enables commanders to meet changing warfare needs, while also supporting faster, easier technological updates

 

Independence-class

Ship Laid down Launched Commissioned Homeport
USS Independence (LCS-2) 01-19-2006 04-26-2008 01-16-2010 San Diego, California
USS Coronado (LCS-4) 12-17-2009 01-14-2012 04-05-2014 San Diego, California
USS Jackson (LCS-6) 08-01-2011 12-14-2013 12-05-2015 San Diego, California
USS Montgomery (LCS-8) 06-25-2013 08-06-2014    
USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS-10) 04-16-2014 02-25-2015    
USS Omaha (LCS-12) 02-18-2015 11-20-2015    
USS Manchester (LCS-14) 06-29-2015      
USS Tulsa (LCS-16) 01-11-2016      
USS Charleston (LCS-18)        
USS Cincinnati (LCS-20)        
USS Kansas City (LCS-22)        
USS Oakland (LCS-24)        

 

The ships are open ocean capable but are designed to defeat growing littoral threats and provide access and dominance in the coastal water battlespace
The ships are open ocean capable but are designed to defeat growing littoral threats and provide access and dominance in the coastal water battlespace

Christening of Omaha

Austal is pleased to announce that Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) 12 was christened at Austal USA’s Mobile, Alabama shipyard on Saturday 19th December 2015.

The Independence Variant of the LCS Class is a high speed, agile, shallow draft and networked surface ship
The Independence Variant of the LCS Class is a high speed, agile, shallow draft and networked surface ship

Austal USA officials joined Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus and the ship sponsor of the future USS Omaha, Susan Buffett, in celebrating the christening of the nation’s 12th Littoral Combat Ship.

The Omaha is the fourth LCS in Austal’s 10-ship, $3.5 billion block-buy contract. With its shallow draft of 14.8 feet/4.5 m, the Austal designed and built Independence-variant LCS is an advanced high-speed and agile 417 feet/127.1 m combat ship designed to operate in near-shore environments, yet capable of open-ocean operation.

«On behalf of Austal’s entire shipbuilding team, we are proud to design and build a ship that will carry the great name of Omaha as she defends our nation», said Austal USA President Craig Perciavalle. «We’re equally proud to honour a tremendous American in Susan Buffett who has given so much to so many people through her philanthropic work, and now gives her spirit as the sponsor to this amazing ship».

Buffett, a philanthropist and current resident and native of Omaha, will serve as the sponsor to the ship. She chairs of The Sherwood Foundation, The Buffett Early Childhood Fund, and the Susan Thompson Buffett Foundation. She also serves on several national non-profit boards, including ONE, Girls Inc., and the Fulfillment Fund.

According to the Society of Sponsors of the United States Navy, «The sponsor will participate in all or some of the milestones in the life of her ship … far beyond participation in ceremonial milestones, sponsorship represents a lifelong relationship with the ship and her crew».

The aluminium hulled trimaran was officially named after Nebraska’s largest city during an announcement by Secretary Mabus, February 15, 2012. He said the name was «to honour the patriotic, hard-working citizens of Omaha and the state of Nebraska for their support of and contributions to the military». She will be the fourth U.S. Navy ship named «Omaha».

The future USS Omaha (LCS-12), launched in November 20 and scheduled for delivery in 2016, has a maximum speed of more than 40 knots/46 mph/74 km/h. The Independence-variant combines superior seakeeping, endurance, and speed with the volume and payload capacity needed to support emerging missions – today and in the future.

«I’m also proud to honour Austal’s workforce today – a group of some of the most dedicated and hard-working professionals I have ever worked with», said Perciavalle. «Their expertise and commitment to excellence is evident in the construction of these incredible warships».

Austal’s LCS program is in full swing with three ships delivered and six ships under construction at this time. USS Jackson (LCS-6) was delivered this past summer and was recently commissioned in Gulfport, Mississippi. USS Montgomery (LCS-8) and USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS-10) are preparing for trials and delivery in 2016.

Final assembly is well underway on USS Manchester (LCS-14) and recently began on USS Tulsa (LCS-16). Modules for USS Charleston (LCS-18) are under construction in Austal’s Module Manufacturing Facility.

The ships are open ocean capable but are designed to defeat growing littoral threats and provide access and dominance in the coastal water battlespace
The ships are open ocean capable but are designed to defeat growing littoral threats and provide access and dominance in the coastal water battlespace

 

The Independence Variant of the LCS Class

PRINCIPAL DIMENSIONS
Construction Hull and superstructure – aluminium alloy
Length overall 417 feet/127.1 m
Beam overall 103 feet/31.4 m
Hull draft (maximum) 14.8 feet/4.5 m
PAYLOAD AND CAPACITIES
Complement Core Crew – 40
Mission crew – 36
Berthing 76 in a mix of single, double & quad berthing compartments
Maximum mission load 210 tonnes
Mission Bay Volume 118,403 feet3/11,000 m3
Mission packages Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW)
Surface Warfare (SUW)
Mine Warfare (MIW)
PROPULSION
Main engines 2 × GE LM2500
2 × MTU 20V 8000
Waterjets 4 × Wartsila steerable
Bow thruster Retractable azimuthing
PERFORMANCE
Speed 40 knots/46 mph/74 km/h
Range 3,500 NM/4,028 miles/6,482 km
Operational limitation Survival in Sea State 8
MISSION/LOGISTICS DECK
Deck area >21,527.8 feet2/2,000 m2
Launch and recovery Twin boom extending crane
Loading Side ramp
Internal elevator to hanger
Launch/Recover Watercraft Sea State 4
FLIGHT DECK AND HANGER
Flight deck dimensions 2 × SH-60 or 1 × CH-53 or multiple Unmanned Aerial Vehicles/Vertical Take-off and Land Tactical Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs/VTUAVs)
Hanger Aircraft stowage & maintenance for 2 × SH-60
Launch/Recover Aircraft Sea State 5
WEAPONS AND SENSORS
Standard 1 × 57-mm gun
4 × 12.7-mm/.50 caliber guns
1 × Surface-to-Air Missile (SAM) launcher
3 × weapons modules
LCS delivers combat capability from core self-defense systems in concert with rapidly interchangeable, modular mission packages and an open architecture command and control system
LCS delivers combat capability from core self-defense systems in concert with rapidly interchangeable, modular mission packages and an open architecture command and control system

 

Ship list

USS Independence (LCS-2)

USS Coronado (LCS-4)

USS Jackson (LCS-6)

USS Montgomery (LCS-8)

USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS-10)

USS Omaha (LCS-12)

USS Manchester (LCS-14)

USS Tulsa (LCS-16)

USS Charleston (LCS-18)

USS Cincinnati (LCS-20)

USS Kansas City (LCS-22)

Modularity maximizes the flexibility of LCS and enables commanders to meet changing warfare needs, while also supporting faster, easier technological updates
Modularity maximizes the flexibility of LCS and enables commanders to meet changing warfare needs, while also supporting faster, easier technological updates

Jackson Commissioned

The crew of USS Jackson (LCS-6) ushered in a new era in naval warfare, December 5, as the ship was brought to life before a crowd of nearly 10,000. «I hereby place United States Ship Jackson in commission. May God bless and guide this warship and all who sail in it», said Secretary of the U.S. Navy Ray Mabus, who helped name the ship in 2011. «This certainly ranks right up there with great days that I’ve had».

USS Jackson (LCS-6) during its christening ceremony at Austal USA shipyard in Mobile, Alabama in 2014 (U.S. Navy Photo)
USS Jackson (LCS-6) during its christening ceremony at Austal USA shipyard in Mobile, Alabama in 2014 (U.S. Navy Photo)

Mississippi Senator Thad Cochran’s daughter, Dr. Kate Cochran, was the ship’s sponsor. It is the first ship to bear the name of Mississippi’s capital city. The name held a special meaning for many of those at the commissioning.

«For it to be named after the city, the capital of the state in which you were born, is even more of a phenomenal feeling», said Command Senior Chief Ken Ballard. Ballard and 52 other crewmembers will man missions aboard the Jackson, one of the fastest and most technologically advanced warships in the world.

«They’re providing incredible presence. They are providing lethality. They’re providing a lot of things that the United States Navy needs today and is going to need for years in the future», said Mabus. For the crew, the commissioning was the culmination of three years of hard work.

A fast, agile, and high-technology surface combatant, Freedom will act as a platform for launch and recovery of manned and unmanned vehicles. Its modular design will support interchangeable mission packages, allowing the ship to be reconfigured for antisubmarine warfare, mine warfare, or surface warfare missions on an as-needed basis.

The littoral combat ship (LCS) will be able to swap out mission packages, adapting as the tactical situation demands. These ships will also feature advanced networking capability to share tactical information with other Navy aircraft, ships, submarines and joint units.

The brand new 417-foot/127-meter ship weighs in at 3,100 tons. It can travel at speeds in excess of 40 knots/46 mph/74 km/h. The USS Jackson will be home ported at Naval Base San Diego.

The Independence variant team is led by Austal USA (for LCS-6 and the subsequent even-numbered hulls) and was originally led by General Dynamics, Bath Iron Works (LCS-2 and LCS-4)
The Independence variant team is led by Austal USA (for LCS-6 and the subsequent even-numbered hulls) and was originally led by General Dynamics, Bath Iron Works (LCS-2 and LCS-4)

 

The Independence Variant of the LCS Class

PRINCIPAL DIMENSIONS
Construction Hull and superstructure – aluminium alloy
Length overall 417 feet/127.1 m
Beam overall 103 feet/31.4 m
Hull draft (maximum) 14.8 feet/4.5 m
PAYLOAD AND CAPACITIES
Complement Core Crew – 40
Mission crew – 36
Berthing 76 in a mix of single, double & quad berthing compartments
Maximum mission load 210 tonnes
Mission Bay Volume 118,403 feet3/11,000 m3
Mission packages Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW)
Surface Warfare (SUW)
Mine Warfare (MIW)
PROPULSION
Main engines 2 × GE LM2500
2 × MTU 20V 8000
Waterjets 4 × Wartsila steerable
Bow thruster Retractable azimuthing
PERFORMANCE
Speed 40 knots/46 mph/74 km/h
Range 3,500 NM/4,028 miles/6,482 km
Operational limitation Survival in Sea State 8
MISSION/LOGISTICS DECK
Deck area >21,527.8 feet2/2,000 m2
Launch and recovery Twin boom extending crane
Loading Side ramp
Internal elevator to hanger
Launch/Recover Watercraft Sea State 4
FLIGHT DECK AND HANGER
Flight deck dimensions 2 × SH-60 or 1 × CH-53 or multiple Unmanned Aerial Vehicles/Vertical Take-off and Land Tactical Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs/VTUAVs)
Hanger Aircraft stowage & maintenance for 2 × SH-60
Launch/Recover Aircraft Sea State 5
WEAPONS AND SENSORS
Standard 1 × 57-mm gun
4 × 12.7-mm/.50 caliber guns
1 × Surface-to-Air Missile (SAM) launcher
3 × weapons modules
Six additional Independence-variant LCS are at various stages of construction at Austal’s shipyard in Mobile, Alabama
Six additional Independence-variant LCS are at various stages of construction at Austal’s shipyard in Mobile, Alabama