Tag Archives: Arafura Class

Patrol Vessel

The first of Australia’s Arafura Class Offshore Patrol Vessels (OPVs) will celebrate a naval tradition with the keel-laying ceremony to bring good luck for the shipbuilders and future crew members.

First Arafura Class marks ceremonial keel-laying
First Arafura Class marks ceremonial keel-laying

In the second major milestone of Australia’s newest warship construction program, the keel laying ceremony will see a commemorative coin placed under the keel of the vessel by the youngest shipbuilders in the Osborne Naval Shipyard, followed by the Chief of Navy wedging the coin under the keel.

Luerssen Australia Chairman Tim Wagner said the milestone marked the official start of the ship’s life, and demonstrated the significant progress made already on the Arafura Class program.

«This is another reminder of the importance of the Arafura Class program towards Australia building a sovereign naval shipbuilding capability», Mr. Wagner said. «As the prime contractor and designer for the SEA1180 program, we have been delighted with progress so far, and remain confident that we will deliver all 12 vessels on time and on budget for the Royal Australian Navy».

ASC Chief Executive Officer Stuart Whiley said the Arafura Class shipbuilding program is progressing well, employing more than 150 shipbuilders.

«The Arafura Class is ASC’s second shipbuilding program, commenced as we continue to successfully complete the Air Warfare Destroyer program, and we are very pleased at its progress to date», said Mr. Whiley. «I would also like to pay tribute to the skilled and experienced workforce of ASC Shipbuilding, who are carrying out the shipbuilding work on this program, under contract to ASC».

The youngest male and female shipyard workers, Boilermaker Kane Ramsay and Document Editor Lauren Pitman, will feature in today’s ceremony.

«I’m excited to be part of this new program – it’s great to be looking to the future of shipbuilding», said Kane. «The lead ship is coming together well and it’s great to be a part of today’s traditional milestone. I’m looking forward to seeing the ship completed in the coming months», said Lauren.

Construction of the first of 12 Arafura Class OPVs commenced last November, on time, by prime contractor Luerssen Australia and shipbuilding subcontractor ASC.

The Arafura Class marks the commencement of continuous naval shipbuilding in Australia, which will see major warships and submarines constructed in Osborne, South Australia, and minor warships in Henderson, Western Australia.

The first two OPVs will be constructed at the Osborne Naval Shipyard in South Australia by ASC, with the Australian steel, cut in Western Australia by Civmec. The remaining ten warships will be constructed at Civmec’s facility in Henderson. It is Luerssen’s intention that the joint venture between Civmec and Luerssen Australia known as Australian Maritime Shipbuilding and Export Group (AMSEG) will play a major role in the construction.

Patrol Vessel

Deputy Chief of Navy, Rear Admiral Mark Hammond, joined staff from Navy’s Construction Branch in Adelaide today to mark the start of construction of the first of 12 new Offshore Patrol Vessels (OPV).

Deputy Chief of Navy Rear Admiral Mark Hammond, AM, RAN, announces that 12 new Offshore Patrol Vessels will be called the Arafura Class
Deputy Chief of Navy Rear Admiral Mark Hammond, AM, RAN, announces that 12 new Offshore Patrol Vessels will be called the Arafura Class

RADM Hammond attended the Osborne Naval Shipyard to see the welding of the first two component blocks which will form part of the first vessel off the production line.

The event included the announcement that Navy’s new Offshore Patrol Vessels will be known as the Arafura Class, with the first vessel to be commissioned HMAS Arafura when she enters service in 2022.

RADM Hammond said calling the vessels Arafura Class reflected the significance of Navy’s lasting operations to protect Australia’s interests in the Arafura Sea between Cape York and Cape Don.

«This name encapsulates the significant role our maritime regions have in the nation’s security and economic prosperity, importantly the littoral regions around the Australian continent», he said. «This is a much more capable class of ship with greater range, endurance, improved accommodation for the crew staying at sea longer and in every respect, it will outperform older patrol boats. The Arafura Class crews will be tight knit, executing very important missions that will ultimately lead to a great sense of camaraderie and achievement in doing something that’s worthwhile».

The Arafura Class is a custom Australian variant of German shipbuilder Lürssen’s PV80 design and is 80 metres/262.5 feet in length with a displacement of around 1,700 tonnes and a draught of 4 metres/13 feet.

The Arafura Class will replace the Armidale Class and Cape Class patrol boats, Huon Class coastal minehunters and Leeuwin Class survey ships and will primarily be used for constabulary missions, maritime patrol and response duties.

The design includes two changeable, containerised mission systems, supporting secondary roles such as mine hunting, unmanned aerial system missions, and hydrographic surveying.

The first two Arafura Class vessels will be built at Osborne with the following ten to be built at Henderson in Western Australia.

Six of the vessels will be based at HMAS Coonawarra in Darwin, four at HMAS Cairns in north Queensland and two at HMAS Stirling in Western Australia.

 

Specifications

Type Offshore Patrol Vessel (OPV)
Roles Maritime border patrol

Maritime constabulary roles including interdiction

Fisheries patrol

Humanitarian and disaster relief

Minehunting

Hydrographic Survey

Builder Lürssen Australia and Civmec
Displacement 1,640 tonnes
Length 80 m/262.5 feet
Beam 13 m/42.6 feet
Draught 4 m/13 feet
Propulsion 2 × 8,500KW diesel engines
Speed 20 knots/23 mph/37 km/h (maximum)
Range 4,000 NM/4,603 miles/7408 km
Boats 2 × 8.5 m/6.56 × 27.9 feet sea boats (side launched)

1 × 10.5 m/3.28 × 34.5 feet sea boat (stern launched)

Weapons 40-mm gun

2 × .50/12.7-mm calibre machine guns

Company 40 crew with accommodation for up to 60 personnel