Omaha Launches

The future USS Omaha (LCS-12) launched November 20, marking another important production milestone for the Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) program. «That this precisely choreographed launch event has become commonplace in Mobile is a sign of the maturity and stability of the LCS serial production line», said Captain Tom Anderson, LCS program manager. «I look forward to the future USS Omaha (LCS-12) completing the test and trial process en route to delivery to the fleet».

Littoral Combat Ship is being put in the water
Littoral Combat Ship is being put in the water

Omaha was rolled out of her assembly bay at the Austal USA Shipyard onto a barge for transfer down the Mobile River to a floating drydock at BAE Shipyard on November 19. The ship entered the water on November 20 when the drydock was flooded and the ship floated off the blocks. The ship will return to Austal’s final assembly pier to continue outfitting, system activation and testing. She is scheduled to be christened on December 19.

Omaha is the fourth ship in a block buy contract with Austal to build Independence- variant ships. USS Montgomery (LCS-8) is preparing for builders trials and USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS-10) was christened in June 2015 and is currently completing system testing in preparation for trials. USS Manchester (LCS-14) is under construction preparing for an early 2016 launch. USS Tulsa (LCS-16) will have her keel laid later this year.

Launch of USS Omaha (LCS 12) at Austal USA facility - Mobile, Alabama
Launch of USS Omaha (LCS 12) at Austal USA facility – Mobile, Alabama

The LCS class consists of the Freedom variant and Independence variant, designed and built by two industry teams. The Freedom variant team is led by Lockheed Martin (for the odd-numbered hulls, e.g. LCS-1). The Independence variant team is led by Austal USA (for LCS-6 and follow-on even-numbered hulls) and was led by General Dynamics, Bath Iron Works for LCS-2 and LCS-4. Purchased under the innovative block-buy acquisition strategy, there are 12 ships currently under construction.

LCS is a modular, reconfigurable ship, with three types of mission packages including surface warfare, mine countermeasures, and anti-submarine warfare. The Program Executive Office Littoral Combat Ships (PEO LCS) is responsible for delivering and sustaining littoral mission capabilities to the fleet. Delivering high-quality warfighting assets while balancing affordability and capability is key to supporting the nation’s maritime strategy.

Defence vessels designed and built by Austal include focused-mission combatants, such as the Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) for the United States Navy
Defence vessels designed and built by Austal include focused-mission combatants, such as the Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) for the United States Navy

 

The Independence Variant of the LCS Class

PRINCIPAL DIMENSIONS
Construction Hull and superstructure – aluminium alloy
Length overall 417 feet/127.1 m
Beam overall 103 feet/31.4 m
Hull draft (maximum) 14.8 feet/4.5 m
PAYLOAD AND CAPACITIES
Complement Core Crew – 40
Mission crew – 36
Berthing 76 in a mix of single, double & quad berthing compartments
Maximum mission load 210 tonnes
Mission Bay Volume 118,403 feet3/11,000 m3
Mission packages Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW)
Surface Warfare (SUW)
Mine Warfare (MIW)
PROPULSION
Main engines 2 × GE LM2500
2 × MTU 20V 8000
Waterjets 4 × Wartsila steerable
Bow thruster Retractable azimuthing
PERFORMANCE
Speed 40 knots/46 mph/74 km/h
Range 3,500 NM/4,028 miles/6,482 km
Operational limitation Survival in Sea State 8
MISSION/LOGISTICS DECK
Deck area >21,527.8 feet2/2,000 m2
Launch and recovery Twin boom extending crane
Loading Side ramp
Internal elevator to hanger
Launch/Recover Watercraft Sea State 4
FLIGHT DECK AND HANGER
Flight deck dimensions 2 × SH-60 or 1 × CH-53 or multiple Unmanned Aerial Vehicles/Vertical Take-off and Land Tactical Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs/VTUAVs)
Hanger Aircraft stowage & maintenance for 2 × SH-60
Launch/Recover Aircraft Sea State 5
WEAPONS AND SENSORS
Standard 1 × 57-mm gun
4 × 12.7-mm/.50 caliber guns
1 × Surface-to-Air Missile (SAM) launcher
3 × weapons modules
The littoral combat ship Independence (LCS 2) underway during builder's trials
The littoral combat ship Independence (LCS 2) underway during builder’s trials

 

Ship list

USS Independence (LCS-2)

USS Coronado (LCS-4)

USS Jackson (LCS-6)

USS Montgomery (LCS-8)

USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS-10)

USS Omaha (LCS-12)

USS Manchester (LCS-14)

USS Tulsa (LCS-16)

USS Charleston (LCS-18)

USS Cincinnati (LCS-20)

USS Kansas City (LCS-22)

SUW Configured Independence
SUW Configured Independence

Milwaukee is ready

The U.S. Navy commissioned the nation’s fifth Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) – USS Milwaukee (LCS-5) – in Milwaukee on November 21, officially placing the ship designed and constructed by a Lockheed Martin-led industry team into active service. Milwaukee, the third Freedom-variant in the LCS class, successfully passed Acceptance Trials in September and was delivered to the U.S. Navy on October 16.

Vice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO) Admiral Michelle Howard speaks during the commissioning of USS Milwaukee (LCS-5)
Vice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO) Admiral Michelle Howard speaks during the commissioning of USS Milwaukee (LCS-5)

«The USS Milwaukee is a warship with capabilities unlike any others», said Stephanie C. Hill, vice president of Ship & Aviation Systems for Lockheed Martin Mission Systems and Training business. «The entire Lockheed Martin-led LCS industry team is proud to deliver USS Milwaukee to the crew who will bring this great ship to life to participate in the defense of our great nation».

The fifth U.S. Navy vessel bearing the name, Milwaukee will transit to its homeport in San Diego, California, where it will be integrated into the fleet and the industry-Navy team will conduct additional program testing and crew training.

The Lockheed Martin-led industry team, which includes shipbuilder Fincantieri Marinette Marine and naval architect Gibbs & Cox, has already delivered two Freedom-variant littoral combat ships to the U.S. Navy. USS Freedom (LCS-1) conducted a successful deployment to Southeast Asia in 2013 and is currently operating out of her homeport in San Diego. USS Fort Worth (LCS-3) is currently deployed in Southeast Asia, serving in the U.S. 7th Fleet.

USS Detroit (LCS-7) is scheduled to be delivered in early 2016. USS Sioux City (LCS-11), USS Wichita (LCS-13), USS Billings (LCS-15), and USS Indianapolis (LCS-17) are in construction. USS St. Louis (LCS-19) and USS Minneapolis/St. Paul (LCS-21) are in long-lead material procurement.

The commissioning is the final act that marks entrance of a ship into the naval forces of her nation. It is the final of three events that bring a ship to life: keel laying, launching and christening, and commissioning.

The USS Milwaukee (LCS-5) departs Fincantieri Marinette Marine shipyard for the last time as LCS crew 104 guides her to Lake Michigan
The USS Milwaukee (LCS-5) departs Fincantieri Marinette Marine shipyard for the last time as LCS crew 104 guides her to Lake Michigan

 

Ship Design Specifications

Hull Advanced semiplaning steel monohull
Length Overall 389 feet/118.6 m
Beam Overall 57 feet/17.5 m
Draft 13.5 feet/4.1 m
Full Load Displacement Approximately 3,200 metric tons
Top Speed Greater than 40 knots/46 mph/74 km/h
Range at top speed 1,000 NM/1,151 miles/1,852 km
Range at cruise speed 4,000 NM/4,603 miles/7,408 km
Watercraft Launch and Recovery Up to Sea State 4
Aircraft Launch and Recovery Up to Sea State 5
Propulsion Combined diesel and gas turbine with steerable water jet propulsion
Power 85 MW/113,600 horsepower
Hangar Space Two MH-60 Romeo Helicopters
One MH-60 Romeo Helicopter and three Vertical Take-off and Land Tactical Unmanned Air Vehicles (VTUAVs)
Core Crew Less than 50
Accommodations for 75 sailors provide higher sailor quality of life than current fleet
Integrated Bridge System Fully digital nautical charts are interfaced to ship sensors to support safe ship operation
Core Self-Defense Suite Includes 3D air search radar
Electro-Optical/Infrared (EO/IR) gunfire control system
Rolling-Airframe Missile Launching System
57-mm Main Gun
Mine, Torpedo Detection
Decoy Launching System
Slicing its way through the choppy waters of Lake Michigan, the future USS Milwaukee (LCS-5) passed its final test, earning high marks and a thumbs-up from the U.S. Navy after successfully completing its acceptance trial September 18
Slicing its way through the choppy waters of Lake Michigan, the future USS Milwaukee (LCS-5) passed its final test, earning high marks and a thumbs-up from the U.S. Navy after successfully completing its acceptance trial September 18

 

Ship list

USS Freedom (LCS-1)

USS Fort Worth (LCS-3)

USS Milwaukee (LCS-5)

USS Detroit (LCS-7)

USS Little Rock (LCS-9)

USS Sioux City (LCS-11)

USS Wichita (LCS-13)

USS Billings (LCS-15)

USS Indianapolis (LCS-17)

USS St. Louis (LCS-19)

USS Minneapolis/St. Paul (LCS-21)

USS Cooperstown (LCS-23)

She will join her sister Freedom-variant littoral combat ships, USS Freedom and USS Fort Worth, in the Fleet
She will join her sister Freedom-variant littoral combat ships, USS Freedom and USS Fort Worth, in the Fleet

Australia lays keel

Last week (November 19) marks significant progress on the Air Warfare Destroyer (AWD) program, as the keel was laid for the third destroyer, Sydney, and initial combat systems activation has commenced on the first destroyer, Hobart. Sydney is the last of three AWDs currently under construction on this program, which will deliver the most capable warships ever possessed by the Royal Australian Navy.

The keel for the third air warfare destroyer (AWD) on order for the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) was laid down on 19 November
The keel for the third air warfare destroyer (AWD) on order for the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) was laid down on 19 November

AWD Alliance CEO, Rod Equid, said that the keel-laying for the third ship is the latest in a series of important achievements across the project, with the start of the hull consolidation phase for Sydney, as well as the progression to the system activation phase for Hobart in advance of sea trials next year. Mr. Equid said the second destroyer, Brisbane, is also on track towards meeting the completion of hull consolidation next month.

«We are proud of this further progress. Production is now more than 70% complete across the project and significant productivity improvements are being realised from ship to ship. We have come a long way since our first keel-laying ceremony was held three years ago. We recognise the importance of the work being done on the third ship, as this is where we will achieve the highest levels of productivity, based on the lessons from Sydney’s sister ships», said Mr. Equid.

AWD Program Manager Peter Croser commended the work accomplished by the AWD Alliance over the course of the last year. «We have achieved a number of critical milestones this year, from launching our first ship Hobart in May, to achieving 70 per cent completion on our second ship, Brisbane, and now commencing the hull consolidation phase for our third ship, Sydney», said Mr. Croser.

The AWD Alliance is responsible for delivering three Hobart Class DDG destroyers and their support systems to the Navy. The Alliance is made up of shipbuilder ASC, mission systems integrator Raytheon Australia and the Government’s Department of Defence.

The vessel, which will be the future HMAS Sydney, is the last of three 6,350-tonne Hobart-class ADWs ordered under a contract signed in October 2007
The vessel, which will be the future HMAS Sydney, is the last of three 6,350-tonne Hobart-class ADWs ordered under a contract signed in October 2007

 

Characteristics

Length 481.3 feet/146.7 m
Beam 61 feet/18.6 m
Draft 23.6 feet/7.2 m
Full load displacement 7,000 tonnes
Main Engine 36 MW/48,276 hp
Top speed 28+ knots/32 mph/52 km/h
Range at 18+ knots/21 mph/33 km/h 5,000+ NM/5,779 miles/9,300 km
Crew 186
Accommodation 234
Combat System Aegis Weapon System Baseline 7.1
AN/SPY-1D(V) Phased Array Radar (81 NM/93 miles/150 km)
AN/SPQ-9B Horizon Search Radar
Mk-41 Vertical Launch System (48 VLS cells: RIM-162 Evolved SeaSparrow Missile (ESSM)/Standard Missile-2 (SM-2)/SM-6)
Mk-45 Mod.4 5” (127-mm) 62 Calibre Gun (Range: 20 NM/23 miles/37 km)
Advanced Harpoon Weapon Control (2 × 4 launchers)
Electronic Warfare (EW) Suite
Very Short Range Air and Surface Defence
Nulka Active Missile Decoy system
Integrated Sonar System incorporating a hull mounted and towed array sonar
Communications Suite
Aviation Flightdeck and hangar for one helicopter
Boats Two Rigid Hulled Inflatable Boats (RHIBs)

 

This computer-generated animation highlights the multi-mission capability of the three naval destroyers being built as part of the Air Warfare Destroyer Project

 

Fifth Astute submarine

The UK Ministry of Defence has awarded us a contract for the delivery of the fifth Astute Class submarine, taking the total value for work on the vessel to £1.3 billion. The full contract covers the design and remaining build, test and commissioning activities on Anson (S123), the fifth of seven technologically advanced submarines in the class. Manufacturing commenced in 2010. Anson (S123) is now at an advanced stage of construction at our Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria site and on schedule to leave for sea trials in 2020.

£1.3 Bn Contract Awarded for Fifth Attack Submarine
£1.3 Bn Contract Awarded for Fifth Attack Submarine

Tony Johns, Managing Director of BAE Systems Submarines, said: «Signing this contract is an important milestone in the Astute programme. This is a hugely complex national endeavour and we are proud of the role we play in helping to protect our nation’s interests. HMS Astute (S119) and HMS Ambush (S120) are already demonstrating their world-class capabilities with the Royal Navy, whilst the third submarine in the class, HMS Artful (S121), is continuing with her sea trials. The build phase for the fourth, Audacious, is also well advanced, so we continue to make positive progress across the programme».

The contract was announced by Philip Dunne MP, Minister of State for Defence Procurement, during a visit to our Company today. He said: «This £1.3 billion contract marks an important step in the progress of the Astute programme. This is a key part of our £166 billion plan to ensure that our armed forces have the equipment they need to defend the UK’s interests across the seas, in the skies and on land, both at home and abroad. This new contract for Anson not only provides significant financial savings of £50 million to the taxpayer but also secures thousands of jobs in Barrow and across the UK supply chain, demonstrating the Government’s commitment to increase defence spending each year for the rest of the decade».

We employ more than 7,600 people in our Submarines business, including those working on the Astute programme. Boat six Agamemnon and the yet-to-be named seventh are also under construction in Barrow. Astute class submarines mark a step change in defence capability. Powered by a nuclear reactor, each of the submarines will provide land strike, strategic intelligence-gathering, anti-submarine and surface ship warfare capabilities.

BAE Systems is also leading the design phase on the programme to replace the current fleet of Vanguard submarines, which carry the UK’s strategic national deterrent. In readiness for the start of construction on this programme, our site is undergoing significant redevelopment with new facilities to be built alongside the refurbishment of others.

HMS Artful (S121) – a 7,400 tonne, 97-meter long attack submarine
HMS Artful (S121) – a 7,400 tonne, 97-meter long attack submarine

 

  1. HMS Astute (S119)
  2. HMS Ambush (S120)
  3. HMS Artful (S121)
  4. Audacious (S122)
  5. Anson (S123)
  6. Agamemnon (S124)
  7. Ajax (S125)

 

Romanian Super Puma

In a ceremony held on 17 November, 2015 by Guillaume Faury, CEO of Airbus Helicopters, and in the presence of Alexandru Nastase, Secretary of State, Airbus Helicopters set down the foundation stone of its new Romanian factory, established to assemble the latest helicopter to join the H Family of aircraft – the H215.

H215 combines competitiveness and performance in a proven airframe
H215 combines competitiveness and performance in a proven airframe

The H215 is an evolution of the former AS332 C1e/L1e Super Puma, offering a new business and industrial concept for this ready, proven and affordable helicopter, proudly built in Romania. Under the control of Airbus Helicopters Industries, the 10,000 m² factory based in Brasov will house H215 production from procurement to after-sales, including design office activities, and will provide jobs to more than 300 employees in the long term. The modern assembly line with its tact time flow line will be capable of producing up to 15 aircraft per year. The first H215 to roll out of the assembly line is planned for 2017.

«The H215 is of strategic importance to Airbus Helicopters and will allow us to offer customers the best helicopter for the job, all with extremely competitive direct operating and maintenance costs», Guillaume Faury said. «This expanded partnership with Romania, an important EU and NATO member, will ensure that our legacy twin-engine heavy helicopters are more economical than ever on current and emerging markets», he added.

All H215 helicopters will come off the final assembly line in a highly capable standard configuration, able to support an extensive list of optionals («shopping list») ready to be selected. This new concept will allow the aircraft to best meet customers’ expectations and serve a wide range of missions, providing a modern and cost-effective solution for markets such as utility, United Nations peacekeeping operations and logistic support missions.

«This new 100% Airbus Helicopters industrial centre is capitalizing on a successful history of aircraft heavy maintenance and complex upgrade programs in Romania and cooperation in the country that goes back more than 40 years», said Serge Durand, managing director of Airbus Helicopters Industries. «The aim is to offer our customers a completely new and modern business concept by proposing a standardized equipment definition for rapid production times and cost-effective acquisition prices», he added.

The H215 is a twin-engine, versatile, economic and robust helicopter that combines advanced avionics and a reliable platform for rugged multi-mission capabilities. It offers long-range capabilities, power, speed, a large useful payload and very good lifting performance in hot and high environments. Both EASA and FAA certified, the aircraft is equipped with the latest, most modern technologies meeting the latest safety requirements of the market. This includes a glass cockpit and the renowned 4-axis autopilot used on the H225, which provides flight envelope protection, unrivalled precision, and stability in even the harshest operating conditions.

Official launch of Airbus Helicopters Industries in Brasov, Romania
Official launch of Airbus Helicopters Industries in Brasov, Romania

 

Characteristics

CAPACITY
Troop transport 2 pilots + 1 chief of stick + 28 seats
VIP transport 2 pilots + 8 to 12 passengers
Casualty evacuation 2 pilots + up to 11 stretchers + 4 seats
Sling load 4,750 kg/10,472 lbs
EXTERNAL DIMENSIONS
Length 16.79 m/55.08 feet
Width 3.96 m/13 feet
Height 4.60 m/15.09 feet
WEIGHT
Maximum Take-Off Weight (MTOW) 11,000 kg/24,251 lbs
MTOW in external load configuration 11,200 kg/24,690 lbs
Empty weight 5,715 kg/12,600 lbs
Useful load 5,285 kg/11,651 lbs
Maximum cargo-sling load 4,750 kg/10,472 lbs
Standard fuel capacity 2,247 kg/4,954 lbs
ENGINES 2 TURBOMECA MAKILA 2A1
Take-off power per engine 1,567 kW/2,101 shp
PERFORMANCE AT MAXIMUM GROSS WEIGHT, ISA*, SL**
Maximum speed (Vne***) 324 km/h/175 knots
Fast cruise speed (at MCP****) 262 km/h/142 knots
Rate of climb 5.4 m/s/1,064 feet/min
Service ceiling (Vz = 0.508 m/s = 100 feet/min) 3,968 m/13,019 feet
Hover ceiling OGE***** at ISA*, MTOW, take-off power 792 m/2,600 feet
Maximum range without reserve at Economical Cruise Speed 909 km/491 NM
Endurance without reserve at 148 km/h/80 knots >4 h 20 min

* International Standard Atmosphere

** Sea Level

*** Never Exceed Speed

**** Mode Control Panel

***** Out of Ground Effect

Airbus has rebranded the AS 332 Super Puma as H215, with production to begin at a new facility in Romania
Airbus has rebranded the AS 332 Super Puma as H215, with production to begin at a new facility in Romania

Technology Insertion

The keel of the future USS Thomas Hudner (DDG-116) was authenticated during a ceremony at the Bath Iron Works (BIW) shipyard November 16. The ship’s keel was authenticated by Ms. Barbara Miller, wife of the former superintendent of the Naval Academy, Vice Admiral Michael Miller. The authenticator etched her initials into the keel plate to symbolically recognize the joining of modular components and the ceremonial beginning of the ship.

Thomas Hudner Jr., Georgea Hudner, Thomas Hudner III, Mrs. Barbara Miller and Captain Mark Vandroff with the keel plate of the future USS Thomas Hudner
Thomas Hudner Jr., Georgea Hudner, Thomas Hudner III, Mrs. Barbara Miller and Captain Mark Vandroff with the keel plate of the future USS Thomas Hudner

«We are very honored to have the namesake of DDG-116, Captain Hudner and his family, here to witness this milestone ceremony», said Captain Mark Vandroff, DDG-51 class program manager, Program Executive Office (PEO) Ships. «These ships serve as a lasting reminder of the courage, leadership and intellectual contribution of the very best that the Navy-Marine Corps team has had to offer».

Medal of Honor recipient, Thomas Hudner, crash landed his plane in 1950 in an attempt to save the life of his wingman who was shot down by Chinese ground troops at the battle of Chosin Reservoir during the Korean War.

USS Thomas Hudner (DDG-116) is the second of two Arleigh Burke class destroyers currently under construction at BIW. DDG-115, the future USS Rafael Peralta, was launched at BIW November 1.

As a Flight IIA ship, Thomas Hudner will be equipped with the Navy’s Aegis Combat System, the world’s foremost integrated naval weapon system. This system delivers quick reaction time, high firepower and increased electronic countermeasures capability for Anti-Air Warfare. Arleigh Burke ships enable power projection, forward presence, and escort operations at sea in support of Low Intensity Conflict/Coastal and Littoral Offshore Warfare as well as open ocean conflict.

USS Thomas Hudner (DDG-116) is so-called «technology insertion» destroyer. «Technology insertion» ships (DDG-116-123) are expected to incorporate certain elements of Arleigh Burke class Flight III, which in turn is planned to run from DDG-124 onwards.

USS Thomas Hudner (DDG-116) started fabrication February 15, 2013, and will join the fleet in 2017 where she will serve as an integral player in global maritime security, engaging in air, undersea, surface, strike and ballistic missile defense.

As one of the Defense Department’s largest acquisition organizations, PEO Ships is responsible for executing the development and procurement of all destroyers, amphibious ships, special mission and support ships and special warfare craft.

The future Thomas Hudner 3000 Ultra Unit moved onto the Land Level
The future Thomas Hudner 3000 Ultra Unit moved onto the Land Level

 

Ship Characteristics

Length Overall 510 feet/156 m
Beam – Waterline 59 feet/18 m
Draft 30.5 feet/9.3 m
Displacement – Full Load 9,217 tons/9,363 metric tons
Power Plant 4 General electric LM 2500-30 gas turbines; 2 shafts; 2 CRP (Contra-Rotating) propellers; 100,000 shaft horsepower/75,000 kW
Speed in excess of 30 knots/34.5 mph/55.5 km/h
Range 4,400 NM/8,149 km at 20 knots/23 mph/37 km/h
Crew 380 total: 32 Officers, 27 CPO (Chief Petty Officer), 321 OEM
Surveillance SPY-1D Phased Array Radar and Aegis Combat System (Lockheed Martin); SPS-73(V) Navigation; SPS-67(V)3 Surface Search; 3 SPG-62 Illuminator; SQQ-89(V)6 sonar incorporating SQS-53C hull mounted and SQR-19 towed array sonars used with Mark-116 Mod 7 ASW fire control system
Electronics/Countermeasures SLQ-32(V)3; Mark-53 Mod 0 Decoy System; Mark-234 Decoy System; SLQ-25A Torpedo Decoy; SLQ-39 Surface Decoy; URN-25 TACAN; UPX-29 IFF System; Kollmorgen Mark-46 Mod 1 Electro-Optical Director
Aircraft 2 embarked SH-60 helicopters ASW operations; RAST (Recovery Assist, Secure and Traverse)
Armament 2 Mark-41 Vertical Launching System (VLS) with 90 Standard, Vertical Launch ASROC (Anti-Submarine Rocket) & Tomahawk ASM (Air-to-Surface Missile)/LAM (Loitering Attack Missile); 5-in (127-mm)/54 Mark-45 gun; 2 CIWS (Close-In Weapon System); 2 Mark-32 triple 324-mm torpedo tubes for Mark-46 or Mark-50 ASW torpedos

 

Flight IIA: Technology Insertion

Ship Yard Launched Commissioned Homeport
DDG-116 Thomas Hudner GDBIW
DDG-117 Paul Ignatius HIIIS
DDG-118 Daniel Inouye GDBIW
DDG-119 Delbert D. Black HIIIS
DDG-120 GDBIW
DDG-121 HIIIS
DDG-122 GDBIW
DDG-123 HIIIS

GDBIW – General Dynamics Bath Iron Works

HIIIS – Huntington Ingalls Industries Ingalls Shipbuilding

DDG – Destroyer, Guided Missile

 

Counter Battery Radar

In response to a request from Ukraine, and as part of our ongoing efforts to bolster Ukraine’s defense and internal security operations, on November 14, 2015 the United States delivered two AN/TPQ-36 radar systems to Ukraine at a ceremony in Lviv.

The compact, mobile, combat proven AN/TPQ-36 Firefinder weapon locating radar accurately, rapidly and automatically locates medium-range enemy mortars, artillery and rocket launchers. It can handle simultaneous fire from weapons at multiple locations, detecting and reporting their positions on the first round
The compact, mobile, combat proven AN/TPQ-36 Firefinder weapon locating radar accurately, rapidly and automatically locates medium-range enemy mortars, artillery and rocket launchers. It can handle simultaneous fire from weapons at multiple locations, detecting and reporting their positions on the first round

Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko had the opportunity to review the equipment, and was briefed by U.S. military personnel on its capabilities. The radar systems delivered on November 14 will help defend Ukrainian military personnel and civilians against rocket and artillery attacks, which have historically been the most lethal threat to Ukrainian personnel and civilians.

The equipment was delivered on a rapid timeline – less than two months after President Obama delegated to the Secretary of State the authority to draw down up to $20 million in defense articles and services and up to $1.5 million in non-lethal commodities and services to provide these systems to Ukraine.

The provision of these systems brings our total security assistance committed to Ukraine in response to the crisis to more than $265 million since 2014.

 

AN/TPQ-36(V)10 Firefinder Weapon Locating System

The AN/TPQ-36 directs accurate counterfire to neutralize enemy positions.

During an official ceremony on Lviv airport attended by ranking government officials, the U.S. government formally delivered two AN/TPQ-36 counter-battery radars to Ukraine, transported to destination by a U.S/ Air Force C-17 airlifter (U.S. State Department photo)
During an official ceremony on Lviv airport attended by ranking government officials, the U.S. government formally delivered two AN/TPQ-36 counter-battery radars to Ukraine, transported to destination by a U.S/ Air Force C-17 airlifter (U.S. State Department photo)

 

Medium-Range Surveillance

ThalesRaytheonSystems’ compact, mobile, combat proven AN/TPQ-36 Firefinder radar accurately, rapidly and automatically locates medium-range enemy mortars, artillery, and rocket launchers. It can handle simultaneous fire from weapons at multiple locations, detecting and reporting their positions on the first round. The AN/TPQ-36 can detect and report the positions of up to 10 different weapons in seconds, at a maximum range of 15 miles/24 km. The system also corrects and improves delivery of friendly fire.

 

Highly Mobile

Compact and highly mobile, the AN/TPQ-36 supports rapid deployment of forces and close combat. It can be positioned and ready for operation in 15 minutes. It can be readied for movement in 5 minutes by a five-man crew. Because it can move quickly from one position to another, it is typically located close to the forward battle line in direct support of brigade operations. The AN/TPQ-36 comprises an antenna-transceiver trailer, a generator, and an operation control shelter that contains the paper map display and communications suite.

The prime movers for the system consists of three HMMWVs (Recon/Cargo Vehicle, Shelter Vehicle with Q-36 in tow, Generator Vehicle with spare generator in tow). The manned operation control shelter can be located as far as 164 feet/50 m away from the unmanned antenna trailer. The system is capable of being operated remotely 328 feet/100 m from the shelter.

 

Defeats Enemy Firepower, Supports Friendly Weapons

The AN/TPQ-36 stationary antenna sweeps a rapid sequence of beams along the horizon, forming an electronic radar curtain over 90 degree area. Any target penetrating the curtain triggers an immediate verification beam. On verification, an automatic tracking sequence begins. While tracking any single target, the radar continues scanning, locating, and tracking others.

 

Training and Maintenance

With high system reliability and maintainability simplified by computer-controlled, built-in test equipment, ThalesRaytheonSystems’ AN/TPQ-36 provides unusually high system availability. Improved On-line fault detection and off-line fault diagnostics alert the operator to system faults, directing repair action to the unit that must be replaced. Ninety percent of all repairs required in the field can be performed by the crew, with a mean-time-to-repair of only 30 minutes. The cost effectiveness of the AN/TPQ-36 is enhanced by its 90 degree – 360 degree sector, small crew, ease of operation, and high availability.

 

State of the Art Radar Processor

The AN/TPQ-36 has been upgraded with a full radar compliance radar processor. The radar processor is common between the AN/TPQ-36 and AN/TPQ-37 Radars. The new processor reduces the number of circuit cards from 9 to 3. Customers benefit tremendously from the significant reduction in cost per unit and unlimited future growth potential. The open LAN based design accommodates future changes.

United States Delivers Two Q-36 Counter Battery Radar Systems to Ukraine
United States Delivers Two Q-36 Counter Battery Radar Systems to Ukraine

 

Specifications

Maximum range 15 miles/24 km
Effective range Mortar: 11 miles/18 km
Artillery: 9 miles/14.5 km
Rockets: 15 miles/24 km
Azimuth sector 90°
Frequency X-band, 32 frequencies
Prime power 115/200 VAC, 400 Hz, 3-phase, 8 kW
Peak transmitted power 23 kW, min

 

First roll out

On November 9 2015, the roll out of the first MPA (Multirole Patrol Aircraft) took place in Genoa and represented a key milestone in the development of this innovative new airplane, which is now approaching ground and flight tests activities to achieve its complete flight envelope configuration.

First roll out for the new MPA – Multirole Patrol Aircraft
First roll out for the new MPA – Multirole Patrol Aircraft

Fully compatible with the unmanned HammerHead system, the MPA is developed by Piaggio Aerospace in partnership with ADASI – Abu Dhabi Autonomous System Investments – and represents a significant evolution of the P.180 Avanti platform, including:

  • 50% increasing of the wing span;
  • 35% increasing of the horizontal tail and 20% increasing of the forward wing surfaces;
  • Significant upgrade of the power plant with new scimitar propeller blades and noise reduction;
  • Increased fuel tanks capacity (50%);
  • New SAAB Albatros Mission System by with Radar 1700 G2, EO/IR and Rockwell Collins Pro Line Fusion Avionic Suite.

Simultaneously with the Italian roll-out, the MPA Ground Demonstrator is show-cased at the Dubai Air Show within the stand of Mubadala, shareholder of Piaggio Aerospace. It is constituted by the forward section of the aircraft, fully equipped with the new avionic and mission systems. The main goal of this Ground Demonstrator is to offer a realistic representation of the system capabilities and perform ground testing of equipment, anthropometric evaluation, cockpit lighting/glare, and human machine interface evaluation.

Carlo Logli, CEO of Piaggio Aerospace, commented in Dubai the MPA roll-out by saying: «We are very pleased about this step ahead in the MPA programme, as we consider this new aircraft as a key strategic asset of our product portfolio. In the very near future, we will be able to offer an integrated range of manned and unmanned solutions, tailored on the needs of each Customer, boosting unique capabilities, and able to match the growing and sophisticated demand of security of many Nations».

Jonas Hjel, SAAB’s Head of Business Area Support and Services, said: «We have worked closely together with Piaggio Aerospace to integrate SAAB’s advanced multi-mission surveillance systems for maritime and overland missions, with equipment that includes a mission management system, radar and electro-optics. Today we are proud to present this system, which is the most advanced technology for airborne surveillance, in the MPA product».

Claude Alber, Rockwell Collins Vice President and Managing Director, Europe, Middle East and Africa added: «Piaggio Aerospace’s new MPA represents a significant technological step forward for completing special missions, and Pro Line Fusion delivers information to the flight deck faster and more efficiently on customised, empowering pilot interfaces. This aircraft is another proud milestone in our long-standing relationship with Piaggio».

Piaggo’s new maritime patrol variant of the Avanti twin-turboprop follows the HammerHead unmanned ISR drone, and is intended to evolve into a family of optionally-manned aircraft (Piaggio photo)
Piaggo’s new maritime patrol variant of the Avanti twin-turboprop follows the HammerHead unmanned ISR drone, and is intended to evolve into a family of optionally-manned aircraft (Piaggio photo)

 

TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS

DIMENSIONS
Span 65.16 feet/21.4 m
Length 43.89 feet/14.4 m
Height 12.08 feet/4 m
WEIGHTS
Maximum Take-Off Weight (MTOW) 16,500 lbs/7,484.3 kg
Maximum Landing Weight (MLW) 14,500 lbs/6,577 kg
Zero Fuel Weight (ZFW) 11,050 lbs/5,012 kg
Mission Payload (mission equipment and 2 operators) 1,350 lbs/612 kg
Maximum Fuel @ Maximum Payload 5,100 lbs/2,313 kg
Maximum Allowable Fuel 5,300 lbs/2,404 kg
PERFORMANCE
Maximum Cruise Speed 350 KTAS/403 mph/648 km/h
Maximum Operation Altitude 41,000 feet/12,497 m
Maximum Endurance (at 5,000 feet/1,524 m) 45 min Visual Flight Rules (VFR) reserve 6.4 hours
POWERPLANT
2 × Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A-66B, 950 shp (ISA, sea level)
Hartzell five blades low noise propeller, counter rotating
MISSION SYSTEM
2 SAAB removable, tactical operator stations equipped with multifunction, integrated display control units
AVIONICS SYSTEM
Rockwell Collins Pro Line Fusion
The Piaggio Aerospace Multirole Patrol Aircraft represents the evolution of the Piaggio Aerospace P.180 Avanti II aircraft
The Piaggio Aerospace Multirole Patrol Aircraft represents the evolution of the Piaggio Aerospace P.180 Avanti II aircraft

Cost-effective solution

The United States Army has exercised $65.8 million in contract options for 12 additional UH-72A Lakota helicopters and associated mission equipment packages. The UH-72A is manufactured by Airbus Helicopters Inc. at its final assembly plant in Columbus, Miss., which has already produced and delivered almost 350 Lakotas to date, all on time and on cost.

UH-72A Lakota in flight
UH-72A Lakota in flight

The UH-72A was competitively selected in 2006 for a broad range of active Army and Army National Guard missions, including training, search and rescue, medical evacuation, border security, command and control, VIP transport and general utility.

The 12 aircraft on this latest contract option will be delivered starting in August of 2017, configured for the Army as initial entry rotary-wing trainers. This year the Army has fielded more than 50 Lakotas to Fort Rucker, Alabama, in preparation for the UH-72A’s formal introduction into the training curriculum by early 2016. Ultimately, Army plans call for an initial-entry rotary wing training fleet of 187 Lakotas, made up of a mix of new deliveries and already in-service aircraft reconfigured for the training mission.

«Time and again the UH-72A has proven to be the most cost-effective solution to meet a wide variety of needs for the U.S. military and our allies», said Allan McArtor, Airbus Group Inc. Chairman and CEO. «The Army’s flawless execution of the Lakota program has proven that even in today’s challenging defense acquisition environment, there are success stories for the taxpayer and warfighter alike».

«Almost half the men and women who build the UH-72A in Mississippi are U.S. military veterans, and some even fly in Lakotas in the National Guard or Reserves», said Chris Emerson, President and CEO of Airbus Helicopters Inc. «Everyone on that production line takes a great amount of pride in their unbroken record of delivering on their commitments, and we hope they’ll be building Lakotas for many years to come».

The Lakota continues to meet a wide range of needs for several military user communities. The Navy operates the Lakota in a training role at the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School and the Army National Guard units operating specially equipped Lakotas are deployed supporting Customs and Border Protection missions along the U.S. southwest border. The Royal Thai Army is the first allied operator of the UH-72A, having purchased six aircraft to date through the U.S. government’s Foreign Military Sales program.

A modern, twin-engine helicopter, the UH-72A is a powerful, stable, and agile platform with a glass cockpit that is compatible with night vision goggles. The Lakota is also single-pilot Instrument Flight Rules certified. It has the lowest cost to buy, own and operate of any U.S. military helicopter in production.

Airbus Group delivers first new UH-72A Lakota for Army initial-entry trainer mission
Airbus Group delivers first new UH-72A Lakota for Army initial-entry trainer mission

 

Characteristics

Maximum Take-Off Weight 3,585 kg/7,903 lbs (All configurations)
Useful load 1,810 kg/3,990 lbs
Capacity 1 pilot + up to 11 passengers
2 pilots + 10 passengers
Maximum cargo sling load 1,500 kg/3,307 lbs
Engine 2 × Turbomeca ARRIEL 1E2, turboshaft engines
Maximum emergency power (OEI) 574 kW/770 shp
Fast cruise speed 133 knots/153 mph/246 km/h
Range 461 NM/531 miles/855 km
Endurance 4 h 30 min
The EC145’s integrated glass cockpit includes Airbus Helicopters’ Vehicle and Engine Multifunction Display (VEMD) and a Caution and Advisory Display (CAD) to enhance pilot efficiency – thereby reducing pilot fatigue and enhancing flight safety
The EC145’s integrated glass cockpit includes Airbus Helicopters’ Vehicle and Engine Multifunction Display (VEMD) and a Caution and Advisory Display (CAD) to enhance pilot efficiency – thereby reducing pilot fatigue and enhancing flight safety

Christening of Munro

Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division christened the company’s sixth U.S. Coast Guard National Security Cutter (NSC), Munro (WMSL-755), on November 14, in front of nearly 600 guests. Julie Sheehan, the great niece of the ship’s namesake, Signalman First Class Douglas Munro, is the ship’s sponsor. At the culmination of the ceremony, she smashed a bottle across the bow of the ship, proclaiming, «May God bless this ship and all who sail in her».

Ship’s Sponsor Julie Sheehan smashes a bottle of sparkling wine across the bow of the National Security Cutter Munro (WMSL-755). Also pictured (left to right) are Captain Thomas King, the ship’s prospective commanding officer; Coast Guard Commandant Admiral Paul Zukunft; and Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias (Photo by Lance Davis/HII)
Ship’s Sponsor Julie Sheehan smashes a bottle of sparkling wine across the bow of the National Security Cutter Munro (WMSL-755). Also pictured (left to right) are Captain Thomas King, the ship’s prospective commanding officer; Coast Guard Commandant Admiral Paul Zukunft; and Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias (Photo by Lance Davis/HII)

Admiral Paul Zukunft, commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard, was the ceremony’s principal speaker. «I couldn’t help but notice when I drove into the shipyard today the banner that read, ‘What you do today matters,’» he said. «Nothing could be truer than what you do today at Huntington Ingalls, because 45 years from today – if not longer – this ship will continue to serve our nation. Many of us will have crossed the bar by that time, but this ship will live on».

Munro died heroically on September 27, 1942, on Guadalcanal. Having volunteered to evacuate a detachment of U.S. Marines who were facing annihilation by a large and unanticipated enemy force, he succeeded in safely extricating them and in doing so was mortally wounded. For his heroic and selfless actions in the completion of this rescue mission, Munro was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor. He is the Coast Guard’s sole recipient of the award. Ingalls has delivered five NSCs, and three more, including Munro, are currently under construction.

«Our Ingalls/Coast Guard team continues to get stronger, proving that serial production and stable requirements have a direct effect on improving quality, cost and schedule, and this program has been an excellent one», said Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias. «The National Security Cutters are clearly changing the game in how to protect our country. Not only does that make us proud, but more importantly, it makes our enemies nervous. It is our job to build a ship that protects the brave men and women who go into harm’s way. And it is a job our shipbuilders take very seriously».

Legend-class NSCs are the flagships of the Coast Guard’s cutter fleet. Designed to replace the 378‐foot/115-meter Hamilton-class High-Endurance Cutters that entered service during the 1960s, they are 418 feet/127 m long with a 54-foot/16-meter beam and displace 4,500 long tons with a full load. They have a top speed of 28 knots/32 mph/52 km/h, a range of 12,000 nautical miles/13,809 miles/22,224 km, an endurance of 60 days and a crew of 110.

NSCs are capable of meeting all maritime security mission needs required of the High-Endurance Cutter. They include an aft launch and recovery area for two rigid hull inflatable boats and a flight deck to accommodate a range of manned and unmanned rotary wing aircraft. The Legend class is the largest and most technologically advanced class of cutter in the Coast Guard, with robust capabilities for maritime homeland security, law enforcement, marine safety, environmental protection and national defense missions. NSCs play an important role enhancing the Coast Guard’s operational readiness, capacity and effectiveness at a time when the demand for their services has never been greater.

Ingalls Shipbuilding Christens Sixth National Security Cutter, Munro
Ingalls Shipbuilding Christens Sixth National Security Cutter, Munro

 

Facts

Displacement 4,500 long tons
Length 418 feet/127 m
Beam 54 feet/16 m
Speed 28 knots/32 mph/52 km/h
Range 12,000 NM/13,809 miles/22,224 km
Endurance 60 days
Crew 120
Equipped with Mk-110 57-mm turret mounted gun
6 × 12.7-mm/.50 caliber machine guns
3D air search radar
2 level 1, class 1 aircraft hangers
A stern launch ramp for mission boats
The fifth U.S. Coast Guard NSC, James (WMSL 754), has successfully completed acceptance trials in early May 2015. The Ingalls-built NSC spent two full days in the Gulf of Mexico proving the ship’s systems (Photo by Lance Davis/HII)
The fifth U.S. Coast Guard NSC, James (WMSL 754), has successfully completed acceptance trials in early May 2015. The Ingalls-built NSC spent two full days in the Gulf of Mexico proving the ship’s systems (Photo by Lance Davis/HII)

 

Ship list

USCGC Bertholf (WMSL-750)

USCGC Waesche (WMSL-751)

USCGC Stratton (WMSL-752)

USCGC Hamilton (WMSL-753)

USCGC James (WMSL-754)

USCGC Munro (WMSL-755)

USCGC Kimball (WMSL-756)

USCGC Midgett (WMSL-757)