Tag Archives: AN/SPY-6(V)1

First SPY-6 Radar

Raytheon Missiles & Defense, a Raytheon Technologies business, delivered the first AN/SPY-6(V)1 radar array for installation on the future USS Jack H. Lucas (DDG-125), the U.S. Navy’s first Flight III guided-missile destroyer. The SPY-6 family of radars performs simultaneous air, missile and surface defense on seven types of U.S. Navy ships.

Raytheon Missiles & Defense, a Raytheon Technologies business, delivered the first AN/SPY-6(V)1 radar array for installation on the future USS Jack H. Lucas (DDG-125), the U.S. Navy’s first Flight III guided-missile destroyer

«SPY-6 will change how the Navy conducts surface fleet operations», said Captain Jason Hall, program manager for Above-Water Sensors for the U.S. Navy’s Program Executive Office for Integrated Warfare Systems. «Our ships will be able to see farther, react quicker and defend against threats in a way we couldn’t before».

The 14′ × 14’/4.27 m × 4.27 m modular array was transported by truck from the company’s automated 30,000-square-foot/2,787 square-meter Radar Development Facility in Andover, Massachusetts, to Huntington Ingalls Industries shipyard in Pascagoula, Mississippi.

«This is the start of what will be a steady stream of SPY-6 array deliveries to the shipyard», said Kim Ernzen, vice president of Naval Power at Raytheon Missiles & Defense. «Threats to Navy ships are getting smaller and faster. SPY-6 will extend the Navy’s reach against dangers like drones, ballistic missiles, aircraft and unmanned ships».

The SPY-6(V) family of radars delivers significantly greater range, increased accuracy, greater resistance to environmental and man-made electronic clutter, advanced electronic protection, and higher reliability than currently deployed radars.

First SPY-6 Radar

Raytheon Missiles & Defense completed comprehensive near-field range testing on the first AN/SPY-6(V)1 radar array, signaling its readiness to be wrapped, packed and shipped to the U.S. Navy’s future USS Jack H. Lucas, DDG-125. The 14’ by 14’ modular array will deliver unprecedented integrated air and missile defense and air defense capabilities to Flight III guided missile destroyers and seven types of U.S. Navy ships.

An AN/SPY-6(V)1 radar array is shown during testing in Raytheon Missiles & Defense’s Andover, MA-based Radar Development Facility. SPY-6 will deliver significantly enhanced integrated air and missile defense capability to the surface fleet by simultaneously addressing ballistic and cruise missiles, surface ships, fighter jets and other advanced threats

«The goal of near-field range testing is to increase integration speed, drive out risk and ensure SPY-6 is primed for installation», said Scott Spence, senior director of Naval Radar Systems. «When SPY-6 radar arrays leave our radar development facility, they are ready to defend the surface fleet».

Before leaving the automated, 30,000 square-foot/2,787 square-meter radar development facility, all SPY-6 arrays undergo extensive testing that includes:

  • Operational health evaluation of more than 5,000 transmit and receive radiating elements;
  • Alignment and calibration of nearly 150 subarray channels and 5,000 radar elements;
  • Collection and validation of over 42,000 «golden database» parameters that allows automatic recalibration of the array during at-sea maintenance;
  • Collection, analysis and verification of over 300 transmit and receive array beam patterns.

Raytheon Missiles & Defense has invested more than $500 million in infrastructure and capacity enhancements, including advanced automation technology, for SPY-6 since the program’s inception. Additional construction on expanded production areas dedicated to transmit/receive integrated microwave modules and radio frequency heads – key radar components – will be completed this year.

 

SPY-6(V)1

Designed for the DDG 51 Flight III destroyers, SPY-6(V)1 features:

  • 4 array faces – each with 37 RMAs (Radar Modular Assemblies) – providing continuous, 360-degree situational awareness;
  • Significantly enhanced range and sensitivity compared to the radar it replaces.

SPY-6(V)1 simultaneously defends against:

  • Ballistic missiles;
  • Cruise missiles;
  • Anti-surface and anti-air threats;
  • Jamming/clutter and electronic warfare.

 

SPY-6(V)2

Designed for amphibious assault ships and Nimitz-class carriers, SPY-6(V)2 – also known as the Enterprise Air Surveillance Radar (rotator variant) – features:

  • 1 rotating array face – with 9 RMAs – providing continuous, 360-degree situational awareness;
  • Air traffic control and ship self-defense capabilities.

SPY-6(V)2 simultaneously defends against:

  • Cruise missiles;
  • Anti-surface and anti-ship threats;
  • Jamming/clutter and electronic warfare.

 

SPY-6(V)3

Designed for Ford-class aircraft carriers and FFG(X) guided missile frigates, SPY-6(V)3 – also known as the Enterprise Air Surveillance Radar (fixed variant) – features:

  • 3 fixed-face array faces – each with 9 RMAs – providing continuous, 360-degree situational awareness;
  • Air traffic control and ship self-defense capabilities.

SPY-6(V)3 simultaneously defends against:

  • Cruise missiles;
  • Anti-surface and anti-ship threats;
  • Jamming/clutter and electronic warfare.

 

SPY-6(V)4

Designed for DDG-51 Flight IIA destroyers, SPY-6(V)4 features:

  • 4 array faces – each with 24 RMAs – providing continuous, 360-degree situational awareness;
  • Significantly enhanced range and sensitivity compared to the radar it replaces.

SPY-6(V)4 simultaneously defends against:

  • Ballistic missiles;
  • Cruise missiles;
  • Anti-surface and anti-air threats;
  • Jamming/clutter and electronic warfare.

Ballistic Missile Test

Raytheon Company’s AN/SPY-6(V)1 air and missile defense radar completed its latest test, exceeding all performance requirements. In the most stressing test to date, the radar searched for, detected, and maintained track on the target as predicted.

Raytheon's SPY-6 aces most complex test yet
Raytheon’s SPY-6 aces most complex test yet

«Now in production, AN/SPY-6(V)1 continues to stack up test successes and milestones, proving the maturity of its design and its exceptional capabilities», said U.S. Navy Captain Seiko Okano, Major Program Manager for Above Water Sensors, Program Executive Office Integrated Warfare Systems. «The radar is on track to deliver game-changing integrated air and missile defense technology to the surface fleet through its ability to simultaneously address air and missile defense targets. This will provide an unprecedented level of comprehensive protection to naval forces and assets».

Since its inception in January 2014, the program has met 20 of 20 milestones, ahead of or on schedule. The radar has progressed well through the U.S. Navy’s dedicated AN/SPY-6(V)1 testing program. Currently in production, the radar is on schedule for delivery to the Navy’s first modernized DDG-51 Flight III, the future USS Jack H Lucas (DDG-125), in 2020.

Throughout testing at the Navy’s Pacific Missile Range Facility, Kauai, Hawaii, AN/SPY-6(V)1 has consistently proved its multi-mission capability to extend the battlespace and safeguard the fleet from multiple, simultaneous threats. The radar has now demonstrated its performance against an array of singular and multiple targets of increasing complexity. This includes integrated air and missile defense targets, as well as targets of opportunity, satellites and aircraft.

AN/SPY-6(V)1 provides greater range, increased accuracy, greater resistance to environmental and man-made electronic clutter, higher reliability and sustainability than currently deployed radars. The radar’s demonstrated sensitivity – significantly more than current radars in the U.S. Navy – provides greater coverage for early and accurate detection.