Tag Archives: AOPS

First AOPS for Canada

Hundreds of employees gathered in the new Assembly Hall at the Halifax Shipyard to celebrate the start of production of the first Arctic Offshore Patrol Ship (AOPS) for Canada. Delivery of the first HMCS Harry DeWolf-class ship is expected in 2018.

Kevin McCoy, President of Irving Shipbuilding and hundreds of employees at the Halifax Shipyard mark the start of production of the first Arctic Offshore Patrol Ship on September 1
Kevin McCoy, President of Irving Shipbuilding and hundreds of employees at the Halifax Shipyard mark the start of production of the first Arctic Offshore Patrol Ship on September 1

«Today is a milestone we have all been anticipating. It is a great day to be a shipbuilder in Nova Scotia as we mark the beginning of this generational opportunity», said Kevin McCoy, President of Irving Shipbuilding. «We’re doing this with the best team and the largest and most modern shipbuilding facility in North America. Our focus is on delivering the best value to Canada with a growing supply chain from coast to coast to coast».

Production has begun on two units for the center section of the first Arctic Offshore Patrol ship. Welders, pipefitters, marine fabricators and ironworkers are among the trades involved in the process, using the new state-of-the-art panel line.

The ship is the first of up to 21 vessels that will renew Canada’s combatant fleet over the next 30 years under the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy. Irving Shipbuilding has built more than 80% of Canada’s current combatant ships.

All of the employees on the recall list have been contacted. Current direct employment at Marine Fabricators in Dartmouth (where steel is cut) and the Halifax Shipyard is about 900 direct employees (staff and hourly). Over the next two years, the workforce at both sites is expected to rise to 1,600 direct employees with over 1,000 directly employed on AOPS production. In addition, total employment at Irving Shipbuilding (all operations) is forecasted to rise to over 2,500 direct employees at peak production of the larger Canadian Surface Combatant vessels that will replace Canada’s current fleet of Halifax Class frigates.

To date, the modernization at Irving Shipbuilding and the AOPS contract have resulted in over $1 Billion in spending commitments:

  • Over $850 Million committed within Canada (84% of contracts awarded);
  • Over $300 Million committed spend to companies in Nova Scotia;
  • Over 2,000 suppliers now registered with Irving Shipbuilding.

These spend will generate:

  • Over 8,700 Direct and Indirect jobs in Canada (3,400 in Nova Scotia);
  • Over $550 Million in Direct and Indirect Employment Income;
  • An Estimated $400 Million in Consumer Spending.
Halifax Shipyard worker cuts components for the first AOPS ship using state-of-the-art plasma cutter
Halifax Shipyard worker cuts components for the first AOPS ship using state-of-the-art plasma cutter

 

Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ships

The Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship (AOPS) project will deliver six ice-capable ships, designated as the Harry DeWolf Class, after Canadian wartime naval hero Vice-Admiral Harry DeWolf.

The AOPS will be capable of:

  • armed sea-borne surveillance of Canada’s waters, including the Arctic;
  • providing government situational awareness of activities and events in these regions;
  • cooperating with other partners in the Canadian Armed Forces and other government departments to assert and enforce Canadian sovereignty, when and where necessary.

Construction of the first AOPS will begin in September 2015, with HMCS Harry DeWolf scheduled for delivery in 2018.

The announced names of the Harry DeWolf-class ships to date are:

  • HMCS Harry DeWolf
  • HMCS Margaret Brooke
  • HMCS Max Bernays
  • HMCS William Hall
  • HMCS Frédérick Rolette
Centre section component of first AOPS ship underway at Halifax Shipyard
Centre section component of first AOPS ship underway at Halifax Shipyard

 

Specifications

Displacement 6,440 tonnes
Length 338 feet/103 m
Beam 62.3 feet/19 m
Maximum speed 17 knots/19.5 mph/31 km/h
Cruising speed 14 knots/16 mph/26 km/h
Range at Cruising speed 6,800 NM/7,825 miles/12,593.6 km
Complement 65
International ice classification standard Polar Class 5
Be able to sustain operations up to 4 months
Remain operational 25 years beyond Initial Operational Capability (IOC)
Harry DeWolf-Class Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship
Harry DeWolf-Class Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship

 

Features

Integrated Bridge Navigation System

Modern integrated bridge, from which control of navigation, machinery, and damage control systems can be performed.

Multi-Purpose Operational Space

Where operational planning and mission execution will be coordinated.

BAE Mk-38 Gun

Remote controlled 25-mm gun to support domestic constabulary role.

Enclosed Focsle/Cable Deck

Protects foredeck machinery and workspace from harsh Arctic environment.

Helicopter Capability

Depending on the mission, the embarked helicopter could range from a small utility aircraft right up to the new CH-148 maritime helicopter.

Cargo/Payloads

Multiple payload options such as shipping containers, underwater survey equipment, or a landing craft. Ship has a 20-tonne crane to self-load/unload.

Vehicle Bay

For rapid mobility over land or ice, the ship can carry vehicles such as pickup trucks, All-Terrain Vehicles (ATVs), and snowmobiles.

Diesel/Electric Propulsion

Propulsion: Two 4.5 MW main propulsion engines, four 3.6 MW generators.

Retractable Active Fin Stabilizers

Deployed to reduce ship roll for open ocean operations, retracted for operations in ice.

Multi-Role Rescue Boats

Top speed of 35+ knots/40+ mph/65+ km/h, 28 feet/8.5 meters long. Will support rescues, personnel transfers, or boarding operations.

Bow Thrusters

To enable maneuvering or berthing without tug assistance.

Artist’s impression of the Harry DeWolf-Class Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship
Artist’s impression of the Harry DeWolf-Class Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship

Guns for Patrol

Irving Shipbuilding of Canada has awarded BAE Systems a contract to deliver up to six modified 25-mm Mk-38 Machine Gun Systems for the Royal Canadian Navy’s Arctic Offshore Patrol Ship (AOPS) program. The award also covers spare parts, technical support, and long-term field support services. Irving Shipbuilding is the prime contractor for the ships and will build them at its Halifax shipyards.

The Mk-38 Mod 2 Machine Gun System (MGS) from BAE Systems
The Mk-38 Mod 2 Machine Gun System (MGS) from BAE Systems

«We will be working very closely with Canadian industry on this program», said Joseph Senftle, vice president and general manager of Weapons Systems at BAE Systems. «BAE Systems is currently selecting its Canadian partners to participate not only in the build of these naval gun systems, but also to join our Mk-38 global supply chain. This will help bring sustained economic value to Canada as part of the AOPS program».

The AOPS program will introduce six vessels that can patrol the Arctic region and remain there for longer than the service’s existing ships to support sovereignty and surveillance operations. BAE Systems’ first gun system will be delivered in 2017, with follow-on deliveries of approximately one per year through 2021, as the AOPS ships are built and become ready for launch.

Each Mk-38 System features a highly accurate gun targeting and surveillance system as well as the M242 Cannon. They will be modified for protection against arctic conditions. The Mk-38 has also been selected by the U.S. Navy, U.S. Coast Guard, and the Spanish Navy.

Harry DeWolf-Class Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship
Harry DeWolf-Class Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship

Mk-38 Mod 2 MGS

The Mk-38 Mod 2 Machine Gun System (MGS) from BAE Systems sets the standard for shipboard defense against small, fast, and agile surface threats. With system variants deployed worldwide, the stabilized, remote control Mk-38 Mod 2 MGS is proven capable in defending against multiple surface threats – in all sea states. The Mk-38 Mod 2 MGS incorporates the service-proven Toplite electro-optical fire control system to optimize effective engagement of enemy targets in all weather conditions, day or night.

Weaponry. The Mk-38 Mod 2 MGS main weapon is the proven M242 NATO standard auto cannon with 2.5-km range and selectable rates of fire.

Lethality. The M242 fires all U.S. Navy (USN) approved 25-mm ammunition at up to 180 rounds per minute, with the Mk-38 Mod 2 MGS providing up to 200 ready rounds on-mount.

Command and Control. The Toplite Fire Control System (FCS) provides four axis gimbal stabilization and superior optics including the forward-looking infrared radar with three fields-of-view, a low contrast, low light level color television camera, and an eye-safe laser range finder.

Survivability. The Mk-38 Mod 2 MGS provides for crew-safe conditions with a remote operation console located in the Combat Information Center or in other protected ship structures.

Adaptability. The enhanced Mk-38 Mod 2 MGS is the USN’s ORDALT choice to upgrade the Mk-38 Mod 0/1 25-mm machine gun.

The system can be applied to a wide range of different ship classes and platform designs of 50 tons or greater displacement. Near term product upgrades include larger magazine, 30-mm cannon, advanced optics, and integration of laser effects.

Artist’s impression of the Harry DeWolf-Class Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship
Artist’s impression of the Harry DeWolf-Class Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship

 

Specifications

Weight (with gun, w/o ammo) 2,300 lbs/1,042 kg
Weapon station
Train ± 15° to ± 165° adjustable to any value in range
Elevation -20° to +40°
Electro-Optical Fire Control System (relative to mount)
Train ± 165°
Elevation -20° to +85°
Gun type 25-mm M242
Ammunition feed Dual
Ammunition capacity 200 ready rounds
Rate of fire 5 rates from single to 180 rpm max
Personnel requirements
Remote 1
Ammunition loading 2
Operability tests and scheduled maintenance (average daily) 6 minutes
Ammunition reloading time 5 minutes
Availability (inherent/predicted) 99.9%

 

With more than 90 system variants deployed worldwide, the stabilized, remote controlled Mk-38 Mod 2 minor caliber gun is proven capable in defending against multiple surface threats – in all sea states

 

Lieutenant Rolette

The Honorable Jason Kenney, Minister of National Defence, announced on July 16, in Québec City, that an Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship (AOPS) will be named in honor of Lieutenant Frédérick Rolette, a Canadian-born officer and naval hero of various actions, ashore and afloat, during the War of 1812, including command of the ship General Hunter. A parallel announcement was made in Windsor, Ontario, by Jeff Watson, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport and Member of Parliament for Essex, close to the sites of many of Lieutenant Rolette’s heroic actions.

Artist’s impression of the Harry DeWolf-Class Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship
Artist’s impression of the Harry DeWolf-Class Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship

Just before the outbreak of the War of 1812, Frédérick Rolette was posted to Amherstburg, Ontario, as a Lieutenant in charge of the brig General Hunter. When word of the outbreak of war reached Amherstburg on July 3, 1812, Rolette acted immediately, capturing an American vessel, the Cuyahoga, before the crew became aware that their country had declared war on Britain. This was the first action of the War of 1812 and a significant prize, because onboard the Cuyahoga were American commander General William Hull’s papers and dispatches, providing the British with a great deal of intelligence on American strengths and deployment.

 

Quick Facts

Lieutenant Rolette was very active in the war, conducting several daring captures of American supply vessels and participating in land battles at the Capture of Detroit, the Battle of Frenchtown, and the skirmish at the Canard River. He was the First Lieutenant (second in command) of the British schooner Lady Prevost at the Battle of Lake Erie on September 10, 1813. When the captain was mortally wounded, he assumed command and fought the ship «with great skill and gallantry» until he himself was severely wounded, burned by an explosion and the ship was a broken unmanageable and sinking wreck.

Construction of the first AOPS will begin in September 2015, with HMCS Harry DeWolf scheduled for delivery in 2018
Construction of the first AOPS will begin in September 2015, with HMCS Harry DeWolf scheduled for delivery in 2018

When the war ended, Lieutenant Rolette returned home to Québec City to a hero’s welcome and was presented with a fifty-guinea sword of honor by its citizens in recognition of his service. Through the research and efforts of the Naval Museum of Québec, the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) was able to locate the whereabouts and current owner of this sword of honor in order to have it displayed to the public as part of the naming announcement.

In September 2014, Prime Minister Stephen Harper announced that the forthcoming AOPS will be named to honor prominent Canadians who served with the highest distinction and conspicuous gallantry in the Navy. The lead ship was named HMCS Harry DeWolf and the class is known as the Harry DeWolf-Class. Other announced ships’ names in the class include HMCS Margaret Brooke, HMCS Max Bernays, HMCS William Hall and, now, HMCS Frédérick Rolette.

On January 23, 2015, the Government of Canada announced the awarding of the build contract with Irving Shipbuilding Inc. for the construction of up to six Harry DeWolf-class AOPS as part of the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy (NSPS). This contract, valued at $2.3 billion, marks the start of the construction phase under the NSPS. Construction is set to begin in the fall of this year.

The RCN will employ the AOPS to conduct sovereignty and surveillance operations in Canadian waters on all three coasts, including in the Arctic. The AOPS will also be used to support other units of the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) in the conduct of maritime-related operations, and to support other government departments in carrying out their mandates, as required.

The AOPS are key to the Government of Canada’s ability to deliver on three of our guiding strategies – the Canada First Defence Strategy, the Northern Strategy, and the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy.

The NSPS – the largest procurement sourcing arrangement in Canadian history – is expected to create thousands of high-value jobs in shipbuilding and related industries across the country. The Strategy is about undertaking major ship procurements in a smarter, more effective way – a way that sustains Canadian jobs, strengthens the marine sector and provides the best value for Canadian taxpayers.

New Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship to be named in honor of French-Canadian hero of War of 1812, Frédérick Rolette
New Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship to be named in honor of French-Canadian hero of War of 1812, Frédérick Rolette

 

Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ships

The Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship (AOPS) project will deliver six ice-capable ships, designated as the Harry DeWolf Class, after Canadian wartime naval hero Vice-Admiral Harry DeWolf.

The AOPS will be capable of:

  • armed sea-borne surveillance of Canada’s waters, including the Arctic;
  • providing government situational awareness of activities and events in these regions;
  • cooperating with other partners in the Canadian Armed Forces and other government departments to assert and enforce Canadian sovereignty, when and where necessary.

Construction of the first AOPS will begin in September 2015, with HMCS Harry DeWolf scheduled for delivery in 2018.

The announced names of the Harry DeWolf-class ships to date are:

  • HMCS Harry DeWolf
  • HMCS Margaret Brooke
  • HMCS Max Bernays
  • HMCS William Hall
  • HMCS Frédérick Rolette

 

Specifications

Displacement 6,440 tonnes
Length 338 feet/103 m
Beam 62.3 feet/19 m
Maximum speed 17 knots/19.5 mph/31 km/h
Cruising speed 14 knots/16 mph/26 km/h
Range at Cruising speed 6,800 NM/7,825 miles/12,593.6 km
Complement 65
International ice classification standard Polar Class 5
Be able to sustain operations up to 4 months
Remain operational 25 years beyond Initial Operational Capability (IOC)

Harry DeWolf-Class Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship

Harry DeWolf-Class Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship

 

Features

Integrated Bridge Navigation System

Modern integrated bridge, from which control of navigation, machinery, and damage control systems can be performed.

Multi-Purpose Operational Space

Where operational planning and mission execution will be coordinated.

BAE Mk-38 Gun

Remote controlled 25-mm gun to support domestic constabulary role.

Enclosed Focsle/Cable Deck

Protects foredeck machinery and workspace from harsh Arctic environment.

Helicopter Capability

Depending on the mission, the embarked helicopter could range from a small utility aircraft right up to the new CH-148 maritime helicopter.

Cargo/Payloads

Multiple payload options such as shipping containers, underwater survey equipment, or a landing craft. Ship has a 20-tonne crane to self-load/unload.

Vehicle Bay

For rapid mobility over land or ice, the ship can carry vehicles such as pickup trucks, All-Terrain Vehicles (ATVs), and snowmobiles.

Diesel/Electric Propulsion

Propulsion: Two 4.5 MW main propulsion engines, four 3.6 MW generators.

Retractable Active Fin Stabilizers

Deployed to reduce ship roll for open ocean operations, retracted for operations in ice.

Multi-Role Rescue Boats

Top speed of 35+ knots/40+ mph/65+ km/h, 28 feet/8.5 meters long. Will support rescues, personnel transfers, or boarding operations.

Bow Thrusters

To enable maneuvering or berthing without tug assistance.

 

Arctic Patrol

The Honourable Diane Finley, Minister of Public Works and Government Services, along with the Honourable Peter MacKay, Regional Minister for Nova Scotia, announced the awarding of the build contract with Irving Shipbuilding Inc. for the construction of six Arctic Offshore Patrol Ships (AOPS) as part of the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy (NSPS). This contract, valued at $2.3 billion, marks the start of the construction phase under the NSPS (Source: Public Works and Government Services Canada).

HMCS Harry DeWolf is the first of the AOPS designed to better enable the RCN to exercise sovereignty in Canadian waters, including in the Arctic
HMCS Harry DeWolf is the first of the AOPS designed to better enable the RCN to exercise sovereignty in Canadian waters, including in the Arctic

The contract has been designed to ensure best value for taxpayers and sets out the plan for the delivery of six ships within a ceiling price.

The AOPS build contract will sustain approximately 1,000 jobs at Irving Shipbuilding as well as many jobs at suppliers across Canada. For example, today, Member of Parliament, Bryan Hayes, highlighted that the majority (60 per cent) of steel plate for the first Arctic Offshore Patrol Ship will be produced at the Essar Steel Algoma rolling mill in his riding of Sault Saint Marie in Ontario. To date, 197 companies in Canada have already benefited from NSPS work.

Construction of an initial block for the first AOPS is scheduled for the summer, while full production will commence in September 2015. Delivery of the first HMCS Harry DeWolf class ship is expected in 2018.

The new DeWolf-class Arctic Offshore Patrol Ships will be able to operate and support the new Cyclone naval helicopters
The new DeWolf-class Arctic Offshore Patrol Ships will be able to operate and support the new Cyclone naval helicopters

It was also confirmed that Irving Shipbuilding will be the Prime Contractor for the Canadian Surface Combatant (CSC) project. As outlined in the NSPS RFP (Request For Proposal) and the resulting umbrella agreement with the selected shipyards, Canada retains the right to determine if the shipyard will be designated as the Prime Contractor. After discussions with industry and review by an independent third party, it was determined that Irving is best positioned to manage the contracts associated with the three decades of work to design and build these ships.

 

Quick Facts

The $3.5 billion budget for the AOPS includes acquisition costs (for vessel design and build), project office operations, a provision for infrastructure costs (e.g. for jetties), as well as initial spares and support.

The build contract, valued at $2.3 billion, is a cost reimbursable incentive fee-based contract that provides incentives for Irving Shipbuilding to deliver 6 ships to the Royal Canadian Navy within a pre‑determined and not-to-exceed ceiling price.

Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship (HMCS) Harry DeWolf is named in honour of a wartime Canadian naval hero. A native of Bedford, Nova Scotia, Vice-Admiral Harry DeWolf (RCN) was decorated for outstanding service throughout his naval career, which included wartime command of HMCS St. Laurent from 1939-40, and later, his 1943-44 command of HMCS Haida, known as the «Fightingest Ship in the RCN»
Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship (HMCS) Harry DeWolf is named in honour of a wartime Canadian naval hero. A native of Bedford, Nova Scotia, Vice-Admiral Harry DeWolf (RCN) was decorated for outstanding service throughout his naval career, which included wartime command of HMCS St. Laurent from 1939-40, and later, his 1943-44 command of HMCS Haida, known as the «Fightingest Ship in the RCN»

The new DeWolf class Arctic Offshore Patrol Ships will be equipped with state of the art sensors and will also be able to operate and support the new Cyclone naval helicopters. Operating in conjunction with other capabilities of the Canadian Armed Forces and the Canadian Coast Guard, the DeWolf class ships will play a critical role in protecting Canada’s offshore sovereignty in the Atlantic, the Pacific as well as in the Arctic.

 

Arctic Offshore Patrol Ships

Canada defends more coastline than any other country, as it is bounded by three oceans. Canada protects its maritime approaches from smuggling, trafficking and pollution, and also provides life-saving search and rescue as well as opportunities for scientific research. The fleets also act internationally to meet our commitments and protect our interests.

In June 2010, the Government of Canada announced the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy. Through this strategy, Canada will replace the current surface fleets of the Royal Canadian Navy and the Canadian Coast Guard, which are reaching the end of their operational lives. First in line will be the Arctic Offshore Patrol Ships for the Royal Canadian Navy in the combat package. These will be followed by the Canadian Surface Combatant. The Joint Support Ships (JSS) will be built for the Royal Canadian Navy under the non-combat work package.

Designed to a Polar Class 5 international ice classification standard, which will allow for operations in first year ice up to one meter in thickness
Designed to a Polar Class 5 international ice classification standard, which will allow for operations in first year ice up to one meter in thickness

The AOPS project will deliver six ice-capable offshore patrol ships that will conduct sovereignty and surveillance operations in Canada’s Exclusive Economic Zone, including in the Arctic. The Royal Canadian Navy will also use the AOPS to support other units of the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) in the conduct of maritime-related operations and to support other government departments in carrying out their mandates, as required. The AOPS project will also deliver associated jetty infrastructure in Esquimalt (BC), Halifax (NS) and Nanisivik (NU).

The AOPS are key to the Government of Canada’s ability to deliver on three of our guiding strategies – the Canada First Defence Strategy, the Northern Strategy, and the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy.

 

Proposed Ship Capabilities

The AOPS will have a number of capabilities that will allow the ships to assist the Royal Canadian Navy in carrying out missions. The following high-level draft requirements are examples of these capabilities, and will be studied and refined during project definition. AOPS will:

Have a cruising speed of at least 14 knots/16 mph/26 km/h and a maximum speed of at least 17 knots/19.5 mph/31 km/h
Have a cruising speed of at least 14 knots/16 mph/26 km/h and a maximum speed of at least 17 knots/19.5 mph/31 km/h
  • Be capable of performing independent open ocean patrols on the east and west coasts of Canada, and in the Canadian Arctic during the navigable season.
  • Designed to a Polar Class 5 international ice classification standard, which will allow for operations in first year ice up to one meter in thickness.
  • Have a capability to manoeuvre in ice, however AOPS will not provide icebreaking services to others.
  • Be able to sustain operations for up to 4 months.
  • Have a range of at least 6,800 nautical miles/12,593.6 km at 14 knots/16 mph/26 km/h.
  • Have a sufficient command, control and communication capability to exchange real-time information with the Canadian Armed Forces Maritime Security Operations Centres.
  • Have a cruising speed of at least 14 knots/16 mph/26 km/h and a maximum speed of at least 17 knots/19.5 mph/31 km/h.
  • Have a gun armament.
  • Remain operational for 25 years beyond Initial Operational Capability (IOC).
  • Be capable of embarking and operating a variety of helicopter types up to and including the Royal Canadian Air Force’s Cyclone helicopter be capable of embarking and deploying a variety of boat types to support activities such as boarding operations and transfer of cargo and personnel for ship-to-shore transfer as well as arrangements for cargo and container storage to support CAF and Other Government Departments operations.
Subsequent ships in the class will be named to honour other prominent Canadian naval heroes who served their country with the highest distinction
Subsequent ships in the class will be named to honour other prominent Canadian naval heroes who served their country with the highest distinction