ASW Corvette

The Fourth Anti Submarine Warfare (ASW) Corvette of Project-28, christened Kavaratti, was launched on May 19 at a glittering ceremony held at Garden Reach Shipbuilders and Engineers Ltd (GRSE), Kolkata. The Honorable Raksha Rajya Mantri, Shri Rao Inderjit Singh was the Chief Guest at the occasion. In keeping with the nautical traditions, the ship was launched by Smt Manita Singh, wife of the Honorable Raksha Rajya Mantri. After an invocation to the Gods was recited, Smt Manita Singh broke a coconut on the Ship’s Bow, named the ship and wished her future crew good luck.

The future INS Kavaratti, an anti-submarine warfare corvette displacing 3,300 tonnes, was launched today at the Garden Reach Shipbuilders and Engineers Ltd shipyard in Kolkata (India MoD photo)
The future INS Kavaratti, an anti-submarine warfare corvette displacing 3,300 tonnes, was launched today at the Garden Reach Shipbuilders and Engineers Ltd shipyard in Kolkata (India MoD photo)

Speaking on the occasion the Honorable Raksha Rajya Mantri, Rao Inderjit Singh lauded the contributions made by GRSE, Kolkata in meeting the growing requirements of the Indian Navy. Admiral RK Dhowan, Chief of the Naval Staff, during his address acknowledged the excellent work done by the yard for contributing towards achieving Indian Navy’s dream of transforming itself from a «Buyers Navy» to «Builders Navy». He also commended the work of DGND and his team at Directorate of Naval Design in designing state of the art warships for the country.

The four ships of Project-28 built by GRSE, Kolkata have been designed indigenously by the Directorate of Naval Design, New Delhi and bear testimony to the acclaimed legacy of Naval Designers. The ships have been constructed using high grade steel (DMR 249A) produced in India. With a displacement of 3,300 tonnes, the sleek and magnificent ASW Corvettes span 109.1 meters/358 feet in length and 13.7 meters/45 feet at the beam. They are propelled by four diesel engines to achieve speeds in excess of 25 knots/29 mph/46 km/h and have an endurance of more than 3,000 NM/3,452 miles/5,556 km.

The P-28 corvettes also boast of «firsts» such as the revolutionary Rail-less Helo Traversing System, Foldable Hangar Door, use of Personnel Locator System and use of Carbon Fibre Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) Superstructure integrated with the Steel Hull in the third (INS Kiltan) and fourth (INS Kavaratti) ships of the Kamorta-Class.

These ships have common raft mounted Gear Box and Diesel Engines, which give the vessels very low radiated underwater noise. This is well complemented with an efficient propeller with very high cavitation inception speed. The P-28 Ships also have Total Atmospheric Control System (TACS) and an Integrated Platform Management System (IPMS), which include Integrated Bridge System as well as Battle Damage Control System.

The ASW Corvettes also incorporate new design concepts for improved survivability, sea keeping, stealth and manoeuvrability. Enhanced stealth features have been achieved by including Low Radar Cross Section (RCS) signature through full beam superstructure, inclined ship sides and reduced Infra-Red (IR) signature by use of Infra-Red Suppression System (IRSS) device for cooling the Engine and Diesel Alternator exhausts. The ships are also equipped to carry and operate one multiple role helicopter.

Kavaratti will also be packed with an array of state of art weapons and sensors, including a Medium Range Gun (from M/s Bharat Heavy Electrical Ltd), Torpedo Tube Launchers (2 × 3) as well as Rocket Launchers (from M/s Larsen & Tubro), Close-In Weapon System (from M/s Gun and Shell Factory) and Chaff System (from M/s Machine Tool Prototype Factory). With significant indigenous content, the Ship is a true hallmark of self-reliance attained by our country in warship design and shipbuilding.

All the ships names of the class are reincarnations of ships from the previous Arnala-class corvettes which are considered the spiritual predecessors of the Kamorta-class
All the ships names of the class are reincarnations of ships from the previous Arnala-class corvettes which are considered the spiritual predecessors of the Kamorta-class

 

General Characteristics

Length Overall 358 feet/109.1 m
Beam 45 feet/13.7 m
Displacement 3,300 tonnes
Max Speed 25 knots/29 mph/46 km/h
Endurance at 18 knots/21 mph/33 km/h 3,450 NM/3,970 miles/6,389 km
Main Engine 4 × 3,888 kW
Diesel Generators 2 × 1,000 kW & 2 × 500 kW
Crew 123 including 17 officers & 106 sailors
INS Kamorta is the first of four anti-submarine Kamorta-class stealth corvettes which has been built for the Indian Navy
INS Kamorta is the first of four anti-submarine Kamorta-class stealth corvettes which has been built for the Indian Navy

The latest RAM

The US Navy successfully completed tests of the Rolling Airframe Block 2 missile at the Navy’s Pacific Missile Test Range, May 10. The missiles were launched from a Self Defense Test Ship operated by the Naval Surface Warfare Center Port Hueneme and intercepted turbojet-powered targets emulating enemy anti-ship cruise missiles.

The Rolling Airframe Missile Block 2 is the latest step in the development of the weapon system
The Rolling Airframe Missile Block 2 is the latest step in the development of the weapon system

Testing continued with another successful firing, using two RAM Block 2 missiles, meeting all test objectives May 12. Scheduled over the next several months, these were the first of a series of planned tests to demonstrate RIM-116 Rolling Airframe Missile (RAM) Block 2 performance against anti-ship cruise missile threats at sea. The Block 2 missile will now have flight tests from an operational ship.

«With an Evolved Radio Frequency (ERF) receiver and improved kinematics, RAM Block 2 was designed to engage these types of LPI (Low-Probability Intercept) and maneuvering threats», said Captain John Keegan, RAM major program manager. «Our success over the last several days is the first step in proving Block 2’s operational effectiveness and suitability for fleet use».

The Block 2 missile is the latest RAM configuration. The missile provides improvements in sensitivity, maneuverability, and range over the existing Block 0 and Block 1A variants currently deployed. RAM Block 2 missile is in Low Rate Initial Production (LRIP) with an approved U.S. inventory objective of 2,093 missiles.

The Rolling Airframe Missile is a supersonic, lightweight, quick reaction, fire-and-forget missile that provides defense against anti-ship cruise missiles, helicopter and airborne threats, and hostile surface craft
The Rolling Airframe Missile is a supersonic, lightweight, quick reaction, fire-and-forget missile that provides defense against anti-ship cruise missiles, helicopter and airborne threats, and hostile surface craft

RAM is a cooperative development, production and in-service program between the United States and Federal Republic of Germany in the Program Executive Office Integrated Warfare Systems’ (PEO IWS) portfolio. The RAM missile is a supersonic, lightweight, quick reaction, fire-and-forget missile that defends against anti-ship cruise missiles.

It is jointly developed and produced by Raytheon Missile Systems and RAMSYS GmbH. In addition to being deployed in the U.S. and German fleets, the RAM system is also in-service or planned for in-service in the navies of Egypt, Greece, Japan, Republic of Korea, Turkey, and the United Arab Emirates.

PEO IWS, an affiliated program executive office of the Naval Sea Systems Command, manages surface ship and submarine combat technologies and systems, and coordinates Navy Enterprise solutions across ship platforms.

The Rolling Airframe Missile provides world-class ship self-defense for U.S. Navy carriers, amphibious ships and littoral combat ships
The Rolling Airframe Missile provides world-class ship self-defense for U.S. Navy carriers, amphibious ships and littoral combat ships

 

RIM-116 Rolling Airframe Missile Block 2

RAM Block 2, the latest step in the development of the Rolling Airframe Missile, is a kinematic and Radio Frequency (RF) receiver upgrade of Block 1/1A. A larger, more powerful, composite case rocket motor and advanced Control Section (4 canards vs. current 2) make the missile two and a half times more maneuverable with one and a half times the effective intercept range. This provides the Block 2 missile with the capability to defeat high-maneuvering threats, increasing the survivability of the defended ship. An enhanced RF receiver allows detection of anti-ship missiles that employ low probability of intercept receivers.

The Mk-44 Guided Missile Round Pack (GMRP) and the Mk-49 Guided Missile Launching System (GMLS), which hold 21 missiles, comprise the Mk-31 Guided Missile Weapon System (GMWS). The system is designed for flexibility in ships’ integration, with no dedicated sensors required. A variety of existing ship sensors can readily provide the target and pointing information required to engage the anti-ship threat.

The Mk-44 GMRP is also the missile used in the SeaRAM Anti-Ship Missile Defense System, replacing the M601A1 Gatling gun in the Phalanx Close-In Weapon System (CIWS) with an 11-round launcher. The Phalanx sensor suite serves as the search and track radar designating the threat for RAM missiles to intercept.

The Rolling Airframe Missile Block 2 upgrade includes a four-axis independent control actuator system and an increase in rocket motor capability
The Rolling Airframe Missile Block 2 upgrade includes a four-axis independent control actuator system and an increase in rocket motor capability

 

General Characteristics

Primary Function Ship Self Defense
Contractor Raytheon
Missile Capacity (Mk-49 GMLS) 21
Length 9.45 feet/2.88 m
Diameter 6.25 inch/15.87 cm
Wingspan 12.65 inch/32.17 cm
Weight 194.4 lbs/88.2 kg
Speed Supersonic
The Rolling Airframe Missile’s autonomous dual-mode, passive radio frequency and infrared guidance design provide a high-firepower capability for engaging multiple threats simultaneously
The Rolling Airframe Missile’s autonomous dual-mode, passive radio frequency and infrared guidance design provide a high-firepower capability for engaging multiple threats simultaneously

Keel for Indiana

The keel of the 16th Virginia-class attack submarine, named after the 16th largest state, was laid May 16 at Newport News Shipyard. She is the third ship to bear the name Indiana, and will be the first in almost 70 years to sail under the national colors with that name. It is said in the Navy Times that the ship’s sponsor, Diane Donald, the wife of retired Admiral Kirk Donald, a former director of Naval Nuclear Propulsion, declared the keel «to be truly and fairly laid». Diane Donald authenticated the keel with her initials, which were welded onto a metal plate and permanently affixed to the ship.

Heather Johnson, a 37-year-old mother of four, has the honor of being the first female welder at Newport News Shipbuilding to weld the sponsor's initials on a Virginia-class submarine (Photo by John Whalen/HII)
Heather Johnson, a 37-year-old mother of four, has the honor of being the first female welder at Newport News Shipbuilding to weld the sponsor’s initials on a Virginia-class submarine (Photo by John Whalen/HII)

Construction on Indiana, the sixth of eight Block III variants, started in September 2012. The state is known as «the crossroads of America», and its namesake honors that motto well. She carries millions of parts from 5,000 suppliers located in all 50 states. Assembling these parts is what Jim Hughes, vice president for Submarines and Fleet Support, called «one of the biggest orchestras in the world». The symphony carefully played by 4,000 shipbuilders will now unite hull sections into a 377-foot/114.8 m military masterpiece that will crescendo with its 2017 commissioning, then slip into three decades of silent service.

Her missions will be many and multifaceted. The Virginia class has a large lock-in/lock-out chamber, and a reconfigurable torpedo room to accommodate more snake eaters. She will carry roughly three dozen Tomahawk cruise missiles. Traditional periscopes have been replaced by photonics masts with high-resolution cameras and infrared sensors. A fly-by-wire ship control system provides unmatched operation in shallow littoral areas.

A shipbuilder on a lift works on the stern unit of Indiana (SSN-789) at Newport News Shipbuilding in 2013 (Photo by Ricky Thompson/HII)
A shipbuilder on a lift works on the stern unit of Indiana (SSN-789) at Newport News Shipbuilding in 2013 (Photo by Ricky Thompson/HII)

While the Virginia class boasts these and other upgrades in weaponry and other tactical equipment, its biggest edge is in acoustics, said Commander Jesse Zimbauer, the ship’s skipper. Among its many advances, the Block III variant vastly improved passive detection by replacing the traditional sonar sphere with the Large Aperture Bow array. «We are building the future with this submarine», said Jesse Zimbauer, who «jumped on the opportunity» to be part of the pre-commissioning unit.

A keel laying is the symbolic beginning of building a ship, originating from the large structural beam, or keel, that serves as the foundation or spine of the ship’s hull. Although modular construction techniques mean that the ship is no longer built from the bottom up, the keel laying is still celebrated as a momentous event in the ship’s construction. During the keel laying ceremony, the ship’s sponsor authenticates the keel by chalking her initials onto a metal plate. The initials are then welded onto a plate that is permanently affixed to the ship.

Diane Donald, the Indiana's sponsor, looks over her initials on a steel plate held by welder Heather Johnson of Newport News Shipbuilding
Diane Donald, the Indiana’s sponsor, looks over her initials on a steel plate held by welder Heather Johnson of Newport News Shipbuilding

 

INDIANA (SSN-789) FACTS

  • Navy names SSN-789 in honor of the state of Indiana: April 13, 2012
  • Construction start: September 2012
  • Keel Authentication Ceremony: May 16, 2015
  • Ship’s sponsor: Ms. Diane Donald, wife of retired Admiral Kirk Donald
  • Number of NNS shipbuilders who support Indiana construction: 4,000
  • Officers and Crew: Currently, 57; At delivery 135; Commanded by Jesse Zimbauer
  • Indiana is about 48 percent complete and is on track to complete in summer 2017
  • Indiana is the 16th ship of the Virginia class
A unit for the Virginia-class submarine South Dakota (SSN-790) under construction at Newport News Shipbuilding in 2014 (Photo by Chris Oxley)
A unit for the Virginia-class submarine South Dakota (SSN-790) under construction at Newport News Shipbuilding in 2014 (Photo by Chris Oxley)

 

General Characteristics

Builder General Dynamics Electric Boat Division and Huntington Ingalls Industries Inc. – Newport News Shipbuilding
Date Deployed October 3, 2004
Propulsion One S9G* nuclear reactor, one shaft
Length 377 feet/114.8 m
Beam 33 feet/10.0584 m
Hull Diameter 34 feet/10.5156 m
Displacement Approximately 7,800 tons/7,925 metric tons submerged
Speed 25+ knots/28+ mph/46.3+ km/h
Diving Depth 800+ feet/244+ m
Crew 132: 15 officers; 117 enlisted
Armament: Tomahawk missiles 12 individual VLS (Vertical Launch System) tubes or two 87-in/2.2 m Virginia Payload Tubes (VPTs), each capable of launching 6 Tomahawk cruise missiles
Armament: MK-48 ADCAP (Advanced Capability) Mod 7 heavyweight torpedoes 4 torpedo tubes
Weapons MK-60 CAPTOR (Encapsulated Torpedo) mines, advanced mobile mines and UUVs (Unmanned Underwater Vehicles)

* – Knolls Atomic Power Laboratories

A panorama of the shipyard shows the bow unit of Illinois (SSN-786) being moved to the sea shuttle (right) June 24, 2014. Illinois is being delivered to the Navy by General Dynamics Electric Boat (Photo by Chris Oxley/HII)
A panorama of the shipyard shows the bow unit of Illinois (SSN-786) being moved to the sea shuttle (right) June 24, 2014. Illinois is being delivered to the Navy by General Dynamics Electric Boat (Photo by Chris Oxley/HII)

Patriotic martyr

A patriotic martyr, Yu Gwan-sun, 1902-1920, who died in her youth while struggling against Japanese coercion, is revived as a most capable submarine. Daewoo Shipbuilding Engineering in Geoje-gun, Gyeongnam, had launching ceremony of the type 214, 6th submarine Yu Gwan Sun Ham on the afternoon of May 7th. The launching ceremony is a ritual of sending a warship, which is mounted with equipment and a weapons system, into the sea for the first time.

The diesel-powered submarine will be deployed on anti-vessel and anti-submarine missions
The diesel-powered submarine will be deployed on anti-vessel and anti-submarine missions

The Navy offered congratulations at the ceremony for the very first female-named submarine and invited female fighters for independence and relevant officials of Korean women’s independence movement organizations to meditate on martyr Yu’s spirit of independence. Defense Minister Han Min-koo was at the ceremony as the guest of honor. His grandfather was the commander of loyal troops, Cheongam Han Bong-soo.

According to the traditional process of the Navy, the launching ceremony was preceded by the Pledge of Allegiance, shipbuilding progress report, the announcement of the name of submarine, ribbon-cutting and champaign breaking.

Navy Chief of Staff Jung Ho-seob named the submarine «Yu Gwan Sun» and assigned «78» as the number of body through a letter of naming No. 462. As Mrs. Kwak Jung-im, Minister Han’s wife, cut the launching ribbon with an axe, colorful confetti and balloons flew through the sky and the first historical whistle blew.

«With its unique invisibility and survivability, Yu Gwan Sun Ham is a national core strategic weapon as well as a symbol of a strong Navy for obtaining maritime control. The Navy should develop the fighting power of the submarine to protect the national interest and the ocean sovereignty as a rock, and have an elevated readiness posture», Minister Han said in a congratulatory speech.

He also made a request for the sailors to be an example of an elite advanced Navy, fighting with self-esteem and pride to protect our territorial waters and seaway, saying that history has proved that strong security is the base of our national existence as well as the foundation for peace of the Korean Peninsula. «I’m very excited to be here at the launching ceremony for Yu Gwan Sun Ham, the first female-named submarine. I hope the Navy befits the name of patriotic martyr Yu to be the strongest Navy in the world», said Mrs. Oh Hee-ok.

The submarine is being built by Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering and it will be delivered in November of next year
The submarine is being built by Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering and it will be delivered in November of next year

The Navy named the type 214, the 6th submarine, the Yu Gwan Sun for the meaningful year of the 70th anniversary of independence, 70th anniversary of the foundation of the Korean Navy, and 95th anniversary of the death of Yu Gwan-sun. It is the first female-named warship in Navy history. There are some other cases of Aegis destroyer and helicopter carrier in the U.S., the UK and France. The Navy has named the type 214 submarines for great men who contributed to the independence movement against Japan or overcoming a national crisis.

Martyr Yu Gwan-sun participated in the Independence Movement in front of the South Gate of Seoul on March 5, 1919, while in Ihwa School. And she was arrested for leading the movement at Aunae marketplace in Galjeon-myeon, Chungnam, on April 1. She died at Seodaemun prison in 1920 due to brutal torture. The government posthumously honored on her with the Order of Merit for National Foundation, Independent Medal, in 1962, admiring her merits.

Yu Gwan Sun Ham, a submarine in the 1,800-ton class with submerged displacement, is 65.3 m/214.2 feet in length, 6.3 m/20.7 feet in width and has a top speed of 20 knots/23 mph/37 km/h. It can make a round trip to Hawaii in the U.S. with around 40 sailors on board without refueling.

With Air Independent Propulsion (AIP) that is able to charge a storage battery without air, it is available for operations for two weeks without floating to the surface of the water.

And thanks to «Haeseong», a domestic submarine-to-ground cruise missile, it can precisely strike the enemy’s main facilities and deal with 300 targets at the same time from under the water. It is capable of not only antiship, antiaircraft and antisubmarine warfare, but it can carry out a mission for offensive mining.

It is the first female-named warship in the Korean Navy history
It is the first female-named warship in the Korean Navy history

It is evaluated as a world-class diesel submarine equipped with detection sensors, such as sailing radar, periscope, sonar, etc., and a decoy system that avoids enemy torpedoes.

The type 214 design is characterised by the following features:

  • increased underwater endurance and low detection risk using the proven Fuel Cell system for air-independent propulsion;
  • increased diving depth;
  • low revolution, permanently excited PERMASYN motor for maximum speed without transient switching noises;
  • optimised signature management;
  • sonar development within the ISUS 90 for increased low-frequency detection ranges (flank array);
  • large weapon payload for a mix of torpedoes, missiles and mines (8 weapon tubes);
  • integration of Torpedo Countermeasures (TCM) system.

It will be delivered to the Navy in November 2016 and protect the Korean territorial waters after its commission and force integration process.

 

Korean Navy names its latest submarine after female independence fighter

 

Test Fire

The solid rocket booster that will propel NASA’s skyscraper-size Space Launch System (SLS) rocket and its Orion spacecraft on deep space missions in the coming years took a huge step forward in its development on March 11, 2015, unleashing its fury on a barren mountainside at Orbital ATK’s test stand in Promontory, Utah, for the Qualification Motor-1 test fire (QM-1). The colossal 154-foot-long (47-meter-long) booster, the largest of its kind in the world, ignited to verify its performance at the highest end of the booster has accepted propellant temperature range, 90 degrees. That’s the temperature the SLS can expect to encounter on a regular basis at its Florida launch site on Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Launch Complex 39B, and this week NASA and Orbital ATK released initial findings and data from the QM-1 test fire. Detailed inspections of the disassembled booster will take another several months.

Orbital ATK’s SLS solid rocket booster Qualification Motor-1 test fire March 11, 2015 at the company’s test stand in Promontory, Utah (Photo Credit: Mike Killian/AmericaSpace)
Orbital ATK’s SLS solid rocket booster Qualification Motor-1 test fire March 11, 2015 at the company’s test stand in Promontory, Utah (Photo Credit: Mike Killian/AmericaSpace)

«Having analyzed the data from QM-1 for a little more than a month, we can now confirm the test was a resounding success», said Charlie Precourt, Vice President and General Manager of Orbital ATK’s Propulsion Systems Division, and four-time space shuttle astronaut. «These test results, along with the many other milestones being achieved across the program, show SLS is on track to preserve our nation’s leadership in space exploration».

It took only a second for the booster to reach 3.6 million pounds of thrust (equivalent to 22 million horsepower/16,405 MW), burning through 5.5 tons of propellant per second, at 5,000 degrees Fahrenheit, for just over two minutes – exactly as it will when it launches the SLS. More than 500 instrumentation channels were used to help evaluate over 100 defined test objectives, and newly designed avionics hardware and equipment to control the motor helped provide improved test monitoring capability.

According to Mike Killian, AmericaSpace reporter, the test also demonstrated the booster’s ability to meet applicable ballistic performance requirements, such as thrust and pressure. Other objectives included data gathering on vital motor upgrades, such as the new internal motor insulation and liner and an improved nozzle design. «Current data show the nozzle and insulation performed as expected, and ballistics performance parameters met allowable requirements», noted Orbital ATK in their report. «Additionally, the thrust vector control and avionics system provided the required command and control of the motor nozzle position».

The five-segment Solid Rocket Booster has been in development for years, having been initially designed to launch NASA’s Ares rockets for the agency’s cancelled Constellation program. The booster is similar to the four-segment Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs) that helped launch NASA’s now retired space shuttle fleet, but it is even larger and incorporates several upgrades and improvements. Now, after a lengthy investigation and trouble-shooting effort to determine root causes and corrective actions for the existence of small voids previously discovered prior to QM-1 between the propellant and outer casing of the booster’s aft segment, Orbital ATK is back on track with the booster’s development and already constructing the hardware for a second test fire in spring 2016 (QM-2).

A cold-temperature test, at a target of 40 degrees Fahrenheit, the low end of the propellant temperature range, is planned for QM-2 before the hardware testing to support qualification of the boosters for flight will be complete, at which point Orbital ATK will then be ready to proceed toward the first flight of SLS, an uncrewed flight to validate the entire integrated system, currently scheduled to fly on the Exploration Mission-1 (EM-1) in late 2018.

Orbital ATK technicians inspect the SLS Qualification Motor-1 booster after a successful test fire on March 11, 2015 (Photo Credit: Orbital ATK)
Orbital ATK technicians inspect the SLS Qualification Motor-1 booster after a successful test fire on March 11, 2015 (Photo Credit: Orbital ATK)

With QM-1 there have now been four fully developed, five-segment SRBs fired up on Orbital ATK’s Promontory, Utah, T-97 test stand since 2009, with the most recent prior to QM-1 having been conducted in 2011, and all performed fine. The first three tests, known as the Development Motor test series (DM-1, DM-2, and DM-3), helped engineers measure the new SRB’s performance at low temperature, verify design requirements of new materials in the motor joints, and gather performance data about upgrades made to the booster since the space shuttle program.

The five-segment SLS boosters will burn for the same amount of time as the old shuttle boosters – two minutes – but they will provide 20 percent more power, while also providing more than 75 percent of the thrust needed for the rocket to escape the gravitational pull of the Earth.

«Ground tests are very important – we strongly believe in testing before flight to ensure lessons-learned occur on the ground and not during a mission», added Precourt. «With each test we have learned things that enable us to modify the configuration to best meet the needs for the upcoming first flight».

Although the boosters themselves will provide 75 percent of the power needed to break Earth’s hold, the SLS will still employ four engines of its own – former (upgraded) liquid-fueled space shuttle RS-25 engines – which are currently at NASA’s Stennis Space Center preparing for their own series of tests, the first of which occurred earlier this year. A second RS-25 test fire is currently scheduled for May or June this year.

The SLS program also kicked off its Critical Design Review (CDR) this week at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, which demonstrates that the SLS design meets all system requirements with acceptable risk, and accomplishes that within cost and schedule constraints. The CDR proves that the rocket should continue with full-scale production, assembly, integration, and testing, and that the program is ready to begin the next major review covering design certification. The SLS CDR is expected to be completed by late July.

 

Turkish LPD

On 7th May, during IDEF 2015, the Defence exhibition in Istanbul, the Turkish shipyard SEDEF has signed a contract with the SSM for the design and construction of one Landing Platform Dock (LPD, also called Amphibious Transport Dock) ship for the Turkish Navy. Navantia participates in this contract as a technological partner.

This ship is the biggest warship ever built in Spain and is named after H.R.M. King Juan Carlos I
This ship is the biggest warship ever built in Spain and is named after H.R.M. King Juan Carlos I

Navantia will provide the design, transfer of technology, equipments and technical assistance to SEDEF for local construction. The design, based on the Landing Helicopter Dock (LHD) Juan Carlos I for the Spanish Navy, is adapted to the Turkish Navy requirements, having the advantage of being a tested ship with excellent performance since commissioning. Navantia will also provide several components and systems, as the engines and the IPMS (Integrated Platform Management System).

The selection of the design was announced on 27th December 2013 and the commissioning of the ship is scheduled for 2021.

Navantia has also a contract for two similar ships in Australia, the HMAS Canberra (L02), already commissioned and the HMAS Adelaide (L01), to be commissioned in the last quarter of 2015. Last, this contract means the entrance of Navantia in the Turkish market, where has opened an office in 2013 and is also involved in the anti-air frigates program, as well as the consolidation of Navantia as a reference in the LHD market.

 

Juan Carlos I (L61)

The Juan Carlos I is a single hull ship made of steel with the superstructure on the starboard side. Her design is based on a combination of military and commercial standards and specifications; the structure, equipment and materials follow Lloyd’s Register of Shipping’s civil standards, whilst her combat system, ordnance handling and stowage systems, systems of supply at sea, flight deck and the damage control system follow military standards.

Garage for heavy loads, with 1,410 square meters and a capacity to house 29 Leopard or similar battle tanks, AAV amphibious vehicles and practically any type of caterpillar track vehicle, as well as 16 tonne TEU cargo containers.  Its length is 90 metres, with a width of 16 metres
Garage for heavy loads, with 1,410 square meters and a capacity to house 29 Leopard or similar battle tanks, AAV amphibious vehicles and practically any type of caterpillar track vehicle, as well as 16 tonne TEU cargo containers. Its length is 90 metres, with a width of 16 metres

 

Characteristics

Length overall 231 m/758 feet
Maximum beam 32 m/105 feet
Draught at full load 7.1 m/23.3 feet
Height 58 m/190 feet
Flight deck height over water level 20 m/65.6 feet
Maximum displacement 26,000 tonnes
Maximum displacement in Amphibious Operation 30,000 tonnes
Maximum speed 21 knots/24 mph/39 km/h
Range at 15 knots/17 mph/28 km/h 9,000 NM/10,357 miles/16,668 km
Capacity 1,435 personnel
Crew 254
Embarked or transport forces 883
Chiefs of Staff 103
Embarked Air Wing Unit 172
Naval Beach Group 23

 

New Generation

According to Nicholas de Larrinaga, Jane’s Defence Weekly reporter, Turkish armoured vehicle manufacturer FNSS displayed its Kaplan-20 Infantry Fighting Vehicle (IFV) for the first time on 5 May at the IDEF 2015 defence exhibition in Istanbul (Turkey). The Kaplan-20 NGAFV (New Generation Armoured Fighting Vehicle), weighing in at 20 tonnes, is the latest member of the Kaplan family, following on from the 10-tonne Kaplan reconnaissance vehicle, which was unveiled at IDEF 2013.

The vehicle architecture contains protection systems against mines, rocket propelled grenades and kinetic energy threats
The vehicle architecture contains protection systems against mines, rocket propelled grenades and kinetic energy threats

The Kaplan-20 IFV at IDEF this year is a working prototype, company officials told IHS Jane’s, and is planned to begin trials in later in 2015. Although not created for a current Turkish military requirement, the country is expected to launch a programme for a replacement IFV within the next few years.

The Kaplan-20 IFV has a low silhouette, and with its twin 6 road wheeled tracks, has the ability operate in hot/cold weather conditions at high speed not only on asphalt and stabilized highways, but also in soft soil, muddy and rough terrains. The advanced suspension system, tracks has been designed to reduce vibration and increase road holding. Access to the vehicle is gained through a personnel door on the ramp or the hydraulic ramp located at the rear of the vehicle. On the top, there is a wide hatch for personnel and another hatch that has been specifically designed to maximize the driver’s field of view. The maintenance and repair of the power pack are performed via the cabin access hatch and hatches that are at the front of the vehicle. The two fuel tanks are located at the rear for balance and are fully-armored and isolated from the vehicle to ensure the security of personnel.

The Kaplan-20 is available with two turret options, with both a two-person and an unmanned version of the FNSS Teber turret being offered. Either can be fitted with a 30-40 mm automatic cannon, with the IDEF display vehicle being equipped with an unmanned turret armed with a an ATK Bushmaster Mk-44 30-mm dual-feed cannon. Both turret configurations are armed with a 7.62-mm coaxial chain gun.

In addition up to date electronic subsystems are also integrated together with high performance power pack, heavy duty suspension and tracks which enables the vehicle to carry heavy loads such as 105-mm gun systems
In addition up to date electronic subsystems are also integrated together with high performance power pack, heavy duty suspension and tracks which enables the vehicle to carry heavy loads such as 105-mm gun systems

Company officials told IHS Jane’s that the vehicle has been designed to offer a low visual and thermal signature. They added that it has an internal volume 40% larger than vehicles in the same weight class, such as the ACV. When fitted with an unmanned turret the Kaplan-20 carries a crew of three and can take eight dismounts – which drops to six when fitted with a manned turret. Situational awareness is provided across 360° through day and night cameras. It is also fitted with a range of features such as an acoustic shot detection system and an Auxiliary Power Unit (APU).

FNSS officials told IHS Jane’s that the Kaplan-20 is entirely indigenously designed, although the vehicle’s running gear, powerpack, electronic systems, and armour have been bought in from foreign suppliers. The Kaplan-20 features rubber band tracks (from Germany’s Diehl), which FNSS company representatives said reduced both noise and vibration, improving crew comfort and extending the service life of onboard equipment.

The IFV has been designed to keep pace with Turkey’s new Altay Main Battle Tank (MBT), and offers a maximum cross-country speed of 43 mph/70 km/h. FNSS intends the Kaplan-20 to offer 25 hp per tonne, although an engine supplier has yet to be chosen for the vehicle, which was displayed without an engine installed. As well, Kaplan-20 has an amphibious capability, with two water jets mounted at the rear.

There are also laser-protected glass periscopes that allows the driver to see outside with wide angle of view which provides, high situational awareness. Integrated night vision systems is standard in all variants
There are also laser-protected glass periscopes that allows the driver to see outside with wide angle of view which provides, high situational awareness. Integrated night vision systems is standard in all variants

Technical Specifications

GENERAL
Power to Weight Ratio 25 hp/ton
Engine Diesel
Transmission Fully Automatic
Crew 3+6, 3+8 (Including Gunner, Driver and Commander)
Length 6.5 m/21.3 feet
Width 3.15 m/10.3 feet (Without Active Protection)
Height Overall 2 m/6.5 feet
Electrical System 24 V
Suspension Torsion Bar
Steering System Through Transmission
MOBILITY
Maximum Road Speed 43 mph/70 km/h
Swimming Amphibiously
Range 404+ miles/650+ km
Gradient 60 %
Side Slope 40 %
Trench Crossing 2.6 m/8.5 feet
Obstacle Climbing 0.70 m/2.3 feet
ARMAMENT
Main Armament RCT (Remote Controlled Turret), 30-mm Automatic Cannon
Coaxial Armament 7.62 mm Machine Gun
PROTECTION SYSTEM
CBRN (Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear) Protection System
CBRN Detection System
A/C
Automatic Fire Extinguishing System
Reduced Thermal Signature
Blast and Leakage Protected Fuel Cells
Advanced Modular Armor Protection
Active Protection System
Mine Blast Protected Seats
Smoke Grenade Dischargers
MISSION EQUIPMENT
360° Degrees Situational Awareness
See Throe Armor System
Wireless Crew Intercom System
Navigation System
Auxiliary Power Unit (APU)
Daylight-Responsive Interior Lighting Controls
Drivers Thermal Sights
Sniper Detection System

 

The New Generation Tracked Armoured Fighting Vehicle

Danish piranha

General Dynamics European Land Systems S.L. (GDELS), through its Switzerland-based subsidiary GDELS-Mowag, has been notified by the Ministry of Defense of Denmark that the PIRANHA 5 Armoured Infantry Fighting Vehicle (IFV) has been selected as the new Armoured Personnel Carrier (APC) for the Danish Armed Forces. The contract from the Danish Ministry of Defense will include the acquisition of a minimum of 206 new armoured personnel carriers, with the exact number to be determined at a later date.

Denmark will purchase a minimum of 206 PIRANHA 5s, with the number potentially rising to 450
Denmark will purchase a minimum of 206 PIRANHA 5s, with the number potentially rising to 450

«General Dynamics European Land Systems is very proud to have been selected to supply its PIRANHA 5 to the Danish Armed Forces as it underlines the confidence and satisfaction of our Danish customer», said Alfonso Ramonet, president of General Dynamics European Land Systems. «General Dynamics European Land Systems looks forward to a close and cooperative relationship with the Danish Ministry of Defense in their selection of a new generation of armored vehicles».

«We are confident that this program and the PIRANHA 5 in particular will guarantee the best protection for the Danish troops and provide the best value for the Danish industrial base. We will work with the Danish Ministry of Defense, our local industry partner Falck Schmidt Defense Systems and other Danish industry to provide the best solution and to meet our customer’s requirements on turn-around time, on-time delivery, cost-effective support and best value», said Alfonso Ramonet.

General Dynamics European Land Systems, headquartered in Madrid, Spain, is a business unit of General Dynamics, and conducts its business through five European operating sites located in Spain, Switzerland, Germany, Austria and Czech Republic.

In Royal Danish Army service the PIRANHA 5 will replace the M113 series of tracked APCs
In Royal Danish Army service the PIRANHA 5 will replace the M113 series of tracked APCs

 

PIRANHA 5

Highly mobile, armored multi-role wheeled vehicle with a high payload and a large internal volume. The PIRANHA 5 provides protection against current threats. Its integrated modular and adaptable survivability system can also be tailored to protect against future threats.

The economic Fuel Efficient Drivetrain System (FEDS) and the high performance diesel engine provide the expected power and cruising range. There is still growth potential in the area of hybrid power boost technology.

The semi-active hydro-pneumatic suspension system with height management allows the highest mobility and provides excellent ride comfort for the crew. The open vehicle architecture with health/usage monitoring system allows for rapid system integration, data exchange between onboard systems and future growth.

The wheeled PIRANHA 5 is technologically one of the most advanced armoured wheeled vehicles, built on international battlefield experience. The inherent growth potential and power reserves will provide the Danish Armed Forces the ability to upgrade the vehicle over the lifetime in accordance with new evolving requirements in the future. It builds on the heritage of the PIRANHA vehicle family already in service with the Danish Armed Forces, which has been proven in international operations.

For the Danish requirement the PIRANHA 5 had competed in trials against one other 8x8, the Nexter Systems Véhicule Blindé de Combat d'Infanterie, and three tracked offerings: the FFG Flensburger Protected Mission Module Carrier G5, BAE Systems Armadillo and General Dynamics European Land Systems – Santa Barbara Sistemas ASCOD 2
For the Danish requirement the PIRANHA 5 had competed in trials against one other 8×8, the Nexter Systems Véhicule Blindé de Combat d’Infanterie, and three tracked offerings: the FFG Flensburger Protected Mission Module Carrier G5, BAE Systems Armadillo and General Dynamics European Land Systems – Santa Barbara Sistemas ASCOD 2

Product Features

WEIGHTS (approximately)
Empty weight 17.0 t/37,478.6 lbs
Payload 13.0 t/28,660.1 lbs
Gross Vehicle Weight (GVW) 30.0 t/66,138.7 lbs
DIMENSIONS (approximately)
Overall length 8.00 m/26.2467 feet
Height over hull 2.34 m/7.67717 feet
Overall width 2.99 m/9.80971 feet
Angle of approach 45°
Angle of departure 35°
Number of seats up to 13
PERFORMANCES WITH GVW
Maximum speed on roads 62 mph/100 km/h
Creep speed 1.8 mph/3 km/h
Gradient 60 %
Maximum side slope 40 %
Maximum step climbing 0.75 m/2.46063 feet
Fording depth 1.50 m/4.92126 feet
Trench crossing capability 2.00 m/6.56168 feet
Turning circle (curb-to-curb) 15.0 m/49.2126 feet
Range on roads (mix of road/off-road driving) 550 km/342 miles
Operating voltage 28 V DC
Power-to-weight ratio 14.3 kW/t (19.3 hp/t)
ENGINE
Type MTU
Fuel Diesel
Performance 430 kW/580 hp
Torque 2000 Nm
TRANSMISSION
Type ZF-Ecomat
Mode of operation Automatic
Number of gears 7+1 r.
DRIVELINE AND SUSPENSION
Axles All wheel drive
Fuel Efficient Drive train System (FEDS)
Wheels and tires 14.00/R 20 or 16.00/R 20 with Central Tire Inflation System (CTIS), run-flat inserts
Suspension system Height-adjustable, semi-active, hydropneumatic suspension system, independent on all wheel stations
Shock absorbers Hydraulic, integrated in the hydro elements
Brakes system Pneumatic double-circuit brake with 6-channel ABS (Anti-lock Brake System)
AMPHIBIOUS KIT (OPTION)
Seawater cooling system
Closable louvres of engine grills
Water propulsion 2 propellers
Steering control 2 twin rudders
Trim van and snorkel system
PROTECTION
Modular integrated protection layout
Baseline vehicle is designed for the highest level of protection against mine and Improvised Explosive Device (IED) threats
Latest shielding technology against Explosively Formed Penetrator (EFP) threats
Add on armour for different protection levels with coverage >95%
Provision for the Active Protection System (APS)
ARMAMENT (EXAMPLE)
Remotely controlled light weapon stations up to heavy turret/gun systems
EQUIPMENT
Nuclear, Biological, Chemical (NBC) overpressure system
Fire-suppression system for the crew compartment
A/C system
Arctic kit
Integrated starter generator for 100 kW external power
Modular electronics architecture (VECTRONICS, MILCAN, HUMS),upgradeable according to customer requirements
BUILT-IN GROWTH POTENTIAL
Gross Vehicle Weight rating 33.0 t/72,752.5 lbs
Hybrid boost power +100 kW
Latest protection kit
Electronic architecture
Lethality
According to the MoD, the selection of the PIRANHA 5 was made «after thorough examination and evaluation of suppliers' offers and testing of the vehicles»
According to the MoD, the selection of the PIRANHA 5 was made «after thorough examination and evaluation of suppliers’ offers and testing of the vehicles»

Christening of Brunswick

The Navy christened the future joint high-speed vessel USNS Brunswick (JHSV-6) on May 9, 2015, during a 10 a.m. CDT ceremony in Mobile, Alabama. Secretary of the U.S. Navy Ray Mabus delivered the ceremony’s principal address. Alma B. «Lee» Booterbaugh served as the ship’s sponsor.

More than 300 naval guests, civic leaders, community members and Austal employees attended Saturday's ceremony, which was held beneath the hull of the Brunswick at Austal's shipyard
More than 300 naval guests, civic leaders, community members and Austal employees attended Saturday’s ceremony, which was held beneath the hull of the Brunswick at Austal’s shipyard

«We are celebrating the christening of the future USNS Brunswick – a modern marvel – just like the incredible shipyard that built it», said Mabus. «More than 4,000 American craftsmen have made this ship possible and the partnership they have with our uniformed men and women, our Navy civilians, the shipbuilding industry as a whole, and the American people, is one of the great strengths of our system. Throughout its life, as it serves around the world, this ship will represent the American spirit of hard work and patriotism the people of Brunswick exude».

Named for a seaport city located on the southeast coast of Georgia, Brunswick is the fourth ship to bear the name. The first was a lightship that served in the U.S. Navy during World War I. The second Brunswick was a patrol frigate that escorted convoys across the Atlantic during World War II. The third ship to bear the name was a salvage and rescue tug that served the U.S. Navy from 1972 to 1996.

Three JHSVs and seven Littoral Combat Ships (LCS) are currently under construction in Austal’s Mobile, Alabama shipyard. The company is scheduled to launch JHSV-6 before the end of the month, while the future USS Jackson (LCS-6) prepares for its acceptance sea trials later this summer
Three JHSVs and seven Littoral Combat Ships (LCS) are currently under construction in Austal’s Mobile, Alabama shipyard. The company is scheduled to launch JHSV-6 before the end of the month, while the future USS Jackson (LCS-6) prepares for its acceptance sea trials later this summer

The 103 m/338 foot-long aluminum catamaran is under construction at the Austal USA shipyard in Mobile, Alabama. Joint High Speed Vessels (JHSVs) are ideal for fast, intra-theater transportation of troops, military vehicles, supplies and equipment. These ships are capable of transporting 600 short tons 1,200 nautical miles/2,222 km at an average speed of 35 knots/40 mph/65 km/h with berthing space for up to 104 personnel and airline-style seating for up to 312.

JHSVs have a 20,000 square foot/1,863 m2 open mission deck and a flight deck to support day and night launch and recovery operations, providing U.S. forces added mobility and flexibility. They can operate in a variety of roles to include supporting overseas contingency operations, conducting humanitarian assistance and disaster relief, supporting special operations forces and supporting emerging joint sea-basing concepts.

Upon delivery to the U.S. Navy’s Military Sealift Command (MSC), Brunswick (JHSV-6) will be designated as a United States Naval Ship (USNS), and will have a core crew of 22 civilian mariners with military mission personnel embarking as necessary.

Provide rapid transport of military equipment and personnel in theater
Provide rapid transport of military equipment and personnel in theater

 

Specifications

Principal dimensions

Material:                                    Hull and superstructure – aluminium alloy

Length overall:                       103 m/337.9 feet

Beam overall:                          28.5 m/93.5 feet

Hull draft (maximum):        3.83 m/12.57 feet

Mission bay

Area (with tie-downs):       1,863 m2/20,053 feet2

Clear Height:                            4.75 m/15.6 feet

Turning diameter:                 26.2 m/86.0 feet

ISO TEU Stations:                  6 Interface Panels

Accommodations

Crew:                                            41

Single SR:                             2

Double SR:                          6

Quad SR:                              7

Troop Seats:                          312

Troop Berths

Permanent:                 104

Temporary:                   46

Galley and Messing:          48

The JHSV program is procuring 10 high-speed transport vessels for the US Army and the US Navy
The JHSV program is procuring 10 high-speed transport vessels for the US Army and the US Navy

Propulsion

Main Engines:    4 × MTU 20V8000 M71L Diesel Engines 4 × 9.1 MW

Gear boxes:         4 × ZF 60000NR2H Reduction Gears

Waterjets:            4 × Wartsila WLD 1400 SR

Performance

Speed

Average:                     35 knots/40 mph/65 km/h @ 90% MCR with 635 mt (700 st) payload

Maximum:                 43 knots/50 mph/80 km/h without payload

Range

Maximum Transit:      1,200 NM/2,222 km

Self-Deployment:        5,600 NM/10,371 km

Survival Through:                 SS-7

Aviation facilities

NAVAIR Level 1 Class 2 Certified Flight Deck for one helicopter

Centreline parking area for one helicopter

NAVAIR Level 1 class 4 Type 2 Certified VERTREP

Helicopter Control Station

Auxiliary systems

Active Ride Control

Transcom Interceptors

Foils: 3.24 m2/34.9 feet2 each, forward on inboard sides of demi-hulls

Vehicle Ramp

Articulated Slewing Stern Ramp

Straight aft to 45 Starboard

Telescoping Boom Crane

12.3 mt @ 15 m, 18.2 mt @ 10 m/13.6 Lt @ 49.2 feet, 20.1 Lt @ 32.8 feet

The JHSV includes a flight deck for helicopter operations and an off-load ramp that allows vehicles to quickly drive off the ship
The JHSV includes a flight deck for helicopter operations and an off-load ramp that allows vehicles to quickly drive off the ship

 

Ships

USNS Spearhead (JHSV-1), Delivered

USNS Choctaw County (JHSV-2), Delivered

USNS Millinocket (JHSV-3), Delivered

USNS Fall River (JHSV-4), Delivered

USNS Trenton (JHSV-5), Delivered

Brunswick (JHSV-6), under construction

Carson City (JHSV-7), under construction

Yuma (JHSV-8), under construction

Bismark (JHSV-9), under construction

Burlington (JHSV-10), under construction

The ships can operate in shallow-draft ports and waterways, interface with roll-on/roll-off discharge facilities, and on/off-load a combat-loaded Abrams Main Battle Tank (M1A2)
The ships can operate in shallow-draft ports and waterways, interface with roll-on/roll-off discharge facilities, and on/off-load a combat-loaded Abrams Main Battle Tank (M1A2)

 

 

 

Norwegian Supacat

The UK high mobility vehicle specialist, Supacat, has signed a £23 million (US $34.8 million) contract with The Norwegian Defence Logistic Organisation (NDLO) to supply a new fleet of High Mobility Vehicles. Supacat is supplying the HMT Extenda vehicle, the most capable vehicle in its class with the highest levels of mobility, protection, payload and firepower.

The open vehicle is typically used for scout, patrol and special forces-type roles
The open vehicle is typically used for scout, patrol and special forces-type roles

Under the contract, the NDLO has an option for a follow-on order that would double the fleet. The award includes the provision of a comprehensive through life support package. The first «pre-series» vehicle will be delivered in late 2016 followed by full fleet delivery from 2017 to 2019. Supacat will build the rolling chassis at its Devon based facility and it is planned that final fit and integration is completed in Norway.

«Securing Norway’s High Mobility Vehicle contract is a prestigious win for Supacat. It reinforces our world lead in this niche corner of the defence industry and underlines HMT Extenda’s position as the vehicle of choice for the modern fighting forces», said Nick Ames, Managing Director, Supacat Group Ltd.

Used by special operations forces, the Extenda order for Norway comes just over eight months after Australia signed up a AUS $105 million (US $82.8 million) deal with Supacat for delivery of 89 of the high-mobility machines
Used by special operations forces, the Extenda order for Norway comes just over eight months after Australia signed up a AUS $105 million (US $82.8 million) deal with Supacat for delivery of 89 of the high-mobility machines

The NDLO will acquire the latest version of the HMT Extenda with modifications to meet Norwegian requirements.

The HMT Extenda is unique as it is convertible to a 4×4 or a 6×6 configuration by inserting or removing a self-contained third axle unit to meet different operational requirements. Like other HMT series platforms, such as «Jackal», the HMT Extenda can be supplied with optional mine blast and ballistic protection kits and with a variety of mission hampers, weapons, communications, ISTAR (Intelligence, Surveillance, Target Acquisition, and Reconnaissance) and force protection equipment to suit a wide range of operational roles.

Designed by Supacat, the HMT product is manufactured under licence from Lockheed Martin
Designed by Supacat, the HMT product is manufactured under licence from Lockheed Martin

 

Specification

Model 4×4 6×6
Gross Vehicle Weight (GVW) 7,600 kg/16,755.1 lbs 10,500 kg/23,148.5 lbs
Payload 2,100 kg/4,629.71 lbs 3,900 kg/8598.03 lbs
Kerb weight (with fuel and armour) 5,500 kg/12,125.4 lbs 6,600 kg/14,550.5 lbs
Turning circle (kerb to kerb) 13.5 m/44.29 feet 17.5 m/57.41 feet
Speed

120 km/h/75 mph

Fuel capacity

200 Litres/52.83 US gal

Maximum road range 700 km/435 miles 800 km/497 miles
Fording

1,000 mm/39.37 inch

Gradient

60%

Side slope

35°

Engine

Cummins 6.7 L, 6 cylinder Diesel, 180 hp, 700 Nm torque

Transmission

5 speed automatic

Drive

2WD/4WD, High low range

Brakes

Air over hydraulic system ABS

Differentials

Limited slip

Steering

Power assisted

Tyres

335/80 R20

Electrical system

24V DC

Suspension

Independent with air adjustable ride height

Options

Runflat tyres, locking differentials, self-recovery winch, weapon mounts, remote weapons station, smoke grenade launchers, IR lights, Right Hand Drive (RHD) or Left Hand Drive (LHD)

 

Instructors from the Specialist Training Division are pictured training members of 1st Queens Dragoon Guards to operate the Extenda vehicle during an intensive eight-day course. The course is run at the Driffield Training area in North Yorkshire, which is part of the Defence School of Transport based at Leconfield. The Extenda is the six-wheeled variant of the Jackal vehicle with a load carrying capability at the rear of the vehicle and amongst other duties is used in Afghanistan for re-supply to areas, which are difficult for other vehicles to access