Alpha sea trials

Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) announced on May 26 that the newest Virginia-class submarine, USS John Warner (SSN-785), successfully completed its initial sea trials on Saturday. Sea trials are aggressive operational tests that demonstrate the submarine’s capabilities at sea. John Warner, the first Virginia-class submarine to be named for a person, is being built as part of a teaming arrangement between HII’s Newport News Shipbuilding division and General Dynamics Electric Boat.

The Virginia-class submarine USS John Warner (SSN-785) completed alpha sea trials on Saturday. All systems, components and compartments were tested. The submarine also submerged for the first time and operated at high speeds on the surface and underwater (Photo by Chris Oxley/HII)
The Virginia-class submarine USS John Warner (SSN-785) completed alpha sea trials on Saturday. All systems, components and compartments were tested. The submarine also submerged for the first time and operated at high speeds on the surface and underwater (Photo by Chris Oxley/HII)

«Alpha sea trials represent the first underway test of the quality of the craftsmanship that went into the construction of this great vessel and the skill of the crew that operates her», said Jim Hughes, Newport News’ vice president of submarines and fleet support. «Both the ship and the crew performed incredibly well, resulting in extremely successful trials that enable the ship to advance directly into its next set of tests. The USS John Warner is now well on its way to being another successful and early Virginia-class delivery».

All systems, components and compartments were tested during the trials. The new submarine submerged for the first time and operated at high speeds on the surface and underwater. USS John Warner (SSN-785) will undergo several more rounds of sea trials before delivery to the U.S. Navy by Newport News.

«The sea trials were a huge success», said Commander Dan Caldwell, the submarine’s prospective commanding officer. «The ship is in great material condition, and I could not be more proud of the way the crew performed. They have worked tirelessly for the last two years preparing to take this ship to sea, and it showed during sea trials. We look forward to completing the ship’s delivery and joining the operational fleet».

Construction of John Warner began in 2010. The boat is 99 percent complete and on schedule to deliver next month – more than three months ahead of its contracted delivery date.

 

Nuclear Submarine Lineup

Ship Yard Christening Commissioned Homeport
SSN-774 Virginia EB 8-16-03 10-23-04 Portsmouth, New Hampshire
SSN-775 Texas NNS 7-31-05 9-9-06 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
SSN-776 Hawaii EB 6-19-06 5-5-07 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
SSN-777 North Carolina NNS 4-21-07 5-3-08 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
SSN-778 New Hampshire EB 6-21-08 10-25-08 Groton, Connecticut
SSN-779 New Mexico NNS 12-13-08 11-21-09 Groton, Connecticut
SSN-780 Missouri EB 12-5-09 7-31-10 Groton, Connecticut
SSN-781 California NNS 11-6-10 10-29-11 Groton, Connecticut
SSN-782 Mississippi EB 12-3-11 6-2-12 Groton, Connecticut
SSN-783 Minnesota NNS 10-27-12 9-7-13 Norfolk, Virginia
SSN-784 North Dakota EB 11-2-13 10-25-14 Groton, Connecticut
SSN-785 John Warner NNS 09-06-14
SSN-786 Illinois EB Under Construction
SSN-787 Washington NNS Under Construction
SSN-788 Colorado EB Under Construction
SSN-789 Indiana NNS Under Construction
SSN-790 South Dakota EB Under Construction
SSN-791 Delaware NNS Under Construction
SSN-792 Vermont EB Under Construction
SSN-793 Oregon NNS Under Construction
SSN-794 (Unnamed)
SSN-795 Hyman G. Rickover
SSN-796 New Jersey
SSN-797 (Unnamed)
SSN-798 (Unnamed)
SSN-799 (Unnamed)
SSN-800 (Unnamed)
SSN-801 (Unnamed)
SSN-802 (Unnamed)
SSN-803 (Unnamed)
SSN-804 (Unnamed)
SSN-805 (Unnamed)

EB – Electric Boat, Groton, Connecticut

NNS – Newport News Shipbuilding, Newport News, Virginia

She will be the first in the class to be named after a person
She will be the first in the class to be named after a person

The First flight
of the Raider

Sikorsky Aircraft Corp., a United Technologies Corp. subsidiary, on May 22 announced the successful first flight of the S-97 Raider helicopter, a rigid coaxial rotor prototype designed to demonstrate a game-changing combination of maneuverability, hover ability, range, speed, endurance and survivability. The first flight was conducted at Sikorsky’s Development Flight Center (DFC) where the two-prototype Raider helicopter test program is based.

Sikorsky’s S-97 Raider, the company’s latest military design, during its maiden flight on May 22
Sikorsky’s S-97 Raider, the company’s latest military design, during its maiden flight on May 22

«Sikorsky has a long tradition of pioneering new aviation technologies including the first practical helicopter. Today’s first flight of the S-97 Raider represents the latest leap forward for Sikorsky, our customers, and the rotorcraft industry», said Sikorsky President Bob Leduc. «The industry has demanded high performance and high value from the products that execute critical missions, and, today, the Raider has given us an exciting look at the future of vertical flight».

During the first test flight, which lasted approximately one hour, S-97 Raider Pilot Bill Fell and Co-Pilot Kevin Bredenbeck took the aircraft through a series of maneuvers designed to test the aircraft’s hover and low-speed capability. With first flight achieved, the Raider now moves into more progressive flight-testing to demonstrate key performance parameters critical to future combat operations including armed reconnaissance, light assault, light attack and special operations. The Raider program is part of the portfolio of Sikorsky Innovations, the technology development organization within Sikorsky Aircraft’s Research & Engineering division.

«It is the Sikorsky Innovations charter to identify the toughest challenges in vertical flight, and to demonstrate solutions to them», said Mark Miller, Vice President of Research & Engineering. «Getting an all-new aircraft into flight, especially one with game-changing capabilities, is a remarkable feat. With this first flight of the S-97 Raider helicopter, Sikorsky Aircraft is proving once again that the tough challenges will always propel us forward».

«This exemplifies the very DNA of Sikorsky Aircraft: to explore, to challenge, to pioneer, and in doing so, to ultimately change what is possible for our customers», Miller said. «It is exciting that the S-97 Raider helicopter leverages a mix of evolutionary rotorcraft technologies that, when combined in this new way, results in revolutionary capability».

The Sikorsky S-97 Raider helicopter is poised to realize this vision and revolutionize next-generation military aviation
The Sikorsky S-97 Raider helicopter is poised to realize this vision and revolutionize next-generation military aviation

Sikorsky launched the S-97 Raider helicopter program in September 2010, with objectives of maturing the Collier-Award winning X2 rotorcraft configuration and demonstrating a helicopter that meets current U.S. Army special operations and armed reconnaissance needs, while maturing technologies for Future Vertical Lift (FVL). The program is 100 percent industry-funded by Sikorsky Aircraft and its 53 industry partners.

Based on the X2 coaxial rotor design, the Raider helicopter is capable of being developed into a unique multi-mission configuration that is able to carry six troops and external weapons. The coaxial counter-rotating main rotors and pusher propeller are expected to provide cruise speeds up to 240 knots/276 mph/444 km/h.

«Based on the capabilities that were demonstrated today, Sikorsky is positioned to develop the S-97 Raider helicopter’s game-changing capabilities to enable helicopter forces to out-perform on the battleground of tomorrow», said Samir Mehta, President of Sikorsky Defense Systems & Services. «With the Raider aircraft’s unmatched combination of speed, maneuverability and acoustic signature, Sikorsky Aircraft is ideally positioned to provide the military with essential mission-specific capabilities. With this flight, we have started the demonstration of solutions to not only near-term capability gaps but also solutions for future vertical lift needs».

The second S-97 Raider helicopter prototype is on track to complete final assembly in 2015. A demonstration tour of the Raider helicopter is planned for 2016.

X2 technology is scalable to a variety of military missions including light assault, light attack, armed reconnaissance, close-air support, combat search and rescue, and unmanned applications
X2 technology is scalable to a variety of military missions including light assault, light attack, armed reconnaissance, close-air support, combat search and rescue, and unmanned applications

 

Specifications

Aircraft Features

  • Low acoustic signature
  • Exceptional hover capability
  • High cruise speed
  • Agility for close air support
  • Fly-by-wire flight controls

Multi-Mission for Operational Flexibility

  • Internal aux fuel tank for extended range/increased endurance
  • Additional ammunition capacity
  • Six seat cabin
  • Aerial refueling capable

Weights

Maximum gross weight:                     11,400 lbs/5,171 kg

Performance

HOGE* capability:                                 >6K/95

Endurance (standard fuel):              >2.7 h

Range:                                                           >373 miles/600 km

Cruise speed:                                            >240 knots/276 mph/444 km/h

Deployability

C-17 loadout:                                           4 aircraft

Payload

  • Hellfire missiles
  • 70-mm 2.75″ rockets
  • 12,7-mm .50 cal gun
  • 62-mm gun

* HOGE – Hover-Out of Ground Effect. This is the absolute limit of the helicopter’s ability to hover. Factors that contribute to this limit are density altitude, atmospheric temperature, available engine torque, and payload.

 

The S-97 Raider helicopter successfully achieved its first flight at the Sikorsky Development Flight Center in West Palm Beach, Florida on May 22. Congratulations to Chief Pilot Bill Fell, Co-pilot Kevin Bredenbeck and the entire Raider team

 

The Boeing-Sikorsky SB-1 Defiant

Orbital Test Vehicle

A United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V rocket successfully launched the Air Force Space Command 5 (AFSPC-5) satellite for the U.S. Air Force at 11:05 a.m. EDT on May 20, 2015 from Space Launch Complex-41. The rocket carried the X-37B Orbital Test Vehicle or OTV, a reliable, reusable, unmanned space test platform for the U.S. Air Force.

A United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V rocket successfully launched the AFSPC-5 satellite for the U.S. Air Force from Space Launch Complex-41. This is ULA’s fifth launch in 2015 and the 96th successful launch since the company was formed in December 2006
A United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V rocket successfully launched the AFSPC-5 satellite for the U.S. Air Force from Space Launch Complex-41. This is ULA’s fifth launch in 2015 and the 96th successful launch since the company was formed in December 2006

«ULA is honored to launch this unique spacecraft for the U.S Air Force. Congratulations to the Air Force and all of our mission partners on today’s successful launch! The seamless integration between the Air Force, Boeing, and the entire mission team culminated in today’s successful launch of the Atlas V AFSPC-5 mission», said Jim Sponnick, ULA vice president, Atlas and Delta Programs.

This Atlas V mission also includes the Aft Bulkhead Carrier (ABC) carrying the National Reconnaissance Office’s (NRO’s) Ultra Lightweight Technology and Research Auxiliary Satellite (ULTRASat). ULTRASat is composed of 10 CubeSats managed by the NRO and NASA. «The ABC contained 8 P-Pods that released 10 CubeSats that were successfully delivered. The CubeSats were developed by the U.S Naval Academy, the Aerospace Corporation, Air Force Research Laboratory, The Planetary Society and California Polytechnic, San Luis Obispo to conduct various on orbit experiments», said Sponnick.

This mission was launched aboard an Atlas V 501 configuration Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV), which includes a 5.4-meter-diameter payload fairing. The Atlas booster for this mission was powered by the RD AMROSS RD-180 engine, and the Centaur upper stage was powered by the Aerojet Rocketdyne RL10C-1 engine. This was ULA’s sixth launch of the 501 configuration, and ULA’s 54th mission to launch on an Atlas V rocket.

ULA’s next launch is the Atlas V GPS IIF-10 mission for the U. S. Air Force, scheduled for July 15 from Space Launch Complex-41 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida.

The EELV program was established by the United States Air Force to provide assured access to space for Department of Defense and other government payloads. The commercially developed EELV program supports the full range of government mission requirements, while delivering on schedule and providing significant cost savings over the heritage launch systems.

With more than a century of combined heritage, United Launch Alliance is the nation’s most experienced and reliable launch service provider. ULA has successfully delivered more than 90 satellites to orbit that provide critical capabilities for troops in the field, aid meteorologists in tracking severe weather, enable personal device-based GPS navigation and unlock the mysteries of our solar system.

ULA has successfully delivered more than 90 satellites to orbit that provide critical capabilities for troops in the fi eld, aid meteorologists in tracking severe weather, enable personal device-based GPS navigation and unlock the mysteries of our solar system
ULA has successfully delivered more than 90 satellites to orbit that provide critical capabilities for troops in the fi eld, aid meteorologists in tracking severe weather, enable personal device-based GPS navigation and unlock the mysteries of our solar system

 

X-37B

The X-37B Orbital Test Vehicle, or OTV, is an experimental test program to demonstrate technologies for a reliable, reusable, unmanned space test platform for the U.S. Air Force. The primary objectives of the X-37B are twofold: reusable spacecraft technologies for America’s future in space and operating experiments, which can be returned to, and examined, on Earth.

The X-37B Orbital Test Vehicle is the newest and most advanced re-entry spacecraft. Based on NASA’s X-37 design, the unmanned OTV is designed for vertical launch to Low Earth Orbit (LEO) altitudes where it can perform long duration space technology experimentation and testing. Upon command from the ground, the OTV autonomously re-enters the atmosphere, descends and lands horizontally on a runway. The X-37B is the first vehicle since NASA’s shuttle orbiter with the ability to return experiments to Earth for further inspection and analysis, however the X-37B can stay in space for much longer.

Technologies being tested in the program include advanced guidance, navigation and control, thermal protection systems, avionics, high temperature structures and seals, conformal reusable insulation, lightweight electromechanical flight systems, and autonomous orbital flight, reentry and landing.

The Atlas V vehicle will also launch an Aft Bulkhead Carrier (ABC) containing eight P-Pods will release 10 CubeSats. Following primary spacecraft separation the Centaur will change altitude and inclination in order to release the CubeSat spacecraft, which are sponsored by the National Reconnaissance Office (NRO) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The ten CubeSats were developed by the U.S. Naval Academy, the Aerospace Corporation, the Air Force Research Laboratory, California Polytechnic State University, and Planetary Society.

The Air Force's AFSPC-5 payload, encapsulated inside a 5-meter diameter payload fairing, is mated to an Atlas V booster inside the Vertical Integration Facility or VIF at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's Space Launch Complex-41
The Air Force’s AFSPC-5 payload, encapsulated inside a 5-meter diameter payload fairing, is mated to an Atlas V booster inside the Vertical Integration Facility or VIF at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station’s Space Launch Complex-41

 

Payload Fairing (PLF)

The AFSPC-5 satellite is encapsulated in a 5-m (14-feet) diameter medium payload fairing. The 5-m PLF is a sandwich composite structure made with a vented aluminum-honeycomb core and graphite-epoxy face sheets. The bisector (two-piece shell) PLF encapsulates both the Centaur and the satellite. The vehicle’s height with the 5-m medium PLF is approximately 63 m/206 feet.

In preparation for launch, an Atlas V rocket, with the Air Force's AFSPC-5 mission, is rolled from the Vertical Integration Facility or VIF to the pad at Space Launch Complex-41
In preparation for launch, an Atlas V rocket, with the Air Force’s AFSPC-5 mission, is rolled from the Vertical Integration Facility or VIF to the pad at Space Launch Complex-41

 

Centaur

The Centaur second stage is 3 m/10 feet in diameter and 12.65 m/41.5 feet in length. Its propellant tanks are constructed of pressure-stabilized, corrosion resistant stainless steel. Centaur is a cryogenic vehicle, fueled with liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen. It uses a single RL10C-1 engine producing 101.86 kN/10,387 kg/22,900 lbs of thrust. The cryogenic tanks are insulated with a combination of helium-purged insulation blankets, radiation shields, and Spray-On Foam Insulation (SOFI). The Centaur forward adapter (CFA) provides the structural mountings for the fault-tolerant avionics system and the structural and electrical interfaces with the spacecraft.

With more than a century of combined heritage, United Launch Alliance is the nation’s most experienced and reliable launch service provider
With more than a century of combined heritage, United Launch Alliance is the nation’s most experienced and reliable launch service provider

 

Booster

The Atlas V booster is 3.8 m/12.5 feet in diameter and 32.46 m/106.5 feet in length. The booster’s tanks are structurally rigid and constructed of isogrid aluminum barrels, spun-formed aluminum domes, and intertank skirts. Atlas booster propulsion is provided by the RD-180 engine system (a single engine with two thrust chambers). The RD-180 burns RP-1 (Rocket Propellant-1 or highly purified kerosene) and liquid oxygen, and delivers 3,826.36 kN/390,180 kg/860,200 lbs of thrust at sea level. The Atlas V booster is controlled by the Centaur avionics system, which provides guidance, flight control, and vehicle sequencing functions during the booster and Centaur phases of flight.

The launch of this mission culminates many months of teamwork between the Air Force Space and Missile System Center (SMC) Launch Systems Directorate (LR), Boeing, ULA and the RCO

Air Warfare Destroyer

A crowd of nearly 6,000 people is gathering at Techport Australia in Adelaide on May 23 to celebrate a major milestone – the launch of the first destroyer built as part of the Air Warfare Destroyer (AWD) program. The AWD workforce and their families were joined by dignitaries and industry leaders for the launch ceremony, which saw the first destroyer Hobart, lowered into the water until it floats for the first time.

The United States Navy and Lockheed Martin have provided support through our AWD Foreign Military Sales case which has been vital to delivering this next-generation capability to the Australian Defence Force
The United States Navy and Lockheed Martin have provided support through our AWD Foreign Military Sales case which has been vital to delivering this next-generation capability to the Australian Defence Force

AWD Alliance CEO Rod Equid said today’s event is the culmination of the efforts of thousands of Australians and other members of the AWD enterprise, reaching back more than 10 years. The launch ceremony celebrated the transition of the ship from the hardstand to the water. «As shipbuilders and systems integrators, we are undertaking one of the most complex projects of its type in Australia’s history», Mr. Equid said. «Our teams take enormous pride in the work we are doing, which is why this launch is such a big day and I wouldn’t be surprised to see a tear in the eyes of many of our workers when HMAS Hobart floats for the first time. It is hard to believe that the AWD Shipyard was opened just five years ago following considerable investment by State and Federal Government and ASC. Australia now has a highly skilled and professional naval shipbuilding capability».

Hobart’s launch is a big step forward in the delivery of three next-generation warships to the Royal Australian Navy (RAN). Over the coming months, progress will be accelerated as the second destroyer, Brisbane, takes the place of Hobart on the hardstand to undergo final block consolidation, and the keel for the third destroyer, Sydney, is laid. The AWD Alliance is responsible for delivering three Hobart Class DDG destroyers and their support systems to the Navy. The Alliance is made up of shipbuilder ASC, mission systems integrator Raytheon Australia and the Government’s Defence Materiel Organisation.

Along with her sister ships, Brisbane and Sydney, Hobart will provide superior interoperability for the ADF and Coalition forces – capable of carrying out multi-mission operations ranging from high-intensity conflict to border protection
Along with her sister ships, Brisbane and Sydney, Hobart will provide superior interoperability for the ADF and Coalition forces – capable of carrying out multi-mission operations ranging from high-intensity conflict to border protection

AWD Program Manager Peter Croser said: «Hobart has a strong and important lineage with many who have served in the previous Hobart who take a keen interest in their name-sake ship which now sits in the waters south of Adelaide. They have watched the progress of this ship and some of them will be represented today at the launch. Many members of the RAN future crew are already here working at Osborne contributing expertise for the launch and the next phase of the program. We look forward to setting to work Hobart and proving her capabilities at sea in the coming two-year period, whilst maintaining a focus on the construction of the next two DDGs».

ASC Shipbuilding CEO Mark Lamarre said the launch of the first destroyer is a momentous occasion when masses of steel, pipe, wire and machinery come to life. It is an emotional and solemn moment for those who build ships and for those that take them to sea. «The highly skilled workforce at ASC have consolidated and outfitted a ship, they are learning and improving every day contributing to the nation’s shipbuilding capability», Mr. Lamarre said. «The construction of Hobart and the other ships under construction at our shipyard represent the dedication and determination of all who are involved in this important national program. It is a project of which the whole of Australia should be incredibly proud».

Raytheon Australia Managing Director Michael Ward congratulated the AWD Alliance on the launch of Hobart. «As the AWD mission systems integrator it is a source of pride for Raytheon that we have applied our unique engineering and project management skills to delivering a project that is integrated in Australia», Mr. Ward said. «The AWD’s combat system integration activities represent some of the most advanced engineering accomplishments yet undertaken in such a project in this country and will contribute to making the AWD the most sophisticated warship ever operated by the Royal Australian Navy».

The destroyers’ combination of endurance, offensive and defensive weapons, flexibility and versatility make the Hobart class one of the most capable surface combatants ever operated by the RAN
The destroyers’ combination of endurance, offensive and defensive weapons, flexibility and versatility make the Hobart class one of the most capable surface combatants ever operated by the RAN

 

Hobart Class

The Hobart Class Air Warfare Destroyers (AWDs) will be capable across the full spectrum of joint maritime operations, from area air defence and escort duties, right through to peacetime national tasking and diplomatic missions. The AWD project will provide the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) with one of the world’s most capable multi-mission warships.

The AWDs, equipped with the SM-2 missile, will provide air defence for accompanying ships in addition to land forces and infrastructure in coastal areas, and for self-protection against missiles and aircraft. They will also be equipped with the SM-6 long-range anti-aircraft missile, the most advanced weapon of its type, with a range of more than 370 kilometers/230 miles/200 NM.

The missiles combined with the Aegis Weapon System, incorporating the state-of-the-art phased array radar AN/SPY 1D(V), will effectively extend the air defence protection offered by these superior ships.

The original contract cost was A$8 billion for the three ships
The original contract cost was A$8 billion for the three ships

The AWDs will carry a helicopter for surveillance and response to support key warfare areas. The surface warfare function will include long-range anti-ship missiles and a naval gun capable of firing extended range munitions in support of land forces.

As they enter service, the AWDs will be equipped with a sophisticated Cooperative Engagement Capability (CEC), which will enable each vessel to act as a part of a wider «grid» of sensor and weapon platforms that can share surveillance and targeting information.

The Hobart Class AWDs will also conduct undersea warfare and be equipped with modern sonar systems, decoys, surface-launched torpedoes and an array of effective close-in defensive weapons.

These capabilities will ensure the AWDs have the layered defensive and offensive capability required to counter conventional and asymmetric threats. When the Hobart Class AWDs (HMAS Hobart 39, HMAS Brisbane 41 and HMAS Sydney 42) enter service, there will be around 100 Aegis equipped ships operating across the globe.

The AWD program is the most complex surface combatant construction project ever undertaken in Australia
The AWD program is the most complex surface combatant construction project ever undertaken in Australia

 

Characteristics

Length 481.3 feet/146.7 m
Beam 61 feet/18.6 m
Draft 23.6 feet/7.2 m
Full load displacement 7,000 tonnes
Main Engine 36 MW/48,276 hp
Top speed 28+ knots/32 mph/52 km/h
Range at 18+ knots/21 mph/33 km/h 5,000+ NM/5,779 miles/9,300 km
Crew 186
Accommodation 234
Combat System Aegis Weapon System Baseline 7.1
AN/SPY-1D(V) Phased Array Radar (81 NM/93 miles/150 km)
AN/SPQ-9B Horizon Search Radar
Mk-41 Vertical Launch System (48 VLS cells: RIM-162 Evolved SeaSparrow Missile (ESSM)/ Standard Missile-2 (SM-2)/SM-6)
Mk-45 Mod.4 5” (127-mm) 62 Calibre Gun
Advanced Harpoon Weapon Control (2 × 4 launchers)
Electronic Warfare (EW) Suite
Very Short Range Air and Surface Defence
Nulka Active Missile Decoy system
Integrated Sonar System incorporating a hull mounted and towed array sonar
Communications Suite
Aviation Flightdeck and hangar for one helicopter
Boats Two Rigid Hulled Inflatable Boats (RHIBs)

 

This computer-generated animation highlights the multi-mission capability of the three naval destroyers being built as part of the Air Warfare Destroyer Project

 

Bofors for Macae

BAE Systems has been awarded a contract to produce and deliver five Bofors 40 Mk-4 Naval Guns for the Brazilian Navy’s 500T «Macae» Class Patrol Vessels. The 40 Mk-4 gun is the latest naval version of the successful Bofors 40-mm Gun that is used by many Navies and Coast Guards around the world.

The system is vital for defence against hostile ships, attack aircraft, anti-ship missiles and shore targets
The system is vital for defence against hostile ships, attack aircraft, anti-ship missiles and shore targets

«The versatility of our new 40-mm Naval Gun and Ammunition System is attractive to customers around the world», said Lena Gillström, managing director of Weapon Systems, Sweden at BAE Systems. «This award illustrates our strong position as a leading naval gun provider in the Americas».

Series production for the guns starts immediately with deliveries beginning in 2016 and continuing through 2018. A portion of the manufacturing of parts, subsystems, as well as final assembly and test will take place in Brazil through BAE Systems’ new and long-term partners. The company recently teamed with Ares Aeroespacial e Defensa S.A. of Rio de Janeiro for manufacturing, assembly, and installation, as well as after-sales activities for the 40 Mk-4 guns.

«This local production for the naval guns illustrates our commitment to establishing mutually beneficial partnerships with Brazilian industry», said Llyr Jones, vice president for Latin America and Canada at BAE Systems. «We’re applying similar principles with our other Brazilian programs».

In the last 40 years, BAE Systems has delivered close to one hundred 40-mm Guns to the Brazilian Navy, Marine Corps, and Army, as well as many thousands of rounds of 40-mm ammunition. The company’s programmable, multi-purpose 3P round has been manufactured in Brazil since 1999.

In addition to Brazil, countries currently using BAE Systems’ 40-mm Guns include Japan, Sweden, Finland, Iceland, Estonia, Uruguay, Indonesia, and Malaysia.

The weapon is equipped with a superior level of target capability, beyond the engagement ability of conventional gun systems
The weapon is equipped with a superior level of target capability, beyond the engagement ability of conventional gun systems

 

Bofors 40 Mk-4

Its low weight and compact dimensions combine with a long range and a high rate of fire. It has the capability to rapidly switch between optimized ammunition types, including programmable 40-mm 3P all-target ammo. This delivers high tactical and operational flexibility alongside outstanding survivability, giving ships the advantage in conflicts of any kind.

The Bofors 40 Mk-4 can go from warning to destruction in less than 0.5 seconds. The 3P ammo can be programmed for optimized effect against any target, including airburst patterns for new threats that were previously impossible to engage. The automatically loaded, remotely controlled weapon can also be locally controlled as a backup, equipping the operator for any scenario.

The system’s lightweight and modest size is made possible by innovative features including its electric drive system. It also has a fully digitised modular architecture, providing weapon synergies and future flexibility. Programmable 3P ammo means less round types are needed, reducing transport, storage, weight and space. These aspects combine to provide straightforward, cost-effective integration.

Dimensions
Dimensions

 

TECHNICAL DATA

STANDARD SPECIFICATIONS
Calibre 40-mm L/70
Weight excluding ammunition <2,500 kg/5,511.56 lbs
Height <2.0 m/6.56 feet
Elevation limits -20 to +80 degrees
Training limits unlimited (slip ring)
Remote control with gyro-stabilised local control back-up
PERFORMANCE
Maximum range 12,500 m/7.77 miles/6.75 NM
Rate of fire 300 rounds/min
Muzzle velocity 1012 m/s/3,643 km/h/2,264 mph (3P)
From warning to destruction <0.5 seconds
Number of rounds available in gun ≥100
Barrel life up to 5,000 rounds
OPTIONS
On-mount TV camera
On-mount muzzle velocity radar
6-mode programmable all-target 3P ammunition
Computer-controlled burst pattern
Air burst capability for small boat defence and engagement of concealed targets

100 rounds ready to fire with the possibility to shift between different types of ammunition

USS Constitution

The world’s oldest commissioned warship afloat is no longer afloat after entering dry dock May 19 for a planned multi-year restoration. USS Constitution, eased into historic Dry Dock 1 at Charlestown Navy Yard Boston National Historical Park with the help and coordination of a large team of stakeholders including the ship’s crew, Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, Naval History and Heritage Command’s Maintenance Detachment Boston, USS Constitution Museum, and the National Park Service.

USS Constitution enters Dry Dock 1 in Charlestown Navy Yard to commence a multi-year planned restoration period (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Matthew R. Fairchild/Released)
USS Constitution enters Dry Dock 1 in Charlestown Navy Yard to commence a multi-year planned restoration period (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Matthew R. Fairchild/Released)

«We couldn’t have asked for better weather or better support from the dedicated team of professionals who helped with the docking», said Commander Sean Kearns, USS Constitution’s 73rd commanding officer. «We are now positioned to carry out the restoration work which will return Constitution to the water preserving her for the next generation of Americans to enjoy and learn about our nation’s great naval heritage».

Since entering service in the U.S. Navy on October 21, 1797, USS Constitution, undefeated in combat, remains a commissioned U.S. Navy warship. However, since 1907, the ship has been on display opening her decks to the public. According to Naval History and Heritage Command Director Sam Cox, that mission is an important one.

«Her mission today is to preserve and promote U.S. Navy heritage by sharing the history of ‘Old Ironsides’ and the stories of the men and women who have faithfully served with distinction on the warship’s decks for 217 years. When a visitor sets foot on the deck of USS Constitution, he or she is making contact with the beginnings of the U.S. Navy, a navy that has kept the sea lanes free for more than 200 years. Keeping her ready to do so is incredibly important», said Cox.

«Constitution was the product of unique American ingenuity», Cox continued. «At a time when the U.S. Navy was outnumbered by the great European navies, Constitution was designed to outgun anything she couldn’t outrun, and outrun anything she couldn’t out-gun. Coupled with great captains and well-trained and disciplined Sailors, that is why she was undefeated».

According to Vice Admiral William Hilarides, the commander of the Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA), which oversees the development, delivery and maintenance of the Navy’s ships, the 217-year-old Constitution is a stark reminder of the importance of sound ship design, construction and maintenance.

«The Navy’s strength comes from its Sailors who must be equipped with ships and tools that make it possible for them to successfully sail into harm’s way, and then return safely home to their families», said Hilarides. «When you look at what was cutting edge Naval technology in the late 18th century, you can see Constitution’s crews were equipped with the best tools in the world which enabled them to achieve such a remarkable record of success in combat. It’s a tradition of design, construction and maintenance excellence that continues in America’s shipyards today».

Still, Hilarides said, like any of the Navy’s other nearly 300 commissioned warships, USS Constitution must be maintained to carry out its vital mission.

Constitution enters Dry Dock 1 in Charlestown Navy Yard (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Victoria Kinney/Released)
Constitution enters Dry Dock 1 in Charlestown Navy Yard (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Victoria Kinney/Released)

This restoration will last more than two years and marks the first time Constitution will have been dry docked since 1992. The work of this restoration will include:

  • replacing lower hull planking and caulking;
  • removing the 1995 copper sheathing and replacing it with 3,400 sheets of new copper that will protect the ship’s hull below the waterline;
  • replacement of select deck beams;
  • on-going preservation and repair of the ship’s rigging, upper masts, and yards.

The estimated cost of the restoration is expected to be $12 million to $15 million and is part of the ongoing care and maintenance the ship receives. It will be a complex work package and among those completing it, is a cadre of craftsmen from the Naval History and Heritage Command’s Maintenance Detachment Boston who have the delicate job of melding new tools and technology into an endeavor that often requires extensive, knowledge of 18th century shipbuilding techniques.

«We do work with modern tools but we still use some of the old methods; the hull planks are still pinned through the deck but we use hydraulics and pneumatics to pull them out», said Detachment Boston’s director, Richard Moore, who says the restoration will require specialized talents. «Back in the day if someone went down, they had someone to replace them. It’s not so easy nowadays to replace a person with someone who is up to speed and knows what they are doing».

Still he believes his team is up to the challenge and he knows they are excited to be a part of the historic restoration.

«They realize the undertaking they are on. I emphasize it all the time, that this is, in my words, ‘a big deal.’ They all know how important it is, they are all proud to work on this vessel, they take such great care and their workmanship is great. I am very proud to work here and so are they».

Beginning June 9, Constitution will reopen to the public and remain open throughout the restoration with tours scheduled:

  • Tuesday through Friday from 2 p.m. until 6 p.m.;
  • Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. (closed Mondays).

Visitors will see something remarkable – an active shipyard with craftspeople including, blacksmiths, wood workers and others, working to make sure USS Constitution remains ship shape for future generations.

This is Constitution's first time in dry dock since its 1992-1996 restoration (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Matthew R. Fairchild/Released)
This is Constitution’s first time in dry dock since its 1992-1996 restoration (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Matthew R. Fairchild/Released)

 

General Characteristics

Builder Colonel George Claghorn, Edmond Harrt’s Shipyard, Boston, Massachusetts
Date Deployed October 21, 1797
Unit Cost $302,718 (1797 dollars)
Propulsion 42,710 feet2/3,968 m2 of sail on three masts
Length 204 feet/62.16 m (billet head to taffrail)
175 feet/53.32 m at waterline
Mast height Foremast, 198 feet/60.33 m
Mainmast, 220 feet/67.03 m
Mizzenmast, 172.5 feet/52.56 m
Beam 43.5 feet/13.25 m
Displacement 2,200 tons
Speed 13+ knots/15 mph, 24 km/h
Crew 450 including 55 Marines and 30 boys (1797)
Armament 32 24-pounder/11-kg long guns
20 32-pounder/14.5-kg carronades
Two 24-pounder/11-kg bow chasers
Landing/Attack Craft One 36-feet/11-meter long boat
Two 30-feet/9-meter cutters, two 28-feet/8.5-meter whaleboats
One 28-feet/8.5-meter gig
One 22-feet/6.7-meter jolly boat
One 14-feet/4.3-meter punt
Anchors Two main bowers (5,300 lbs/2,404 kg)
One sheet anchor (5,400 lbs/2,449 kg)
One stream anchor (1,100 lbs/499 kg)
Two kedge anchors (400 to 700 lbs/ 181 to 318 kg)
Homeport Charlestown Navy Yard, Boston, Massachusetts

 

Milestone C

Raytheon Company and the U.S. Air Force successfully completed the Small Diameter Bomb II (SDB II) Milestone C decision briefing, paving the way for the program to enter Low Rate Initial (LRI) production. SDB II is an all-weather solution that continues to provide precision even in limited visibility scenarios.

With its tri-mode seeker, the Small Diameter Bomb II destroys moving and stationary targets in adverse weather
With its tri-mode seeker, the Small Diameter Bomb II destroys moving and stationary targets in adverse weather

Unlike standard bombs, SDB II employs Raytheon’s revolutionary tri-mode seeker that operates in three different modes:

  • millimeter-wave radar;
  • uncooled imaging infrared;
  • semi-active laser.

SDB II can strike targets from a range of more than 40 nautical miles/46 miles/74 km, with a dynamic warhead that can destroy both soft and hard targets. The bomb can also change targets in-flight through the use of a secure datalink.

Locked and loaded, the F-15E fighter aircraft can carry seven groups of four Small Diameter Bomb IIs, for a total of 28 weapons
Locked and loaded, the F-15E fighter aircraft can carry seven groups of four Small Diameter Bomb IIs, for a total of 28 weapons

«The Milestone C decision enables us to begin putting this game-changing capability into the warfighters’ hands», said Colonel Kevin Hickman, USAF SDB II program manager. «The ability to strike moving targets with extreme precision in adverse weather reduces an aircrew’s time in harm’s way and limits collateral damage in the battlespace».

The Milestone C achievement follows a successful functional configuration audit, production readiness review and system verification review. Milestone C will lead to a positive acquisition decision memorandum validating the preparedness of the company and the weapon system to continue to production.

«Achieving Milestone C marks the hard work of the U.S. government and Raytheon teams to verify that we meet or exceed the requirements necessary for a Lot 1 production decision», said Jim Sweetman, SDB II program director for Raytheon Missile Systems. «SDB II’s unique capabilities help ensure that our warfighters maintain their unfair advantage in the fight».

Raytheon, the U.S. Navy and U.S. Air Force have begun Small Diameter Bomb II integration activities on the F-35, F/A-18E/F and F-16 aircrafts
Raytheon, the U.S. Navy and U.S. Air Force have begun Small Diameter Bomb II integration activities on the F-35, F/A-18E/F and F-16 aircrafts

 

Small Diameter Bomb II

SDB II employs Raytheon’s unprecedented tri-mode seeker. The new seeker operates in multi-attack modes: millimeter-wave radar, uncooled imaging infrared and semi-active laser. These sensors enable the weapon to seek and destroy targets, both moving and stationary, even in adverse weather conditions from standoff ranges.

SDB II can strike targets from a range of more than 40 nautical miles/46 miles/74 km, with a dynamic warhead that can destroy both soft and armored targets, while keeping collateral damage to a minimum through a small explosive footprint. The highly accurate SDB II offers warfighters the flexibility to change targets after release through a secure datalink that passes in-flight updates to the weapon.

The Department of Defense has validated SDB II as a weapon that meets a critical warfighter need and has invested more than $700 million in the SDB II program.

SDB II can fly over 46 miles/74 km to meet its target, allowing the warfighter to maintain a secure distance from the threat
SDB II can fly over 46 miles/74 km to meet its target, allowing the warfighter to maintain a secure distance from the threat

 

This animation depicts a Raytheon Small Diameter Bomb II using laser guidance to track and destroy a target.

 

This animation depicts an F-15E aircraft employing a Raytheon Small Diameter Bomb II.

 

This animation depicts an F-15 employing a Raytheon Small Diameter Bomb II. Using its advanced Tri-mode seeker, the SDB II targets and destroys a moving vehicle.

 

Small Diameter Bomb II can fly more than 45 miles to strike mobile targets, reducing aircrews’ time in harm’s way. The weapon’s small size allows fewer aircraft to take out the same number of targets as previous, larger weapons that required multiple jets.

 

Operational Trials

Six U.S. Marine Corps F-35B Lightning II jet aircraft arrived on the evening of May 18, 2015 aboard the USS Wasp (LHD-1) off the coast of the United States’ Eastern Seaboard to mark the beginning of the first shipboard phase of the F-35B Operational Test (OT-1).

A sailor aboard the USS Wasp (LHD-1) signals to the pilot of an F-35B Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter to land as it arrives for the first phase of operational testing, May 18, 2015. The short take-off, vertical landing capabilities of the F-35B are crucial to the mission of the Marine Corps and necessary for operation aboard a Navy amphibious ship (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Remington Hall/Released)
A sailor aboard the USS Wasp (LHD-1) signals to the pilot of an F-35B Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter to land as it arrives for the first phase of operational testing, May 18, 2015. The short take-off, vertical landing capabilities of the F-35B are crucial to the mission of the Marine Corps and necessary for operation aboard a Navy amphibious ship (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Remington Hall/Released)

The at-sea period will continue aboard USS Wasp (LHD-1) for the next two weeks, with fleet representative aircraft and maintenance personnel from Marine Operational Test and Evaluation Squadron 22, Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 121, Marine Fighter Attack Training Squadron 501, and Marine Aviation Logistics Squadrons 13 and 31.

OT-1 will assess the integration of the F-35B while operating across a wide array of flight and deck operations. Specific OT-1 objectives include:

  • demonstrating and assessing day and night flight operations in varying aircraft configurations;
  • digital interoperability of aircraft and ship systems;
  • F-35B landing signal officer’s launch and recovery software;
  • day and night weapons loading;
  • all aspects of maintenance, logistics, and sustainment support of the F-35B while deployed at sea.

Additionally, the U.S. Navy-Marine Corps team is working closely with Naval Sea Systems Command to assess specific modifications made to USS Wasp (LHD-1) to support future deployments.

«The F-35 Lightning II is the most versatile, agile and technologically-advanced aircraft in the skies today, enabling our Marine Corps to be the nation’s force in readiness, regardless of the threat, and regardless of the location of the battle», said Lieutenant General Jon Davis, the Deputy Commandant for Marine Corps Aviation. «As we modernize our fixed-wing aviation assets for the future, the continued development and fielding of the short take-off and vertical landing, the F-35B remains the centerpiece of this effort».

Data collected and lessons learned during OT-1 will lay the groundwork for F-35B deployments aboard U.S. Navy amphibious carriers following the Marine Corps’ F-35B Initial Operating Capability (IOC) declaration planned for this coming July.

Marines and sailors aboard the USS Wasp (LHD-1) secure and refuel an F-35B Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter after its arrival for the first session of operational testing, May 18, 2015. Data and information gathered from OT-1 will lay the groundwork for F-35B deployments aboard Navy amphibious ships and the announcement of the Marine Corps' initial operating capacity of the F-35B in July (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Remington Hall/Released)
Marines and sailors aboard the USS Wasp (LHD-1) secure and refuel an F-35B Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter after its arrival for the first session of operational testing, May 18, 2015. Data and information gathered from OT-1 will lay the groundwork for F-35B deployments aboard Navy amphibious ships and the announcement of the Marine Corps’ initial operating capacity of the F-35B in July (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Remington Hall/Released)

 

F-35B SPECIFICATIONS

Length:                                                       51.2 feet/15.6 m

Height:                                                       14.3 feet/4.36 m

Wingspan:                                                35 feet/10.7 m

Wing area:                                                460 feet2/42.7 m2

Horizontal tail span:                           21.8 feet/6.65 m

Weight empty:                                       32,300 lbs/14,651 kg

Internal fuel capacity:                        13,500 lb/6,125 kg

Weapons payload:                               15,000 lbs/6,800 kg

Maximum weight:                                60,000 lbs class/27,215 kg

Standard internal weapons load:

Two AIM-120C Air-to-Air Missiles

Two 2,000-pound/907-kg GBU-31 JDAM (Joint Direct Attack Munition) guided bombs

Four F-35B Lighting II Joing Strike Fighters (JSF) sit secured to the deck after their arrival aboard the USS Wasp (LHD-1), May 18, 2015. As the future of Marine Corps aviation, the F-35B will eventually replace all aircraft from three legacy Marine Corps platforms; the AV-8B Harrier, the F/A-18 Hornet, and the EA-6B Prowler (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Remington Hall/Released)
Four F-35B Lighting II Joing Strike Fighters (JSF) sit secured to the deck after their arrival aboard the USS Wasp (LHD-1), May 18, 2015. As the future of Marine Corps aviation, the F-35B will eventually replace all aircraft from three legacy Marine Corps platforms; the AV-8B Harrier, the F/A-18 Hornet, and the EA-6B Prowler (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Remington Hall/Released)

Propulsion (uninstalled thrust ratings):    F135-PW-600

Maximum Power (with afterburner):         41,000 lbs/182,4 kN/ 18,597 kgf

Military Power (without afterburner):      27,000 lbs/120,1 kN/ 12,247 kgf

Short Take Off Thrust:                              40,740 lbs/181,2 kN/18,479 kgf

Hover Thrust:                                                 40,650 lbs/180,8 kN/18,438 kgf

Main Engine:                                                   18,680 lbs/83,1 kN/8,473 kgf

Lift Fan:                                                              18,680 lbs/83,1 kN/8,473 kgf

Roll Post:                                                           3,290 lbs/14,6 kN/1,492 kgf

Length:                                                               369 in/9.37 m

Main Engine Inlet Diameter:                 43 in/1.09 m

Main Engine Maximum Diameter:     46 in/1.17 m

Lift Fan Inlet Diameter:                            51 in/1,30 m

Lift Fan Maximum Diameter:               53 in/1,34 m

Conventional Bypass Ratio:                  0.57

Powered Lift Bypass Ratio:                   0.51

Conventional Overall Pressure Ratio:         28

Powered Lift Overall Pressure Ratio:          29

An F-35B Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter idles on the flight deck of the USS Wasp (LHD-1) in preparation for take-off, May 18, 2015 (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Remington Hall/Released)
An F-35B Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter idles on the flight deck of the USS Wasp (LHD-1) in preparation for take-off, May 18, 2015 (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Remington Hall/Released)

Speed (full internal weapons load):               Mach 1.6 (~1,200 mph/1,931 km/h)

Combat radius (internal fuel):                          >450 NM/833 km

Range (internal fuel):                                             >900 NM/1,667 km

Max g-rating:                                                              7.0

 

Planned Quantities

U.S. Marine Corps:                                        340;

U.K. Royal Air Force/Royal Navy:        138;

Italy:                                                                          30;

In total:                                                                  508

Two F-35B Lightning II Joint Strike Fighters complete vertical landings aboard the USS Wasp (LHD-1) during the opening day of the first session of operational testing, May 18, 2015 (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Remington Hall/Released)
Two F-35B Lightning II Joint Strike Fighters complete vertical landings aboard the USS Wasp (LHD-1) during the opening day of the first session of operational testing, May 18, 2015 (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Remington Hall/Released)

ASW Corvette

The Fourth Anti Submarine Warfare (ASW) Corvette of Project-28, christened Kavaratti, was launched on May 19 at a glittering ceremony held at Garden Reach Shipbuilders and Engineers Ltd (GRSE), Kolkata. The Honorable Raksha Rajya Mantri, Shri Rao Inderjit Singh was the Chief Guest at the occasion. In keeping with the nautical traditions, the ship was launched by Smt Manita Singh, wife of the Honorable Raksha Rajya Mantri. After an invocation to the Gods was recited, Smt Manita Singh broke a coconut on the Ship’s Bow, named the ship and wished her future crew good luck.

The future INS Kavaratti, an anti-submarine warfare corvette displacing 3,300 tonnes, was launched today at the Garden Reach Shipbuilders and Engineers Ltd shipyard in Kolkata (India MoD photo)
The future INS Kavaratti, an anti-submarine warfare corvette displacing 3,300 tonnes, was launched today at the Garden Reach Shipbuilders and Engineers Ltd shipyard in Kolkata (India MoD photo)

Speaking on the occasion the Honorable Raksha Rajya Mantri, Rao Inderjit Singh lauded the contributions made by GRSE, Kolkata in meeting the growing requirements of the Indian Navy. Admiral RK Dhowan, Chief of the Naval Staff, during his address acknowledged the excellent work done by the yard for contributing towards achieving Indian Navy’s dream of transforming itself from a «Buyers Navy» to «Builders Navy». He also commended the work of DGND and his team at Directorate of Naval Design in designing state of the art warships for the country.

The four ships of Project-28 built by GRSE, Kolkata have been designed indigenously by the Directorate of Naval Design, New Delhi and bear testimony to the acclaimed legacy of Naval Designers. The ships have been constructed using high grade steel (DMR 249A) produced in India. With a displacement of 3,300 tonnes, the sleek and magnificent ASW Corvettes span 109.1 meters/358 feet in length and 13.7 meters/45 feet at the beam. They are propelled by four diesel engines to achieve speeds in excess of 25 knots/29 mph/46 km/h and have an endurance of more than 3,000 NM/3,452 miles/5,556 km.

The P-28 corvettes also boast of «firsts» such as the revolutionary Rail-less Helo Traversing System, Foldable Hangar Door, use of Personnel Locator System and use of Carbon Fibre Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) Superstructure integrated with the Steel Hull in the third (INS Kiltan) and fourth (INS Kavaratti) ships of the Kamorta-Class.

These ships have common raft mounted Gear Box and Diesel Engines, which give the vessels very low radiated underwater noise. This is well complemented with an efficient propeller with very high cavitation inception speed. The P-28 Ships also have Total Atmospheric Control System (TACS) and an Integrated Platform Management System (IPMS), which include Integrated Bridge System as well as Battle Damage Control System.

The ASW Corvettes also incorporate new design concepts for improved survivability, sea keeping, stealth and manoeuvrability. Enhanced stealth features have been achieved by including Low Radar Cross Section (RCS) signature through full beam superstructure, inclined ship sides and reduced Infra-Red (IR) signature by use of Infra-Red Suppression System (IRSS) device for cooling the Engine and Diesel Alternator exhausts. The ships are also equipped to carry and operate one multiple role helicopter.

Kavaratti will also be packed with an array of state of art weapons and sensors, including a Medium Range Gun (from M/s Bharat Heavy Electrical Ltd), Torpedo Tube Launchers (2 × 3) as well as Rocket Launchers (from M/s Larsen & Tubro), Close-In Weapon System (from M/s Gun and Shell Factory) and Chaff System (from M/s Machine Tool Prototype Factory). With significant indigenous content, the Ship is a true hallmark of self-reliance attained by our country in warship design and shipbuilding.

All the ships names of the class are reincarnations of ships from the previous Arnala-class corvettes which are considered the spiritual predecessors of the Kamorta-class
All the ships names of the class are reincarnations of ships from the previous Arnala-class corvettes which are considered the spiritual predecessors of the Kamorta-class

 

General Characteristics

Length Overall 358 feet/109.1 m
Beam 45 feet/13.7 m
Displacement 3,300 tonnes
Max Speed 25 knots/29 mph/46 km/h
Endurance at 18 knots/21 mph/33 km/h 3,450 NM/3,970 miles/6,389 km
Main Engine 4 × 3,888 kW
Diesel Generators 2 × 1,000 kW & 2 × 500 kW
Crew 123 including 17 officers & 106 sailors
INS Kamorta is the first of four anti-submarine Kamorta-class stealth corvettes which has been built for the Indian Navy
INS Kamorta is the first of four anti-submarine Kamorta-class stealth corvettes which has been built for the Indian Navy

The latest RAM

The US Navy successfully completed tests of the Rolling Airframe Block 2 missile at the Navy’s Pacific Missile Test Range, May 10. The missiles were launched from a Self Defense Test Ship operated by the Naval Surface Warfare Center Port Hueneme and intercepted turbojet-powered targets emulating enemy anti-ship cruise missiles.

The Rolling Airframe Missile Block 2 is the latest step in the development of the weapon system
The Rolling Airframe Missile Block 2 is the latest step in the development of the weapon system

Testing continued with another successful firing, using two RAM Block 2 missiles, meeting all test objectives May 12. Scheduled over the next several months, these were the first of a series of planned tests to demonstrate RIM-116 Rolling Airframe Missile (RAM) Block 2 performance against anti-ship cruise missile threats at sea. The Block 2 missile will now have flight tests from an operational ship.

«With an Evolved Radio Frequency (ERF) receiver and improved kinematics, RAM Block 2 was designed to engage these types of LPI (Low-Probability Intercept) and maneuvering threats», said Captain John Keegan, RAM major program manager. «Our success over the last several days is the first step in proving Block 2’s operational effectiveness and suitability for fleet use».

The Block 2 missile is the latest RAM configuration. The missile provides improvements in sensitivity, maneuverability, and range over the existing Block 0 and Block 1A variants currently deployed. RAM Block 2 missile is in Low Rate Initial Production (LRIP) with an approved U.S. inventory objective of 2,093 missiles.

The Rolling Airframe Missile is a supersonic, lightweight, quick reaction, fire-and-forget missile that provides defense against anti-ship cruise missiles, helicopter and airborne threats, and hostile surface craft
The Rolling Airframe Missile is a supersonic, lightweight, quick reaction, fire-and-forget missile that provides defense against anti-ship cruise missiles, helicopter and airborne threats, and hostile surface craft

RAM is a cooperative development, production and in-service program between the United States and Federal Republic of Germany in the Program Executive Office Integrated Warfare Systems’ (PEO IWS) portfolio. The RAM missile is a supersonic, lightweight, quick reaction, fire-and-forget missile that defends against anti-ship cruise missiles.

It is jointly developed and produced by Raytheon Missile Systems and RAMSYS GmbH. In addition to being deployed in the U.S. and German fleets, the RAM system is also in-service or planned for in-service in the navies of Egypt, Greece, Japan, Republic of Korea, Turkey, and the United Arab Emirates.

PEO IWS, an affiliated program executive office of the Naval Sea Systems Command, manages surface ship and submarine combat technologies and systems, and coordinates Navy Enterprise solutions across ship platforms.

The Rolling Airframe Missile provides world-class ship self-defense for U.S. Navy carriers, amphibious ships and littoral combat ships
The Rolling Airframe Missile provides world-class ship self-defense for U.S. Navy carriers, amphibious ships and littoral combat ships

 

RIM-116 Rolling Airframe Missile Block 2

RAM Block 2, the latest step in the development of the Rolling Airframe Missile, is a kinematic and Radio Frequency (RF) receiver upgrade of Block 1/1A. A larger, more powerful, composite case rocket motor and advanced Control Section (4 canards vs. current 2) make the missile two and a half times more maneuverable with one and a half times the effective intercept range. This provides the Block 2 missile with the capability to defeat high-maneuvering threats, increasing the survivability of the defended ship. An enhanced RF receiver allows detection of anti-ship missiles that employ low probability of intercept receivers.

The Mk-44 Guided Missile Round Pack (GMRP) and the Mk-49 Guided Missile Launching System (GMLS), which hold 21 missiles, comprise the Mk-31 Guided Missile Weapon System (GMWS). The system is designed for flexibility in ships’ integration, with no dedicated sensors required. A variety of existing ship sensors can readily provide the target and pointing information required to engage the anti-ship threat.

The Mk-44 GMRP is also the missile used in the SeaRAM Anti-Ship Missile Defense System, replacing the M601A1 Gatling gun in the Phalanx Close-In Weapon System (CIWS) with an 11-round launcher. The Phalanx sensor suite serves as the search and track radar designating the threat for RAM missiles to intercept.

The Rolling Airframe Missile Block 2 upgrade includes a four-axis independent control actuator system and an increase in rocket motor capability
The Rolling Airframe Missile Block 2 upgrade includes a four-axis independent control actuator system and an increase in rocket motor capability

 

General Characteristics

Primary Function Ship Self Defense
Contractor Raytheon
Missile Capacity (Mk-49 GMLS) 21
Length 9.45 feet/2.88 m
Diameter 6.25 inch/15.87 cm
Wingspan 12.65 inch/32.17 cm
Weight 194.4 lbs/88.2 kg
Speed Supersonic
The Rolling Airframe Missile’s autonomous dual-mode, passive radio frequency and infrared guidance design provide a high-firepower capability for engaging multiple threats simultaneously
The Rolling Airframe Missile’s autonomous dual-mode, passive radio frequency and infrared guidance design provide a high-firepower capability for engaging multiple threats simultaneously