Canadian Combatant

Rheinmetall Canada and Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI) subsidiary ELTA Systems (IAI/ELTA) have joined forces to propose the state-of-the-art, operationally proven MF-STAR radar for the Canadian Surface Combatant (CSC) programme. Like this team’s success in bringing the battle-proven Medium Range Radar (MRR) of «Iron Dome» fame to the Canadian Army, ELM-2248 MF-STAR will provide the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) with a built-in-Canada, cutting-edge, fully digital, multifunctional Active Electronically Scanned Array (AESA) naval radar for long-range air and surface surveillance and tracking. The MF-STAR radar is based on the same radar technology as the MRR currently in production at Rheinmetall Canada’s plant in Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, Québec.

A Canadian, cost effective, proven and low risk CSC radar solution
A Canadian, cost effective, proven and low risk CSC radar solution

The MF-STAR antenna includes four fixed faces of active arrays in S-band frequency, delivering a high-quality air and surface situation picture and weapon support – particularly in severely cluttered target, electronic, topographical and environmental conditions. With advanced technology and robust system architecture, the MF-STAR employs unique, proven multi-beam and pulse doppler techniques to extract low Radar Cross-Section (RCS) targets from complex clutter and jamming environments.

Moreover, the MF-STAR radar can be easily scaled to fit different requirements and different ship sizes – from 1200-tonne corvettes to frigate/destroyers weighing 7000+ tons. The radar is already in service with two navies in missions similar to those proposed for the CSC.

Importantly, the MF-STAR’s 360-degree coverage and fully multifunction operation minimizes the installation requirements to a single system, thus reducing the upper deck «footprint». MF-STAR’s in-service record and the ongoing delivery of the MRR means reduced operational, technological and programme risk – from contract award to delivery and beyond from an established Canadian company which has recently concluded over $1 billion in Industrial and Technological Benefit (ITB) transactions with Canada.

«We are honoured to extend our teaming with Rheinmetall Canada to include the state-of-the-art MF-STAR radar», declared Mr. Nissim Hadas, IAI Executive VP & ELTA President. «MF-STAR radar is already operational and provides excellent value to our customers».

«This partnership with IAI/ELTA Systems is of strategic importance to Rheinmetall Canada», stated Rheinmetall Canada’s President and CEO, Dr. Andreas Knackstedt. «Our successful teaming with IAI/ELTA on the MRR programme positions Rheinmetall as a leading Canadian radar company. We are building on this experience to offer the MF-STAR radar for the CSC programme and firmly establish Rheinmetall Canada as the in-country radar provider and supporter to DND and the Canadian Forces».

«Furthermore», added Dr. Knackstedt, «we know that it’s not only necessary to provide the best product at the best price to the Canadian government, but to bring value to the Canadian economy. We did this with MRR and achieved 80% identified offsets at bid response. This expertise is essential to any prime contractor and we have the right know-how».

 

Features:

  • Fast threat alert response time;
  • Very high tracking update rate and accuracy for priority targets;
  • Short search frame/ Track While Scan (TWS) revisit time;
  • Mid-course guidance of active/semi-active anti-air missiles;
  • Illuminator enslavement for semi-active missiles;
  • Automatic splash detection and measurement for gunnery support;
  • Instantaneous multi-beam;
  • Advanced beam forming techniques for Electronic Counter-CounterMeasures (ECCM);
  • Lightweight antenna;
  • Scalable, modular active solid-state phased array;
  • High reliability and high availability.

 

Operational Capabilities:

  • Blue water and littoral warfare support;
  • Simultaneous multi-engagement support;
  • Active and semi active missile support;
  • 3D long-range air surveillance;
  • 3D medium range automatic threat alert;
  • Missile horizon search and threat alert;
  • Maritime surface surveillance;
  • Target classification (including Helo);
  • Gunnery control and splash spotting.

 

Performances and Parameters

Automatic track initiation
Low flying attacking missile > 25 km/15.5 miles
High flying fighter aircraft > 120 km/74.5 miles
Rx/Tx S-Band solid state
Antenna 4 static arrays
Spatial coverage
Azimuth 360°
Elevation -20° – +85°
Weight 1,500 kg/3,307 lbs per face
900 kg/1,984 lbs below deck

 

Specialist center

A new center containing facilities to support the new Queen Elizabeth Class aircraft carriers is nearing completion at Portsmouth Naval Base. The Queen Elizabeth Class Centre of Specialisation will cover an area of 70,000 square meters – approximately the size of 10 football pitches. It will include a 7,000 square meter Forward Support Centre able to hold 15,000 pallets of medical, mail and naval stores under one roof, a café seating more than 500 people at any one time and a reception center for all those working on or visiting the carriers.

The Queen Elizabeth Class Centre of Specialisation works are nearing completion
The Queen Elizabeth Class Centre of Specialisation works are nearing completion

The center will house employees of Team Portsmouth, a partnership between the Ministry of Defence and BAE Systems, with engineers, logisticians and waterfront staff working alongside each other to plan and deliver the maintenance for these ships.

Mike Howarth, Managing Director for BAE Systems Maritime Services in Portsmouth, said: «At 65,000 tonnes the new carriers are the largest and most complex naval ships built in the UK. It’s essential that they have high quality facilities and highly skilled people to support them. This center will be the home not just for the carriers; it will also be home for the military and civilian people who support them. With improvements to the jetty and construction of a high voltage power station already in its final stages, you can now see that we are well on the way to being ready for HMS Queen Elizabeth’s arrival next year».

Commodore Jeremy Rigby, Naval Base Commander, said: «The work on the Queen Elizabeth Class center is yet another tangible milestone in getting the Naval Base ready to support our new aircraft carriers. A huge amount of activity is in train ashore and in the harbour to make sure we are ready to receive HMS Queen Elizabeth. These are exciting times for the Naval Base and the wider Portsmouth area as we prepare for these huge ships which have secured the future of the base for the rest of the century. BAE Systems is working in partnership with the Royal Navy under the Team Portsmouth banner to improve the Queen Elizabeth Class Ships’ Company experience that the carrier’s crew will receive at the waterfront and provide the resources, information, material and facilities they will need in Portsmouth and on operations around the world».

Mark Lancaster, Minister for Defence Personnel and Veterans, was at Portsmouth Naval Base to see the progress on the infrastructure works. He said: «This new Centre of Specialisation will ensure that our highly skilled engineers, logisticians and waterfront staff are well supported, and have the facilities they need as Portsmouth becomes the home of the Queen Elizabeth Class Carriers next year. Our £100 million investment in the naval base and the arrival of the carriers will support and sustain thousands of jobs across the region».

The creation of a dedicated area for the carriers forms part of the overall vision for Portsmouth Naval Base – four dedicated areas to support the ships based ships. The first of these dedicated areas was opened in 2015 as the Centre of Specialisation for Frigates and Destroyers, while work began on minehunter HMS Brocklesby (M33) in the new Small Ships Centre of Specialisation in early May.

Specialist center to support aircraft carriers takes shape
Specialist center to support aircraft carriers takes shape

Tanker Schedule

Boeing KC-46 Pegasus aircraft are now expected to arrive at their first basing locations by late summer or early fall 2017. The Boeing KC-46 Pegasus was most recently scheduled for a spring 2017 arrival at Altus Air Force Base (AFB), Oklahoma, the first formal training unit location; and McConnell AFB, Kansas, the first active duty-led KC-46 Pegasus main operating base. But after a schedule risk assessment, Air Force officials determined the fielding timeline needed to be extended.

The U.S. Air Force is moving its formal production decision on the Boeing KC-46 tanker program – known as Milestone C – from June 2016 to August 2016 to allow additional time to implement the solution to a refueling boom loads issue identified during flight testing earlier this year
The U.S. Air Force is moving its formal production decision on the Boeing KC-46 tanker program – known as Milestone C – from June 2016 to August 2016 to allow additional time to implement the solution to a refueling boom loads issue identified during flight testing earlier this year

Brigadier General Duke Richardson, the program executive officer for tankers, said, «Technical challenges with boom design and issues with certification of the centerline drogue system and wing air refueling pods have driven delays to low rate production approval and initial aircraft deliveries. Throughout KC-46 development, the Air Force remained cautiously optimistic that Boeing would quickly address these issues and meet the original goal», he continued. «However, we understand that no major procurement program is without challenges and the Air Force remains committed to ensuring all aircraft are delivered as technically required».

The multi-year tanker procurement program remains one of the service’s top priorities and the U.S. Air Force will continue to work with Boeing to find ways to mitigate delays.

«The Air Force considers the KC-46 a critical capability and it’s important to take the time necessary to get it right», Richardson said. «There is no increased cost to the government as a result of these changes».

Boeing continues to work on a solution to address the higher than expected boom axial loads recorded during C-17 Globemaster III air refueling demonstration flights.

The government now expects to make a low rate initial production decision, known as a Milestone C, in August 2016 to allow Boeing additional time to fix the loads issue and accomplish the remaining aerial refueling demonstrations with the required C-17 and A-10 Thunderbolt II aircraft. Following a successful decision, the U.S. Air Force will immediately award a contract for the first two production lots, followed by Lot 3 in January 2017.

The Boeing KC-46 Pegasus will provide improved capabilities, including boom and drogue refueling on the same sortie, worldwide navigation and communication, cargo capacity on the entire main deck floor, receiver air refueling, improved force protection and survivability, and multi-point air refueling capability.

At this time, aircraft deliveries to Pease Air National Guard Base, New Hampshire, remain unchanged at spring 2018.

The KC-46A Pegasus deploys the centerline boom for the first time October 9, 2015. The boom is the fastest way to refuel aircraft at 1,200 gallons per minute (Boeing photo/John D. Parker)
The KC-46A Pegasus deploys the centerline boom for the first time October 9, 2015. The boom is the fastest way to refuel aircraft at 1,200 gallons per minute (Boeing photo/John D. Parker)

 

General Characteristics

Primary Function Aerial refueling and airlift
Prime Contractor The Boeing Company
Power Plant 2 × Pratt & Whitney 4062
Thrust 62,000 lbs/275.790 kN/28,123 kgf – Thrust per High-Bypass engine (sea-level standard day)
Wingspan 157 feet, 8 inches/48.1 m
Length 165 feet, 6 inches/50.5 m
Height 52 feet, 10 inches/15.9 m
Maximum Take-Off Weight (MTOW) 415,000 lbs/188,240 kg
Maximum Landing Weight 310,000 lbs/140,614 kg
Fuel Capacity 212,299 lbs/96,297 kg
Maximum Transfer Fuel Load 207,672 lbs/94,198 kg
Maximum Cargo Capacity 65,000 lbs/29,484 kg
Maximum Airspeed 360 KCAS (Knots Calibrated AirSpeed)/0.86 M/414 mph/667 km/h
Service Ceiling 43,100 feet/13,137 m
Maximum Distance 7,299 NM/8,400 miles/13,518 km
Pallet Positions 18 pallet positions
Air Crew 15 permanent seats for aircrew, including aeromedical evacuation aircrew
Passengers 58 total (normal operations); up to 114 total (contingency operations)
Aeromedical Evacuation 58 patients (24 litters/34 ambulatory) with the AE Patient Support Pallet configuration; 6 integral litters carried as part of normal aircraft configuration equipment
The Boeing-built KC-46A Pegasus tanker takes off on its first flight, from Paine Field, Everett, Washington to Boeing Field, Seattle. The KC-46A is a multirole tanker Boeing is building for the U.S. Air Force that can refuel all allied and coalition military aircraft compatible with international aerial refueling procedures and can carry passengers, cargo and patients (Boeing photo)
The Boeing-built KC-46A Pegasus tanker takes off on its first flight, from Paine Field, Everett, Washington to Boeing Field, Seattle. The KC-46A is a multirole tanker Boeing is building for the U.S. Air Force that can refuel all allied and coalition military aircraft compatible with international aerial refueling procedures and can carry passengers, cargo and patients (Boeing photo)

SM-3 Flight Tests

The Missile Defense Agency (MDA) and U.S. Navy sailors aboard USS Hopper (DDG-70) successfully conducted two developmental flight tests of the Standard Missile-3 (SM-3) Block IB Threat Upgrade guided missile on May 25 and 26 off the west coast of Hawaii.

The flight tests, designated Controlled Test Vehicle-01a and CTV-02, demonstrated the successful performance of design modifications to the SM-3 third-stage rocket motor nozzle
The flight tests, designated Controlled Test Vehicle-01a and CTV-02, demonstrated the successful performance of design modifications to the SM-3 third-stage rocket motor nozzle

The flight tests, designated Controlled Test Vehicle-01a (CTV-01a) and CTV-02, demonstrated the successful performance of design modifications to the SM-3 Third-Stage Rocket Motor (TSRM) nozzle. The results of these flight tests will support a future SM-3 Block IB production authorization request.

«Based on the early data, the missiles performed as designed and validated the design modifications we made to further improve the reliability of the SM-3 Block IB», said MDA Director Vice Admiral Jim Syring. «I was very proud of the government and industry team in their performance this week and am appreciative of the support provided by USS Hopper (DDG-70) and her great crew».

During each test, Hopper’s Aegis Weapon System was prompted to generate a fire control solution and launch an SM-3 against a simulated target. No intercept was planned, and no live target missile was launched. The MDA and the U.S. Navy cooperatively manage the Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) program.

The results of these flight tests will support a future SM-3 Block IB production authorization request
The results of these flight tests will support a future SM-3 Block IB production authorization request

Iron Dome of the Sea

The Israeli Navy has completed a successful test of the Tamir Adir Missile Interceptor System, a sea-based version of the Iron Dome. The system will be able to shoot down short-range rockets to protect strategic assets at sea.

The Tamir Adir Missile Interceptor System was successfully tested by the Israeli Navy
The Tamir Adir Missile Interceptor System was successfully tested by the Israeli Navy

The test proved the ability of the «Iron Dome of the Sea» to operate on a highly dynamic, moving platform. During the test, multiple short-range rockets were fired from shore, all of which were classified as real threats by the Adir Radar System and targeted by the Tamir Weapon System.

«I can say all the threats shot toward our assets were targeted by the Adir radar – one of the most advanced naval radars that exists today – and interception was accomplished by Iron Dome», said Colonel Ariel Shir, the Israeli Navy’s Head of Combat Systems Development.

The system is capable of shooting down rockets similar to those launched from Gaza. The Tamir Adir Missile Interceptor System uses the same technology developed for Iron Dome, which was a game changer in Operation Protective Edge in 2014.

During the operation, it shot down Hamas rockets with a success rate of 90%. According to Colonel Shir, the test «proved the Israeli Navy’s ability to protect Israel’s strategic assets at sea against short-range strategic rockets».

The Tamir Adir system will work in conjunction with the Barak 8 Missile Defense System, which is designed to intercept sea-skimming missiles and defend against enemy aircraft. Together, they will protect Israel’s offshore assets, including natural gas rigs in Israel’s territorial waters. These gas rigs, 16 nautical miles/18.4 miles/29.6 km from the Gaza coast, have been unsuccessfully targeted by Hamas in the past.

The system, designed jointly by Israel Aerospace Industries, Rafael Industries, the Israel Ministry of Defense, and the Israeli Navy is prepared for its initial operational mission. It will soon be integrated, along with the Barak 8, for complete naval defense.

Meet the Iron Dome of the seas. The Tamir Adir Missile Defense System officially broke the land barrier with a successful interception on the high seas

Path to Launch

Northrop Grumman Corporation’s delivery of the fully integrated Optical Telescope Element (OTE) for NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope marks another major milestone toward the October 2018 launch of the largest telescope ever built for space.

The spacecraft, or bus, of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope is designed and developed at Northrop Grumman. The bus recently reached a major milestone, successfully completing first time power-on, showcasing the spacecraft's ability to provide observatory power and electrical resources for the Webb telescope
The spacecraft, or bus, of NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope is designed and developed at Northrop Grumman. The bus recently reached a major milestone, successfully completing first time power-on, showcasing the spacecraft’s ability to provide observatory power and electrical resources for the Webb telescope

Northrop Grumman delivered the OTE in March to NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. Northrop Grumman is under contract to Goddard and leads the industry team that designs and develops the Webb Telescope, its sunshield and spacecraft. Northrop Grumman has completed the integration, testing and delivery of the telescope.

The Webb telescope’s 18 hexagonal gold coated beryllium mirrors are supported by the telescope structure. The OTE hardware is made of the most precise graphite composite material system ever created, and contributes to the Webb Telescope’s ability to provide an unprecedented exploratory view into the formation of the first stars and galaxies formed over 13.5 billion years ago.

The precision manufacturing and integration of the 21.5-foot/6.5-meter telescope structure allow it to withstand the pressure and weight of the launch loads when stowed inside the 15-foot/4.6-meter-diameter fairing of the Ariane 5 rocket. The cutting-edge design and transformer like capabilities of the telescope structure allow it to fold-up and fit inside the launch vehicle, and then deploy once the Webb telescope reaches its ultimate destination, one million miles away from earth. Furthermore, throughout travel and deployment, the telescope simultaneously maintains its dimensional stability while also operating at cryogenic or extremely cold temperatures, approximately 400 degrees below zero Fahrenheit/240 degrees below zero Celsius. The telescope is the world’s first deployable structure of this size and dimensional stability ever designed and built.

«The significant milestone of completing and delivering the OTE to NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, marks the completion of the telescope, and attests to the commitment of our hardworking team», said Scott Texter, telescope manager, Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems. «The telescope structure is one of the four main elements of this revolutionary observatory. The other elements include: the spacecraft, sunshield and the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM), the latter of which is also complete. All of the elements require a collaborative team effort. We are all committed to the cause and excited about the upcoming phases of development as we prepare for launch in October 2018».

The next step in the progress of the telescope structure includes its integration with the ISIM to combine the OTE and ISIM, referred to as the OTIS. The OTIS will undergo vibration and acoustic testing by the end of this year, and then travel to NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, to undergo optical testing at vacuum and operational cryogenic temperatures, around 40 kelvin/233 degrees below zero Celsius. The OTIS will be delivered to Northrop Grumman’s Space Park facility in Redondo Beach, towards the end of 2017, where it will be integrated with the sunshield and spacecraft.

The James Webb Space Telescope is the world’s next-generation space observatory and successor to the Hubble Space Telescope. The most powerful space telescope ever built, the Webb Telescope will observe the most distant objects in the universe, provide images of the first galaxies formed and see unexplored planets around distant stars. The Webb Telescope is a joint project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Canadian Space Agency.

Poseidon first flight

Australia’s first P-8A Poseidon aircraft has completed its maiden flight. The aircraft flew a short distance from Renton Airfield to Boeing Field in Washington State USA, to where the P-8A’s sophisticated mission systems will be installed as part of project AIR 7000.

The first P-8A aircraft for the Royal Australian Air Force leaves Renton Field for Boeing Field in nearby Seattle, marking its transfer from Commercial Airplanes to Boeing Defense, Space & Security for final completion
The first P-8A aircraft for the Royal Australian Air Force leaves Renton Field for Boeing Field in nearby Seattle, marking its transfer from Commercial Airplanes to Boeing Defense, Space & Security for final completion

The $5.4 billion P-8A program will provide Australia’s future manned maritime patrol and response aircraft capability, replacing in part the AP-3C Orion aircraft.

The P-8A Poseidon is 129.5 feet/39.47 metres long, has a maximum takeoff weight of 189,200 lbs/85,820 kg and a wingspan of 123.6 feet/37.64 m. Powered by two jet engines, it has a top speed is 490 knots/564 mph/908 km/h with a maximum range of 4,660 miles/7,500 km.

Head of Aerospace Division, Air Vice Marshal (AVM) Catherine Roberts congratulated on May 25 Defence’s cooperative program partner, the United States Navy along with prime contractor Boeing Defence Space and Security, on achieving this significant milestone.

«This major acquisition is creating opportunities for Australian defence industry to participate in maintenance and to develop training facilities and infrastructure», AVM Roberts said. «Aircraft production includes around $25 million of high-tech production work undertaken by local subsidiary, Boeing Aerostructures Australia. «The primary roles of the P-8A include the detection and response to naval surface and submarine threats, surveillance and reconnaissance, and assisting in search and rescue operations».

With a saving of US$260 million compared to the initial budget, the P-8A Poseidon aircraft were acquired through a cooperative program with the United States Navy and contracted to Boeing Defence Space and Security.

A Royal Australian Air Force crew will fly the aircraft to Australia in late 2016 following post-production checks and acceptance.

Boeing will also provide the RAAF with a complete training system for the P-8A
Boeing will also provide the RAAF with a complete training system for the P-8A

 

Technical Specifications

Wing Span 123.6 feet/37.64 m
Height 42.1 feet/12.83 m
Length 129.5 feet/39.47 m
Propulsion 2 × CFM56-7B engines; 27,000 lbs/12,237 kgf/120 kN thrust
Speed 490 knots/564 mph/908 km/h
Range 1,200 NM/1,381 miles/2,222 km with 4 hours on station
Ceiling 41,000 feet/12,496 m
Crew 9
Maximum Take-Off Gross Weight 189,200 lbs/85,820 kg

 

P-8A Poseidon maiden flight

 

Navy Railgun

Raytheon Company has begun deliveries of pulse power containers in support of the U.S. Navy’s Railgun program. The containers, which are comprised of multiple pulsed power modules, will be integrated into the U.S. Navy’s Railgun test range for additional development and testing.

Raytheon built this pulse power container to provide the mighty 32-megajoule jolt that the U.S. Navy's new railgun requires. The railgun would fire a projectile at six times the speed of sound (PRNewsFoto/Raytheon Company)
Raytheon built this pulse power container to provide the mighty 32-megajoule jolt that the U.S. Navy’s new railgun requires. The railgun would fire a projectile at six times the speed of sound (PRNewsFoto/Raytheon Company)

The modular pulsed power containers, when combined, produce enough energy to enable the electromagnetic launch of a railgun’s high-velocity projectile at speeds in excess of Mach 6 (six times the speed of sound).

«Directed energy has the potential to redefine military technology beyond missiles and our pulse power modules and containers will provide the tremendous amount of energy required to power applications like the Navy Railgun», said Colin Whelan, vice president of Advanced Technology for Raytheon’s Integrated Defense Systems business. «Raytheon’s engineering and manufacturing expertise uniquely position us to support next generation weapon systems to meet the ever-evolving threat».

Raytheon’s pulse power container design is the result of work stemming from an initial $10 million contract with Naval Sea Systems Command to develop a pulsed power system, which will enable land or sea-based projectiles to reach great distances without the use of an explosive charge or rocket motor. Raytheon is one of three contractors developing a Pulse Power Container (PPC) design for the U.S. Navy.

Luigi Rizzo
begins sea trials

On May 17, ITS Luigi Rizzo cast off at 7.20 a.m. from Fincantieri shipyard in Muggiano (La Spezia) for her first sea outing. This activity marks the beginning of the programme of sea trials which will continue until the completion of the ship’s outfitting phase. The FREMM frigate is scheduled to be delivered to the Italian Navy in early 2017.

The Italian Navy’s sixth FREMM-class frigate, ITS Luigi Rizzo, sails from Fincantieri’s Muggiano shipyard on her initial sea trials (IT Navy photo)
The Italian Navy’s sixth FREMM-class frigate, ITS Luigi Rizzo, sails from Fincantieri’s Muggiano shipyard on her initial sea trials (IT Navy photo)

The ship had on board Vice-Admiral Donato Marzano, Italian Navy Logistic Commander and Chairman of the Naval Ship Acceptance Commission, personnel from Marinalles New Ships Outfitting and Testing Navy Centre, representatives from technical organisations involved in testing activities, and some of future crew members.

ITS Luigi Rizzo – the sixth new-generation frigate commissioned by the Italian Navy within the framework of the FREMM (European Multimission Frigate) Italo-French Programme, and second in General Purpose (GP) version – is characterised by high flexibility and is designed to cover a variety of operational deployments. Laid down on March 5 2013, it was launched on December 19 2015 at the Fincantieri shipyard in Riva Trigoso (Genoa).

Thanks to their command and control capabilities and logistic autonomy, FREMM frigates will be able to provide patrol service (presence and surveillance) and to conduct activities related to monitoring of migration flows and shipping control, as well as counter-terrorism and counter-piracy operations. Moreover, their prominent dual use capabilities will allow for their deployment on humanitarian assistance and disaster relief missions, including civil protection and support for cultural heritage.

FREMM-IT will replace the Maestrale and Lupo frigates in service with the Italian Navy
FREMM-IT will replace the Maestrale and Lupo frigates in service with the Italian Navy

 

Main Characteristics

Length overall 472.4 feet/144 m
Width 64.6 feet/19.7 m
Depth (main deck) 37 feet/11.3 m
Displacement 6700 tonnes
Maximum speed 27 knots/31 mph/50 km/h
Crew 145 people
Accommodation Up to 200 men and women
CODLAG PROPULSION SYSTEM
Avio-GE LM2500+G4 32 MW
Electric propulsion motors 2 × 2,5 MW
Diesel Generator (DG) sets 4 × 2,1 MW
Propellers 2 × Controllable-Pitch Propeller (CPP)
Endurance 45 days
Range at 15 knots/17 mph/28 km/h 6,000 NM/6,905 miles/11,112 km
COMBAT SYSTEM
Anti-Air Warfare (AAW)/ Anti-Surface Warfare (ASuW) Capabilities
Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) Defence
Electronic Warfare (EW) Capabilities

 

Unveiling of Gripen E

Defence and security company Saab took the next step in the evolution of the Gripen fighter system on 18 May, with the unveiling of the first test aircraft of the next generation, Gripen E. Gripen E is equipped with a highly integrated and sophisticated sensor suite including an Active Electronically Scanned Array (AESA) radar, Infra-Red Search and Track (IRST), Electronic Warfare (EW) suite, and datalink technology, which, when combined gives the pilot, and co-operating forces exactly the information needed at all times.

Gripen is more than a fighter: it’s a national asset that protects sovereign independence and empowers a nation towards a more secure future
Gripen is more than a fighter: it’s a national asset that protects sovereign independence and empowers a nation towards a more secure future

The unveiling of the first Gripen E test aircraft took place at Saab’s facilities in Linköping. Among the speakers are the Swedish Minister for Defence, Peter Hultqvist; the Swedish Air Force Chief of Staff, Mats Helgesson; Commander of the Brazilian Air Force, Nivaldo Luiz Rossato; and from Saab the Chairman of the Board, Marcus Wallenberg; the CEO, Håkan Buskhe and head of business area Aeronautics, Ulf Nilsson.

«There is huge global interest in the Gripen fighter system and we are now ready to present the first Gripen E. We look forward to sharing this important event with both guests and viewers», says Ulf Nilsson, head of Saab business area Aeronautics. «This key milestone is proof of our ability to build world-class fighters on time and on budget and it brings us one step closer to first flight and delivery to our customer», says Ulf Nilsson.

The Gripen evolution
The Gripen evolution

 

KEY DATA

Length overall 15.2 m/50 feet
Width overall 8.6 m/28 feet
Basic mass empty 8,000 kg/17,637 lbs
Internal fuel 3,400 kg/7,496 lbs
Maximum takeoff weight 16,500 kg/36,376 lbs
Maximum thrust 98 kN/9,993 kgf/22,031 lbf
Minimum takeoff distance 500 m/1,640 feet
Landing distance 600 m/1,968 feet
Maximum speed at sea level > 756 knots/870 mph/1400 km/h
Maximum speed at high altitude Mach 2
Supercruise capability Yes
Maximum service altitude > 16,000 m/52,500 feet
G-limits -3G / +9G
Hardpoints 10
Combat turnaround air-to-air 10 min
Full engine replacement 1 hour

 

Saab Unveils the New Gripen E Smart Fighter