Gen III Helmet

Senator Joni Ernst, Lockheed Martin and Rockwell Collins executives commemorated the delivery of the first Gen III F-35 Helmet Mounted Display System (HMDS) on August 11. In addition to the HMDS, the Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II demonstrator was on site at the Cedar Rapids headquarters of Rockwell Collins for Senator Ernst to get a first-hand experience of «flying» the military’s most advanced fighter jet following the delivery ceremony.

The F-35 Gen III HMDS offers a fully integrated day and night solution through advanced, next-generation features
The F-35 Gen III HMDS offers a fully integrated day and night solution through advanced, next-generation features

Rockwell Collins, through its joint venture, Rockwell Collins ESA Vision Systems LLC, is providing the most advanced technology for warfighters with the F-35 HMDS, which provides pilots with unprecedented levels of situational awareness and allows them to «look through» the airframe.

«Today’s visit was an opportunity to place focus on Rockwell Collins, as manufacturing makes up such an important part of our economy here in Iowa», said Senator Ernst. «Having served in the military for over 20 years, I appreciate the company’s efforts in support of our national defense, our armed forces and our veterans».

«We’re pleased to be able to demonstrate the advanced capabilities of the F-35 Lightning II at Rockwell Collins today to Senator Ernst and members of the Cedar Rapids community», said Steve Callaghan, director, F-35 Lightning II Program, Lockheed Martin Washington Operations. «The employees at Rockwell Collins are contributing to the F-35s flying today, and we’re pleased to have the opportunity to showcase the superior performance capabilities of this aircraft with them».

The Gen III helmet, which includes an improved night vision camera, improved liquid-crystal displays, automated alignment and software improvements is to be introduced to the fleet in Low Rate Initial Production (LRIP) Lot 7 in 2016. Rockwell Collins ESA Vision Systems LLC also developed the Gen 2 helmet that F-35 pilots currently use, which met the needs for the U.S. Marine Corps and will allow the service to declare Initial Operational Capability (IOC).

All the information that pilots need to complete their missions – through all weather, day or night – is projected on the helmet’s visor. Additionally, the F-35’s Distributed Aperture System (DAS), made by Northrop Grumman, streams real-time imagery from six infrared cameras mounted around the aircraft to the helmet, allowing pilots to «look through» the airframe.

Overall, Rockwell Collins has built and fit more than 200 helmets for F-35 pilots who are being trained for the program.

For night missions, the HMDS projects the night vision scene directly onto the visor, eliminating the need for separate night-vision goggles
For night missions, the HMDS projects the night vision scene directly onto the visor, eliminating the need for separate night-vision goggles

 

Helmet Mounted Display System

Pilots flying missions in the F-35 Lightning II and other multi-role tactical aircraft now can have unmatched visual capability. The F-35 Gen III Helmet Mounted Display System provides a next-generation user interface that integrates the F-35 pilot more tightly than ever into the aircraft’s avionics, with more than 10,000 flight hours of operational use.

The system gives F-35 pilots unsurpassed situational awareness by displaying critical flight information and sensor video throughout the entire mission. The HMDS serves as the virtual head-up display, enabling the F-35 to become the first tactical fighter in 50 years without a traditional head-up display.

By fully integrating three advanced technologies – head-up display, helmet-mounted display and visor-projected night vision – the F-35 Gen III HMDS provides revolutionary capability to the fighter cockpit.

F-35 Gen III Helmet Mounted Display System
F-35 Gen III Helmet Mounted Display System

 

Key benefits

  • Provides enhanced situational awareness
  • Integrated, virtual head-up display on the helmet visor for critical flight and mission information with a smooth transition to HMD symbology
  • Night vision capability built into the helmet
  • Lightweight helmet with optimal center of gravity for maximum comfort and reduced pilot fatigue
  • Provides weapons targeting by looking at and designating targets, and target verification when receiving steering cues from onboard sensors or via datalink
The F-35 Gen III HMDS is provided by Rockwell Collins ESA Vision Systems, LLC, a joint venture between Elbit Systems Ltd. of Israel, through its U.S. subsidiary Elbit Systems of America, of Fort Worth, Texas, and Rockwell Collins
The F-35 Gen III HMDS is provided by Rockwell Collins ESA Vision Systems, LLC, a joint venture between Elbit Systems Ltd. of Israel, through its U.S. subsidiary Elbit Systems of America, of Fort Worth, Texas, and Rockwell Collins

 

Key features

  • Binocular, 30-by-40-degree wide-field-of-view with 100 percent overlap
  • Virtual head-up display
  • Look-through-aircraft capability via Distributed Aperture System imagery
  • High accuracy tracking with auto-boresighting
  • Active Noise Reduction (ANR)
  • Digital night vision sensor
  • Ejection capability to 550 KEAS
  • Lightweight and well-balanced helmet
  • Custom helmet liner for precise fit and comfort
  • Multiple Interpupillary Distance (IPD) settings
  • Video recording
  • Picture in picture
  • Compatible with eyeglasses and Laser Eye Protection (LEP) devices
F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)

Sniper Pod

Lockheed Martin received a direct commercial sale contract through Mitsubishi Heavy Industries to integrate the Sniper Advanced Targeting Pod (ATP) onto the Japan Air Self-Defense Force’s (JASDF) F-2 aircraft.

Sniper Advanced Targeting Pod (Photo by Lockheed Martin)
Sniper Advanced Targeting Pod (Photo by Lockheed Martin)

This initial contract, awarded in 2014, includes a Sniper pod, spares and support equipment for integration. The F-2 is the eighth aircraft platform to be equipped with Sniper ATP, joining variants of the F-15, F-16, F-18, A-10, B-1, B-52 and Harrier.

«Sniper ATP’s proven performance and low life cycle cost will provide necessary support to the JASDF mission», said Marc Nazon, Sniper international program manager at Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control. «Integrating Sniper ATP on the F-2 aircraft also enables increased collaboration in U.S. Air Force and JASDF joint combat operations».

Lockheed Martin will work with Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, the prime aircraft manufacturer, to complete Sniper ATP integration on the F-2. Follow-on contracts are expected to include additional pods, spares, logistics and support equipment for the F-2 fleet.

Sniper ATP offers pilots high-resolution imagery for precision targeting and non-traditional Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) missions. Sniper ATP detects, identifies, automatically tracks and laser designates small tactical targets at long ranges and supports employment of all laser- and GPS-guided weapons against multiple fixed and moving targets.

Sniper, pictured here on a CF-18, has been selected by 16 international air forces (Photo Courtesy of the U.S. Air Force)
Sniper, pictured here on a CF-18, has been selected by 16 international air forces (Photo Courtesy of the U.S. Air Force)

 

Features

  • 1K high-definition, mid-wave targeting forward-looking infrared
  • 1K high-definition television
  • Solid-state digital data recorder enabling cockpit playback and nontraditional Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance
  • Precision long-range geo-coordinate generation
  • Laser lead guidance supporting precise delivery of traditional laser-guided weapons on moving targets
  • Passive detection, tracking and ranging for air-to-air and air-to-ground targets
  • Two-way datalink with full-motion video and meta data
  • Combat-proven moving target tracker algorithms enabling automatic reacquisition up to 10 seconds of obscuration
  • Diode-pumped laser with cockpit selectable tactical and eye-safe wavelengths
  • Laser spot tracker for acquiring laser designations for air and ground sources
  • Laser marker illumination for night vision goggles and target coordination
  • User-selectable collateral damage circle display to estimate weapon damage area
  • Two-level maintenance with automatic optical boresight alignment
  • Optimized line replaceable unit partition enabling two-level maintenance, streamlined sustainment and minimal life cycle costs
  • Global Scope advanced sensor software suite for video and metadata playback, advanced scene visualization and point of interest planning
Sniper’s superior range and rock-steady stabilization enables pilots to complete missions safely with unequaled accuracy (Photo by Lockheed Martin)
Sniper’s superior range and rock-steady stabilization enables pilots to complete missions safely with unequaled accuracy (Photo by Lockheed Martin)

 

Specifications

Field of Regard
Pitch +5 deg; -155 deg
Roll Continuous
Diameter 11.9 inch/30.5 cm
Length 98.2 inch/2.52 m
Pod Only Weight 446 lbs/202 kg
Mean Time Between Failures (MTBF) >600 hrs
Sniper’s system capability is increasing and rapidly expanding to other U.S. Air Force and international aircraft (Photo Courtesy of the U.S. Air Force by Senior Airman Julius Delos Reyes)
Sniper’s system capability is increasing and rapidly expanding to other U.S. Air Force and international aircraft (Photo Courtesy of the U.S. Air Force by Senior Airman Julius Delos Reyes)

 

The Sniper Advanced Targeting Pod is the targeting system of record for the U.S. Air Force

 

Modular Radio

The U.S. Navy has ordered 56 AN/USC-61(C) Digital Modular Radios (DMRs) and related equipment from General Dynamics. The newly built DMR radios will be capable of using the Mobile User Objective System (MUOS) waveform, the digital dial tone needed to make voice calls to the U.S. Department of Defense’s next generation, narrowband MUOS satellite communications system. The four-channel radios form the foundation of the Navy’s network communications aboard submarines, surface ships and on-shore locations. This order, valued at over $29 million, exercises option five on a contract awarded to General Dynamics in 2010.

Built using open architecture standards, General Dynamics’ Digital Modular Radios continue to provide improved functionality and interoperability while setting the stage to incorporate next-generation communications, including forthcoming waveforms and advanced network connectivity
Built using open architecture standards, General Dynamics’ Digital Modular Radios continue to provide improved functionality and interoperability while setting the stage to incorporate next-generation communications, including forthcoming waveforms and advanced network connectivity

«DMR is an extremely versatile radio and we continue to update its capabilities to ensure that Navy communications networks have the most advanced and secure technologies», said Mike DiBiase, vice president and general manager of C4IRS Technologies for General Dynamics Mission Systems. «MUOS is an excellent example of an advanced capability that will provide smartphone-like connectivity among military personnel working in some of the toughest, most remote environments».

Earlier this year, General Dynamics announced a software upgrade for existing DMRs that turns the radio’s four channels into eight virtual channels. This expanded communications capacity is available when sailors are using high frequency (HF) communication frequencies. As a software upgrade, the added capacity keeps the existing onboard DMR, saving the U.S. Navy the cost of replacing the physical radio or changing the configuration in space-constrained radio rooms.

The software-defined DMRs are one of the only military approved radios to communicate with Ultra-High Frequency SATCOM, Single-Channel Ground and Airborne Radio Systems (SINCGARS), Line of Sight and High Frequency radios on Navy vessels and land locations. General Dynamics has delivered more than 550 DMRs since 1998.

The compact, multi-channel DMR provides multiple waveforms and multi-level information security for voice and data communications from the core of the network to the tactical edge
The compact, multi-channel DMR provides multiple waveforms and multi-level information security for voice and data communications from the core of the network to the tactical edge

 

Benefits

  • Single radio for the entire 2 MHz – 2 GHz band
    • Lower spares cost and inventory
    • Single depot and common logistic
    • Common operations and maintenance training
    • Common manuals
    • Single point of control
    • Low life-cycle costs
  • Dramatically simplified shipboard communications system architecture
    • Embedded Type 1 Encryption
    • Embedded red/black baseband switching and routing
  • Superior co-site performance
  • Reduced manpower requirements
    • Single point of control for entire HF/VHF/UHF/SATCOM system
    • High reliability
    • Built-In Test (BIT)
  • Full logistical support in the U.S. Navy system

 

Technical Specifications Communication

  • Reprogrammable Waveform Capabilities
    • SATCOM – MIL-STD-188-181B, 182A, and 183A
    • SINCGARS SIP/ESIP
    • Havequick I/II
    • HF/UHF Link-11
    • UHF Link-4A
    • MIL-STD-188-110B HF Modem
    • MIL-STD-188-141B HF ALE
    • VHF/UHF LOS
    • AM Civil and Military Aviation (WB/NB)
    • FM Voice and Data (WB/NB)
    • FSK/BPSK/SBPSK/QPSK/CPM
    • Others as Required
  • Reprogrammable Voice and Data Security Options
    • KY-57/58
    • KGV-11
    • KGV-10
    • KG-84A/C
    • KYV-5 (ANDVT)
    • KY-99A
    • KWR-46
    • Others as Required
  • Key Fill Devices
    • DS-101
    • DS-102
  • Configuring, controlling, and operating
    • Single HMI can control up to 128 DMR channels
    • Single DMR can be controlled from up to 15 networked operator stations

 

System Characteristics

Frequency Range 2 MHz – 2 GHz, contiguous
Size 17.5×19.25×22 inch (EIA-310-D Clearance) (44.45×48.90×55.9 cm)
Input Power 100 – 140 VAC, (47 – 63 Hz)
Operating Temperature 0° to 55° C
Vibration MIL-STD-167
Shock M-S-901
EMI MIL-STD-461, and MIL-STD-1399

 

Expanding the Boundaries with the U.S. Navy’s Digital Modular Radio

Japan AEGIS

The U.S. State Department has made a determination approving a possible Foreign Military Sale to Japan for DDG 7 and 8 AEGIS Combat System (ACS), Underwater Weapon System (UWS), Cooperative Engagement Capability (CEC) and associated equipment, parts and logistical support for an estimated cost of $1.5 billion. The Defense Security Cooperation Agency delivered the required certification notifying Congress of this possible sale on August 4, 2015.

A new ship class of Japan DDGs based upon a modified Atago-class hull (Ship Class not yet named)
A new ship class of Japan DDGs based upon a modified Atago-class hull (Ship Class not yet named)

The Government of Japan has requested a possible sale of two (2) ship sets of the Mk-7 AEGIS Weapon System, AN/SQQ-89A(V) 15J UWS and CEC. Additional items include associated equipment, training and support for its Japan Fiscal Year (JFY) 2015 and JFY2016 new construction destroyers (DDGs). The ACS and associated support will be procured over a six (6) to seven (7) year period, as approved by Japan in budgets for JFY2015 and JFY2016. The estimated value of this proposed sale is $1.5 billion.

The ACS/UWS/CEC support ship construction for a new ship class of DDGs based upon a modified Atago-class hull (Ship Class not yet named) and a new propulsion system. The equipment and services to be provided include: two (2) ship sets of installation support material and special purpose test equipment, as well as the systems engineering, technical services, on-site vendor assistance, spare parts, systems training and staging services necessary to support ship construction and delivery. Post-construction Combat System Qualification Testing is expected to be procured in a future Foreign Military Sales (FMS) case.

 

Major Defense Equipment (MDE) includes:

-Two (2) AEGIS Weapon Systems (AWS) Mk-7

-One (1) J7 AWS Computer Program

-Two (2) ship sets Multi-Mission Signal Processor (MMSP)

-Two (2) ship sets AN/Mk-8 Mod 4 AEGIS Common Display System (CDS)

-Two (2) ship sets AN/SPQ-15 Digital Video Distribution System and Common Processor System (CPS)

-Two (2) ship sets AWS Computing Infrastructure Mk-1 Mod 4

-Two (2) ship sets Operational Readiness Test System (ORTS) hosted in AWS computing infrastructure

-Two (2) Mk-99 Mod 8 Fire Control Systems

-Two (2) ship sets AN/SPG-62A Radar, Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) including Mission Planner blade server processors hosted in the CPS

-Two (2) Kill Assessment System/Weapon Data Recording Cabinets (KAS/WDRC)

-Two (2) ship sets Mode 5/S capable Identification Friend or Foe (IFF) System

-Two (2) ship sets Mk-36 Mod 6 Decoy Launching System

-Two (2) ship sets AN/SQQ-89A(V) 15 Underwater Surveillance and Communication System

-Two (2) Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) Navigation systems with OE-553/U antenna

-Two (2) ship sets AN/SSN-6F(V) 4 Navigation Sensor System Interface (NAVSSI)

-Two (2) ship sets WSN-7(V) Inertial Navigation System (INS)

-Two (2) ship sets AN/URC-141(V) 3(C) Multifunctional Information Distribution System (MIDS) Radio Set

-Two (2) ship sets AN/UYQ-86(V) 6 Common Data Link Management System (CDLMS)

-Two (2) ship sets AN/SQQ-89A(V) 15J UWS

-Two (2) ship sets Gigabit Ethernet Data Multiplex System (GEDMS)

-Two (2) ship sets Maintenance Assist Modules (MAMs) cabinets for Fire Control and Combat Systems equipment

-Two (2) ship sets Multi-Function Towed Array (MFTA) and associated OK-410(V)3/SQR handling equipment

-Two (2) ship sets of Vertical Launching System (VLS)

-MK41 components for Direct Commercial Sales (DCS) launcher to support BMD missions employing the Standard Missile-3 (SM-3)

-Two (2) ship sets Launch Control Units (LCU) Mk-235 Mod 9 with Vertical Launching System (VLS) Global Positioning System (GPS) Integrator (VGI)

-VLS launcher components including twenty-four (24) Mk-448 Mod 1 Motor Control Panel

-Four (4) Programmable Power Supplies Mk-179 Mod 0

-Twenty-four (24) Launch Sequencers Mk-5 Mod 1

-Four (4) Fiber Optic Distribution Boxes (FODB)

-Twenty-four (24) Single Module Junction Boxes

-Two (2) ship sets Gun Weapon System Mk-34

-Two (2) ship sets Mk-20 Electro-Optical Sensor System (EOSS)

-Two (2) ship sets of Cooperative Engagement Capability (CEC)

-Two (2) ship sets Global Command and Control System-Maritime (GCCS-M)

-Two (2) ship sets AN/SPQ-9B Radar

-Two (2) ship sets Enhanced AEGIS Combat Systems Trainer (ACTS) with communication suite

-Two (2) ship sets technical documentation

Japan continues to modernize its fleet to support Integrated Air and Missile Defense (IAMD) roles and special mission requirements. The addition of two (2) new AEGIS DDGs will fulfill Japan’s mission goal of acquiring eight (8) ballistic missile defense capable ships and will further enhance interoperability with the U.S. Navy, build upon a longstanding cooperative effort with the United States, and provide enhanced capability with a valued partner in a geographic region of critical importance to Japan and the U.S. Government.

The proposed sale to Japan will represent an important commitment by the U.S. Government in furtherance of foreign policy and national security goals for both the United States and Japan. Japan is one of the major political and economic powers in East Asia and the Western Pacific and a key partner of the United States in ensuring peace and stability in that region. It is vital to the U.S. national interest to assist Japan in developing and maintaining a strong and ready self-defense capability. This proposed sale is consistent with U.S. foreign policy and national security objectives and the 1960 Treaty of Mutual Cooperation and Security.

The addition of two (2) new AEGIS DDGs to Japan’s fleet will afford more flexibility and capability to counter regional threats and continue to enhance stability in the region. Japan currently operates AEGIS ships and is proficient at using evolving ballistic missile defense capability and effective at employing the AN/SQQ-89 UWS for undersea surveillance and detection. Japan has demonstrated the capability and commitment necessary to incorporate CEC into its fleet and will capably assimilate this technology into its operations.

The proposed sale of these combat systems will not alter the basic military balance in the region.

The prime contractors will be Lockheed Martin, with offices based in Moorestown, New Jersey; Syracuse, New York; and Manassas, Virginia per sole source request from Japan as the primary AEGIS System Contractor for JFY 2015 and JFY 2016 DDG Class Ships. Japan has also requested Data Link Solutions, Cedar Rapids, IA be designated as the sole source prime contractor for the Multifunctional Information Distribution System (MIDS) on Ships (MOS) to reduce the cost of sparing and logistics for its AEGIS Ships. There are also a significant number of companies under contract with the U. S. Navy that will provide components and systems as well as engineering services during the execution of this effort.

Japanese industry has requested participation with U.S. industry as sub-contractors under the FMS case on a limited basis to provide selected components and software. Japanese industry sourced items are:

1) TR-343 Equivalent Replacement Sonar Transducers for SQS-53C sonar by NEC;

2) Partial AEGIS Display System application software by MHI;

3) Partial AEGIS Display System Hardware and Common Display System hardware by Fujitsu.

The Japan sourced products will be subject to product qualification, export control or other requirements for use in FMS-provided systems. The U.S. Navy retains the option to use U.S. Navy Programs of Record to source products or services as required to meet program requirements. There are no known offset agreements in connection with this potential sale.

Implementation of this proposed sale will require travel of U.S. Government or contractor representatives to Japan on a temporary basis for program technical support and management oversight.

There will be no adverse impact on U. S. defense readiness as a result of this proposed sale.

This notice of a potential sale is required by law and does not mean the sale has been concluded.

 

Six weeks ahead

Lockheed Martin delivered another C-5M Super Galaxy to the U. S. Air Force on August 5. A Defense Contract Management Agency (DCMA) aircrew ferried the aircraft from the Lockheed Martin facility here to Travis Air Force Base, in Fairfield, California, where it will be permanently based. It will be the 12th Super Galaxy assigned to Travis.

The latest Lockheed Martin C-5M Super Galaxy takes off on its delivery flight on August 5, 2015 (Lockheed Martin photo by Damien Guarnieri)
The latest Lockheed Martin C-5M Super Galaxy takes off on its delivery flight on August 5, 2015 (Lockheed Martin photo by Damien Guarnieri)

The Lockheed Martin aircraft (U. S. Air Force serial number 86-0026) as originally delivered to the U.S. Air Force in June 1988 and has recorded approximately 20,230 flight hours over its career. This C-5M Super Galaxy was delivered more than six weeks ahead of the contract commitment delivery date.

 

C-5M Super Galaxy

The C-5M Super Galaxy aircraft is a game changer to the warfighter and America’s premier global direct delivery weapons system. It is also the Air Force’s only true strategic airlifter. While setting 86 world records in airlift, the C-5M Super Galaxy established new benchmarks in carrying more cargo faster and farther than any other airlifter.

Two M-1 Abrams tanks loaded into the cargo area of the C-5M Super Galaxy (U.S. Air Force photo by Lieutenant Colonel Chad Gibson)
Two M-1 Abrams tanks loaded into the cargo area of the C-5M Super Galaxy (U.S. Air Force photo by Lieutenant Colonel Chad Gibson)

A venerable workhorse, the recognized improvements in performance, efficiency and safety it provides validate the tremendous value to the taxpayer in modernizing proven and viable aircraft. As the only strategic airlifter with the capability of carrying 100 percent of certified air-transportable cargo, the C-5M Super Galaxy can carry twice the cargo of other strategic airlift systems. The C-5M Super Galaxy also has a dedicated passenger compartment, carrying troops and their supplies straight to the theater. It can be loaded from the front and back simultaneously, and vehicles can also be driven directly on or off the Galaxy. This means the C-5M Super Galaxy can be loaded quickly and efficiently.

The C-5M Super Galaxy has been a vital element of strategic airlift in every major contingency and humanitarian relief effort since it entered service. The C-5M Super Galaxy is the only strategic airlifter capable of linking America directly to the warfighter in all theatres of combat with mission capable rates excess of 80 percent. With more than half of its useful structural life remaining, the C-5M Super Galaxy will be a force multiplier through 2040 and beyond.

C-5M Super Galaxy Specifications
C-5M Super Galaxy Specifications

 

General Characteristics

Primary Function Outsize cargo transport
Prime Contractor Lockheed-Georgia Co.
Crew Seven: pilot, co-pilot, 2 flight engineers and 3 loadmasters
Length 247.8 feet/75.53 m
Height 65.1 feet/19.84 m
Wingspan 222.8 feet/67.91 m
Power Plant 4 × General Electric CF6-80C2 turbofans
Thrust 50,580 lbs/22,942.7 kgf/225 kN
Normal cruise speed Mach 0.77/518 mph/834 km/h
Unrefueled Range with 120,000 lbs/54,431 kg 5,250 NM/9,723 km
Maximum Take-Off Weight (2.2 g) 840,000 lbs/381,018 kg
Operating weight 400,000 lbs/181,437 kg
Fuel capacity 332,500 lbs/150,819 kg
Maximum payload (2.0 g) 285,000 lbs/129,274 kg
Cargo Compartment
Length 143.7 feet/43.8 m
Width 19 feet/5.79 m
Height 13.48 feet/4.11 m
Pallet Positions 36
Unit Cost $90 million (fiscal 2009 constant dollars)
Deployed 2009
Inventory
16 C-5Ms have been delivered through December 2013
52 C-5Ms are scheduled to be in the inventory by fiscal 2017
The C-5M flies during its First Flight ceremony at Lockheed Martin’s Marietta, Georgia plant
The C-5M flies during its First Flight ceremony at Lockheed Martin’s Marietta, Georgia plant

 

Current and future C-5M Wings include:

  • 60th Air Mobility Wing, Travis AFB;
  • 349th Air Mobility Wing, Travis AFB;
  • 436th Airlift Wing, Dover AFB;
  • 439th Airlift Wing, Westover AFB;
  • 512th Airlift Wing, Dover AFB.

 

C-5M Strategic Airlift Redefined

 

Type 26

BAE Systems has awarded the first equipment manufacturing contracts for the Type 26 Global Combat Ships (GCSs), worth in excess of £170 million. With the contracts awarded to seven companies in the supply chain, there are now more than 1,250 people across the UK working on the programme to deliver the Royal Navy’s next generation warships.

The first vessel is due to enter service as soon as possible after 2020
The first vessel is due to enter service as soon as possible after 2020

The contracts, awarded from the Demonstration Phase contract funding, cover key equipment such as propulsion, communications and electrical systems for the first three Type 26 ships. The commitment to long lead items keeps the programme on track and means the equipment will be delivered to Glasgow at the point it is needed in the ship’s manufacturing phase, which is expected to begin next year. The contracts include the creation of onshore testing facilities to test the equipment prior to installation on the ships. The contracts are awarded to:

  • Babcock for the ship’s air weapons handling system;
  • David Brown Gear Systems Ltd for the propulsion gearbox and the test facility;
  • General Electric (GE) Power Conversion for the electric propulsion motor and drive system and testing facility;
  • Raytheon for the integrated navigation and bridge system;
  • Rolls Royce Power Engineering for the gas turbine;
  • Rohde & Schwarz UK Ltd for the communications systems;
  • WR Davis for the uptakes and downtakes.
Type 26 Global Combat Ship, Design concept only
Type 26 Global Combat Ship, Design concept only

BAE Systems has also confirmed a subcontract to its Combat Systems team for the Meteorological and Oceanographic (METOC) system, which collates and analyses environmental information to support operations.

Geoff Searle, Type 26 Programme Director at BAE Systems, said: «Today’s announcement is exciting for everyone involved in the Type 26 programme, as it will enable our partners in the supply chain to start manufacturing key equipment for the first three ships. This reinforces the strong momentum behind the programme and is an important step towards the start of manufacturing the Type 26 ships for the Royal Navy in Glasgow next year».

These contracts are helping to support the UK’s vibrant industrial base, as Steve Watson, Managing Director, David Brown Gear Systems Ltd, explains: «The contract to supply the gearboxes for the Type 26 ships is the largest single order in our firm’s 150 history. As a result of our involvement in this programme, we have made significant investments in our infrastructure and we have transformed a semi-derelict area of our Huddersfield site into new state of the art manufacturing, assembly and test facilities. This means we can provide the latest generation of gearing technology to the Royal Navy’s Type 26 ships and it creates a strong platform to secure future orders across the defence, oil and gas, and power generation sectors».

Type 26 Global Combat Ship
Type 26 Global Combat Ship

The £859 million Demonstration Phase contract for the Type 26 programme began in April 2015. The new manufacturing contracts build on the existing 15 design development agreements across the supply chain, which means that a total of 17 companies across the UK, Europe and Canada already have contracts in place under the Type 26 programme. A joint team from BAE Systems, the Ministry of Defence, and the supply chain are working together to complete the detailed design for the ships, procure key equipment and prepare the manufacturing proposal to be submitted to the Ministry of Defence.

Under current planning assumptions, 13 Type 26 ships will be delivered to the Royal Navy. The first vessel is due to enter service in the early 2020s and the Type 26 class will remain in service into the middle of this century and beyond.

The Type 26 Global Combat Ship will be a globally deployable, multi-mission warship capable of undertaking a wide range of roles from high intensity warfare to humanitarian assistance, either operating independently or as part of a task group. The ship will take full advantage of modular design and open systems architecture, ensuring it can be easily upgraded as new technology develops and can accommodate different sub-systems and equipment suited to potential overseas customer needs.

 

Latest footage of the Type 26 Global Combat Ship

 

Brazilian Gripen

According to Reuters, Brazil’s Senate approved on 05 August 2015 a $4.6 billion financing agreement reached last week with Sweden for the purchase of 36 Gripen fighter jets from Swedish planemaker Saab AB for the Brazilian Air Force.

From the very beginning, Gripen has been designed to be a true multi-role and swing-role fighter – meaning it can perform air-to-air, air-to-surface and reconnaissance missions
From the very beginning, Gripen has been designed to be a true multi-role and swing-role fighter – meaning it can perform air-to-air, air-to-surface and reconnaissance missions

The Senate rushed through a request from President Dilma Rousseff’s government authorizing it to borrow up to 39.88 billion Swedish crowns from Sweden’s export credit agency SEK for the planes and an additional $245.3 million for weaponry.

In the midst of a fiscal crunch, Brazil managed to negotiate better terms, reducing the interest rate on the main credit to 2.19 percent from 2.54 percent agreed last year. Interest on the smaller dollar loan was set at 3.56 percent. Brazil has 25 years to repay the loans with an eight-year grace period. Despite Brazil’s economic difficulties, the borrowing authorization was backed by opposition parties who said the purchase was of strategic importance for the country’s defense.

The first Gripen NG fighter jets should be delivered to Brazil in 2019. Saab plans to set up a Brazilian assembly line producing the fighter jets through 2024 in partnership with Brazilian planemaker Embraer SA. The contract provides for full transfer of technology and the production of 15 of the jets in Brazil.

Brazil awarded the contract in December 2013, choosing Saab’s fighter over Boeing Co.’s F-18 Super Hornet and the Rafale made by France’s Dassault Aviation SA. Brazil signed an additional $245 million contract with Saab in April to provide arms for the Gripens.

Gripen NG has weapons for all types of mission, from guided bombs for precision engagement with low collateral damage, to long-range and agile air-to-air missiles and heavy anti-ship armaments
Gripen NG has weapons for all types of mission, from guided bombs for precision engagement with low collateral damage, to long-range and agile air-to-air missiles and heavy anti-ship armaments

 

Gripen NG

The maximum combat radius for Gripen NG on an air-to-surface configuration is approximately 800 NM/932 miles/1,500 km. This is defined as flying to a target, releasing air-to-surface weapons, and then returning to home base. The actual combat radius depends on the configuration of the aircraft’s external stores, its profiles and the availability of reserve fuel tanks. Gripen NG’s combat radius meets the needs of air forces around the world, but at a much lower cost than its competitors.

The aircraft’s maximum time on station in a mission depends on the stores carried and the distance from the home base to the combat air patrol station. In a typical air-to-air configuration for example, Gripen NG can patrol for over two hours.

The single-seat Gripen NG is equipped with a 27-mm Mauser BK27 gun. This can be used in air-to-surface attacks against land and sea targets and is suitable for air policing missions. Gripen NG can also carry pods and sensors for reconnaissance and special missions.

Gripen’s flexible weapon system architecture allows easy and cost-efficient integration of new stores, from long-range and agile air-to-air missiles to anti-ship missiles and guided bombs. This is enabled by standard pylon interfaces, a modular avionics system, and adaptive payload classifications that eliminate the need for updates of the flight control system.

The new PS-05/A Mk4 is a multi-function radar system developed to provide air force commanders with efficient means of countering evolving threats and executing complex missions types with new fighter aircraft capabilities.

Gripen NG has a canard/delta wing configuration with relaxed stability. A triplex fly-by-wire aerodynamic control system enables stable and precise flight with highly agile maneuvering
Gripen NG has a canard/delta wing configuration with relaxed stability. A triplex fly-by-wire aerodynamic control system enables stable and precise flight with highly agile maneuvering

 

SINGLE-SEATER

Dimensions
Span (incl. launchers) 27.56 feet/8.4 m
Length (excl. pitot tube) 46.26 feet/14.1 m
Height overall 14.76 feet/4.5 m
Wheel track 7.87 feet/2.4 m
Wheel base 17 feet/5.2 m
Weights
Empty weight 14,991 lbs/6,800 kg
Internal fuel >4,409 lbs/2,000 kg
Total load capacity 11,685 lbs/5,300 kg
Maximum take-off weight 30,865 lbs/14,000 kg
One of Gripen NG’s key strengths is its ability to find and exploit information
One of Gripen NG’s key strengths is its ability to find and exploit information

 

TWO-SEATER

Dimensions
Span (incl. launchers) 27.56 feet/8.4 m
Length (excl. pitot tube) 48.56 feet/14.8 m
Height overall 14.76 feet/4.5 m
Wheel track 7.87 feet/2.4 m
Wheel base 19.36 feet/5.9 m
Weights
Empty weight 15,653 lbs/7,100 kg
Internal fuel >4,409 lbs/2,000 kg
Total load capacity 11,685 lbs/5,300 kg
Maximum take-off weight 30,865 lbs/14,000 kg

 

Gripen: The Smart Fighter

Tomahawk flight test

The U.S. Navy and Raytheon Company demonstrated new capabilities for the Tomahawk Block IV cruise missile in a successful flight test conducted from the guided missile cruiser USS Anzio (CG-68). The test proved that the Block IV can operate with an improved, more flexible mission planning capability.

The guided missile-cruiser USS Anzio (CG-68) is en route to Scotland to participate in Joint Warrior, a United Kingdom-led semi-annual multinational cooperative training exercise. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Ryan U. Kledzik/Released)
The guided missile-cruiser USS Anzio (CG-68) is en route to Scotland to participate in Joint Warrior, a United Kingdom-led semi-annual multinational cooperative training exercise. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Ryan U. Kledzik/Released)

«Together with our U.S. Navy partners, we continue to modernize the Tomahawk Baseline IV weapon system to outpace threats and provide warfighters with a tactical edge», said Mike Jarrett, Raytheon Air Warfare Systems vice president. «Tomahawk continues to be our nation’s weapon of choice for long-range, precision strikes against high-value targets».

The flight test validated recent updates to the mission planning system software, enabling planners to more rapidly design dynamic missions. This was also the first significant software update to the tactical Tomahawk missile in more than five years.

The mission missile scored a direct hit on its target. These capabilities will be disseminated throughout the fleet for use in overseas contingency operations.

Tomahawk Block IV cruise missile can circle for hours, shift course instantly on command and beam a picture of its target to controllers halfway around the world before striking with pinpoint accuracy
Tomahawk Block IV cruise missile can circle for hours, shift course instantly on command and beam a picture of its target to controllers halfway around the world before striking with pinpoint accuracy

 

Tomahawk cruise missile

Description

The Tomahawk Land Attack Missile (TLAM) is an all-weather, long range, subsonic cruise missile used for land attack warfare, launched from U. S. Navy surface ships and U.S. Navy and Royal Navy submarines.

Features

Tomahawk carries a nuclear or conventional payload. The conventional, land-attack, unitary variant carries a 1,000-pound-class (453.6 kg) warhead (TLAM-C) while the submunitions dispenser variant carries 166 combined-effects bomblets (TLAM-D).

The Block III version incorporates engine improvements, an insensitive extended range warhead, time-of-arrival control and navigation capability using an improved Digital Scene Matching Area Correlator (DSMAC) and Global Positioning System (GPS), which can significantly reduce mission-planning time and increase navigation and terminal accuracy.

Tomahawk Block IV (TLAM-E) is the latest improvement to the Tomahawk missile family. Block IV capability enhancements include:

  1. increased flexibility utilizing two-way satellite communications to reprogram the missile in-flight to a new aimpoint or new preplanned mission, send a new mission to the missile enroute to a new target, and missile health and status messages during the flight;
  2. increased responsiveness with faster launch timelines, mission planning capability aboard the launch platform, loiter capability in the area of emerging targets, the ability to provide battle damage indication in the target area, and the capability to provide a single-frame image of the target or other areas of interest along the missile flight path;
  3. improved affordability with a production cost of a Block IV significantly lower than the cost of a new Block III and a 15-year Block IV recertification interval compared to the eight-year interval for Block III.

Background

Tomahawk cruise missiles are designed to fly at extremely low altitudes at high subsonic speeds, and are piloted over an evasive route by several mission tailored guidance systems. The first operational use was in Operation Desert Storm, 1991, with immense success. The missile has since been used successfully in several other conflicts. In 1995 the governments of the United States and United Kingdom signed a Foreign Military Sales Agreement for the acquisition of 65 missiles, marking the first sale of Tomahawk to a foreign country.

The latest variant (Tomahawk Block IV) includes a two-way satellite data-link that enables the missile to be retargeted in flight to preprogrammed, alternate targets
The latest variant (Tomahawk Block IV) includes a two-way satellite data-link that enables the missile to be retargeted in flight to preprogrammed, alternate targets

 

General Characteristics

Primary Function Long-range subsonic cruise missile for striking high value or heavily defended land targets
Contractor Raytheon Systems Company, Tucson, Arizona
Date Deployed
Block II TLAM-A IOC* 1984
Block III TLAM-C, TLAM-D IOC* 1994
Block IV TLAM-E IOC* 2004
Unit Cost Approximately $569,000
Propulsion Williams International F107 cruise turbo-fan engine; ARC/CSD solid-fuel booster
Length 18 feet 3 inch/5.56 m; 20 feet 6 inch/6.25 m with booster
Diameter 20.4 inch/51.81 cm
Wingspan 8 feet 9 inch/2.67 m
Weight 2,900 lbs/1,315.44 kg; 3,500 lbs/1,587.6 kg with booster
Speed about 478 knots/550 mph/880 km/h
Range
Block II TLAM-A 1,350 NM/1,500 statute miles/2,500 km
Block III TLAM-C 900 NM/1,000 statute miles/1,600 km
Block III TLAM-D 700 NM/800 statute miles/1,250 km
Block IV TLAM-E 900 NM/1,000 statute miles/1,600 km
Guidance System
Block II TLAM-A INS**, TERCOM***
Block III TLAM-C, D & Block IV TLAM-E INS**, TERCOM***, DSMAC****, GPS
Warhead
Block II TLAM-N W80 nuclear warhead
Block III TLAM-D conventional submunitions dispenser with combined effect bomblets
Block III TLAM-C and Block IV TLAM-E unitary warhead

* Initial Operational Capability

** Inertial Navigation System

*** TERrain COtour Matching

**** Digital Scene-Mapping Area Correlator

The U.S. Navy has conducted more than 70 successful Tomahawk flight tests since 2006
The U.S. Navy has conducted more than 70 successful Tomahawk flight tests since 2006

Four-for-Four

The Missile Defense Agency (MDA), U.S. Pacific Command, and U.S. Navy Sailors aboard the USS John Paul Jones (DDG-53) – the third Arleigh Burke-class Guided Missile Destroyer – successfully conducted a series of four flight test events exercising the Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) element of the nation’s Ballistic Missile Defense System (BMDS). The flight test, designated Multi-Mission Warfare (MMW) Events 1 through 4, demonstrated successful intercepts of short-range ballistic missile and cruise missile targets by the USS John Paul Jones (DDG-53), configured with Aegis Baseline 9.C1 (BMD 5.0 Capability Upgrade) and using Standard Missile-6 (SM-6) Dual I and SM-2 Block IV missiles. All flight test events were conducted at the Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF), Kauai, Hawaii.

SM-6 has been selected to fulfill the U.S. Navy's Sea-Based Terminal (SBT) role and will provide defense against ballistic missiles in their terminal phase of flight, succeeding the SM-2 Block IV missile
SM-6 has been selected to fulfill the U.S. Navy’s Sea-Based Terminal (SBT) role and will provide defense against ballistic missiles in their terminal phase of flight, succeeding the SM-2 Block IV missile

MDA Director Vice Admiral James D. Syring said, «This important test campaign not only demonstrated an additional terminal defense layer of the BMDS, it also proved the robustness of the multi-use SM-6 missile on-board a U.S. Navy destroyer, further reinforcing the dynamic capability of the Aegis Baseline 9 weapon system».

 

Event 1

On July 28, at approximately 10:30 p.m. Hawaii Standard Time (July 29, 4:30 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time), a short-range ballistic missile (SRBM) target was launched from PMRF in a northwesterly trajectory. The USS John Paul Jones (DDG-53), positioned west of Hawaii, detected, tracked, and launched a SM-6 Dual I missile, resulting in a successful target intercept.

USS John Paul Jones (DDG-53) – the third Arleigh Burke-class Guided Missile Destroyer
USS John Paul Jones (DDG-53) – the third Arleigh Burke-class Guided Missile Destroyer

 

Event 2

On July 29, at approximately 8:15 p.m. Hawaii Standard Time (July 30, 2:15 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time), a short-range ballistic missile (SRBM) target was launched from PMRF in a northwesterly trajectory. The USS John Paul Jones (DDG-53) detected, tracked, and launched a SM-2 Block IV missile, resulting in a successful target intercept.

 

Event 3

On July 31, at approximately 2:30 p.m. Hawaii Standard Time, (8:30 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time) an AQM-37C cruise missile target was air-launched to replicate an air-warfare threat. The USS John Paul Jones (DDG-53) detected, tracked, and successfully engaged the target using an SM-6 Dual I missile.

 

Event 4

On August 1, at approximately 3:45 p.m. Hawaii Standard Time, (9:45 p.m. Eastern Standard Time), a BQM-74E cruise missile target was launched from PMRF. The USS John Paul Jones (DDG-53) detected, tracked, and successfully engaged the target using an SM-6 Dual I missile. The SM-6’s proximity-fuze warhead was programmed not to detonate after reaching the lethal distance from the target, thus providing the ability to recover and reuse the BQM-74E target.

The USS John Paul Jones (DDG-53) used a Standard Missile-6 to destroy a supersonic high altitude target drone in live fire tests
The USS John Paul Jones (DDG-53) used a Standard Missile-6 to destroy a supersonic high altitude target drone in live fire tests

 

Facts

  • MMW Event 1 was the first live fire event of the SM-6 Dual I missile.
  • MMW Events 1 and 2 were the 30th and 31st successful ballistic missile defense intercepts in 37 flight test attempts for the Aegis BMD program since flight-testing began in 2002.
  • The MDA will use test results to improve and enhance the Ballistic Missile Defense System (BMDS).
  • Aegis BMD is the naval component of the BMDS. The MDA and the U.S. Navy cooperatively manage the Aegis BMD program.
  • Operational elements of the BMDS are currently deployed, protecting the nation, our allies, and friends against ballistic missile attack.
  • The BMDS continues to undergo development and testing to provide a robust layered defense against ballistic missiles of all ranges in all phases of flight.
A Standard Missile-6 is loaded into a specialized container at the Raytheon Redstone Missile Integration Facility for delivery to the U.S. Navy
A Standard Missile-6 is loaded into a specialized container at the Raytheon Redstone Missile Integration Facility for delivery to the U.S. Navy

Lightning is ready

The Marine Corps declared on July 31 that a squadron of 10 F-35B Lightning II aircraft is ready for worldwide deployment. The Marines’ declaration of Initial Operational Capability (IOC) for its squadron of F-35Bs «marks a significant milestone in the continued evolution of the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) program», Undersecretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics Frank Kendall said in a statement issued on July 31.

An F-35B Lightning II prepares to taxi on the flight deck of the USS Wasp during night operations at sea as part of a Marine Corps operational test, May, 22, 2015 (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Corporal Anne K. Henry)
An F-35B Lightning II prepares to taxi on the flight deck of the USS Wasp during night operations at sea as part of a Marine Corps operational test, May, 22, 2015 (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Corporal Anne K. Henry)

«The decision was made following a thorough operational readiness inspection, which assessed the U.S. Marine Corps’ ability to employ this complex weapon system in an operational environment», Kendall continued. «This achievement is a testament to the efforts of the F-35 Joint Program Office and industry team, as well as the hard work and support from the U.S. Marine Corps».

 

The F-35 Program is on Track

«This accomplishment is an affirmation that the F-35 program is on track to deliver essential 5th generation warfighting capabilities to our U.S. services and international partners», Kendall added. «It is also a reminder that we still have work ahead to deliver the full warfighting capability required by all three services and our partners while we continue our successful efforts to drive cost out of the program».

Two F-35B Lightning II Joint Strike Fighters complete vertical landings aboard the USS Wasp (LHD-1) during the opening day of the first session of operational testing, May 18, 2015 (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Remington Hall/Released)
Two F-35B Lightning II Joint Strike Fighters complete vertical landings aboard the USS Wasp (LHD-1) during the opening day of the first session of operational testing, May 18, 2015 (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Remington Hall/Released)

Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 121, or VMFA-121, based in Yuma, Arizona, is the first squadron in military history to become operational with an F-35 variant, following a five-day operational readiness inspection, which concluded July 17, according to a news release issued on July 31 by the U.S. Marine Corps.

«I am pleased to announce that VMFA-121 has achieved Initial Operational Capability in the F-35B, as defined by requirements outlined in the June 2014 Joint Report to Congressional Defense Committees», Marine Corps General Joseph F. Dunford Jr., commandant of the Marine Corps, said in the U.S. Marine Corps release.

«VMFA-121 has ten aircraft in the Block 2B configuration with the requisite performance envelope and weapons clearances, to include the training, sustainment capabilities, and infrastructure to deploy to an austere site or a ship», Dunford continued. «It is capable of conducting close air support, offensive and defensive counter air, air interdiction, assault support escort and armed reconnaissance as part of a Marine air-ground task force, or in support of the joint force».

Dunford stated that he has his full confidence in the F-35B’s ability to support Marines in combat, predicated on years of concurrent developmental testing and operational flying.

«Prior to declaring Initial Operating Capability, we have conducted flight operations for seven weeks at sea aboard an L-Class carrier, participated in multiple large force exercises, and executed a recent operational evaluation which included multiple live ordnance sorties», Dunford said. «The F-35B’s ability to conduct operations from expeditionary airstrips or sea-based carriers provides our nation with its first 5th generation strike fighter, which will transform the way we fight and win».

F135-PW-600 engine for F-35B Short Take Off and Vertical Landing (STOVL)
F135-PW-600 engine for F-35B Short Take Off and Vertical Landing (STOVL)

 

F-35 Will Eventually Replace Legacy Aircraft

As the future of Marine Corps tactical aviation, the F-35 will eventually replace three legacy platforms: the AV-8B Harrier, the F/A-18 Hornet, and the EA-6B Prowler, according to the Marine Corps release.

«The success of VMFA-121 is a reflection of the hard work and effort by the Marines in the squadron, those involved in the program over many years, and the support we have received from across the Department of the Navy, the joint program office, our industry partners, and the undersecretary of defense», Dunford added. «Achieving Initial Operating Capability has truly been a team effort».

The Marine Corps has trained and qualified more than 50 Marine F-35B pilots and certified about 500 maintenance personnel to assume autonomous, organic-level maintenance support for the F-35B, the release said.

Marine Attack Squadron 211, an AV-8B Harrier II squadron, is scheduled to transition next to the F-35B in fiscal year 2016, according to the release. In 2018, Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 122, an F/A-18 Hornet squadron, will conduct its transition.

Arrival (Vertical landing) on USS Wasp for DT-II. Mr. Peter Wilson was the pilot on 12 August 2013
Arrival (Vertical landing) on USS Wasp for DT-II. Mr. Peter Wilson was the pilot on 12 August 2013

 

Specifications

Length 51.2 feet/15.6 m
Height 14.3 feet/4.36 m
Wingspan 35 feet/10.7 m
Wing area 460 feet2/42.7 m2
Horizontal tail span 21.8 feet/6.65 m
Weight empty 32,300 lbs/14,651 kg
Internal fuel capacity 13,500 lbs/6,125 kg
Weapons payload 15,000 lbs/6,800 kg
Maximum weight 60,000 lbs class/27,215 kg
Standard internal weapons load Two AIM-120C air-to-air missiles
Two 2,000-pound/907 kg GBU-31 JDAM (Joint Direct Attack Munition) guided bombs
Propulsion (uninstalled thrust ratings) F135-PW-600
Maximum Power (with afterburner) 41,000 lbs/182,4 kN/18,597 kgf
Military Power (without afterburner) 27,000 lbs/120,1 kN/12,247 kgf
Short Take Off Thrust 40,740 lbs/181,2 kN/18,479 kgf
Hover Thrust 40,650 lbs/180,8 kN/18,438 kgf
Main Engine 18,680 lbs/83,1 kN/8,473 kgf
Lift Fan 18,680 lbs/83,1 kN/8,473 kgf
Roll Post 3,290 lbs/14,6 kN/1,492 kgf
Main Engine Length 369 inch/9.37 m
Main Engine Inlet Diameter 43 inch/1.09 m
Main Engine Maximum Diameter 46 inch/1.17 m
Lift Fan Inlet Diameter 51 inch/1,30 m
Lift Fan Maximum Diameter 53 inch/1,34 m
Conventional Bypass Ratio 0.57
Powered Lift Bypass Ratio 0.51
Conventional Overall Pressure Ratio 28
Powered Lift Overall Pressure Ratio 29
Speed (full internal weapons load) Mach 1.6 (~1,043 knots/1,200 mph/ 1,931 km/h)
Combat radius (internal fuel) >450 NM/517.6 miles/833 km
Range (internal fuel) >900 NM/1,036 miles/1,667 km
Max g-rating 7.0
Planned Quantities
U.S. Marine Corps 340
U.K. Royal Air Force/Royal Navy 138
Italy 30
In total 508
An F-35B test jet takes off from the USS Wasp on Aug. 21, 2013. The takeoff was part of Developmental Test Phase Two for the F-35 short takeoff/vertical landing variant
An F-35B test jet takes off from the USS Wasp on Aug. 21, 2013. The takeoff was part of Developmental Test Phase Two for the F-35 short takeoff/vertical landing variant