Specialist Vehicle

General Dynamics UK has been awarded a £390 million contract by the UK Ministry of Defence (MoD) to provide in-service support for the Scout Specialist Vehicle (Scout SV) fleet until 2024. In addition, the company is opening a new Armored Fighting Vehicle (AFV) Assembly, Integration and Testing (AIT) facility in South Wales.

Scout Specialist Vehicle
Scout Specialist Vehicle

The contract is an extension of the in-service support that General Dynamics UK was contracted to provide for the Scout SV fleet until 2020, and it includes the provision of spares and repairs for all 589 platforms. The extended in-service support contract offers a cost-effective support solution that builds upon the Scout SV manufacturing phase, taking advantage of the production pricing of parts.

With this facility investment, General Dynamics UK will undertake the assembly, integration and testing of 489 Scout Specialist Vehicle platforms. A further 100 platforms will undergo assembly, integration and testing at General Dynamics European Land Systems’ facility in Seville, Spain. The vehicles are on schedule to be delivered to the British Army from 2017 through 2024.

The new UK industrial capability, alongside the Scout SV extended in-service support contract, will support the creation of 250 new jobs in South Wales. The Scout SV programme directly supports approximately 2,650 jobs across the UK.

The investment by General Dynamics UK in this new AIT industrial capability is reaffirmation of the UK’s proud history of developing and manufacturing AFVs.

Protected Mobility Reconnaissance Support (PMRS) variant
Protected Mobility Reconnaissance Support (PMRS) variant

Prime Minister David Cameron said: «Today’s decision by General Dynamics to bring the assembly of these world class armored vehicles to South Wales is to the credit of the skills and expertise in the local area. The 250 additional new skilled jobs at General Dynamics UK will build on those already safeguarded by the decision to purchase 589 Scout vehicles for our Armed Forces, ensuring our servicemen and women have the very best equipment to keep us safe».

Defence Minister Philip Dunne said: «Increasing British jobs both at General Dynamics UK and through the supply chain, the Scout SV will make a real contribution to the UK economy over its 30 year lifespan. The decision from General Dynamics UK to create a facility in Wales to assemble and maintain this cutting-edge capability for the British Army will result in greater efficiency in maintaining vehicles, lower costs and create highly-skilled jobs in the process».

Kevin Connell, vice president of General Dynamics Land Systems – UK, said: «The UK MoD is a critical partner for General Dynamics, and today’s announcement demonstrates our commitment to delivering world-leading AFV platforms to the British Army from the UK. This new industrial capability will support the delivery of extended in-service support for Scout SV, whilst creating 250 new jobs on this important UK programme, and will open up exciting new possibilities for General Dynamics in the UK in the years ahead».

Scout SV was developed at General Dynamics UK’s AFV design and engineering center in Oakdale, South Wales. The company’s employees include highly skilled engineers who are delivering the family of best-in-class platforms. Today’s announcement creates a UK-based team of more than 550 with expertise in the design, development and AIT of AFV.

Command & Control
Command & Control

Wideband Global SATCOM

A United Launch Alliance (ULA) Delta IV rocket successfully launched the seventh Wideband Global SATCOM (WGS) communications satellite for the U.S. Air Force at 8:07 p.m. EDT on July 23 from Space Launch Complex-37. This is ULA’s seventh launch in 2015 and the second successful ULA launch in just eight days. It marks ULA’s 98th successful one-at-a-time launch since the company was formed in December 2006.

A Delta IV rocket lifts off carrying the seventh Wideband Global SATCOM satellite for the U.S. Air Force
A Delta IV rocket lifts off carrying the seventh Wideband Global SATCOM satellite for the U.S. Air Force

«Kudos to the U.S. Air Force and all of our mission partners on today’s successful launch and orbital delivery of the WGS-7 satellite. The ULA team is honored to work with these premier U.S. government and industry mission teammates and to contribute to the WGS enhanced communications capabilities to the warfighter», said Jim Sponnick, ULA vice president, Atlas and Delta Programs. «The team continues to emphasize reliability, and one launch at a time focus on mission success to meet our customer’s needs».

This mission was launched aboard a Delta IV Medium-plus (5,4) configuration Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV) using a single ULA common booster core powered by an Aerojet Rocketdyne RS-68A main engine, along with four Orbital ATK GEM-60 solid rocket motors. The upper stage was powered by an Aerojet Rocketdyne RL10B-2 engine with the satellite encapsulated in a five-meter-diameter composite payload fairing.

Wideband Global SATCOM provides anytime, anywhere communication for the warfighter through broadcast, multicast and point-to-point connections. WGS provides essential communications services, allowing Combatant Commanders to exert command and control of their tactical forces, from peacetime to military operations. WGS is the only military satellite communications system that can support simultaneous X and Ka band communications.

In preparation for launch from Space Complex-37, the Mobile Service Tower or MST is rolled back from the ULA Delta IV rocket carrying the WGS-7 mission for the U.S. Air Force
In preparation for launch from Space Complex-37, the Mobile Service Tower or MST is rolled back from the ULA Delta IV rocket carrying the WGS-7 mission for the U.S. Air Force

ULA’s next launch is the Atlas V MUOS-4 mission for the United States Navy, scheduled for August 31 from Space Launch Complex-41 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida.

The EELV program was established by the United States Air Force to provide assured access to space for Department of Defense and other government payloads. The commercially developed EELV program supports the full range of government mission requirements, while delivering on schedule and providing significant cost savings over the heritage launch systems.

With more than a century of combined heritage, United Launch Alliance is the nation’s most experienced and reliable launch service provider. ULA has successfully delivered more than 95 satellites to orbit that provide critical capabilities for troops in the field, aid meteorologists in tracking severe weather, enable personal device-based GPS navigation and unlock the mysteries of our solar system.

The Air Force's seventh Wideband Global SATCOM satellite, encapsulated inside a 5-meter payload fairing, is mated to a Delta IV rocket at Space Launch Complex-37
The Air Force’s seventh Wideband Global SATCOM satellite, encapsulated inside a 5-meter payload fairing, is mated to a Delta IV rocket at Space Launch Complex-37

 

Wideband Global SATCOM (WGS)

WGS-7, the first Block II Follow-on satellite, supports communications links in the X-band and Ka-band spectra. While Block I and II satellites can instantaneously filter and downlink up to 4.575 MHz from 39 primary channels, WGS-7 can filter and downlink up to 5.375 MHz from 46 primary channels.

As with the Block II satellites, WGS-7 includes a high-bandwidth Radio Frequency (RF) bypass capability, which allows for larger bandwidth allocations to users. Depending on the mix of ground terminals, data rates, and modulation and coding schemes employed, a single WGS satellite can support data transmission rates between 2.1 and 3.6 Gbps.

WGS-7 also allows for up to ~800 MHz of additional bandwidth through the use of «Redundant Port Activation».

The Air Force's seventh Wideband Global SATCOM satellite is encapsulated inside a Delta IV 5-meter payload fairing
The Air Force’s seventh Wideband Global SATCOM satellite is encapsulated inside a Delta IV 5-meter payload fairing

WGS has 19 independent coverage areas, 18 of which can be positioned throughout its field-of-view. This includes eight steerable/shapeable X-band beams formed by separate transmit/receive phased arrays; 10 Ka-band beams served by independently steerable diplexed antennas; and one transmit/receive X-band Earth-coverage beam. WGS can tailor coverage areas and connect X-band and Ka-band users anywhere within its field-of-view.

Five globally located Army Wideband SATCOM Operations Centers provide 24/7 payload monitoring and command and control of the WGS constellation. Each Global Satellite Configuration and Control Element has the capability to control up to three satellites at a time.

Spacecraft platform control and anomaly resolution is accomplished by the third Space Operations Squadron at Schriever Air Force Base in Colorado Springs, Colorado.

 

The U.S. Air Force’s seventh Wideband Global SATCOM satellite, encapsulated inside a 5-meter payload fairing, is mated to a Delta IV rocket at Space Launch Complex-37

 

A Delta IV rocket lifts off carrying the seventh Wideband Global SATCOM satellite for the U.S. Air Force. Wideband Global SATCOM provides anytime, anywhere communication for the warfighter through broadcast, multicast and point-to-point connections

 

The East Commonwealth

On July 24, a delegation headed by the Minister of National Defence of Lithuania Juozas Olekas paid a visit to Lviv, Ukraine. During the visit Minister of Defence of Poland Tomasz Semoniak and Minister of Defence of Ukraine Lieutenant General Stepan Poltorak and Minister Juozas Olekas met to sign a technical agreement on a joint military unit of the respective countries, the Lithuanian-Polish-Ukrainian Brigade (LITPOLUKRBRIG), and fundamentals of its command.

The LITPOLUKRBRIG battalions will be held on standby in their home countries, and deploy in composition of the LITPOLUKRBRIG in case a decision is made to activate the Brigade or any of its elements
The LITPOLUKRBRIG battalions will be held on standby in their home countries, and deploy in composition of the LITPOLUKRBRIG in case a decision is made to activate the Brigade or any of its elements

The technical agreement supplements and elaborates on the agreement of establishing the LITPOLUKRBRIG the defence Ministers of the three establishing countries endorsed in Warsaw last September. The technical agreement stipulates that within 6 months after the signature of the document the LITPOLUKRBRIG command will have reached its initial operational capability, while within 12 months it will be fully capable of commanding the unit. The capacity of the LITPOLUKRBRIG command will then need to be approved by international certification.

The brigade commander, his deputy and the chief of staff will be assigned by Lithuania, Poland and Ukraine for a period of three years on a rotating basis. The establishing states will delegate representatives to form a LITPOLUKRBRIG Coordination Group, which will be tasked with approving the brigade’s budget-related, or other finance, training, exercises and logistics-related planning, and with supervision of the command’s work.

While in Lviv, Minister of National Defence and his delegation will also observe Exercise Rapid Trident in Yavoriv district of Lviv region. It is an exercise the U.S. Army Europe (USAREUR) organizes in Ukraine on an annual basis. This year a contingent formed by the Grand Duchess Birutė Battalion is taking part in the exercise, also involving 17 other NATO allies and partner nations, on Lithuania’s behalf. Commander of the Lithuanian Land Force Major General Almatnas Leika will also pay a visit to Exercise Rapid Trident. The Battalion will also form the core of the Lithuanian contingent to be assigned to the trilateral LITPOLUKRBRIG Brigade.

The LITPOLUKRBRIG is planned to be made up of an international staff, three battalions and special-purpose units
The LITPOLUKRBRIG is planned to be made up of an international staff, three battalions and special-purpose units

 

Lithuanian-Polish-Ukrainian Brigade (LITPOLUKRBRIG)

The Ministers of Defence of the stablishing countries endorsed the agreement on establishing the trilateral Lithuanian-Polish-Ukrainian Brigade (LITPOLUKRBRIG) in Warsaw on 19 September 2014. Subsequently, the agreement was ratified by the parliaments of the respective countries.

The Brigade will be formed following the model of multinational crisis response capabilities – European Union Battle Groups (EU BGs). The LITPOLUKRBRIG is planned to be made up of an international staff, three battalions and special-purpose units. Lithuania, Poland and Ukraine will each assign an infantry battalion, the establishing nations will commit personnel for special-purpose units and the LITPOLUKRBRIG staff.

The agreement provides for the participation of the LITPOLUKRBRIG personnel in joint training and exercises and deployment of the Brigade or its elements to international operations mandated by the United Nations Security Council, while decision regarding deployment of the LITPOLUKRBRIG to international operations will be made by general consent of all the establishing countries.

The LITPOLUKRBRIG HQ will be based in Lublin, Poland. Lithuania plans posting up to five soldiers on a permanent basis as well as to deploy additional military personnel during LITPOLUKRBRIG training and exercises. The LITPOLUKRBRIG battalions will be held on standby in their home countries, and deploy in composition of the LITPOLUKRBRIG in case a decision is made to activate the Brigade or any of its elements.

The Lithuanian contribution to the LITPOLUKRBRIG will be formed from the personnel of the Grand Duchess Birutė Uhlan Battalion. Personnel of the Battalion were also the source of the Lithuanian input into the joint Lithuanian-Polish Battalion (LITPOLBAL) in 1999-2007. The contemporary military unit formed cooperatively with a NATO ally enabled Lithuanian solders to adopt NATO military procedures, to prepared for NATO-led multinational operations as well as to get ready for integration into NATO’s military organization. The LITPOLUKRBRIG project is also aimed strengthening regional cooperation and assisting Ukraine in taking a more active part in the cooperation in the region and Euro-Atlantic area, and adopting experience and military standards of NATO allies.

As embedded in the LITPOLUKRBRIG establishing agreement, other nations will be able to join the unit at the invitation of the establishing nations. Negotiations on the establishment of the Lithuanian, Latvian and Ukrainian trilateral military unit thus contributing to regional and wide-scale international stability and security were launched in 2007. The project also aims for strengthening the strategic partnership and defence cooperation between Lithuania and Poland and assisting Ukraine to join the cooperation in the Euro-Atlantic space on a more active basis.

 

Fabrication of Destroyer

Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division marked the start of fabrication for the Arleigh Burke-class (DDG 51) guided missile destroyer Delbert D. Black (DDG-119) on July 21. The start of fabrication signifies that 100 tons of steel have been cut.

Ima Black reacts after starting a plasma cutter machine at Ingalls Shipbuilding, officially beginning construction of the Arleigh Burke-class destroyer Delbert D. Black (DDG-119), which is named in honor of her late husband (Photo by Andrew Young/HII)
Ima Black reacts after starting a plasma cutter machine at Ingalls Shipbuilding, officially beginning construction of the Arleigh Burke-class destroyer Delbert D. Black (DDG-119), which is named in honor of her late husband (Photo by Andrew Young/HII)

The ship is named in honor of Delbert D. Black, who served as a gunner’s mate in the U.S. Navy and was aboard the battleship USS Maryland during the attack on Pearl Harbor. Black served in three wars and was the first Master Chief Petty Officer of the U.S. Navy.

«Our shipbuilders are very excited about beginning the fabrication process of another DDG 51 destroyer, especially one named after the first Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy», said George Nungesser, Ingalls’ DDG 51 program manager. «Serial production provides the most effective and efficient way to build ships, and this is our fourth ship started in three years. We are committed to building another great warship for the Navy».

Black’s widow, Ima, is the ship’s sponsor and participated in the ceremony. She met Black after World War II, during which she served as a Navy WAVE (Women Accepted for Voluntary Emergency Service). She and Delbert were married 50 years until the time of his death in 2000.

«I want to thank all of the shipbuilders who are building this ship», she said. «Today was very emotional for me. I’m happy they did name the ship for him and that they are building it for him, but it is sad that he was not here to receive these honors. He would be very pleased about it. I know the men and women who serve on this ship will be proud to have the name Delbert D. Black on their uniform».

Delbert D. Black is the 32nd Arleigh Burke-class destroyer to be built at Ingalls. From this point on, shipbuilders will assemble the ship using modular construction, where pre-fabricated units are constructed separately and later lifted in place and integrated with other units.

«I am excited to see DDG-119 production starting off strong», said Captain Mark Vandroff, the Navy’s DDG 51 class program manager. «This ship will not only honor a great Navy leader, it will serve as a testament to all our current and future senior enlisted leaders of the value the Navy places on their service. My team was greatly honored to have Mrs. Black present at the start of fabrication and looks forward to her enthusiasm guiding us during the ship’s construction».

To date, Ingalls has delivered 28 Arleigh Burke-class destroyers to the U.S. Navy. The highly capable, multi-mission ship can conduct a variety of operations, from peacetime presence and crisis management to sea control and power projection, all in support of the United States’ military strategy. Arleigh Burke-class destroyers are capable of simultaneously fighting air, surface and subsurface battles. The ship contains myriad offensive and defensive weapons designed to support maritime defense needs well into the 21st century.

Arleigh Burke Class Flight IIA
Arleigh Burke Class Flight IIA

 

Ship Characteristics

Length Overall 510 feet/156 m
Beam – Waterline 59 feet/18 m
Draft 30.5 feet/9.3 m
Displacement – Full Load 9,217 tons/9,363 metric tons
Power Plant 4 General electric LM 2500-30 gas turbines; 2 shafts; 2 CRP (Contra-Rotating) propellers; 100,000 shaft horsepower/ 75,000 kW
Speed in excess of 30 knots/34.5 mph/ 55.5 km/h
Range 4,400 NM/8,149 km at 20 knots/23 mph/37 km/h
Crew 380 total: 32 Officers, 27 CPO (Chief Petty Officer), 321 OEM
Surveillance SPY-1D Phased Array Radar and Aegis Combat System (Lockheed Martin); SPS-73(V) Navigation; SPS-67(V)3 Surface Search; 3 SPG-62 Illuminator; SQQ-89(V)6 sonar incorporating SQS-53C hull mounted and SQR-19 towed array sonars used with Mark-116 Mod 7 ASW fire control system
Electronics/Countermeasures SLQ-32(V)3; Mark-53 Mod 0 Decoy System; Mark-234 Decoy System; SLQ-25A Torpedo Decoy; SLQ-39 Surface Decoy; URN-25 TACAN; UPX-29 IFF System; Kollmorgen Mark-46 Mod 1 Electro-Optical Director
Aircraft 2 embarked SH-60 helicopters ASW operations; RAST (Recovery Assist, Secure and Traverse)
Armament 2 Mark-41 Vertical Launching System (VLS) with 90 Standard, Vertical Launch ASROC (Anti-Submarine Rocket) & Tomahawk ASM (Air-to-Surface Missile)/LAM (Loitering Attack Missile); 5-in (127-mm)/54 Mark-45 gun; 2 CIWS (Close-In Weapon System); 2 Mark-32 triple 324-mm torpedo tubes for Mark-46 or Mark-50 ASW torpedos
USS Nitze (DDG-94) - Flight IIA: 5"/62, one 20-mm CIWS variant
USS Nitze (DDG-94) – Flight IIA: 5″/62, one 20-mm CIWS variant

 

Guided Missile Destroyers Lineup

Ship Yard Launched Commissioned Homeport
DDG-51 Arleigh Burke GDBIW 09-16-89 07-04-91 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-52 Barry HIIIS 06-08-91 12-12-92 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-53 John Paul Jones GDBIW 10-26-91 12-18-93 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-54 Curtis Wilbur GDBIW 05-16-92 03-19-94 Yokosuka, Japan
DDG-55 Stout HIIIS 10-16-92 08-13-94 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-56 John S. McCain GDBIW 09-26-92 07-02-94 Yokosuka, Japan
DDG-57 Mitscher HIIIS 05-07-93 12-10-94 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-58 Laboon GDBIW 02-20-93 03-18-95 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-59 Russell HIIIS 10-20-93 05-20-95 San Diego, California
DDG-60 Paul Hamilton GDBIW 07-24-93 05-27-95 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-61 Ramage HIIIS 02-11-94 07-22-95 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-62 Fitzgerald GDBIW 01-29-94 10-14-95 Yokosuka, Japan
DDG-63 Stethem HIIIS 07-17-94 10-21-95 Yokosuka, Japan
DDG-64 Carney GDBIW 07-23-94 04-13-96 Mayport, Florida
DDG-65 Benfold HIIIS 11-09-94 03-30-96 San Diego, California
DDG-66 Gonzalez GDBIW 02-18-95 10-12-96 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-67 Cole HIIIS 02-10-95 06-08-96 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-68 The Sullivans GDBIW 08-12-95 04-19-97 Mayport, Florida
DDG-69 Milius HIIIS 08-01-95 11-23-96 San Diego, California
DDG-70 Hopper GDBIW 01-06-96 09-06-97 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-71 Ross HIIIS 03-22-96 06-28-97 Rota, Spain
DDG-72 Mahan GDBIW 06-29-96 02-14-98 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-73 Decatur GDBIW 11-10-96 08-29-98 San Diego, California
DDG-74 McFaul HIIIS 01-18-97 04-25-98 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-75 Donald Cook GDBIW 05-03-97 12-04-98 Rota, Spain
DDG-76 Higgins GDBIW 10-04-97 04-24-99 San Diego, California
DDG-77 O’Kane GDBIW 03-28-98 10-23-99 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-78 Porter HIIIS 11-12-97 03-20-99 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-79 Oscar Austin GDBIW 11-07-98 08-19-00 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-80 Roosevelt HIIIS 01-10-99 10-14-00 Mayport, Florida
DDG-81 Winston S. Churchill GDBIW 04-17-99 03-10-01 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-82 Lassen HIIIS 10-16-99 04-21-01 Yokosuka, Japan
DDG-83 Howard GDBIW 11-20-99 10-20-01 San Diego, California
DDG-84 Bulkeley HIIIS 06-21-00 12-08-01 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-85 McCampbell GDBIW 07-02-00 08-17-02 Yokosuka, Japan
DDG-86 Shoup HIIIS 11-22-00 06-22-02 Everett, Washington
DDG-87 Mason GDBIW 06-23-01 04-12-03 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-88 Preble HIIIS 06-01-01 11-09-02 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-89 Mustin HIIIS 12-12-01 07-26-03 Yokosuka, Japan
DDG-90 Chafee GDBIW 11-02-02 10-18-03 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-91 Pinckney HIIIS 06-26-02 05-29-04 San Diego, California
DDG-92 Momsen GDBIW 07-19-03 08-28-04 Everett, Washington
DDG-93 Chung-Hoon HIIIS 12-15-02 09-18-04 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-94 Nitze GDBIW 04-03-04 03-05-05 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-95 James E. Williams HIIIS 06-25-03 12-11-04 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-96 Bainbridge GDBIW 11-13-04 11-12-05 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-97 Halsey HIIIS 01-09-04 07-30-05 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-98 Forrest Sherman HIIIS 10-02-04 01-28-06 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-99 Farragut GDBIW 07-23-05 06-10-06 Mayport, Florida
DDG-100 Kidd HIIIS 01-22-05 06-09-07 San Diego, California
DDG-101 Gridley GDBIW 12-28-05 02-10-07 San Diego, California
DDG-102 Sampson GDBIW 09-16-06 11-03-07 San Diego, California
DDG-103 Truxtun HIIIS 06-02-07 04-25-09 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-104 Sterett GDBIW 05-19-07 08-09-08 San Diego, California
DDG-105 Dewey HIIIS 01-26-08 03-06-10 San Diego, California
DDG-106 Stockdale GDBIW 05-10-08 04-18-09 San Diego, California
DDG-107 Gravely HIIIS 03-30-09 11-20-10 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-108 Wayne E. Meyer GDBIW 10-18-08 10-10-09 San Diego, California
DDG-109 Jason Dunham GDBIW 08-01-09 11-13-10 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-110 William P. Lawrence HIIIS 12-15-09 06-04-11 San Diego, California
DDG-111 Spruance GDBIW 06-06-10 10-01-11 San Diego, California
DDG-112 Michael Murphy GDBIW 05-08-11 10-06-12 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-113 John Finn HIIIS 03-28-15
DDG-114 Ralph Johnson HIIIS
DDG-115 Rafael Peralta GDBIW
DDG-116 Thomas Hudner GDBIW
DDG-117 Paul Ignatius HIIIS
DDG-118 Daniel Inouye GDBIW
DDG-119 Delbert D. Black HIIIS
DDG-120 GDBIW
DDG-121 HIIIS
DDG-122 GDBIW
DDG-123 HIIIS
DDG-124 GDBIW
DDG-125 HIIIS
DDG-126 GDBIW

GDBIW – General Dynamics Bath Iron Works

HIIIS – Huntington Ingalls Industries Ingalls Shipbuilding

DDG – Destroyer, Guided Missile

The Arleigh Burk-class guided-missile destroyer USS Sampson (DDG-102) departs Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam to support Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2010 exercises
The Arleigh Burk-class guided-missile destroyer USS Sampson (DDG-102) departs Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam to support Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2010 exercises

First three Rafales

The official ceremony marking the acceptance by the Arab Republic of Egypt of its first three Rafales was held on July 20 at the Dassault Aviation flight test center in Istres, under the patronage of His Excellency Mr. Ehab Badawy, Egyptian Ambassador to France, and in the presence of Dassault Aviation Chairman & CEO Eric Trappier.

Dassault Aviation Delivers First Rafales to the Arab Republic of Egypt
Dassault Aviation Delivers First Rafales to the Arab Republic of Egypt

This first delivery comes just five months after the Egyptian decision to acquire 24 Rafales (16 two-seaters and 8 single-seaters) in order to equip its Air Force with a latest-generation multirole fighter capable of meeting the country’s operational requirements and enabling Egypt, with full sovereignty, to secure its geostrategic position in the region. At the same time, an initial group of Egyptian users has been trained in France. Egyptian pilots, trained by the French Air Force, flew the first three Rafales to Cairo on the day after the ceremony.

Eric Trappier declared: «This contract constitutes a new milestone in the cooperation between Dassault Aviation and Egypt since the 1970s – more than 40 years of an exemplary partnership marked by commitment and mutual trust. After the Mirage 5, the Alpha Jet and the Mirage 2000, the Rafale is the fourth Dassault aircraft to fly in Egyptian colors, and Egypt is the first export customer for the Rafale, as it was for the Mirage 2000. We are very pleased with this partnership, which over time has shown its solidity and ensured the durability of the historical links between our two countries. On behalf of Dassault Aviation and its 8,000 employees, its partners Thales and Snecma and the 500 subcontractors, I thank the Egyptian authorities, for the trust they have placed in us once again, and also the authorities and the French armed forces, without whose support this success would not have been possible».

Composite materials are extensively used in the Rafale and they account for 70% of the wetted area. They also account for the 40% increase in the max take-off weight to empty weight ratio compared with traditional airframes built of aluminium and titanium
Composite materials are extensively used in the Rafale and they account for 70% of the wetted area. They also account for the 40% increase in the max take-off weight to empty weight ratio compared with traditional airframes built of aluminium and titanium

Specifications and performance data

DIMENSIONS
Wingspan 35.76 feet/10.90 m
Length 50.19 feet/15.30 m
Height 17.38 feet/5.30 m
WEIGHT
Overall empty weight 22,000 lbs/10,000 kg class
Maximum Take-Off Weight (MTOW) 54,000 lbs/24,500 kg
Fuel (internal) 10,300 lbs/4,700 kg
Fuel (external) up to 14,700 lbs/6,700 kg
External load 21,000 lbs/9,500 kg
STORE STATIONS
Total 14
Heavy – wet 5
PERFORMANCE
Maximum thrust 2 × 7.5 tons
Limit load factors -3.2 g / +9 g
Maximum speed (Low altitude) M = 1.1/750 knots/863 mph/1,389 km/h
Maximum speed (High altitude) M = 1.8/1,032 knots/1,187 mph/1,911 km/h
Approach speed less than 120 knots/138 mph/222 km/h
Landing ground run 1,500 feet/450 m without drag-chute
Service ceiling 50,000 feet/15,240 m
The radar cross section of the airframe has been kept to the lowest possible value by selecting the most adequate outer mould line and materials. Most of the stealth design features are classified, but some of them are clearly visible, such as the serrated patterns on the trailing edge of the wings and canards
The radar cross section of the airframe has been kept to the lowest possible value by selecting the most adequate outer mould line and materials. Most of the stealth design features are classified, but some of them are clearly visible, such as the serrated patterns on the trailing edge of the wings and canards

 

Orion record confirmed

Aurora Flight Sciences announced on July 14 that on July 1, 2015 the company received official notification from the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale (FAI) that its Orion aircraft set the world record for duration of flight for a remotely controlled Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV). The record was awarded based on the aircraft’s 80-hour, 2-minute and 52-second flight that took place December 5-8, 2014. The previous record for the same class of unmanned aircraft was just over 30 hours, set by a Global Hawk in 2001.

Orion is able to fly for 5 days with 1,000 lbs/453.6 kg payload at 20,000 feet/6,096 m in altitude
Orion is able to fly for 5 days with 1,000 lbs/453.6 kg payload at 20,000 feet/6,096 m in altitude

The National Aeronautic Association (NAA) also notified Aurora that the record-breaking Orion flight was being formally recognized by NAA as one of the most memorable aviation milestones of 2014. In 2014 the Orion record flight was also recognized by NAA in naming Orion as a finalist for the Collier Trophy, one of the world’s most distinguished aviation awards. Officials from NAA were on-hand to supervise and formally witness the Orion record-breaking flight in December, 2014.

«We’re thrilled to receive notification that FAI and NAA have officially recognized this groundbreaking development in unmanned flight», said Dr. John S. Langford, chairman and CEO of Aurora Flight Sciences. «The U.S. military put the challenge to Aurora to develop a long-endurance unmanned system that far exceeded the capabilities of existing technologies. Obviously, when taxpayer dollars are invested, the goal is not only to see if a long-endurance flight can be achieved, but to ultimately deploy the system in support of the American warfighter. We met and exceeded our customer’s requirements for the aircraft. The most important recognition for Orion will come when the aircraft is put to work meeting exactly what U.S. warfighter is calling for – unmanned, persistent surveillance of our enemies. We stand ready to meet this growing demand».

In recent months, demand from U.S. national security leaders for long-endurance, or «persistent», Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) capabilities in an unmanned aircraft has been on the rise. Speaking on the floor of the U.S. House of Representatives on June 10, 2015, House Defense Appropriations subcommittee chairman Rodney Frelinghuysen said, «We believe that a strong Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance capability is a critical component of the Global War on Terrorism. And yet, a succession of combatant commanders has testified that only a fraction of their ISR requirements are being met, in essence, leaving them blind to the enemy’s activities, movements and intentions».

Aurora Flight Sciences is a world leader in design and manufacture of medium altitude, long-endurance unmanned and optionally piloted aircraft for military ISR requirements and a wide range of commercial applications. «It’s not every day that a U.S. government contractor is tasked with testing the existing boundaries of a given aviation threshold, only to shatter that threshold and establish a world record», said Langford. «The Orion platform certainly joins our Centaur aircraft as a pillar in Aurora’s growing suite of products that we believe will experience significant demand in the coming years».

The company’s Centaur optionally piloted, medium altitude, long-endurance aircraft, in service with customers including a European defense agency, also recently became the first large Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) to fly in one of six Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) test sites designed to prepare for integration in the U.S. national air space. The ability to fly manned or unmanned in the sovereign airspace of customer and neighboring countries is a unique capability that greatly reduces costs and logistics, and optimizes the aircraft’s time-on-mission.

«The global threat environment and related ISR requirements are evolving rapidly, and doing so in the context of deep budget cuts», said Dr. John S. Langford, chairman and CEO of Aurora. «Our go-to-market strategy is grounded in the basic notion of a customer-driven contracting approach. We’re doing traditional sale and lease agreements, as well as company-owned and operated deals that allow the government customer to focus more on the acquisition of information, as opposed to airplanes».

Orion provides over 3 days on station from bases 1,738 NM/2,000 miles/3,219 km from the mission
Orion provides over 3 days on station from bases 1,738 NM/2,000 miles/3,219 km from the mission

 

Orion Payload Options

  • Multi-Spectral Full Motion Video (FMV)
  • Wide Area Airborne Surveillance (WAAS)
  • Search And Rescue (SAR)/Dismount Moving Target Indication (DMTI)
  • Hyperspectral Video and Imaging
  • Line-Of-Sight (LOS) and Beyond Line-Of-Sight (BLOS) Communications Relay
  • Signals Intelligence (SIGNIT)
  • Maritime Domain Awareness radars
  • Foliage Penetration radars (FOPEN)
  • Onboard Processing, Exploitation, and Dissemination (PED)

 

Specifications

Wingspan 132 feet/40.23 m
Length overall 50 feet/15.24 m
Gross Take-Off Weight (GTOW) 11,200 lbs/5,080 kg
Useful Payload Weight 2,600 lbs/1,179 kg
Useful Payload Space 146+ feet3/4.13+ m3
Dedicated Payload Power 11 kW (22 kW Option)
Propulsion Dual FAA certified heavy-fuel engines
Reliability Triplex avionics for reliable operation
Endurance 120 hours with 1,000 lbs/453.6 kg payload
Mission Radius 3,476 NM/4,000 miles/6,437 km with 24 hours on-station
Ferry Range 13,034 NM/15,000 miles/24,140 km
Operating Ceiling 30,000 feet/9,144 m
Speed 120 knots/138 mph/222 km/h
Cruise Speed 67-85 knots/77-98 mph/124-157 km/h
Orion has the potential to provide strike capability for the warfighter with the ability to carry over 1,000 lbs/453.6 kg per wing hardpoint
Orion has the potential to provide strike capability for the warfighter with the ability to carry over 1,000 lbs/453.6 kg per wing hardpoint

Eurofighter Enhanced

Airbus Defence and Space has successfully completed flight-testing of a package of aerodynamic upgrades to the Eurofighter Typhoon swing-role fighter that promises to enhance further the aircraft’s agility and weapons-carrying ability. The Aerodynamic Modification Kit (AMK) is part of a wider Eurofighter Enhanced Maneuverability (EFEM) programme with the potential to help ensure the type is continuing superiority for many years to come.

Flight-test of Eurofighter Aerodynamic Upgrades Completed
Flight-test of Eurofighter Aerodynamic Upgrades Completed

It entails primarily the addition of fuselage strakes and leading-edge root extensions, which increase the maximum lift created by the wing by 25% – resulting in an increased turn rate, tighter turning radius, and improved nose-pointing ability at low speed – all critical fighter capabilities in air-to-air combat.

The introduction of the AMK will not only enhance the Eurofighter’s current capability as a swing-role fighter-bomber, but will provide additional growth potential, enabling easier integration of future air-to-surface configurations and much more flexible applications, vastly enhancing the aircraft’s mission effectiveness in the air-to-surface role.

The Defensive Aids Sub-System (DASS), which constitutes the Electronic Warfare suite, monitors and responds to the outside world
The Defensive Aids Sub-System (DASS), which constitutes the Electronic Warfare suite, monitors and responds to the outside world

Eurofighter Project Pilot Germany Raffaele Beltrame said: «This programme has been a tremendous success with very impressive results – in some areas even better than we expected. We saw angle of attack values around 45% greater than on the standard aircraft, and roll rates up to 100% higher, all leading to increased agility. The handling qualities appeared to be markedly improved, providing more maneuverability, agility and precision while performing tasks representative of in-service operations. In addition, it is extremely interesting to consider the potential benefits in the air-to-surface configuration thanks to the increased variety and flexibility of stores that can be carried. It is right to say that the EFEM/AMK work has allowed us to discover a new aircraft with much higher performance and greater potential to meet the challenges of the years ahead».

The flight trials followed some five years of studies. Eurofighter test pilots, joined in the latter stages by operational pilots from Germany, Italy and the UK, completed 36 sorties from Manching, Germany on the IPA7 Instrumented Production Aircraft.

Modifications boost agility and weapons-carrying capability
Modifications boost agility and weapons-carrying capability

 

Eurojet EJ200

The EJ200 has been designed with inherent growth potential up to 15%. Enhancements in the compression system and latest innovations in core engine technology could deliver up to 30% increased power. This performance improvement may also be traded for life cycle cost improvements, maintaining current thrust levels. This flexibility is enabled by the advanced Digital Engine Control and Monitoring Unit (DECMU), fully exploiting the advantages of the enhanced engine in line with operational requirements.

Eurofighter Typhoon is equipped with two Eurojet EJ200 engines to increase safety in peacetime and redundancy in war
Eurofighter Typhoon is equipped with two Eurojet EJ200 engines to increase safety in peacetime and redundancy in war
Thrust / Weight ratio ~10:1
Overall pressure ratio 26:1
Bypass ratio 0.4
Overall length 157 inch/4 m
Inlet diameter 29 inch/0.74 m
Digital Engine Control and Monitoring Unit (DECMU)
Each aspect of the Eurofighter Typhoon is designed to provide a balanced contribution to the overall effectiveness of the weapon system
Each aspect of the Eurofighter Typhoon is designed to provide a balanced contribution to the overall effectiveness of the weapon system

 

General characteristics

DIMENSIONS
Wingspan 35 feet 11 inch/10.95 m
Length overall 52 feet 4 inch/15.96 m
Height 17 feet 4 inch/5.28 m
Wing Area 551.1 feet2/51.2 m2
MASS
Basic Mass Empty 24,250 lbs/11,000 kg
Maximum Take-Off >51,809 lbs/23,500 kg
Maximum External Load >16,535 lbs/7,500 kg
DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS
Single seat twin-engine, with a two-seat variant
Weapon Carriage 13 Hardpoints
G’ limits +9/-3 ‘g’
Engines Two Eurojet EJ200 reheated turbofans
Maximum dry thrust class 13,500 lbs/6,124 kgf/60 kN
Maximum reheat thrust class 20,000 lbs/9,072 kgf/90 kN
GENERAL PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS
Ceiling >55,000 feet/16,764 m
Brakes off to 35,000 feet(10,668 m)/Mach 1.5 <2.5 minutes
Brakes off to lift off <8 seconds
At low level, 200 knots/230 mph/370 km/h to Mach 1.0 in 30 seconds
Maximum Speed Mach 2.0
Operational Runway Length <2,297 feet/700 m
MATERIALS
Carbon Fibre Composites (CFC) 70%
Glass Reinforced Plastic (GRP) 12%
Aluminium Alloy, Titanium Alloy 15%
Acrylic (Röhm 249) 3%
OPERATORS
United Kingdom 232 Aircraft
Germany 180 Aircraft
Italy 121 Aircraft
Spain 87 Aircraft
Kingdom of Saudi Arabia 72 Aircraft
Austria 15 Aircraft
Sultanate of Oman 12 Aircraft
Total 719 Aircraft
Eurofighter Typhoon provides a diverse range of options for all Air-to-Air and Air-to-Surface operations
Eurofighter Typhoon provides a diverse range of options for all Air-to-Air and Air-to-Surface operations

8th Italian FREMM

The 8th Italian FREMM ship was laid down on the 12th July 2015 at the Riva Trigoso shipyard. The ceremony marks an important milestone in the OCCAR (l’Organisation Conjointe de Coopération en matière d’Armement – Organization for Joint Armament) FREMM Programme after the first steel cutting of this frigate on the 25th February 2015. This new FREMM ship will be in the General Purpose configuration and will be delivered to the Italian Navy at the beginning of 2019.

The ASW version was fitted with both towed and hull mounted sonars
The ASW version was fitted with both towed and hull mounted sonars

The FREMM ships are characterized by a high level of flexibility, and are specifically designed to operate in multiple scenarios. The Programme, which is the most important joint initiative to date between European industries in the field of naval defence, continues to run beyond 2020 after the placement on 16th April 2015 of the order for the last two FREMM frigates for Italy.

The other Italian FREMM ships are currently at different stages of production: Carlo Bergamini (F590), the First Of Class (FOC) in General Purpose (GP) configuration, and Virginio Fasan (F591), the FOC in Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) configuration, are fully operational and employed by the Italian Navy. Both of them are in the In Service Phase with all the necessary support services provided through the Temporary Global Support contract.

Carlo Margottini (F592) and Carabiniere (F593), the Follow On Ships (FOS) in ASW configuration, are respectively under the Warranty Works period up to the end of July 2015 (when Carlo Margottini will be fully operational), and the Warranty period.

Alpino (F594), the FOS №3 in ASW configuration, was launched on 13th December 2014; Luigi Rizzo (А595), the FOS №1 in GP configuration, will be launched in December 2015; and the 7th Italian FREMM is under construction.

First segment of the 8th Italian FREMM frigate
First segment of the 8th Italian FREMM frigate

 

Main Characteristics

Length overall 472.5 feet/144 m
Width 65.6 feet/20 m
Depth (main deck) 37 feet/11.3 m
Displacement 6700 tonnes
Maximum speed 27 knots/31 mph/50 km/h
Crew 145 people
Accommodation Up to 200 men and women
CODLAG PROPULSION SYSTEM
Avio-GE LM2500+G4 32 MW
Electric propulsion motors 2 × 2,5 MW
Diesel Generator (DG) sets 4 × 2,1 MW
Propellers 2 × Controllable-Pitch Propeller (CPP)
Endurance 45 days
Range at 15 knots/17 mph/28 km/h 6,000 NM/6,905 miles/11,112 km
COMBAT SYSTEM
Anti-Air Warfare (AAW)/ Anti-Surface Warfare (ASuW) Capabilities
Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) Defence
Electronic Warfare (EW) Capabilities
The FREMM will be built in Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASM/ASW), Anti-Air Warfare (FREDA) and General Purpose (GP) versions
The FREMM will be built in Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASM/ASW), Anti-Air Warfare (FREDA) and General Purpose (GP) versions

Modernization for GPS

The 10th Boeing GPS IIF satellite has reached orbit and sent its first signals after being launched on July 15, 2015. This satellite advances the U.S. Air Force’s modernization program for GPS, improving accuracy and enhancing security for the navigation system used by millions of people around the world every day.

A United Launch Alliance Atlas V blasts off from Cape Canaveral with the GPS IIF-10 mission for the U.S. Air Force (United Launch Alliance photo)
A United Launch Alliance Atlas V blasts off from Cape Canaveral with the GPS IIF-10 mission for the U.S. Air Force (United Launch Alliance photo)

The Boeing-built GPS IIFs are the newest generation of GPS satellites, delivering a longer design life, greater accuracy, increased signal power for civil applications, a more robust military M-code signal and variable power for better jamming resistance. The IIFs also are outfitted with the new civilian L-5 signal, which, when fully operational, will be used for emergency applications.

«The GPS IIF-10 launch milestone continues a series of recent unparalleled successes for the GPS IIF program», said Dan Hart, vice president, Boeing Government Space Systems. «We understand the importance of this system to the global community, both civil and military, and the government-Boeing team is partnering to assure mission success and operational excellence».

GPS IIF-10 lifted off from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V expendable launch vehicle at 11:36 a.m. EDT. About three hours and 23 minutes later, the spacecraft was released into its medium earth orbit of about 12,000 miles/19,312.1 km.

Boeing will support the U.S. Air Force in performing on-orbit checkout of GPS IIF-10 before it is formally declared operational in about one month. The next GPS satellite, GPS IIF-11, was shipped to Cape Canaveral on June 8 in preparation for the third and final IIF launch of 2015 later this fall.

A unit of The Boeing Company, Defense, Space & Security is one of the world’s largest defense, space and security businesses specializing in innovative and capabilities-driven customer solutions, and the world’s largest and most versatile manufacturer of military aircraft. Headquartered in St. Louis, Defense, Space & Security is a $31 billion business with 53,000 employees worldwide.

 

As the number of GPS devices increases globally, so does our dependence on GPS, but satellites wear out.  Bringing innovations from their airplane assembly lines to GPS production, Boeing is helping to make GPS service available wherever, whenever you need it

Lieutenant Rolette

The Honorable Jason Kenney, Minister of National Defence, announced on July 16, in Québec City, that an Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship (AOPS) will be named in honor of Lieutenant Frédérick Rolette, a Canadian-born officer and naval hero of various actions, ashore and afloat, during the War of 1812, including command of the ship General Hunter. A parallel announcement was made in Windsor, Ontario, by Jeff Watson, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport and Member of Parliament for Essex, close to the sites of many of Lieutenant Rolette’s heroic actions.

Artist’s impression of the Harry DeWolf-Class Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship
Artist’s impression of the Harry DeWolf-Class Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship

Just before the outbreak of the War of 1812, Frédérick Rolette was posted to Amherstburg, Ontario, as a Lieutenant in charge of the brig General Hunter. When word of the outbreak of war reached Amherstburg on July 3, 1812, Rolette acted immediately, capturing an American vessel, the Cuyahoga, before the crew became aware that their country had declared war on Britain. This was the first action of the War of 1812 and a significant prize, because onboard the Cuyahoga were American commander General William Hull’s papers and dispatches, providing the British with a great deal of intelligence on American strengths and deployment.

 

Quick Facts

Lieutenant Rolette was very active in the war, conducting several daring captures of American supply vessels and participating in land battles at the Capture of Detroit, the Battle of Frenchtown, and the skirmish at the Canard River. He was the First Lieutenant (second in command) of the British schooner Lady Prevost at the Battle of Lake Erie on September 10, 1813. When the captain was mortally wounded, he assumed command and fought the ship «with great skill and gallantry» until he himself was severely wounded, burned by an explosion and the ship was a broken unmanageable and sinking wreck.

Construction of the first AOPS will begin in September 2015, with HMCS Harry DeWolf scheduled for delivery in 2018
Construction of the first AOPS will begin in September 2015, with HMCS Harry DeWolf scheduled for delivery in 2018

When the war ended, Lieutenant Rolette returned home to Québec City to a hero’s welcome and was presented with a fifty-guinea sword of honor by its citizens in recognition of his service. Through the research and efforts of the Naval Museum of Québec, the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) was able to locate the whereabouts and current owner of this sword of honor in order to have it displayed to the public as part of the naming announcement.

In September 2014, Prime Minister Stephen Harper announced that the forthcoming AOPS will be named to honor prominent Canadians who served with the highest distinction and conspicuous gallantry in the Navy. The lead ship was named HMCS Harry DeWolf and the class is known as the Harry DeWolf-Class. Other announced ships’ names in the class include HMCS Margaret Brooke, HMCS Max Bernays, HMCS William Hall and, now, HMCS Frédérick Rolette.

On January 23, 2015, the Government of Canada announced the awarding of the build contract with Irving Shipbuilding Inc. for the construction of up to six Harry DeWolf-class AOPS as part of the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy (NSPS). This contract, valued at $2.3 billion, marks the start of the construction phase under the NSPS. Construction is set to begin in the fall of this year.

The RCN will employ the AOPS to conduct sovereignty and surveillance operations in Canadian waters on all three coasts, including in the Arctic. The AOPS will also be used to support other units of the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) in the conduct of maritime-related operations, and to support other government departments in carrying out their mandates, as required.

The AOPS are key to the Government of Canada’s ability to deliver on three of our guiding strategies – the Canada First Defence Strategy, the Northern Strategy, and the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy.

The NSPS – the largest procurement sourcing arrangement in Canadian history – is expected to create thousands of high-value jobs in shipbuilding and related industries across the country. The Strategy is about undertaking major ship procurements in a smarter, more effective way – a way that sustains Canadian jobs, strengthens the marine sector and provides the best value for Canadian taxpayers.

New Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship to be named in honor of French-Canadian hero of War of 1812, Frédérick Rolette
New Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship to be named in honor of French-Canadian hero of War of 1812, Frédérick Rolette

 

Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ships

The Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship (AOPS) project will deliver six ice-capable ships, designated as the Harry DeWolf Class, after Canadian wartime naval hero Vice-Admiral Harry DeWolf.

The AOPS will be capable of:

  • armed sea-borne surveillance of Canada’s waters, including the Arctic;
  • providing government situational awareness of activities and events in these regions;
  • cooperating with other partners in the Canadian Armed Forces and other government departments to assert and enforce Canadian sovereignty, when and where necessary.

Construction of the first AOPS will begin in September 2015, with HMCS Harry DeWolf scheduled for delivery in 2018.

The announced names of the Harry DeWolf-class ships to date are:

  • HMCS Harry DeWolf
  • HMCS Margaret Brooke
  • HMCS Max Bernays
  • HMCS William Hall
  • HMCS Frédérick Rolette

 

Specifications

Displacement 6,440 tonnes
Length 338 feet/103 m
Beam 62.3 feet/19 m
Maximum speed 17 knots/19.5 mph/31 km/h
Cruising speed 14 knots/16 mph/26 km/h
Range at Cruising speed 6,800 NM/7,825 miles/12,593.6 km
Complement 65
International ice classification standard Polar Class 5
Be able to sustain operations up to 4 months
Remain operational 25 years beyond Initial Operational Capability (IOC)

Harry DeWolf-Class Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship

Harry DeWolf-Class Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship

 

Features

Integrated Bridge Navigation System

Modern integrated bridge, from which control of navigation, machinery, and damage control systems can be performed.

Multi-Purpose Operational Space

Where operational planning and mission execution will be coordinated.

BAE Mk-38 Gun

Remote controlled 25-mm gun to support domestic constabulary role.

Enclosed Focsle/Cable Deck

Protects foredeck machinery and workspace from harsh Arctic environment.

Helicopter Capability

Depending on the mission, the embarked helicopter could range from a small utility aircraft right up to the new CH-148 maritime helicopter.

Cargo/Payloads

Multiple payload options such as shipping containers, underwater survey equipment, or a landing craft. Ship has a 20-tonne crane to self-load/unload.

Vehicle Bay

For rapid mobility over land or ice, the ship can carry vehicles such as pickup trucks, All-Terrain Vehicles (ATVs), and snowmobiles.

Diesel/Electric Propulsion

Propulsion: Two 4.5 MW main propulsion engines, four 3.6 MW generators.

Retractable Active Fin Stabilizers

Deployed to reduce ship roll for open ocean operations, retracted for operations in ice.

Multi-Role Rescue Boats

Top speed of 35+ knots/40+ mph/65+ km/h, 28 feet/8.5 meters long. Will support rescues, personnel transfers, or boarding operations.

Bow Thrusters

To enable maneuvering or berthing without tug assistance.