Tag Archives: Austal USA

Keel-laying for Yuma

On March 29 in Mobile, Alabama Austal USA celebrated the keel-laying milestone for the Expeditionary Fast Transport (EFT) vessel USNS Yuma (T-EPF-8) with a ceremony marking a significant milestone in the ship’s construction. This ship is the eighth EPF built at Austal USA under the 10-ship, $1.6 billion block-buy contract awarded to Austal in 2008.

Mayor Nicholls was assisted by Austal USA A-Class welder, Courtney Cagle
Mayor Nicholls was assisted by Austal USA A-Class welder, Courtney Cagle

Laying the keel is the formal recognition of the start of a ship’s construction. The keel runs lengthwise down the middle of the ship serving as the basic foundation or spine of the structure, providing the major source of the hull’s strength.

The Honorable Douglas Nicholls, Mayor of the City of Yuma, Arizona, authenticated the keel at the ceremony by welding his initials onto an aluminum keel plate that will eventually be placed in ship’s hull. Mayor Nicholls was assisted by Austal USA A-Class welder, Courtney Cagle. Ms. Cagle began her employment with Austal USA in 2012 as an apprentice.

«I am excited to reach this significant milestone today in such a short period of time, considering we just launched EPF-7 from this bay in late January», Austal USA President Craig Perciavalle said. «The momentum we’re experiencing on the construction of this amazing ship is evidence of the strength of Austal’s EPF program, and the continued success displayed by Austal’s talented shipbuilding team».

The EPF program at Austal is progressing rapidly. USNS Brunswick (T-EPF-6) was delivered in mid-January and there are three other EPFs under construction at Austal USA’s headquarters and ship manufacturing facility in Mobile, Alabama. Of the ships already delivered to the U.S. Navy, USNS Spearhead (T-EPF-1) is in Africa on its third deployment and recently took part in a successful anti-piracy operation. USNS Choctaw County (T-EPF-2) and USNS Millinocket (T-EPF-3) are also currently deployed supporting U.S. Navy fleet operations, including many international exercises.

Austal is also under a 10-ship block-buy contract worth over $3.5 billion for the U.S. Navy’s Independence-variant Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) program. The company has delivered three LCS with another seven currently under construction. The future USS Montgomery (LCS-8) is scheduled for delivery later this year.

 

Ships

Defence vessels designed and built by Austal include multi-mission combatants, such as the Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) for the United States Navy and military high speed vessels for transport and humanitarian relief, such as the Expeditionary Fast Transport (EPF) – previously known as the Joint High Speed Vessel (JHSV) – for the United States Navy and High Speed Support Vessel (HSSV) for the Royal Navy of Oman. Austal also designs, constructs, integrates and maintains an extensive range of patrol and auxiliary vessels for government agencies globally, including the Cape Class Patrol Boat Program for Australian Border Force. Defence vessels are designed and constructed in Mobile, Alabama and in Henderson, Western Australia.

Austal has been at the forefront of the high speed ferry market since the early days of the industry. Our market leading designs of high performance aluminium vessels have long been at the heart of Austal’s research and development. Today, commercial ship construction is centred on our shipyard in Balamban, Philippines.

Austal celebrates keel-laying for nation's eighth Expeditionary Fast Transport vessel – USNS Yuma (T-EPF-8)
Austal celebrates keel-laying for nation’s eighth Expeditionary Fast Transport vessel – USNS Yuma (T-EPF-8)

 

SPECIFICATIONS

PRINCIPAL DIMENSIONS
Material Hull and superstructure – aluminium alloy
Length overall 103 m/337.9 feet
Beam overall 28.5 m/93.5 feet
Hull draft (maximum) 3.83 m/12.57 feet
MISSION BAY
Area (with tie-downs) 1,863 m2/20,053 feet2
Clear Height 4.75 m/15.6 feet
Turning diameter 26.2 m/86.0 feet
ISO TEU (Twenty Equivalent Units) Stations 6 Interface Panels
ACCOMMODATIONS
Crew 41
Single SR 2
Double SR 6
Quad SR 7
Troop Seats 312
Troop Berths Permanent: 104
Temporary: 46
Galley and Messing 48
PROPULSION
Main Engines 4 × MTU 20V8000 M71L Diesel Engines 4 × 9.1 MW
Gear boxes 4 × ZF 60000NR2H Reduction Gears
Waterjets 4 × Wartsila WLD 1400 SR
PERFORMANCE
Average Speed 35 knots/40 mph/65 km/h @ 90% MCR with 635 mt (700 st) payload
Maximum Speed 43 knots/50 mph/80 km/h without payload
Maximum Transit Range 1,200 NM/1,381 miles/2,222 km
Self-Deployment Range 5,600 NM/6,444 miles/10,371 km
Survival Through SS-7
AVIATION FACILITIES
NAVAIR Level 1 Class 2 Certified Flight Deck for one helicopter
Centreline parking area for one helicopter
NAVAIR Level 1 class 4 Type 2 Certified VERTREP (Vertical Replenishment)
Helicopter Control Station
AUXILIARY SYSTEMS
Active Ride Control Transcom Interceptors
Foils: 3.24 m2/34.9 feet2 each, forward on inboard sides of demi-hulls
Vehicle Ramp Articulated Slewing Stern Ramp
Straight aft to 45 Starboard
Telescoping Boom Crane 12.3 mt @ 15 m, 18.2 mt @ 10 m/13.6 Lt @ 49.2 feet, 20.1 Lt @ 32.8 feet
Rollout of USNS Brunswick (EPF-6)
Rollout of USNS Brunswick (EPF-6)

 

Ships

USNS Spearhead (EPF-1), Delivered

USNS Choctaw County (EPF-2), Delivered

USNS Millinocket (EPF-3), Delivered

USNS Fall River (EPF-4), Delivered

USNS Trenton (EPF-5), Delivered

USNS Brunswick (EPF-6), Delivered

Carson City (EPF-7), under construction

Yuma (EPF-8), under construction

Bismark (EPF-9), under construction

Burlington (EPF-10), under construction

EPF-11

EPF-12

 

The third trimaran

Austal Limited is pleased to announce that Littoral Combat Ship 6 (LCS-6), the future USS Jackson, has successfully completed U.S. Navy acceptance trials. The trials, the last significant milestone before delivery, were undertaken in the Gulf of Mexico and involved comprehensive testing of the vessel’s major systems and equipment by the U.S. Navy.

Defence vessels designed and built by Austal include focused-mission combatants, such as the Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) for the United States Navy
Defence vessels designed and built by Austal include focused-mission combatants, such as the Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) for the United States Navy

Austal Chief Executive Officer Andrew Bellamy said it was pleasing that acceptance trials on LCS-6 had been successfully completed. «The LCS program is maturing into an efficient phase of construction. Completion of our first Acceptance Trial on LCS-6 as the prime contractor is a significant and important milestone for Austal. This program is steadily gaining momentum heading towards a smooth transition from LCS to frigate», Mr. Bellamy said.

After delivery of LCS-6, Austal will deliver a further nine Littoral Combat Ships from its shipyard at Mobile, Alabama, under a 10-ship, $3.5 billion block-buy contract from the U.S. Navy. Of those, Montgomery (LCS-8) is preparing for trials and delivery later this year. Gabrielle Giffords (LCS-10) was recently christened. Final assembly is well underway on Omaha (LCS-12) and Manchester (LCS-14). Modules for Tulsa (LCS-16) and Charleston (LCS-18) are under construction in Austal’s module manufacturing facility.

The Independence Variant of the LCS Class is a high speed, agile, shallow draft and networked surface ship
The Independence Variant of the LCS Class is a high speed, agile, shallow draft and networked surface ship

 

The Independence Variant of the LCS Class

PRINCIPAL DIMENSIONS
Construction Hull and superstructure – aluminium alloy
Length overall 417 feet/127.1 m
Beam overall 103 feet/31.4 m
Hull draft (maximum) 14.8 feet/4.5 m
PAYLOAD AND CAPACITIES
Complement Core Crew – 40
Mission crew – 36
Berthing 76 in a mix of single, double & quad berthing compartments
Maximum mission load 210 tonnes
Mission Bay Volume 118,403 feet3/11,000 m3
Mission packages Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW)
Surface Warfare (SUW)
Mine Warfare (MIW)
PROPULSION
Main engines 2 × GE LM2500
2 × MTU 20V 8000
Waterjets 4 × Wartsila steerable
Bow thruster Retractable azimuthing
PERFORMANCE
Speed 40 knots/46 mph/74 km/h
Range 3,500 NM/4,028 miles/6,482 km
Operational limitation Survival in Sea State 8
MISSION/LOGISTICS DECK
Deck area >21,527.8 feet2/2,000 m2
Launch and recovery Twin boom extending crane
Loading Side ramp
Internal elevator to hanger
Launch/Recover Watercraft Sea State 4
FLIGHT DECK AND HANGER
Flight deck dimensions 2 × SH-60 or 1 × CH-53 or multiple Unmanned Aerial Vehicles/Vertical Take-off and Land Tactical Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs/VTUAVs)
Hanger Aircraft stowage & maintenance for 2 × SH-60
Launch/Recover Aircraft Sea State 5
WEAPONS AND SENSORS
Standard 1 × 57-mm gun
4 × 12.7-mm/.50 caliber guns
1 × Surface-to-Air Missile (SAM) launcher
3 × weapons modules
The littoral combat ship Independence (LCS 2) underway during builder's trials
The littoral combat ship Independence (LCS 2) underway during builder’s trials

Keel for Manchester

Austal and the U.S. Navy held a keel-laying ceremony on June 29 for the future USS Manchester (LCS-14), marking the first significant milestone in its construction. This new ship is the fifth Independence variant Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) built at Austal under the 10-ship, $3.5 billion block buy contract awarded to Austal in 2010.

Keel Laying for USS Manchester (LCS 14)
Keel Laying for USS Manchester (LCS 14)

«It has been said that building a high-tech Littoral Combat Ship is more akin to making a spacecraft than a traditional warship», said Senator Jeanne Shaheen (D-N.H.), sponsor of the Manchester. «These ships and their technology are impressive. However, what is always most impressive, to me is the professionalism and excellence of the officers and sailors who serve on these remarkable vessels. We are also grateful to the engineers, the welders, the machinists, the metalworkers and electricians – all the men and women who are working as a team to build the USS Manchester (LCS-14). I am honored and humbled to be her official ship sponsor».

Shaheen, the only woman to serve as both a U.S. senator and state governor, authenticated the keel by welding her initials onto an aluminum plate that will be placed in the keel – a beam around which the hull, or body, of a ship is built. The keel runs lengthwise down the middle of the ship serving as the basic foundation or spine of the structure, providing the major source of the hull’s strength. Shaheen has been part of New Hampshire’s leadership fabric by representing her state in Congress since 2009.

Due to Austal’s modular approach to ship manufacturing, 36 of 37 modules used to form this 127-meter (419-foot) aluminum trimaran are already being fabricated. For Austal, keel laying marks the beginning of final assembly. Nineteen modules have been moved from Austal’s Module Manufacturing Facility (MMF) and erected in the final assembly bay in their pre-launch position. The remaining 18 modules will follow over the coming months.

Austal is a global defense prime contractor and a designer and manufacturer of defense and commercial ships
Austal is a global defense prime contractor and a designer and manufacturer of defense and commercial ships

«With 19 modules of Manchester already erected, and the christening of Gabrielle Giffords just a few short weeks ago, it’s exciting to see just how well the LCS program is maturing here», said Craig Perciavalle, president of Austal USA. «This milestone would not have been possible without the hard work and dedication of Austal’s talented design and production team».

Austal’s LCS program delivered USS Independence (LCS-2) in 2009 and USS Coronado (LCS-4) in 2013. Seven additional LCS are under construction at the Mobile, Alabama shipyard. The U.S. Navy conducted acceptance trials on the future USS Jackson (LCS-6) last week, while the future USS Montgomery (LCS-8) is preparing for builders trials later this year. The future USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS-10) was christened June 13, and the future USS Omaha (LCS-12) will complete final assembly and prepare for launch later this summer. Modules for the future USS Tulsa (LCS-16) and the future USS Charleston (LCS-18) are in the early phases of construction.

Austal is also building ten 103-meter (338-foot) Joint High Speed Vessels (JHSVs) for the U.S. U.S. Navy under a $1.6 billion block-buy contract. USNS Trenton (JHSV-5) marked the fifth vessel in this class to be delivered since the inception of the program. Both USNS Spearhead (JHSV-1) and USNS Millinocket (JHSV-3) are on humanitarian missions, in Central America and Southwest Asia, respectively.

Austal USA is a full-service shipyard offering design, construction and high-speed vessel service and repair. As Austal USA continues to expand its service and repair capabilities, the company is well positioned for new business with engineering, test and trials capabilities, and a new warehouse and office location in San Diego, California.

Austal also designs, constructs, integrates and maintains an extensive range of patrol and auxiliary vessels for government agencies globally
Austal also designs, constructs, integrates and maintains an extensive range of patrol and auxiliary vessels for government agencies globally

Christening of Gabby

The U.S. Navy christened its tenth Littoral Combat Ship (LCS), the future USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS-10), during a midday ceremony June 13 at Austal USA shipyard in Mobile, Alabama. LCS 10 is named after former United States Representative Gabrielle Giffords.

The future USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS-10), a Littoral Combat Ship built at the Austal USA shipyards in Mobile, Alabama, is christened during a ceremony Saturday, June 13, 2015, on the Mobile River
The future USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS-10), a Littoral Combat Ship built at the Austal USA shipyards in Mobile, Alabama, is christened during a ceremony Saturday, June 13, 2015, on the Mobile River

«The christening of the future USS Gabrielle Giffords marks the beginning of what is certain to be a long life for this great ship», said Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus. «It is also a celebration of the skill and dedication of the men and women who have built LCS 10 and the courage of her namesake. This ship truly embodies the Navy motto of Semper Fortis – Always Courageous».

During the event, Second Lady of the United States Doctor Jill Biden, the ship’s sponsor, smashed a champagne bottle on the bow as other dignitaries, including Austal USA President Craig Perciavalle and former U.S. Representative Gabrielle Giffords of Arizona and her husband Captain Mark Kelly, USN (Retired), were watching from the platform.

Though Gabby’s comments were brief, Giffords’ excitement shown through every word during Saturday’s christening ceremony. «Thank you to all the people who built this ship. She’s stealthy. She will defend freedom around the world. Go Navy», Giffords said.

The LCS class consists of the Freedom variant and Independence variant, each designed and built by different industry teams. The Freedom variant team is led by Lockheed Martin (for odd-numbered hulls, e.g., LCS-1). The Independence variant team is led by General Dynamics (LCS-2 and LCS-4) and Austal USA (for the subsequent even-numbered hulls). Purchased under the innovative block-buy acquisition strategy, there are 12 ships currently under construction.

While capable of open-ocean tasking, LCS is intended to operate in the littorals – shallow, coastal waters. As such, the ships can operate in water as shallow as 20 feet/6 meter deep and can travel at speeds in excess of 40 knots/46 mph/74 km/h. USS Freedom (LCS-1) and USS Fort Worth (LCS-3) recently demonstrated these critical capabilities as part of their operational deployments to U.S. 7th Fleet in the Asia-Pacific region.

The ship is Austal's fifth in a $3.5 billion, 10-ship Independence-class LCS contract with the Navy
The ship is Austal’s fifth in a $3.5 billion, 10-ship Independence-class LCS contract with the Navy

 

The Independence Variant of the LCS Class

Principal dimensions

Construction:                         Hull and superstructure – aluminium alloy

Length overall:                       417 feet/127.1 m

Beam overall:                          103 feet/31.4 m

Hull draft (maximum):        14.8 feet/4.5 m

 

Payload and capacities

Complement:                          Core Crew – 40

Mission crew – 36

Berthing:                                   76 in a mix of single, double & quad berthing compartments

Maximum mission load:   210 tonnes

Mission packages:               ASW, SUW, MIW

 

Propulsion

Main engines:                        2 × GE LM2500

2 × MTU 20V 8000

Waterjets:                                4 × Wartsila steerable

Bow thruster:                         Retractable azimuthing

It is 16th U.S. naval ship to be named for a woman and only the 13th since 1850 to be named for a living person
It is 16th U.S. naval ship to be named for a woman and only the 13th since 1850 to be named for a living person

Performance

Speed:                                         40 knots/46 mph/74 km/h

Range:                                         3,500 NM/4,028 miles/6,482 km

Operational limitation:      Survival in Sea State 8

 

Mission/Logistics deck

Deck area:                                  >21,527.8 feet2/2,000 m2

Launch and recovery:          Twin boom extending crane

Loading:                                       Side ramp

Internal elevator to hanger

 

Flight deck and hanger

Flight deck dimensions:      2 × SH-60 or 1 × CH-53

Hanger:                               Aircraft stowage & maintenance for 2 × SH-60

 

Weapons and sensors

Standard:

1 × 57-mm gun

4 × 12.7-mm/.50 caliber guns

1 × Surface-to-Air Missile (SAM) launcher

3 × weapons modules

The ship is a 417-foot trimaran designed to destroy mines, hunt submarines, interdict drugs and rush humanitarian relief to distant shores
The ship is a 417-foot trimaran designed to destroy mines, hunt submarines, interdict drugs and rush humanitarian relief to distant shores

Christening of Brunswick

The Navy christened the future joint high-speed vessel USNS Brunswick (JHSV-6) on May 9, 2015, during a 10 a.m. CDT ceremony in Mobile, Alabama. Secretary of the U.S. Navy Ray Mabus delivered the ceremony’s principal address. Alma B. «Lee» Booterbaugh served as the ship’s sponsor.

More than 300 naval guests, civic leaders, community members and Austal employees attended Saturday's ceremony, which was held beneath the hull of the Brunswick at Austal's shipyard
More than 300 naval guests, civic leaders, community members and Austal employees attended Saturday’s ceremony, which was held beneath the hull of the Brunswick at Austal’s shipyard

«We are celebrating the christening of the future USNS Brunswick – a modern marvel – just like the incredible shipyard that built it», said Mabus. «More than 4,000 American craftsmen have made this ship possible and the partnership they have with our uniformed men and women, our Navy civilians, the shipbuilding industry as a whole, and the American people, is one of the great strengths of our system. Throughout its life, as it serves around the world, this ship will represent the American spirit of hard work and patriotism the people of Brunswick exude».

Named for a seaport city located on the southeast coast of Georgia, Brunswick is the fourth ship to bear the name. The first was a lightship that served in the U.S. Navy during World War I. The second Brunswick was a patrol frigate that escorted convoys across the Atlantic during World War II. The third ship to bear the name was a salvage and rescue tug that served the U.S. Navy from 1972 to 1996.

Three JHSVs and seven Littoral Combat Ships (LCS) are currently under construction in Austal’s Mobile, Alabama shipyard. The company is scheduled to launch JHSV-6 before the end of the month, while the future USS Jackson (LCS-6) prepares for its acceptance sea trials later this summer
Three JHSVs and seven Littoral Combat Ships (LCS) are currently under construction in Austal’s Mobile, Alabama shipyard. The company is scheduled to launch JHSV-6 before the end of the month, while the future USS Jackson (LCS-6) prepares for its acceptance sea trials later this summer

The 103 m/338 foot-long aluminum catamaran is under construction at the Austal USA shipyard in Mobile, Alabama. Joint High Speed Vessels (JHSVs) are ideal for fast, intra-theater transportation of troops, military vehicles, supplies and equipment. These ships are capable of transporting 600 short tons 1,200 nautical miles/2,222 km at an average speed of 35 knots/40 mph/65 km/h with berthing space for up to 104 personnel and airline-style seating for up to 312.

JHSVs have a 20,000 square foot/1,863 m2 open mission deck and a flight deck to support day and night launch and recovery operations, providing U.S. forces added mobility and flexibility. They can operate in a variety of roles to include supporting overseas contingency operations, conducting humanitarian assistance and disaster relief, supporting special operations forces and supporting emerging joint sea-basing concepts.

Upon delivery to the U.S. Navy’s Military Sealift Command (MSC), Brunswick (JHSV-6) will be designated as a United States Naval Ship (USNS), and will have a core crew of 22 civilian mariners with military mission personnel embarking as necessary.

Provide rapid transport of military equipment and personnel in theater
Provide rapid transport of military equipment and personnel in theater

 

Specifications

Principal dimensions

Material:                                    Hull and superstructure – aluminium alloy

Length overall:                       103 m/337.9 feet

Beam overall:                          28.5 m/93.5 feet

Hull draft (maximum):        3.83 m/12.57 feet

Mission bay

Area (with tie-downs):       1,863 m2/20,053 feet2

Clear Height:                            4.75 m/15.6 feet

Turning diameter:                 26.2 m/86.0 feet

ISO TEU Stations:                  6 Interface Panels

Accommodations

Crew:                                            41

Single SR:                             2

Double SR:                          6

Quad SR:                              7

Troop Seats:                          312

Troop Berths

Permanent:                 104

Temporary:                   46

Galley and Messing:          48

The JHSV program is procuring 10 high-speed transport vessels for the US Army and the US Navy
The JHSV program is procuring 10 high-speed transport vessels for the US Army and the US Navy

Propulsion

Main Engines:    4 × MTU 20V8000 M71L Diesel Engines 4 × 9.1 MW

Gear boxes:         4 × ZF 60000NR2H Reduction Gears

Waterjets:            4 × Wartsila WLD 1400 SR

Performance

Speed

Average:                     35 knots/40 mph/65 km/h @ 90% MCR with 635 mt (700 st) payload

Maximum:                 43 knots/50 mph/80 km/h without payload

Range

Maximum Transit:      1,200 NM/2,222 km

Self-Deployment:        5,600 NM/10,371 km

Survival Through:                 SS-7

Aviation facilities

NAVAIR Level 1 Class 2 Certified Flight Deck for one helicopter

Centreline parking area for one helicopter

NAVAIR Level 1 class 4 Type 2 Certified VERTREP

Helicopter Control Station

Auxiliary systems

Active Ride Control

Transcom Interceptors

Foils: 3.24 m2/34.9 feet2 each, forward on inboard sides of demi-hulls

Vehicle Ramp

Articulated Slewing Stern Ramp

Straight aft to 45 Starboard

Telescoping Boom Crane

12.3 mt @ 15 m, 18.2 mt @ 10 m/13.6 Lt @ 49.2 feet, 20.1 Lt @ 32.8 feet

The JHSV includes a flight deck for helicopter operations and an off-load ramp that allows vehicles to quickly drive off the ship
The JHSV includes a flight deck for helicopter operations and an off-load ramp that allows vehicles to quickly drive off the ship

 

Ships

USNS Spearhead (JHSV-1), Delivered

USNS Choctaw County (JHSV-2), Delivered

USNS Millinocket (JHSV-3), Delivered

USNS Fall River (JHSV-4), Delivered

USNS Trenton (JHSV-5), Delivered

Brunswick (JHSV-6), under construction

Carson City (JHSV-7), under construction

Yuma (JHSV-8), under construction

Bismark (JHSV-9), under construction

Burlington (JHSV-10), under construction

The ships can operate in shallow-draft ports and waterways, interface with roll-on/roll-off discharge facilities, and on/off-load a combat-loaded Abrams Main Battle Tank (M1A2)
The ships can operate in shallow-draft ports and waterways, interface with roll-on/roll-off discharge facilities, and on/off-load a combat-loaded Abrams Main Battle Tank (M1A2)

 

 

 

Ready for delivery

The joint high-speed vessel USNS Trenton (JHSV-5) completed acceptance trials at the Austal USA shipyard March 13, the U.S. Navy announced March 24. The week-long trials were held in the Gulf of Mexico and overseen by the Navy’s Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV). INSURV worked alongside the shipyard to demonstrate the ship’s equipment and system operation to ensure it is ready for delivery and fulfills all contractual requirements.

The future Military Sealift Command joint high-speed vessel USNS Trenton (JHSV 5) rolls out in preparation for launch at Austal USA shipyard
The future Military Sealift Command joint high-speed vessel USNS Trenton (JHSV 5) rolls out in preparation for launch at Austal USA shipyard

«USNS Trenton performed very well during these trials», said Strategic and Theater Sealift Program Manager Capt. Henry Stevens. «The rigorous testing each ship undergoes ensures the U.S. Navy receives the most capable and mission ready asset at delivery».

JHSVs are versatile, non-combatant ships capable of transporting 600 short tons 1,200 nautical miles/2,222 km at an average speed of 35 knots/40 mph/65 km/h. They are equipped with airline style seating for 312 embarked forces, and fixed berthing for 104. USNS Trenton will be used for the fast intra-theater transportation of troops, military vehicles and equipment. The ship’s 15-foot/4.6 m shallow draft, ability to interface with roll-on/roll-off discharge facilities, and ease of access to austere and deteriorated piers will facilitate littoral operations and port access.

Having completed acceptance trials, USNS Trenton (JHSV-5) will now prepare for delivery to the U.S. Navy’s Military Sealift Command (MSC) later this year. The ship will be capable of supporting a wide range of operations including non-combatant evacuation operations, humanitarian assistance and disaster relief.

The first four ships of the Spearhead-class have delivered to the fleet. The first two ships of the class, USNS Spearhead (JHSV-1) and USNS Choctaw County (JHSV-2) have completed overseas deployments to Europe, West Africa and the Caribbean.

As one of the Defense Department’s largest acquisition organizations, Program Executive Offices (PEO) Ships is responsible for executing the development and procurement of all destroyers, amphibious ships, special mission and support ships and special warfare craft. Delivering high-quality war fighting assets – while balancing affordability and capability – is key to supporting the U.S. Navy’s Maritime Strategy.

The JHSV program is procuring 10 high-speed transport vessels for the US Army and the US Navy
The JHSV program is procuring 10 high-speed transport vessels for the US Army and the US Navy

 

Specifications

Principal dimensions

Material:                                    Hull and superstructure – aluminium alloy

Length overall:                       103 m/337.9 feet

Beam overall:                          28.5 m/93.5 feet

Hull draft (maximum):        3.83 m/12.57 feet

Mission bay

Area (with tie-downs):       1,863 m2/20,053 feet2

Clear Height:                            4.75 m/15.6 feet

Turning diameter:                 26.2 m/86.0 feet

ISO TEU Stations:                  6 Interface Panels

Accommodations

Crew:                                            41

Single SR:                             2

Double SR:                          6

Quad SR:                              7

Troop Seats:                          312

Troop Berths

Permanent:                 104

Temporary:                   46

Galley and Messing:          48

The ships can operate in shallow-draft ports and waterways, interface with roll-on/roll-off discharge facilities, and on/off-load a combat-loaded Abrams Main Battle Tank (M1A2)
The ships can operate in shallow-draft ports and waterways, interface with roll-on/roll-off discharge facilities, and on/off-load a combat-loaded Abrams Main Battle Tank (M1A2)

Propulsion

Main Engines:    4 × MTU 20V8000 M71L Diesel Engines 4 × 9.1 MW

Gear boxes:         4 × ZF 60000NR2H Reduction Gears

Waterjets:            4 × Wartsila WLD 1400 SR

Performance

Speed

Average:                     35 knots/40 mph/65 km/h @ 90% MCR with 635 mt (700 st) payload

Maximum:                 43 knots/50 mph/80 km/h without payload

Range

Maximum Transit:      1,200 NM/2,222 km

Self-Deployment:        5,600 NM/10,371 km

Survival Through:                 SS-7

Aviation facilities

NAVAIR Level 1 Class 2 Certified Flight Deck for one helicopter

Centreline parking area for one helicopter

NAVAIR Level 1 class 4 Type 2 Certified VERTREP

Helicopter Control Station

Auxiliary systems

Active Ride Control

Transcom Interceptors

Foils: 3.24 m2/34.9 feet2 each, forward on inboard sides of demi-hulls

Vehicle Ramp

Articulated Slewing Stern Ramp

Straight aft to 45 Starboard

Telescoping Boom Crane

12.3 mt @ 15 m, 18.2 mt @ 10 m/13.6 Lt @ 49.2 feet, 20.1 Lt @ 32.8 feet

Provide rapid transport of military equipment and personnel in theater
Provide rapid transport of military equipment and personnel in theater

Gabrielle Giffords

The future USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS-10), launched from the Austal USA shipyard February 25, marking an important production milestone for the Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) program. The ship is named after former United States Representative Gabrielle Giffords. LCS-10 will be the 16th U.S. naval ship to be named for a woman, and only the 13th ship to be named for a living person since 1850.

Gabrielle Giffords posted a Twitter photo Thursday of the new U.S. Navy ship named after her
Gabrielle Giffords posted a Twitter photo Thursday of the new U.S. Navy ship named after her

«This third Independence variant ship of the block buy is the first ship constructed fully utilizing Austal’s LCS Modular Manufacturing Facility and is launching at the highest level of production completion to-date», said Capt. Tom Anderson, Littoral Combat Ship program manager, «a sign that facility investments are now paying off in schedule and cost performance».

Gabrielle Giffords was rolled out of her assembly bay onto a barge for transfer down the Mobile River to a floating drydock February 24. The new ship entered the water for the first time the following day when the drydock was flooded for the ship launch. The ship will return to the shipyard to continue final outfitting and activation until her christening later this year. She is expected to deliver to the fleet in 2017.

Gabrielle Giffords is the third ship in a block buy contract with Austal to build 10 Independence- variant LCS ships. Sister ship Jackson (LCS-6) is preparing for builder’s trials, and Montgomery (LCS-8) was christened in November 2014. The LCS program is ramping up in 2015 to deliver two ships per year from the Austal shipyard, as well as two Freedom-variant ships from the Marinette Marine shipyard in Wisconsin.

The Navy is leveraging competition, fixed-price contracting and ongoing production efficiencies to reduce construction time and costs on littoral combat ships. Lessons learned from the lead ships have been incorporated into both Freedom-variant (odd-numbered) and Independence-variant (even-numbered) hulls.

PEO (Program Executive Offices) LCS is responsible for delivering and sustaining littoral mission capabilities to the fleet and is working with industry to increase production efficiencies and leverage cost savings to achieve steady serial production. Delivering high-quality warfighting assets while balancing affordability and capability is key to supporting the Navy’s Maritime Strategy.

Former U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords was gravely wounded in an assassination attempt in 2011
Former U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords was gravely wounded in an assassination attempt in 2011

 

The Independence Variant of the LCS Class

 Principal dimensions

Construction:                            Hull and superstructure – aluminium alloy

Length overall:                          417 feet/127.1 m

Beam overall:                             103 feet/31.4 m

Hull draft (maximum):           14.8 feet/4.5 m

 

Payload and capacities

Complement:

Core Crew – 40

Mission crew – 36

Berthing:                                      76 in a mix of single, double & quad berthing compartments

Maximum mission load:      210 tonnes

Mission packages:                  ASW, SUW, MIW

 

Propulsion

Main engines:

2 × GE LM2500

2 × MTU 20V 8000

Waterjets:                                  4 × Wartsila steerable

Bow thruster:                           Retractable azimuthing

 

Performance

Speed:                                               40 knots/46 mph/74 km/h

Range:                                               3,500 NM/6,482 km

Operational limitation:           Survival in Sea State 8

 

Mission/Logistics deck

Deck area:                                    >21,527.8 feet2/2,000 m2

Launch and recovery:            Twin boom extending crane

Loading:

Side ramp

Internal elevator to hanger

 

Flight deck and hanger

Flight deck dimensions:         2 × SH-60 or 1 × CH-53

Hanger:                               Aircraft stowage & maintenance for 2 × SH-60

 

Weapons and sensors

Standard:

1 × 57-mm gun

4 × .50 caliber guns

1 × SAM launcher

3 × weapons modules

The littoral combat ship Independence (LCS 2) underway during builder's trials
The littoral combat ship Independence (LCS 2) underway during builder’s trials

Fifth high-speed vessel

The Navy christened the future USNS Trenton (JHSV 5) January 10 during a 10 a.m. CDT ceremony in Mobile, Alabama. «This ship represents the hard-working men and women of New Jersey and the importance of the American cities along the Delaware River. It represents American shipyard, factory, and assembly line workers who have been the backbone of the Arsenal of Democracy since President Franklin Roosevelt coined the phrase more than seven decades ago. It represents the American spirit of hard work, patriotism and perseverance», said Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus. «The USNS Trenton will carry these values and this spirit around the world. It is tailor-made for our 21st century operations and maritime security missions, from the wide expanses of the Pacific to the littorals of Africa».

The future Military Sealift Command joint high-speed vessel USNS Trenton (JHSV 5) rolls out in preparation for launch at Austal USA shipyard
The future Military Sealift Command joint high-speed vessel USNS Trenton (JHSV 5) rolls out in preparation for launch at Austal USA shipyard

JHSV 5 will be the fourth naval vessel to bear the name Trenton. The first ship was built following the Civil War and was named to honor George Washington’s Revolutionary War victory on the banks of the Delaware River. Since then, a ship bearing the name Trenton has served during every vital Navy mission until 2007 when the last ship was decommissioned.

The 338 foot-long (103 m) aluminum catamaran is under construction at the Austal USA shipyard in Mobile, Alabama. JHSVs are ideal for fast, intra-theater transportation of troops, military vehicles, supplies and equipment. These ships are capable of transporting 600 short tons 1,200 nautical miles (2,222 km) at an average speed of 35 knots (65 km/h) with berthing space for up to 104 personnel and airline-style seating for up to 312.

JHSVs have a 20,000 square foot (1,863 m2) open mission deck and a flight deck to support day and night launch and recovery operations, providing U.S. forces added mobility and flexibility. They can operate in a variety of roles to include supporting overseas contingency operations, conducting humanitarian assistance and disaster relief, supporting special operations forces and supporting emerging joint sea-basing concepts.

Upon delivery to the U.S. Navy’s Military Sealift Command, Trenton will be designated as a United States Naval ship, and will have a core crew of 22 civilian mariners with military mission personnel embarking as necessary.

The JHSV program is procuring 10 high-speed transport vessels for the US Army and the US Navy
The JHSV program is procuring 10 high-speed transport vessels for the US Army and the US Navy

 

Specifications

Principal dimensions

Material:                                    Hull and superstructure – aluminium alloy

Length overall:                       103 m/337.9 ft

Beam overall:                          28.5 m/93.5 ft

Hull draft (maximum):        3.83 m/12.57 ft

Mission bay

Area (with tie-downs):       1,863 m2/20,053 ft2

Clear Height:                            4.75 m/15.6 ft

Turning diameter:                 26.2 m/86.0 ft

ISO TEU Stations:                  6 Interface Panels

Accommodations

Crew:                                            41

Single SR:                             2

Double SR:                          6

Quad SR:                              7

Troop Seats:                          312

Troop Berths

Permanent:                 104

Temporary:                   46

Galley and Messing:          48

The ships can operate in shallow-draft ports and waterways, interface with roll-on/roll-off discharge facilities, and on/off-load a combat-loaded Abrams Main Battle Tank (M1A2)
The ships can operate in shallow-draft ports and waterways, interface with roll-on/roll-off discharge facilities, and on/off-load a combat-loaded Abrams Main Battle Tank (M1A2)

Propulsion

Main Engines:    4 × MTU 20V8000 M71L Diesel Engines 4 × 9.1 MW

Gear boxes:         4 × ZF 60000NR2H Reduction Gears

Waterjets:            4 Wartsila WLD 1400 SR

Performance

Speed

Average:                     35 knots/65 km/h @ 90% MCR with 635 mt (700 st) payload

Maximum:                 43 knots/80 km/h without payload

Range

Maximum Transit:      1,200 NM/2,222 km

Self-Deployment:        5,600 NM/10,371 km

Survival Through:                 SS-7

Aviation facilities

NAVAIR Level 1 Class 2 Certified Flight Deck for one helicopter

Centreline parking area for one helicopter

NAVAIR Level 1 class 4 Type 2 Certified VERTREP

Helicopter Control Station

Auxiliary systems

Active Ride Control

Transcom Interceptors

Foils: 3.24 m2/34.9 ft2 each, forward on inboard sides of demi-hulls

Vehicle Ramp

Articulated Slewing Stern Ramp

Straight aft to 45 Starboard

Telescoping Boom Crane

12.3 mt @ 15 m, 18.2 mt @ 10 m/13.6 Lt @ 49.2 ft, 20.1 Lt @ 32.8 ft

The JHSV includes a flight deck for helicopter operations and an off-load ramp that allows vehicles to quickly drive off the ship
The JHSV includes a flight deck for helicopter operations and an off-load ramp that allows vehicles to quickly drive off the ship