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A United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V rocket carrying the fourth Mobile User Objective System (MUOS) satellite for the U.S. Navy launched from Space Launch Complex-41 at 6:18 a.m. EDT on September 2, 2015. The MUOS-4 spacecraft will bring advanced, new, global communications capabilities to mobile military forces, as well as ensure continued mission capability of the existing Ultra High Frequency (UHF) satellite communications system. This is ULA’s eighth launch in 2015, the second MUOS satellite launched in 2015 and ULA’s 99th successful launch since the company was formed in December 2006.

An Atlas V rocket with the Navy’s fourth Mobile User Objective System (MUOS-4)
An Atlas V rocket with the Navy’s fourth Mobile User Objective System (MUOS-4)

«The ULA team is proud to support the U.S. Navy and the U.S. Air Force by delivering this critical communications asset to orbit today», said Jim Sponnick, ULA vice president, Atlas and Delta Programs. «Today’s successful launch will enable the MUOS constellation to reach global coverage. The Lockheed Martin-built MUOS-4 satellite will deliver voice, data, and video communications capability, similar to a cellular network, to our troops all over the globe».

This mission was launched aboard an Atlas V Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV) 551 configuration vehicle, which includes a 5-meter diameter payload fairing along with five Aerojet Rocketdyne solid rocket motors attached to the Atlas booster. The Atlas booster for this mission was powered by the RD AMROSS RD-180 engine and the Centaur upper stage was powered by the Aerojet Rocketdyne RL10C-1 engine.

The U.S. Navy’s MUOS is a next-generation narrowband tactical satellite communications system designed using a combination of orbiting satellites and relay ground stations to significantly improve communications for U.S. forces on the move. MUOS will provide new beyond-line-of-sight communications capabilities, with smartphone-like simultaneous voice, video and data – to connect military users almost anywhere around the globe.

ULA’s next launch is the Atlas V Morelos-3, communications satellite for Lockheed Martin Commercial Launch Services and Secretaria de Comunicaciones y Transportes, a government agency of Mexico, scheduled for October 2 from Space Launch Complex-41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida.

The EELV program was established by the U.S. Air Force to provide assured access to space for Department of Defense and other government payloads. The commercially developed EELV program supports the full range of government mission requirements, while delivering on schedule and providing significant cost savings over the heritage launch systems.

With more than a century of combined heritage, United Launch Alliance is the nation’s most experienced and reliable launch service provider. ULA has successfully delivered more than 95 satellites to orbit that provide critical capabilities for troops in the field, aid meteorologists in tracking severe weather, enable personal device-based GPS navigation and unlock the mysteries of our solar system.

An Atlas V rocket carrying the MUOS-4 mission lifts off from Space Launch Complex 41
An Atlas V rocket carrying the MUOS-4 mission lifts off from Space Launch Complex 41

12 CV90s to Norway

BAE Systems has delivered 12 new CV90 Infantry Fighting Vehicles (IFVs) to the Norwegian Army. They are the first production batch of a total of 144 new and upgraded CV90s planned for the nation’s Army and represent the next generation of advanced combat vehicles.

The first 12 new CV90 infantry combat vehicles delivered by BAE Systems to the Norwegian army are new-built
The first 12 new CV90 infantry combat vehicles delivered by BAE Systems to the Norwegian army are new-built

The delivery of the CV90s occurred on schedule and took place during a ceremony at the Setermoen Military Camp in North-Norway. The event was attended by several BAE Systems representatives, including Erwin Bieber, president of the company’s Platforms & Services sector, as well as Tommy Gustafsson-Rask, president of BAE Systems Hägglunds AB.

«The delivery of these vehicles on schedule and within cost illustrates the highly collaborative, robust relationship between the Norwegian authorities, BAE Systems and its Norwegian industry partners», said Gustafsson-Rask. «We look forward to sustaining that relationship as we continue to carry out this contract over many years to come».

The Norwegian Defence Logistics Organisation and BAE Systems signed a contract in June 2012 for the production of the 41 new vehicles as well as upgrades to 103 of the Army’s existing fleet of CV9030s. The upgrades include enhanced capabilities for protection, survivability, situational awareness, intelligence, and interoperability.

The IFV program is a key part of the Norwegian military’s ongoing modernization. The CV90 is a next generation combat vehicle, one of the most advanced in the world, and is also a mature, proven, and cost-effective solution.

F1 technology adapted to Armoured Combat Vehicles by BAE Systems
F1 technology adapted to Armoured Combat Vehicles by BAE Systems

«We are very proud of giving our soldiers the best IFV in the world. It is thanks to a close and intensive cooperation with BAE Systems Hägglunds and with Norwegian industry for several years that led to this delivery», said Colonel Ragnar Wennevik, the Norwegian Army’s CV90 project leader. «We received the CV90s exactly on the date we wrote into the contract more than three years ago and that is something that we are very pleased with. BAE Systems Hägglunds is a good partner and we hope we can continue to develop the relationship during the many years of use for the CV90 fleet».

The 144 vehicles are designed to operate in five configurations: 74 for infantry fighting, 21 for reconnaissance, 15 for command and control, 16 for engineering support, 16 in a multi-role configuration, and 2 for driver training.

BAE Systems Hägglunds developed a comprehensive partnership with Norwegian industry to develop, produce, and deliver these vehicles. Kongsberg Defence & Aerospace, Nammo Raufoss AS, CHSnor AS, Moelv, and Ritek AS Levanger are among the companies playing a key role in delivering on the contract.

«Our industrial cooperation in Norway is extensive and critical, especially when collaboration across industry is a major factor for international success», said Gustafsson-Rask.

BAE Systems Hägglunds, based in Örnsköldsvik, Sweden, is a leading provider of tracked and wheeled combat vehicles, and also develops versions that can be used for civilian purposes. BAE Systems Hägglunds is a subsidiary of BAE Systems, Inc. headquartered in the United States.

In a world first, tracked military vehicles are being upgraded with technology adapted from Formula One to improve handling and speed across the battlefield
In a world first, tracked military vehicles are being upgraded with technology adapted from Formula One to improve handling and speed across the battlefield

The Sixth FREMM

DCNS has floated the French Navy’s FREMM multi-mission frigate Auvergne in Lorient. The achievement took place on 2 September and marks an important step in the construction of the most modern front-line ship of the 21st century. The FREMM D654 Auvergne is the sixth frigate in the programme and fourth of the series ordered by OCCAR (l’Organisation Conjointe de Coopération en matière d’Armement – Organization for Joint Armament) on behalf of the DGA (the French defence procurement agency) for the French Navy.

Auvergne, seen here as it floats out of the building hall in Lorient, is the sixth FREMM frigate built by DCNS, which is building another three for the French navy
Auvergne, seen here as it floats out of the building hall in Lorient, is the sixth FREMM frigate built by DCNS, which is building another three for the French navy

With three FREMMs currently under construction in DCNS’ Lorient site, DCNS is accelerating the production speed in order to deliver six FREMMs to the French Navy before mid-2019. Two additional frigates equipped with strengthened anti-aircraft capacities will be delivered before 2022. Two further units have also been sold to international clients: The Royal Moroccan Navy and the Egyptian Navy.

«The floating of the FREMM Auvergne, after the delivery of the FREMM Tahya Misr to the Egyptian Navy and the delivery of the FREMM Provence in June, demonstrate DCNS’s ability to successfully achieve a serial production», explains Anne Bianchi, FREMM Programme Director at DCNS. «DCNS is doing everything in its power to satisfy its clients, the OCCAR, the DGA and the French Navy by delivering these last six frigates before mid-2019».

DCNS commenced construction of the FREMM Auvergne in August 2012. This new-generation frigate will be operated by an optimized crew of 108 (half that required for the frigates of the previous generation). Delivery of the FREMM Aquitaine, the first multi-mission frigate to be built for the French Navy, was taken by OCCAR on 23 November 2012 on behalf of the DGA.

OCCAR: the Organisation for Joint Armaments Operations, is an international organisation whose core-business is the through-life management of cooperative defence equipment programmes entrusted to it by the Member States. It ensures, amongst other things, the project management for the multi-mission frigates intended for France and Italy
OCCAR: the Organisation for Joint Armaments Operations, is an international organisation whose core-business is the through-life management of cooperative defence equipment programmes entrusted to it by the Member States. It ensures, amongst other things, the project management for the multi-mission frigates intended for France and Italy

 

Four surface ships currently being produced at DCNS Lorient

The floating of the FREMM Auvergne is being celebrated while the FREMM programme is progressing at an accelerated speed on the DCNS site in Lorient. Three FREMM frigates are currently under construction for the French Navy. The Lorient teams are also mobilized for the construction of the first GOWIND corvette for the Egyptian Navy.

FREMM technical characteristics

Under the project management of DCNS, the heavily armed FREMM frigates are equipped with the most effective weapon systems and hardware, such as the Héraclès multifunctional radar, the Naval Cruise Missile, the Aster and Exocet MM 40 missiles and the MU 90 torpedoes.

DCNS commenced construction of the FREMM Auvergne in August 2012
DCNS commenced construction of the FREMM Auvergne in August 2012

 

Characteristics

Total length 466 feet/142 m
Width 65.6 feet/20 m
Displacement 6,000 tonnes
Maximum speed 27 knots/31 mph/50 km/h
Operation 108 persons (including helicopter detachment)
Accommodation capacity 145 men and women
Range at 15 knots/17 mph/28 km/h 6,000 nautical miles/6,905 miles/11,112 km

 

Pressure hull complete

Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) announced on September 1 that the Virginia-class submarine USS Washington (SSN-787) is «pressure hull complete», signifying that all of the submarine’s hull sections have been joined to form a single, watertight unit. USS Washington (SSN-787) will be the U.S. Navy’s 14th Virginia-class submarine (VCS) and the seventh to be delivered by HII’s Newport News Shipbuilding division.

The Virginia-class submarine Washington is «pressure hull complete», a construction milestone signifying that all of the submarine’s hull sections have been joined to form a single, watertight unit. The boat is currently 83 percent complete (Photo by Ricky Thompson/HII)
The Virginia-class submarine Washington is «pressure hull complete», a construction milestone signifying that all of the submarine’s hull sections have been joined to form a single, watertight unit. The boat is currently 83 percent complete (Photo by Ricky Thompson/HII)

«Pressure hull complete is an exciting step toward the boat’s completion because it’s the point when the submarine really starts to take its final shape and is the last major construction milestone before christening and delivery next year», said Jim Hughes, Newport News’ vice president of submarines and fleet support. «As with all of our Virginia-class submarines, Washington represents a true team effort that involves our partners at General Dynamics Electric Boat, the Navy, our suppliers and the Washington crew».

Washington’s construction, which began in September 2011 under a teaming arrangement between Newport News and Electric Boat, marked the beginning of the VCS program’s two-submarines-per-year build plan. The ship is currently 83 percent complete.

«Over the last year and a half, I have enjoyed watching the many parts that make up a submarine come together», said Commander Jason Schneider, Washington’s commanding officer. «I can truly say Washington now looks like a submarine on the outside. I look forward to seeing the systems that make up the internals of the submarine continue to come together as we approach launch and delivery».

The bow unit of the submarine Washington (SSN-787) is transported out of the Supplemental Modular Outfitting Facility
The bow unit of the submarine Washington (SSN-787) is transported out of the Supplemental Modular Outfitting Facility

 

Nuclear Submarine Lineup

Ship Yard Christening Commissioned Homeport
SSN-774 Virginia EB 8-16-03 10-23-04 Portsmouth, New Hampshire
SSN-775 Texas NNS 7-31-05 9-9-06 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
SSN-776 Hawaii EB 6-19-06 5-5-07 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
SSN-777 North Carolina NNS 4-21-07 5-3-08 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
SSN-778 New Hampshire EB 6-21-08 10-25-08 Groton, Connecticut
SSN-779 New Mexico NNS 12-13-08 11-21-09 Groton, Connecticut
SSN-780 Missouri EB 12-5-09 7-31-10 Groton, Connecticut
SSN-781 California NNS 11-6-10 10-29-11 Groton, Connecticut
SSN-782 Mississippi EB 12-3-11 6-2-12 Groton, Connecticut
SSN-783 Minnesota NNS 10-27-12 9-7-13 Norfolk, Virginia
SSN-784 North Dakota EB 11-2-13 10-25-14 Groton, Connecticut
SSN-785 John Warner NNS 09-06-14 08-01-15 Norfolk, Virginia
SSN-786 Illinois EB Under Construction
SSN-787 Washington NNS Under Construction
SSN-788 Colorado EB Under Construction
SSN-789 Indiana NNS Under Construction
SSN-790 South Dakota EB Under Construction
SSN-791 Delaware NNS Under Construction
SSN-792 Vermont EB Under Construction
SSN-793 Oregon NNS Under Construction
SSN-794 (Unnamed)
SSN-795 Hyman G. Rickover
SSN-796 New Jersey
SSN-797 (Unnamed)
SSN-798 (Unnamed)
SSN-799 Idaho
SSN-800 (Unnamed)
SSN-801 (Unnamed)
SSN-802 (Unnamed)
SSN-803 (Unnamed)
SSN-804 (Unnamed)
SSN-805 (Unnamed)

EB – Electric Boat, Groton, Connecticut

NNS – Newport News Shipbuilding, Newport News, Virginia

SSN – Attack Submarine, Nuclear-powered

USS Washington (SSN-787)
USS Washington (SSN-787)

Submarine-killer

Boeing will provide the first P-8A Poseidon maritime surveillance aircraft for Australia and additional P-8As for the U.S. Navy following a $1.49 billion contract award from the Navy for 13 aircraft. The order includes nine aircraft for the U.S. Navy and four Poseidon aircrafts for the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF), a long-time partner to the U.S. Navy on P-8A development.

Boeing took its Next-Generation 737-800 and adapted it for the United States Navy P-8A and its variant for India the P-8I
Boeing took its Next-Generation 737-800 and adapted it for the United States Navy P-8A and its variant for India the P-8I

«By working together since the early stages of P-8A development, the U.S. and Australia have created one airplane configuration that serves the needs of both countries», said Captain Scott Dillon, U.S. Navy P-8 program manager. «The U.S. and Australian P-8As will be able to operate with each other effectively and affordably for decades to come».

This latest award puts Boeing on contract to build the Navy’s second lot of full-rate production aircraft, bringing the U.S. Navy’s fleet total to 62 P-8As. Boeing has delivered 28 Poseidon aircrafts to date.

«Delivering premier aircraft on schedule and on cost has become a hallmark of the P-8 program», said James Dodd, Boeing vice president and general manager of Mobility, Surveillance and Engagement. «We look forward to building on Boeing’s long-standing relationship with Australia by providing the quality, value and capability of the P-8A».

Based on Boeing’s Next-Generation 737-800 commercial airplane, the P-8A offers the worlds’ most advanced Anti-Submarine (ASW), Anti-Surface Warfare (ASuW) and Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) capabilities. The U.S. Navy has deployed the first two P-8A patrol squadrons since operations started in 2013.

Australia’s participation in the P-8 program began in 2009 when the government signed the first in a series of memorandums of understanding to work with the U.S. Navy on system design and development. The U.S. Navy and the RAAF also established a joint program office that operates at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Maryland.

Production of the first Australian P-8A will begin later this year, with delivery to the RAAF scheduled for 2016. Boeing will also provide the RAAF with a complete training system for the P-8A, using simulators to train pilots and mission crews to operate the aircraft, its sensors, communications and weapons systems without relying on costly live flights.

P-8 has twice the sonobuoy processing capability and can carry 30 percent more sonobuoys than any maritime patrol and reconnaissance aircraft currently flying
P-8 has twice the sonobuoy processing capability and can carry 30 percent more sonobuoys than any maritime patrol and reconnaissance aircraft currently flying

 

Technical Specifications

Wing Span 123.6 feet/37.64 m
Height 42.1 feet/12.83 m
Length 129.5 feet/39.47 m
Propulsion 2 × CFM56-7B engines; 27,000 lbs/12,237 kgf/120 kN thrust
Speed 490 knots/564 mph/908 km/h
Range 1,200 NM/1,381 miles/2,222 km with 4 hours on station
Ceiling 41,000 feet/12,496 m
Crew 9
Maximum Take-Off Gross Weight 189,200 lbs/85,820 kg
P-8 has the ability to control unmanned air vehicles (level 2 control-receive) to extend sensor reach
P-8 has the ability to control unmanned air vehicles (level 2 control-receive) to extend sensor reach

Australian Patrol

Austal Limited is pleased to announce it has delivered Cape York the final of eight Cape Class Patrol Boats supplied to Australian Border Force (formerly Australian Customs and Border Protection) under a $330 million design, build and in-service support contract.

The Cape Class Patrol Boats will have greater range, endurance and flexibility in responding to maritime security threats than the current fleet
The Cape Class Patrol Boats will have greater range, endurance and flexibility in responding to maritime security threats than the current fleet

Austal Chief Executive Officer Andrew Bellamy said that with eight boats successfully delivered within the original timeframe, Austal has demonstrated its credentials as a partner of choice for government defence vessel programs and a world leader in patrol boat design, build and sustainment.

«The on-time and on-budget delivery of all eight Cape Class Patrol Boats is a credit to our highly skilled team at the Henderson shipyard, which has achieved valuable production efficiencies as the program progressed; clearly demonstrating the benefits of continuous shipbuilding and reinforcing Austal’s capability to successfully design, build and sustain multiple naval and border protection vessel programs. Austal has delivered one Cape Class Patrol vessel approximately every 10 weeks over 2014-2015; which has significantly increased Australian Border Force’s capability to reliably deliver on the Border Protection obligations it undertakes for the Commonwealth of Australia», Mr. Bellamy said. «Our national sustainment team, services and facilities continues to grow in line with the Cape Class Patrol Boats coming into service; ensuring the operational availability of the Australian Border Force fleet around the country».

As the sole provider of the Commonwealth’s border patrol capability for the past 17 years and as a successful exporter, Austal has now delivered a total of 72 patrol boats. The company has recently submitted a tender for the Pacific Patrol Boat Replacement Program, comprising 21 vessels for delivery to Pacific Island nations from 2017.

These vessels will also have enhanced capability to operate in higher sea states and survive in more severe conditions
These vessels will also have enhanced capability to operate in higher sea states and survive in more severe conditions

 

SPECIFICATIONS

PRINCIPAL DIMENSIONS
Length overall 190.6 feet/58.1 m
Beam (overall) 35.4 feet/10.8 m
Draft (approximately) 10.2 feet/3.1 m
ACCOMMODATION
Crew 18
Facilities Holding areas equipped with Closed-Circuit Television (CCTV) and facilities for accommodating intercepted illegal foreign fishers and suspected unauthorized people attempting to enter Australia
ARMAMENT
Weapons Two deck-mounted 12.7-mm/0.50 cal general purpose machine guns
COMMUNICATION & SENSORS
Communication system Secure/Non-secure voice and data over Very High Frequency (VHF), Ultra High Frequency (UHF), Satellite Communications (SATCOM) and Sea Boat’s Situational Awareness
Navigation Integrated bridge system including Radars, 2 × Electronic Chart Display & Information System (ECDIS), 2 × Gyro Compass, Secure Automatic Identification System (AIS), 2 × Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS), Electro-Optical Sensor System (EOSS) and Voyage Data Recorder (VDR)
ADDITIONAL FEATURES
Sea boats 2 × 24 feet/7.3 m Gemini
Motion control system Austal 2 × 35 feet2/3.25 m2 roll fins; 2 × 48.4 feet2/4.5 m2 trim flaps
PROPULSION
Main engines 2 × Caterpillar 3516C; 2 × 3,386 hp/2,525 kW @ 1,800 rpm
Gearboxes 2 × ZF 9055A
Propellers 2 × fixed pitch
Bow thruster HRP 2001 TT (160 kW)
PERFORMANCE
Speed 26 knots/30 mph/48 km/h
Range at 12 knots/14 mph/22 km/h 4,000 NM/4,603 miles/7,408 km

 

Customs and Border Protection patrol boats may be deployed according to aerial surveillance, community reports and/or radar sightings
Customs and Border Protection patrol boats may be deployed according to aerial surveillance, community reports and/or radar sightings

 

 

Inmarsat Global Xpress

When the third Boeing-built Inmarsat-5 satellite, which is now in orbit, becomes fully operational later this year, it will provide the technology and coverage necessary for worldwide high-speed broadband access.

The Inmarsat-5 F3 satellite launched Friday aboard an International Launch Services (ILS) Proton Breeze M rocket from Baikonur, Kazakhstan (ILS Photo)
The Inmarsat-5 F3 satellite launched Friday aboard an International Launch Services (ILS) Proton Breeze M rocket from Baikonur, Kazakhstan (ILS Photo)

Inmarsat-5 F3 sent signals from space following its launch on August 28, on an International Launch Services Proton Breeze M launch vehicle. After reaching final orbit, the spacecraft will undergo testing and checkout before becoming operational.

«The Inmarsat Global Xpress network will be the first high-speed Ka-band broadband network to span the world», said Rupert Pearce, CEO, Inmarsat. «New technology and engineering design will allow us to steer capacity where it’s needed most and adjust to shifting subscriber usage patterns and evolving demographics over the minimum 15-year life span of the network. We can now look forward to the introduction of global GX commercial services by the end of this year».

Each of the three Inmarsat-5 satellites use fixed narrow spot beams to deliver higher speeds through more compact terminals. Steerable beams direct additional capacity in real-time to where it’s needed to provide seamless, global broadband communications coverage to Inmarsat users worldwide on land, at sea, and in the air. The first two Inmarsat-5 Global Xpress satellites were launched December 2013 and February 2015, respectively. A fourth Boeing-built Inmarsat-5 (F4) is scheduled for delivery in mid-2016.

«The 702HP (high power) satellite is ideally suited for delivering the advanced capabilities Inmarsat required for this mission», said Mark Spiwak, president, Boeing Satellite Systems International. «More than 20 of these 702HP spacecraft are in orbit now for customers, including Inmarsat, providing reliable, affordable and innovative service».

Boeing has a strategic marketing partnership with Inmarsat and currently provides both military Ka-band and commercial Global Xpress services to U.S. government customers. Boeing recently concluded an extensive demonstration program for ten U.S. government customer communities using the Inmarsat-5 F2 spacecraft.

Final Sea Trials

HMAS Adelaide (L01), Australia’s second Landing Helicopter Dock (LHD) ship, is successfully completing her second and final sea trials in Port Phillip Bay. The 27,800-tonne warship will return to BAE Systems’ Williamstown shipyard later on August 28 where she will then be prepared for delivery to the Department of Defence’s Capability Acquisition and Sustainment Group (CASG) and the Royal Australian Navy (RAN).

Having completed its sea trials, the future HMAS Adelaide (L01) will now be handed over to the Department of Defence’s CASG while its future crew works up (AUS DoD photo)
Having completed its sea trials, the future HMAS Adelaide (L01) will now be handed over to the Department of Defence’s CASG while its future crew works up (AUS DoD photo)

The main focus of the final sea trials was on testing the ship’s combat and communications systems. They were undertaken over a 10-day period throughout the ship’s journey from Williamstown to Jervis Bay, NSW and the return voyage. These areas were chosen to provide maximum flexibility and proximity to the Australian Defence Force assets being used.

The Royal Australian Navy will have the opportunity to perform various routine alongside exercises as it continues to build its capability for crewing the vessel while the ship compartments and systems are progressively handed over to the HMAS Adelaide (L01) crew as part of the overall ship delivery process.

The crew has already been trained for its role on the RAN’s second LHD ship. BAE Systems Australia trained all 700 crew serving on HMAS Adelaide (L01) and HMAS Canberra (L02) at the Company’s state-of-the-art training facility at Mascot, Sydney.

Director of Maritime, BAE Systems Australia, Bill Saltzer said: «The upcoming handover will of course be a very proud day for all involved with building HMAS Adelaide (L01), but it won’t be the end of our involvement with these mighty ships. As prime contractor for LHD In Service Support, our team of experienced engineers, technicians and logisticians in both Sydney and Williamstown will continue to be the key partner to the CASG and RAN in managing the availability of these two ships at Garden Island, Sydney. Our LHD team is now focused on the final elements of work in preparing HMAS Adelaide (L01) for delivery. Some of the team members on the LHD build program will then transition to the support services group. Some have already made that transition since the time of delivery of HMAS Canberra (L02). BAE Systems has the capability, experience and facilities to support and upgrade the Navy’s ships, as we are currently successfully demonstrating on the Anzac Frigate Anti-Ship Missile Defence upgrade project and our other support activities on both Anzac and Adelaide Class Frigates, Hydrographic Vessels and systems/components installed on the RAN’s minehunters and submarines».

HMAS Canberra (L02) off the north Queensland coast with five MRH 90 aircraft on deck and her four Landing Craft deployed (AUS DoD photo)
HMAS Canberra (L02) off the north Queensland coast with five MRH 90 aircraft on deck and her four Landing Craft deployed (AUS DoD photo)

 

Characteristics

PLATFORM CHARACTERISTICS
Length Overall 757 feet/230.8 m
Length Waterline 680 feet/207.2 m
Beam 105 feet/32 m
Design Draft 23.5 feet/7.18 m
Full Load Displacement 27,831 tonnes
Crew and Embarked Forced Accommodation 1,403
MACHINERY
Propulsion 2 × Siemens 11,000 kW PODs
Bowthruster 2 × 1,500 kW Brunvoll/Siemens motors
Stabilisers 2 × Fincantieri
Generators 1 × 22,000 kW GE LM2500 Gas Turbine and 2 × 7,680 kW Diesel
Integrated Platform Management System Navantia – Sistemas
Fresh Water 6 × Reverse Osmosis Plants (each 25 tonnes/day)
Sewage 2 × Treatment Plants
PERFORMANCE
Maximum Speed 20+ knots/23+ mph/37+ km/h
Economic Speed 15 knots/17 mph/28 km/h
Maximum Range 9,250 NM/10,644 miles/17,131 km
Endurance 45+ days
CAPACITY
Flight Deck 51,128.57 feet²/4,750 m²
Dock (including ramp) 12,540 feet²/1,165 m²
Heavy Cargo Garage 12,270.86 feet²/1,410 m²
Light Cargo Garage 20,236 feet²/1,880 m²
Hangar 10,656.27 feet²/990 m²
Garages, Hangar and Well Dock 1,350 lane meter (2.9 m wide)
General Store Rooms 11,614.26 feet²/1,079 m²
Future Growth Margin 672 tonnes

 

Helicopter destroyer

According to Sam LaGrone, USNI News editor, Japan has launched the second in its new class of helicopter carrier – the largest Japanese ships since World War II – in a Thursday (August 27) ceremony in Yokohama. The 24,000-ton Kaga (DDH-184) – built by ship builder Japan Marine United – bears the same name as the World War II Imperial Japanese Navy carrier Kaga that was part of Pearl Harbor attack and was sunk in the Battle Midway.

JMSDF will commission the JS Kaga (DDH-184) in March 2017
JMSDF will commission the JS Kaga (DDH-184) in March 2017

The ship follows JS Izumo (DDH-183) which entered service in the Japanese Maritime Self Defense Force (JMSDF) in March. The Japanese have said the primary roles of the two ships are Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) and Humanitarian Aid and Disaster Relief (HADR) operations. The ships «heightens our ability to deal with Chinese submarines that have become more difficult to detect», a JMSDF officer told Asahi Shimbum in March.

The ships will field seven Mitsubishi-built SH-60 ASW helicopters and seven AgustaWestland MCM-101 Mine CounterMeasure (MCM) helicopters, U.S. Naval Institute’s Combat Fleets of the World. There is a potential for the two ships to work with American MV-22s and potentially the Short Take-Off and Vertical Landing (STOVL) variant of the Lockheed Martin F-35 Lighting II Joint Strike Fighter (JSF). However, the Japanese say they have no plans to operate the JSF from either ship.

When JS Kaga (DDH-184) commissions Japan will have four helicopter carriers. Along with Izumo, Japan have 18,300-ton Hyuga-class helicopter carriers already in commission.

 

General characteristics

Standard Displacement 19,500 long tons
Full Displacement 24,000 long tons
Length 813.6 feet/248 m
Beam 124.7 feet/38 m
Draft 24 feet/7.3 m
Installed power 112,000 hp/84 MW
Speed 30 knots/34.5 mph/55.5 km/h
Aircraft carried 7 ASW helicopters and 7 MCM helicopters
Construction of the ship cost 115.5 billion yen
Construction of the ship cost 115.5 billion yen

Fire Scout

Northrop Grumman Corporation and the U.S. Navy successfully demonstrated endurance capabilities with the MQ-8C Fire Scout unmanned helicopter. On a planned 10+ hour flight and range out to 150 nautical miles/173 miles/278 km flight from Naval Base Ventura County, Point Mugu; the MQ-8C Fire Scout achieved 11 hours with over an hour of fuel in reserve.

MQ-8C Fire Scout demonstrates a long range, long endurance flight part of a capability based test at Naval Base Ventura County, Point Mugu (Photo by Northrop Grumman)
MQ-8C Fire Scout demonstrates a long range, long endurance flight part of a capability based test at Naval Base Ventura County, Point Mugu (Photo by Northrop Grumman)

The long range, long endurance flight was part of a series of capability based tests used by the U.S. Navy to validate their concept of operations and previously tested performance parameters. The U.S. Navy conducted the demonstration with support of Northrop Grumman engineers.

«Endurance flights provide a full evaluation of the MQ-8C Fire Scout systems», said Captain Jeff Dodge, program manager, Fire Scout, Naval Air Systems Command. «We can better understand the capability of the system and look at crew tasks and interactions in a controlled environment. This will allow us to adjust operational procedures to maximize the system’s effectiveness».

This is a new flight record set for the MQ-8 Fire Scout; a system designed to provide persistent reconnaissance, situational awareness, and precision targeting support for ground, air and sea forces.

«Today’s MQ-8C Fire Scout performance matches our model exactly. With adjustments, our production aircraft will have 12 hours of total endurance on a standard day. This prolonged endurance gives the Navy’s commanders a tremendous operational advantage», said George Vardoulakis, vice president, medium range tactical systems, Northrop Grumman. «Increased time-on-station and fewer launch and recovery cycles better enables the Navy’s diverse missions».

The MQ-8C Fire Scout completed its developmental flight test program earlier this year and has operational assessment planned for later this year. The MQ-8C Fire Scout has accumulated over 513 flight hours and flown 353 sorties.

Unmanned helicopter providing unprecedented maritime multiple intelligence persistence (Photo by Northrop Grumman)
Unmanned helicopter providing unprecedented maritime multiple intelligence persistence (Photo by Northrop Grumman)

 

Specifications

Length 41.4 feet/12.6 m
Width 7.8 feet/2.4 m
Blades Folded Hangar 7.8×34.7×10.9 feet/2.4×10.6×3.3 m
Height 10.9 feet/3.3 m
Rotor Diameter 35 feet/10.7 m
Gross Take-Off Weight (GTOW) 6,000 lbs/2,721.5 kg
Engine Rolls-Royce 250-C47B with FADEC (Full Authority Digital Electronic Control)
Maximum Speed 140 knots/161 mph/259 km/h
Operational Ceiling 17,000 feet/5,100 m
Maximum Endurance 14 hours
Maximum Payload (Internal) 1,000 lbs/453.6 kg
Typical Payload (11 hours endurance) 600 lbs/272 kg
Maximum Sling Load 2,650 lbs/1,202 kg