Category Archives: Navy

Commission Submarine

The Navy commissioned its newest fast attack submarine, the USS John Warner (SSN-785), during a 10 a.m. EDT ceremony Saturday, August 1, 2015, at Naval Station Norfolk, in Norfolk, Virginia.

She will be the first in the class to be named after a person
She will be the first in the class to be named after a person

John Warner, designated SSN-785, honors Senator John W. Warner for a lifetime of service to the Commonwealth of Virginia and to the United States of America as a trusted leader, statesman and public servant. He wore the uniform of American nation as both a Marine and sailor and served as the 61st Secretary of the Navy, 1972-1974.

Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Jonathan Greenert delivered the ceremony’s principal address. Jeanne Warner, wife of Senator Warner, is serving as the ship’s sponsor. In a time-honored Navy tradition, she gave the order to «man our ship and bring her to life»!

«The commissioning of USS John Warner marks the beginning of what is expected to be 33 years of distinguished service for this great submarine – a fitting tribute to a man who served his nation for so long as a sailor, a Marine, a United States Senator and, as one of my most esteemed predecessors as Secretary of the Navy», said the Honorable Ray Mabus, Secretary of the U.S. Navy. «This ceremony is not only a celebration of a man who dedicated so much of his life to his country and to the Department of the Navy, but also a reminder of the partnership our Navy shares with the shipbuilding industry in Senator Warner’s home state of Virginia and the continued success of the Virginia-class attack submarine program».

USS John Warner (SSN-785) is the 12th Virginia-class fast attack submarine. While other Virginia-class submarines have been named after U.S. states, SSN-785 holds the distinction of being the first to be named after a person. This next-generation attack submarine provides the U.S. Navy with the capabilities required to maintain the nation’s undersea supremacy well into the 21st century. It will have improved stealth, sophisticated surveillance capabilities and special warfare enhancements that will enable them to meet the Navy’s multi-mission requirements.

USS John Warner (SSN-785) has the capability to attack targets ashore with highly accurate Tomahawk cruise missiles and conduct covert long-term surveillance of land areas, littoral waters or other sea-based forces. Other missions include anti-submarine and anti-ship warfare; mine delivery and minefield mapping. It is also designed for Special Forces delivery and support, a subject senator John Warner worked on throughout his career in the U.S. Senate.

Virginia-class submarines are built with a reactor plant that will not require refueling during the planned life of the ship – reducing lifecycle costs while increasing underway time.

 

General Characteristics

Builder Huntington Ingalls Industries Inc. – Newport News Shipbuilding
Date Deployed Jun 25, 2015
Propulsion One GE PWR S9G(*) nuclear reactor, two turbines, one shaft; 40,000 hp/30 MW
Length 377 feet/114.8 m
Beam 33 feet/10.0584 m
Hull Diameter 34 feet/10.3632 m
Displacement Approximately 7,800 tons/7,925 metric tons submerged
Speed 25+ knots/28+ mph/46.3+ km/h
Diving Depth 800+ feet/244+ m
Crew 132: 15 officers; 117 enlisted
Armament: Tomahawk missiles two 87-inch/2.2-meter Virginia Payload Tubes (VPTs), each capable of launching 6 Tomahawk cruise missiles
Armament: MK-48 ADCAP (Advanced Capability) Mod 7 heavyweight torpedoes 4 torpedo tubes
Weapons MK-60 CAPTOR (Encapsulated Torpedo) mines, advanced mobile mines and UUVs (Unmanned Underwater Vehicles)

* – Knolls Atomic Power Laboratories

The Virginia-class submarine USS John Warner (SSN-785) completed alpha sea trials on Saturday. All systems, components and compartments were tested. The submarine also submerged for the first time and operated at high speeds on the surface and underwater (Photo by Chris Oxley/HII)
The Virginia-class submarine USS John Warner (SSN-785) completed alpha sea trials on Saturday. All systems, components and compartments were tested. The submarine also submerged for the first time and operated at high speeds on the surface and underwater (Photo by Chris Oxley/HII)

 

Nuclear Submarine Lineup

Ship Yard Christening Commissioned Homeport
SSN-774 Virginia EB 8-16-03 10-23-04 Portsmouth, New Hampshire
SSN-775 Texas NNS 7-31-05 9-9-06 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
SSN-776 Hawaii EB 6-19-06 5-5-07 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
SSN-777 North Carolina NNS 4-21-07 5-3-08 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
SSN-778 New Hampshire EB 6-21-08 10-25-08 Groton, Connecticut
SSN-779 New Mexico NNS 12-13-08 11-21-09 Groton, Connecticut
SSN-780 Missouri EB 12-5-09 7-31-10 Groton, Connecticut
SSN-781 California NNS 11-6-10 10-29-11 Groton, Connecticut
SSN-782 Mississippi EB 12-3-11 6-2-12 Groton, Connecticut
SSN-783 Minnesota NNS 10-27-12 9-7-13 Norfolk, Virginia
SSN-784 North Dakota EB 11-2-13 10-25-14 Groton, Connecticut
SSN-785 John Warner NNS 09-06-14 08-01-15 Norfolk, Virginia

EB – Electric Boat, Groton, Connecticut

NNS – Newport News Shipbuilding, Newport News, Virginia

For its home port

On Wednesday 22 July, the FREMM FFG-1001 Tahya Misr of the Egyptian navy left the Brest military port to join its homeport in Alexandria, Egypt, six months after the contract for the supply of a multi-mission frigate was signed between DCNS and the Ministry of Defence of the Arab Republic of Egypt.

The Egyptian navy is now the third navy to operate this exceptional latest-generation warship
The Egyptian navy is now the third navy to operate this exceptional latest-generation warship

DCNS quickly initiated the required adaptation and outfitting work and the training of seamen to permit the Egyptian navy to take on the ship. As early as March 2015 DCNS trained the Egyptian seamen making up this frigate’s crew. In order to operate such a highly automated ship safely, DCNS and its partners accompany the crew for a period of 15 months. The programme includes several phases: theoretical modules, on-land training using platforms and simulators and then onboard training both at the quayside and at sea.

On 23 June of this year, the FREMM Tahya Misr was transferred from DCNS to the Egyptian navy during a ceremony attended by the Egyptian and French Defence Ministers. On 22 July, the Egyptian FREMM cast off from Brest and headed to Alexandria, its homeport.

The partnership with DCNS does not, however, stop with the FREMM Tahya Misr leaving France: the contract also includes DCNS providing support services and through life support in Egypt for the next five years.

With the FREMM developed and built by DCNS, the Egyptian navy has the most modern front-line ship of the 21st century
With the FREMM developed and built by DCNS, the Egyptian navy has the most modern front-line ship of the 21st century

 

Second international success for the FREMM

The most technologically advanced and most competitive ship on the market, the FREMM meets the operational requirements of numerous navies due to its versatility and its maneuverability. Capitalizing on its unprecedented success in Europe for the firing of the naval cruise missile on board the FREMM Aquitaine on 19 May 2015, DCNS offers its clients vessels that are global references in terms of their design and construction as well as for the integration of innovative systems.

In addition, the updating of the Military Planning Law will permit DCNS to continue developing its range of ships and services and to accelerate its international development. With the kick-off of the intermediate-size frigate program, DCNS is going to propose a product, which meets the needs of the French Navy and will meet a growing international demand for front-line frigates of approximately 4,000 tons.

Currently, in the surface ship market, DCNS counts among its customers, the Royal Moroccan Navy with the delivery in January 2014 of the FREMM Mohammed VI and the Egyptian Navy with the delivery of the FREMM Tahya Misr (FFG-1001) and four GOWIND corvettes. Moreover, DCNS is building six GOWIND corvettes for the Malaysian Navy. These contracts show the success of DCNS’ products in the international market.

The Gowind 2500 multi-mission corvette is designed for surveillance, surface and subsurface combat, protection and escort naval missions
The Gowind 2500 multi-mission corvette is designed for surveillance, surface and subsurface combat, protection and escort naval missions

 

Technical characteristics of the FREMMs

Equipped with high-tech sensors and weapons, integrated with the SETIS combat system developed by DCNS, the frigate can counter all types of threats, whether air, surface, submarine or land-based. The heavily armed FREMM is equipped with the most effective weapons systems and equipment, such as the Herakles multifunction radar, the Aster and Exocet MM 40 missiles, or the MU 90 torpedoes. It is innovative and offers unequalled levels of interoperability and availability.

 

Characteristics

Total length 466 feet/142 m
Width 65.6 feet/20 m
Displacement 6,000 tonnes
Maximum speed 27 knots/31 mph/50 km/h
Operation 108 persons (including helicopter detachment)
Accommodation capacity 145 men and women
Cruising range at 15 knots/17 mph/28 km/h 6,000 nautical miles/6,905 miles/11,112 km
D651 «Normandie» FREMM multi-mission frigate (front view)
D651 «Normandie» FREMM multi-mission frigate (front view)

Fabrication of Destroyer

Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division marked the start of fabrication for the Arleigh Burke-class (DDG 51) guided missile destroyer Delbert D. Black (DDG-119) on July 21. The start of fabrication signifies that 100 tons of steel have been cut.

Ima Black reacts after starting a plasma cutter machine at Ingalls Shipbuilding, officially beginning construction of the Arleigh Burke-class destroyer Delbert D. Black (DDG-119), which is named in honor of her late husband (Photo by Andrew Young/HII)
Ima Black reacts after starting a plasma cutter machine at Ingalls Shipbuilding, officially beginning construction of the Arleigh Burke-class destroyer Delbert D. Black (DDG-119), which is named in honor of her late husband (Photo by Andrew Young/HII)

The ship is named in honor of Delbert D. Black, who served as a gunner’s mate in the U.S. Navy and was aboard the battleship USS Maryland during the attack on Pearl Harbor. Black served in three wars and was the first Master Chief Petty Officer of the U.S. Navy.

«Our shipbuilders are very excited about beginning the fabrication process of another DDG 51 destroyer, especially one named after the first Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy», said George Nungesser, Ingalls’ DDG 51 program manager. «Serial production provides the most effective and efficient way to build ships, and this is our fourth ship started in three years. We are committed to building another great warship for the Navy».

Black’s widow, Ima, is the ship’s sponsor and participated in the ceremony. She met Black after World War II, during which she served as a Navy WAVE (Women Accepted for Voluntary Emergency Service). She and Delbert were married 50 years until the time of his death in 2000.

«I want to thank all of the shipbuilders who are building this ship», she said. «Today was very emotional for me. I’m happy they did name the ship for him and that they are building it for him, but it is sad that he was not here to receive these honors. He would be very pleased about it. I know the men and women who serve on this ship will be proud to have the name Delbert D. Black on their uniform».

Delbert D. Black is the 32nd Arleigh Burke-class destroyer to be built at Ingalls. From this point on, shipbuilders will assemble the ship using modular construction, where pre-fabricated units are constructed separately and later lifted in place and integrated with other units.

«I am excited to see DDG-119 production starting off strong», said Captain Mark Vandroff, the Navy’s DDG 51 class program manager. «This ship will not only honor a great Navy leader, it will serve as a testament to all our current and future senior enlisted leaders of the value the Navy places on their service. My team was greatly honored to have Mrs. Black present at the start of fabrication and looks forward to her enthusiasm guiding us during the ship’s construction».

To date, Ingalls has delivered 28 Arleigh Burke-class destroyers to the U.S. Navy. The highly capable, multi-mission ship can conduct a variety of operations, from peacetime presence and crisis management to sea control and power projection, all in support of the United States’ military strategy. Arleigh Burke-class destroyers are capable of simultaneously fighting air, surface and subsurface battles. The ship contains myriad offensive and defensive weapons designed to support maritime defense needs well into the 21st century.

Arleigh Burke Class Flight IIA
Arleigh Burke Class Flight IIA

 

Ship Characteristics

Length Overall 510 feet/156 m
Beam – Waterline 59 feet/18 m
Draft 30.5 feet/9.3 m
Displacement – Full Load 9,217 tons/9,363 metric tons
Power Plant 4 General electric LM 2500-30 gas turbines; 2 shafts; 2 CRP (Contra-Rotating) propellers; 100,000 shaft horsepower/ 75,000 kW
Speed in excess of 30 knots/34.5 mph/ 55.5 km/h
Range 4,400 NM/8,149 km at 20 knots/23 mph/37 km/h
Crew 380 total: 32 Officers, 27 CPO (Chief Petty Officer), 321 OEM
Surveillance SPY-1D Phased Array Radar and Aegis Combat System (Lockheed Martin); SPS-73(V) Navigation; SPS-67(V)3 Surface Search; 3 SPG-62 Illuminator; SQQ-89(V)6 sonar incorporating SQS-53C hull mounted and SQR-19 towed array sonars used with Mark-116 Mod 7 ASW fire control system
Electronics/Countermeasures SLQ-32(V)3; Mark-53 Mod 0 Decoy System; Mark-234 Decoy System; SLQ-25A Torpedo Decoy; SLQ-39 Surface Decoy; URN-25 TACAN; UPX-29 IFF System; Kollmorgen Mark-46 Mod 1 Electro-Optical Director
Aircraft 2 embarked SH-60 helicopters ASW operations; RAST (Recovery Assist, Secure and Traverse)
Armament 2 Mark-41 Vertical Launching System (VLS) with 90 Standard, Vertical Launch ASROC (Anti-Submarine Rocket) & Tomahawk ASM (Air-to-Surface Missile)/LAM (Loitering Attack Missile); 5-in (127-mm)/54 Mark-45 gun; 2 CIWS (Close-In Weapon System); 2 Mark-32 triple 324-mm torpedo tubes for Mark-46 or Mark-50 ASW torpedos
USS Nitze (DDG-94) - Flight IIA: 5"/62, one 20-mm CIWS variant
USS Nitze (DDG-94) – Flight IIA: 5″/62, one 20-mm CIWS variant

 

Guided Missile Destroyers Lineup

Ship Yard Launched Commissioned Homeport
DDG-51 Arleigh Burke GDBIW 09-16-89 07-04-91 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-52 Barry HIIIS 06-08-91 12-12-92 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-53 John Paul Jones GDBIW 10-26-91 12-18-93 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-54 Curtis Wilbur GDBIW 05-16-92 03-19-94 Yokosuka, Japan
DDG-55 Stout HIIIS 10-16-92 08-13-94 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-56 John S. McCain GDBIW 09-26-92 07-02-94 Yokosuka, Japan
DDG-57 Mitscher HIIIS 05-07-93 12-10-94 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-58 Laboon GDBIW 02-20-93 03-18-95 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-59 Russell HIIIS 10-20-93 05-20-95 San Diego, California
DDG-60 Paul Hamilton GDBIW 07-24-93 05-27-95 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-61 Ramage HIIIS 02-11-94 07-22-95 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-62 Fitzgerald GDBIW 01-29-94 10-14-95 Yokosuka, Japan
DDG-63 Stethem HIIIS 07-17-94 10-21-95 Yokosuka, Japan
DDG-64 Carney GDBIW 07-23-94 04-13-96 Mayport, Florida
DDG-65 Benfold HIIIS 11-09-94 03-30-96 San Diego, California
DDG-66 Gonzalez GDBIW 02-18-95 10-12-96 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-67 Cole HIIIS 02-10-95 06-08-96 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-68 The Sullivans GDBIW 08-12-95 04-19-97 Mayport, Florida
DDG-69 Milius HIIIS 08-01-95 11-23-96 San Diego, California
DDG-70 Hopper GDBIW 01-06-96 09-06-97 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-71 Ross HIIIS 03-22-96 06-28-97 Rota, Spain
DDG-72 Mahan GDBIW 06-29-96 02-14-98 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-73 Decatur GDBIW 11-10-96 08-29-98 San Diego, California
DDG-74 McFaul HIIIS 01-18-97 04-25-98 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-75 Donald Cook GDBIW 05-03-97 12-04-98 Rota, Spain
DDG-76 Higgins GDBIW 10-04-97 04-24-99 San Diego, California
DDG-77 O’Kane GDBIW 03-28-98 10-23-99 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-78 Porter HIIIS 11-12-97 03-20-99 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-79 Oscar Austin GDBIW 11-07-98 08-19-00 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-80 Roosevelt HIIIS 01-10-99 10-14-00 Mayport, Florida
DDG-81 Winston S. Churchill GDBIW 04-17-99 03-10-01 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-82 Lassen HIIIS 10-16-99 04-21-01 Yokosuka, Japan
DDG-83 Howard GDBIW 11-20-99 10-20-01 San Diego, California
DDG-84 Bulkeley HIIIS 06-21-00 12-08-01 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-85 McCampbell GDBIW 07-02-00 08-17-02 Yokosuka, Japan
DDG-86 Shoup HIIIS 11-22-00 06-22-02 Everett, Washington
DDG-87 Mason GDBIW 06-23-01 04-12-03 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-88 Preble HIIIS 06-01-01 11-09-02 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-89 Mustin HIIIS 12-12-01 07-26-03 Yokosuka, Japan
DDG-90 Chafee GDBIW 11-02-02 10-18-03 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-91 Pinckney HIIIS 06-26-02 05-29-04 San Diego, California
DDG-92 Momsen GDBIW 07-19-03 08-28-04 Everett, Washington
DDG-93 Chung-Hoon HIIIS 12-15-02 09-18-04 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-94 Nitze GDBIW 04-03-04 03-05-05 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-95 James E. Williams HIIIS 06-25-03 12-11-04 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-96 Bainbridge GDBIW 11-13-04 11-12-05 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-97 Halsey HIIIS 01-09-04 07-30-05 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-98 Forrest Sherman HIIIS 10-02-04 01-28-06 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-99 Farragut GDBIW 07-23-05 06-10-06 Mayport, Florida
DDG-100 Kidd HIIIS 01-22-05 06-09-07 San Diego, California
DDG-101 Gridley GDBIW 12-28-05 02-10-07 San Diego, California
DDG-102 Sampson GDBIW 09-16-06 11-03-07 San Diego, California
DDG-103 Truxtun HIIIS 06-02-07 04-25-09 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-104 Sterett GDBIW 05-19-07 08-09-08 San Diego, California
DDG-105 Dewey HIIIS 01-26-08 03-06-10 San Diego, California
DDG-106 Stockdale GDBIW 05-10-08 04-18-09 San Diego, California
DDG-107 Gravely HIIIS 03-30-09 11-20-10 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-108 Wayne E. Meyer GDBIW 10-18-08 10-10-09 San Diego, California
DDG-109 Jason Dunham GDBIW 08-01-09 11-13-10 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-110 William P. Lawrence HIIIS 12-15-09 06-04-11 San Diego, California
DDG-111 Spruance GDBIW 06-06-10 10-01-11 San Diego, California
DDG-112 Michael Murphy GDBIW 05-08-11 10-06-12 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-113 John Finn HIIIS 03-28-15
DDG-114 Ralph Johnson HIIIS
DDG-115 Rafael Peralta GDBIW
DDG-116 Thomas Hudner GDBIW
DDG-117 Paul Ignatius HIIIS
DDG-118 Daniel Inouye GDBIW
DDG-119 Delbert D. Black HIIIS
DDG-120 GDBIW
DDG-121 HIIIS
DDG-122 GDBIW
DDG-123 HIIIS
DDG-124 GDBIW
DDG-125 HIIIS
DDG-126 GDBIW

GDBIW – General Dynamics Bath Iron Works

HIIIS – Huntington Ingalls Industries Ingalls Shipbuilding

DDG – Destroyer, Guided Missile

The Arleigh Burk-class guided-missile destroyer USS Sampson (DDG-102) departs Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam to support Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2010 exercises
The Arleigh Burk-class guided-missile destroyer USS Sampson (DDG-102) departs Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam to support Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2010 exercises

8th Italian FREMM

The 8th Italian FREMM ship was laid down on the 12th July 2015 at the Riva Trigoso shipyard. The ceremony marks an important milestone in the OCCAR (l’Organisation Conjointe de Coopération en matière d’Armement – Organization for Joint Armament) FREMM Programme after the first steel cutting of this frigate on the 25th February 2015. This new FREMM ship will be in the General Purpose configuration and will be delivered to the Italian Navy at the beginning of 2019.

The ASW version was fitted with both towed and hull mounted sonars
The ASW version was fitted with both towed and hull mounted sonars

The FREMM ships are characterized by a high level of flexibility, and are specifically designed to operate in multiple scenarios. The Programme, which is the most important joint initiative to date between European industries in the field of naval defence, continues to run beyond 2020 after the placement on 16th April 2015 of the order for the last two FREMM frigates for Italy.

The other Italian FREMM ships are currently at different stages of production: Carlo Bergamini (F590), the First Of Class (FOC) in General Purpose (GP) configuration, and Virginio Fasan (F591), the FOC in Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) configuration, are fully operational and employed by the Italian Navy. Both of them are in the In Service Phase with all the necessary support services provided through the Temporary Global Support contract.

Carlo Margottini (F592) and Carabiniere (F593), the Follow On Ships (FOS) in ASW configuration, are respectively under the Warranty Works period up to the end of July 2015 (when Carlo Margottini will be fully operational), and the Warranty period.

Alpino (F594), the FOS №3 in ASW configuration, was launched on 13th December 2014; Luigi Rizzo (А595), the FOS №1 in GP configuration, will be launched in December 2015; and the 7th Italian FREMM is under construction.

First segment of the 8th Italian FREMM frigate
First segment of the 8th Italian FREMM frigate

 

Main Characteristics

Length overall 472.5 feet/144 m
Width 65.6 feet/20 m
Depth (main deck) 37 feet/11.3 m
Displacement 6700 tonnes
Maximum speed 27 knots/31 mph/50 km/h
Crew 145 people
Accommodation Up to 200 men and women
CODLAG PROPULSION SYSTEM
Avio-GE LM2500+G4 32 MW
Electric propulsion motors 2 × 2,5 MW
Diesel Generator (DG) sets 4 × 2,1 MW
Propellers 2 × Controllable-Pitch Propeller (CPP)
Endurance 45 days
Range at 15 knots/17 mph/28 km/h 6,000 NM/6,905 miles/11,112 km
COMBAT SYSTEM
Anti-Air Warfare (AAW)/ Anti-Surface Warfare (ASuW) Capabilities
Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) Defence
Electronic Warfare (EW) Capabilities
The FREMM will be built in Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASM/ASW), Anti-Air Warfare (FREDA) and General Purpose (GP) versions
The FREMM will be built in Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASM/ASW), Anti-Air Warfare (FREDA) and General Purpose (GP) versions

Lieutenant Rolette

The Honorable Jason Kenney, Minister of National Defence, announced on July 16, in Québec City, that an Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship (AOPS) will be named in honor of Lieutenant Frédérick Rolette, a Canadian-born officer and naval hero of various actions, ashore and afloat, during the War of 1812, including command of the ship General Hunter. A parallel announcement was made in Windsor, Ontario, by Jeff Watson, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport and Member of Parliament for Essex, close to the sites of many of Lieutenant Rolette’s heroic actions.

Artist’s impression of the Harry DeWolf-Class Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship
Artist’s impression of the Harry DeWolf-Class Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship

Just before the outbreak of the War of 1812, Frédérick Rolette was posted to Amherstburg, Ontario, as a Lieutenant in charge of the brig General Hunter. When word of the outbreak of war reached Amherstburg on July 3, 1812, Rolette acted immediately, capturing an American vessel, the Cuyahoga, before the crew became aware that their country had declared war on Britain. This was the first action of the War of 1812 and a significant prize, because onboard the Cuyahoga were American commander General William Hull’s papers and dispatches, providing the British with a great deal of intelligence on American strengths and deployment.

 

Quick Facts

Lieutenant Rolette was very active in the war, conducting several daring captures of American supply vessels and participating in land battles at the Capture of Detroit, the Battle of Frenchtown, and the skirmish at the Canard River. He was the First Lieutenant (second in command) of the British schooner Lady Prevost at the Battle of Lake Erie on September 10, 1813. When the captain was mortally wounded, he assumed command and fought the ship «with great skill and gallantry» until he himself was severely wounded, burned by an explosion and the ship was a broken unmanageable and sinking wreck.

Construction of the first AOPS will begin in September 2015, with HMCS Harry DeWolf scheduled for delivery in 2018
Construction of the first AOPS will begin in September 2015, with HMCS Harry DeWolf scheduled for delivery in 2018

When the war ended, Lieutenant Rolette returned home to Québec City to a hero’s welcome and was presented with a fifty-guinea sword of honor by its citizens in recognition of his service. Through the research and efforts of the Naval Museum of Québec, the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) was able to locate the whereabouts and current owner of this sword of honor in order to have it displayed to the public as part of the naming announcement.

In September 2014, Prime Minister Stephen Harper announced that the forthcoming AOPS will be named to honor prominent Canadians who served with the highest distinction and conspicuous gallantry in the Navy. The lead ship was named HMCS Harry DeWolf and the class is known as the Harry DeWolf-Class. Other announced ships’ names in the class include HMCS Margaret Brooke, HMCS Max Bernays, HMCS William Hall and, now, HMCS Frédérick Rolette.

On January 23, 2015, the Government of Canada announced the awarding of the build contract with Irving Shipbuilding Inc. for the construction of up to six Harry DeWolf-class AOPS as part of the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy (NSPS). This contract, valued at $2.3 billion, marks the start of the construction phase under the NSPS. Construction is set to begin in the fall of this year.

The RCN will employ the AOPS to conduct sovereignty and surveillance operations in Canadian waters on all three coasts, including in the Arctic. The AOPS will also be used to support other units of the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) in the conduct of maritime-related operations, and to support other government departments in carrying out their mandates, as required.

The AOPS are key to the Government of Canada’s ability to deliver on three of our guiding strategies – the Canada First Defence Strategy, the Northern Strategy, and the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy.

The NSPS – the largest procurement sourcing arrangement in Canadian history – is expected to create thousands of high-value jobs in shipbuilding and related industries across the country. The Strategy is about undertaking major ship procurements in a smarter, more effective way – a way that sustains Canadian jobs, strengthens the marine sector and provides the best value for Canadian taxpayers.

New Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship to be named in honor of French-Canadian hero of War of 1812, Frédérick Rolette
New Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship to be named in honor of French-Canadian hero of War of 1812, Frédérick Rolette

 

Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ships

The Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship (AOPS) project will deliver six ice-capable ships, designated as the Harry DeWolf Class, after Canadian wartime naval hero Vice-Admiral Harry DeWolf.

The AOPS will be capable of:

  • armed sea-borne surveillance of Canada’s waters, including the Arctic;
  • providing government situational awareness of activities and events in these regions;
  • cooperating with other partners in the Canadian Armed Forces and other government departments to assert and enforce Canadian sovereignty, when and where necessary.

Construction of the first AOPS will begin in September 2015, with HMCS Harry DeWolf scheduled for delivery in 2018.

The announced names of the Harry DeWolf-class ships to date are:

  • HMCS Harry DeWolf
  • HMCS Margaret Brooke
  • HMCS Max Bernays
  • HMCS William Hall
  • HMCS Frédérick Rolette

 

Specifications

Displacement 6,440 tonnes
Length 338 feet/103 m
Beam 62.3 feet/19 m
Maximum speed 17 knots/19.5 mph/31 km/h
Cruising speed 14 knots/16 mph/26 km/h
Range at Cruising speed 6,800 NM/7,825 miles/12,593.6 km
Complement 65
International ice classification standard Polar Class 5
Be able to sustain operations up to 4 months
Remain operational 25 years beyond Initial Operational Capability (IOC)

Harry DeWolf-Class Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship

Harry DeWolf-Class Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship

 

Features

Integrated Bridge Navigation System

Modern integrated bridge, from which control of navigation, machinery, and damage control systems can be performed.

Multi-Purpose Operational Space

Where operational planning and mission execution will be coordinated.

BAE Mk-38 Gun

Remote controlled 25-mm gun to support domestic constabulary role.

Enclosed Focsle/Cable Deck

Protects foredeck machinery and workspace from harsh Arctic environment.

Helicopter Capability

Depending on the mission, the embarked helicopter could range from a small utility aircraft right up to the new CH-148 maritime helicopter.

Cargo/Payloads

Multiple payload options such as shipping containers, underwater survey equipment, or a landing craft. Ship has a 20-tonne crane to self-load/unload.

Vehicle Bay

For rapid mobility over land or ice, the ship can carry vehicles such as pickup trucks, All-Terrain Vehicles (ATVs), and snowmobiles.

Diesel/Electric Propulsion

Propulsion: Two 4.5 MW main propulsion engines, four 3.6 MW generators.

Retractable Active Fin Stabilizers

Deployed to reduce ship roll for open ocean operations, retracted for operations in ice.

Multi-Role Rescue Boats

Top speed of 35+ knots/40+ mph/65+ km/h, 28 feet/8.5 meters long. Will support rescues, personnel transfers, or boarding operations.

Bow Thrusters

To enable maneuvering or berthing without tug assistance.

 

Little Rock Launch

The Lockheed Martin-led industry team launched the nation’s ninth Littoral Combat Ship (LCS), Little Rock, into the Menominee River at the Marinette Marine Corporation (MMC) shipyard on July 18. The ship’s sponsor, Mrs. Janee Bonner, christened USS Little Rock (LCS-9) with the traditional smashing of a champagne bottle across the ship’s bow just prior to the launch.

The ninth Littoral Combat Ship, the future USS Little Rock (LCS-9), was christened and launched into the Menominee River in Marinette, Wisconsin, on July 18
The ninth Littoral Combat Ship, the future USS Little Rock (LCS-9), was christened and launched into the Menominee River in Marinette, Wisconsin, on July 18

«It is such an honor and a privilege to serve as the sponsor of the future USS Little Rock (LCS-9) and to be a part of this major milestone along the way to her assuming her place as part of the great U.S. Navy fleet», Bonner said.

Secretary of the U.S. Navy Ray Mabus, who served as an officer aboard the cruiser USS Little Rock, presented the keynote address. Following christening and launch, USS Little Rock (LCS-9) will continue to undergo outfitting and testing before delivery to the U.S. Navy later this year.

«This future USS Little Rock (LCS-9) will use interchangeable mission modules that empower her to face a variety of high-priority missions, from Anti-Surface Warfare (ASuW) to Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) to Mine CounterMeasures (MCM)», said Vice President of Littoral Ships & Systems, Joe North. «She is ideally suited to navigate the reefs and shallows in the Asia-Pacific, as so well demonstrated by USS Fort Worth (LCS-3) on her current deployment».

The USS Little Rock (LCS-9) is one of seven Littoral Combat Ships under construction at Marinette Marine. The Lockheed Martin-led industry team is building the Freedom variant, and has already delivered two ships to the U.S. Navy. USS Freedom (LCS-1) successfully deployed to Southeast Asia in 2013 and is currently operating out of her homeport in San Diego, California. USS Fort Worth (LCS-3) is currently deployed in Southeast Asia, serving in the U.S. 7th Fleet to strengthen international relationships, engage in multi-regional naval exercises and further LCS capabilities using manned and unmanned assets.

USS Milwaukee (LCS-5) was christened and launched in 2013, and is slated to be delivered to the U.S. Navy this fall. USS Detroit (LCS-7) was launched in 2014. USS Sioux City (LCS-11) is in construction, and USS Wichita (LCS-13) had its keel laid in February 2015. USS Billings (LCS-15), USS Indianapolis (LCS-17) and USS St. Louis (LCS-19) are in the construction phase.

Ship sponsor Mrs. Janée Bonner conducted the time-honored tradition of christening the ship by smashing a bottle of champagne across the bow
Ship sponsor Mrs. Janée Bonner conducted the time-honored tradition of christening the ship by smashing a bottle of champagne across the bow

 

Ship Design Specifications

Hull Advanced semiplaning steel monohull
Length Overall 389 feet/118.6 m
Beam Overall 57 feet/17.5 m
Draft 13.5 feet/4.1 m
Full Load Displacement Approximately 3,200 metric tons
Top Speed Greater than 40 knots/46 mph/74 km/h
Range at top speed 1,000 NM/1,151 miles/1,852 km
Range at cruise speed 4,000 NM/4,603 miles/7,408 km
Watercraft Launch and Recovery Up to Sea State 4
Aircraft Launch and Recovery Up to Sea State 5
Propulsion Combined diesel and gas turbine with steerable water jet propulsion
Power 85 MW/113,600 horsepower
Hangar Space Two MH-60 Romeo Helicopters
One MH-60 Romeo Helicopter and three Vertical Take-off and Land Tactical Unmanned Air Vehicles (VTUAVs)
Core Crew Less than 50
Accommodations for 75 sailors provide higher sailor quality of life than current fleet
Integrated Bridge System Fully digital nautical charts are interfaced to ship sensors to support safe ship operation
Core Self-Defense Suite Includes 3D air search radar
Electro-Optical/Infrared (EO/IR) gunfire control system
Rolling-Airframe Missile Launching System
57-mm Main Gun
Mine, Torpedo Detection
Decoy Launching System
Lockheed Martin is a global security and aerospace company that employs approximately 112,000 people worldwide
Lockheed Martin is a global security and aerospace company that employs approximately 112,000 people worldwide

 

Ship list

USS Freedom (LCS-1)

USS Fort Worth (LCS-3)

USS Milwaukee (LCS-5)

USS Detroit (LCS-7)

USS Little Rock (LCS-9)

USS Sioux City (LCS-11)

USS Wichita (LCS-13)

USS Billings (LCS-15)

USS Indianapolis (LCS-17)

USS St. Louis (LCS-19)

Marinette Marine Corporation (MMC) is located on the Menominee River flowage into Green Bay

For sea trials

The Right Honourable Michael Fallon MP, Secretary of State for Defence, visited BAE Systems on July 10 and toured the latest Astute class submarine. HMS Artful is the third of seven highly sophisticated Astute class submarines being built by the Company for the UK Royal Navy. The remaining four are under construction at its site in Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria.

HMS Artful, the third of the Royal Navy’s seven Astute-class attack submarines, is currently preparing to leave the construction yard in Barrow-in-Furness for sea trials, before joining the Royal Navy fleet around the end of this year
HMS Artful, the third of the Royal Navy’s seven Astute-class attack submarines, is currently preparing to leave the construction yard in Barrow-in-Furness for sea trials, before joining the Royal Navy fleet around the end of this year

The 7,400-tonne nuclear-powered attack submarine is undergoing final preparations before leaving for its operational base at Her Majesty’s Naval Base Clyde, in Faslane, Scotland. From there, it will undergo sea trials, when its full range of capabilities will be tested under the control of its Commanding Officer, Commander Scott Bower. Artful’s sister submarines, HMS Astute (S119) and HMS Ambush (S120), are already operating out of Faslane.

Mr. Fallon, who also visited BAE Systems’ giant build hall in which final assembly of each 318-feet-long/97-meter-long submarine takes place, said: «The Astute submarine programme is a key part of our £163 billion plan to ensure that our armed forces have the equipment they need. HMS Artful (S121) will now join HMS Astute (S119) and HMS Ambush (S120), helping to keep Britain safe. The next four boats are already under construction, securing thousands of jobs and showing our commitment to increase defence spending each year for the rest of the decade».

BAE Systems, which now employs more than 7,000 people at its Submarines facility, is responsible for designing, building, testing and commissioning the Astute class – the most capable attack submarines ever built for the UK Royal Navy. Each submarine packs a range of world-class technologies and is armed with Spearfish heavyweight torpedoes and Tomahawk land attack missiles.

The seven Astute class nuclear powered submarines (SSNs) will have the capability to circumnavigate the globe without surfacing, limited only by their food storage capacity. Able to deploy rapidly, they are powered by a nuclear reactor that can run for their 25 year lifespan without refuelling
The seven Astute class nuclear powered submarines (SSNs) will have the capability to circumnavigate the globe without surfacing, limited only by their food storage capacity. Able to deploy rapidly, they are powered by a nuclear reactor that can run for their 25 year lifespan without refuelling

Tony Johns, Managing Director of BAE Systems Submarines, said: «It was a pleasure to welcome the Secretary of State to BAE Systems and to accompany him on a tour of Artful and our world-class submarine building facilities. The design and build of a nuclear powered submarine is the pinnacle of technology, engineering and manufacturing excellence. It is a hugely complex programme of enormous national significance. When Artful was launched, it was done so in a more advanced state of build than any other submarine we have built, so it was a proud moment to be able showcase the progress we are making across the Astute programme and we will continue to look for ways of improving our efficiency and effectiveness. Today’s visit is recognition of the hard work by everyone at BAE Systems, our submarine partners, the Royal Navy crew and the hundreds of businesses in our supply chain network».

This is an exciting time for BAE Systems in Barrow. As well as Astute, the Company is undertaking £300 million-plus of facilities investment in readiness for the start of construction on Successor – the programme to replace the current fleet of Vanguard submarines, which carry the UK’s strategic national deterrent. BAE Systems is leading the design phase of this programme and has more than 1,500 people currently working on it.

  1. HMS Astute (S119)
  2. HMS Ambush (S120)
  3. HMS Artful (S121)
  4. Audacious (S122)
  5. Anson (S123)
  6. Agamemnon (S124)
  7. Ajax (S125)
The Astute class is designed and engineered to be the stealthiest submarine of her type, equipped with the latest and most powerful sonar suite and secure communications facilities, while exhibiting a low noise signature and optimum detection avoidance characteristics
The Astute class is designed and engineered to be the stealthiest submarine of her type, equipped with the latest and most powerful sonar suite and secure communications facilities, while exhibiting a low noise signature and optimum detection avoidance characteristics

 

 

 

Jehu Class

One of the new Jehu class landing ships, which the Finnish Navy received in June, was presented to the audience for the first time on 9 July in the South Harbour of Helsinki.

The Finnish navy has publicly unveiled its new Jehu-class of 200-tonne combat/landing boats, the first three of which were handed over in June (Finnish Armed Forces photo)
The Finnish navy has publicly unveiled its new Jehu-class of 200-tonne combat/landing boats, the first three of which were handed over in June (Finnish Armed Forces photo)

The multipurpose and fast Jehu class represents the newest capacity of the Navy. The ships can be used for troop transports, medical and evacuation tasks, landing, sea surveillance and escorting tasks, as well as for battle and battle support missions. The Jehu boats can be used both in the archipelago and coastal areas and on the high seas.

The Jehu class strengthens the capacity of the coastal troops of the Navy. The capacity of the Navy’s warships is good at the moment, but during the next decade a remarkable part of the warship fleet will have to be replaced by new capacities.

Finland has ordered 12 of these fast, maneuverable vessels
Finland has ordered 12 of these fast, maneuverable vessels

 

Combat Support Service Vessel (CSSV)

The latest vessel developed by Marine Alutech is the Watercat M18 Armored Modular Craft (AMC). This is a new landing craft, which is designed to fulfill all modern requirements for future combat support vessels. It has been recently announced that Marine Alutech will deliver 12 pcs of these Watercat M18 AMC multipurpose high-speed landing crafts to Finnish Navy during 2014-2016. The vessels will be powered by two 660 kW Scania diesel engines and feature Rolls-Royce waterjet propulsion.

The Watercat M18 AMC is suitable for troop transportation, medical and evacuation tasks, landing operations, patrolling and escort tasks, as well as combat and battle support scenarios. The vessel has been specially designed for archipelagic, coastal and offshore conditions with an effective heating and air-conditioning system allowing heat and extreme cold, arid or humid climates.

The Navy secures the territorial integrity of Finland day and night, every day, by keeping at least one warship in constant readiness
The Navy secures the territorial integrity of Finland day and night, every day, by keeping at least one warship in constant readiness

 

GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS

Length overall 65.3 feet/19.9 m
Beam 14.1 feet/4.3 m
Draught 3.6 feet/1.1 m
Displacement 32 t (full load)
Main engine 2 × Scania DI16 077, 900 hp/660 kW
Gearbox 2 × ZF 500
Propulsion 2 × Waterjet, Rolls-Royce 40A3
Auxiliary engine Fischer Panda 25i PMS
Steering system Rolls-Royce ROCCS
Maximum speed >40 knots/46 mph/74 km/h (lightship)
Cruising speed 35 knots/40 mph/65 km/h (full load)
Fuel capacity 2,100 L
Crew 2-5
Passengers 26
Remote Weapon System (RWS) 12.7×107-mm ITKK
7.62×53-mm KK
Watercat M18 Armored Modular Craft
Watercat M18 Armored Modular Craft

 

Construction material

Hull and deck: Aluminium

Superstructure: Composite

 

Navigation system

Satellite navigation and positioning systems, radar, forward looking sonar, depth sounder, Automatic Identification System (AIS), autopilot and onboard camera monitoring system

 

Communication system

Comprehensive radio equipment such as sea, authority, military and data communications (Inmarsat-C). Onboard communication is provided by an intercom system

The vessels will be powered by two 660 kW Scania diesel engines and feature Rolls-Royce waterjet propulsion
The vessels will be powered by two 660 kW Scania diesel engines and feature Rolls-Royce waterjet propulsion

 

Additional info

Vessel has Ballistic- and Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN) protection systems, Remote controlled Weapon Station (RWS) and pedestals for manual operated weapons

 

Watercat M18 AMC modular solution

Troop transportation

Medical and evacuation tasks

Landing operations

Patrolling and escort tasks

Combat and battle support scenarios

Finland has been a leading country concerning maritime surveillance already for some time
Finland has been a leading country concerning maritime surveillance already for some time

Romeo Romei

On 4 July 2015, in the presence of the Minister of Justice Andrea Orlando, the Fincantieri shipyard in Muggiano (La Spezia) hosted the launching ceremony for the «Romeo Romei» (S529) submarine, the last of the four U212A «Todaro» class twin units ordered to Fincantieri by the Central Unit for Naval Armament – NAVARM for the Italian Navy.

ITS Romei, launched on July 4 at Fincantieri’s yard at Muggiano, is the final of four U212A diesel-electric submarines on order for the Italian Navy
ITS Romei, launched on July 4 at Fincantieri’s yard at Muggiano, is the final of four U212A diesel-electric submarines on order for the Italian Navy

The ceremony was attended among others by the Chief of Staff of the Italian Navy, Admiral Giuseppe De Giorgi, while Fincantieri was represented by Giuseppe Bono and Vincenzo Petrone, respectively CEO and Chairman, political and local civil authorities.

After the launching, outfitting works will be continued on the unit at the Integrated Naval shipyard in Muggiano (La Spezia), leading to its delivery scheduled in the second half of 2016.

The submarine «Romeo Romei», as its twin unit «Pietro Venuti» launched last October at the Muggiano shipyard, will feature highly innovative technological solutions. It will be entirely built with amagnetic material, using the most modern silencing techniques to reduce its acoustic signature.

It is a sister-ship of Sciré, the second Todaro-class submarine (USN photo)
It is a sister-ship of Sciré, the second Todaro-class submarine (USN photo)

The «Romei» submarine

The «Romei» is the 102nd submarine built in the shipyard of Muggiano since 1907, when the Italian Royal Navy’s «Foca» submarine was launched. Since then, this shipyard stands out for naval vessels building, not only for the Italian Navy but also worldwide (Brasil, Spain, Portugal, Sweden, Denmark).

The «Romei» is part of the second pair of submarines to be built in chronological order, and follows about one year the «Pietro Venuti», currently under construction at the same shipyard in Muggiano. In the Navy’s fleet these vessels, whose delivery is scheduled in 2015 and 2016, will replace two submarines of the «Sauro» class (third series), built in the late 1980s.

The submarine building programme is the continuation of the project launched in 1994 in cooperation with the German Submarine Consortium, which has already led to the construction in the past years of six vessels for Germany and two for Italy – the «Todaro» and the «Scirè». These latter units, delivered by Fincantieri in 2006 and 2007 respectively, are already operating successfully as part of the Italian Navy’s fleet.

Like the other vessels in the series, the «Romei» features highly innovative technological solutions. It is built entirely of amagnetic material, using the most modern silencing techniques to reduce its acoustic signature. Additionally, it is equipped with a silent propulsion system based on fuel cell technology, producing energy through an oxygen-hydrogen reaction independently from external oxygen, ensuring a considerably higher submerged than the conventional battery-based systems. It also features a fully integrated electro-acoustic and weapon-control system, as well as a modern platform automation system.

«Romei» has a surface displacement of 1,509 tonnes, an overall length of 183.4 feet/55.9 meters, a maximum diameter of 23 feet/7 meters, and can exceed 16 knots/18 mph/30 km/h underwater. It has a 27-person crew.

Pietro Venuti (S528) submarine
Pietro Venuti (S528) submarine

 

Main Characteristics

Length overall 187.5 feet/57.15 m
Length between perpendiculars 183.4 feet/55.9 m
Maximum breadth (on P.H.) 23 feet/7 m
Height overall (masts in) 38.96 feet/11.875 m
Surface displacement (ready to dive) 1,509 tonnes
Standard displacement 1,460 tonnes
Lead cells battery banks (two sub-batteries)
1 synchronous motor with permanent magnet excitation
1 16 cylinder turbocharged diesel-generators set
Air-Independent Propulsion (A.I.P.) System with 8 + 1 Fuel Cell module
Low signature (acoustic, hydrodynamic, magnetic, radar, I/R)
Maximum surface speed 12 knots/14 mph/22 km/h
Endurance at 8 knots/9 mph/15 km/h on surface 8,000 NM/9,206 miles/14,816 km/h
Maximum submerged speed >16 knots/18 mph/30 km/h
CREW
Officers 9
P.O. & Ratings 15
Extra crew 3
Sanitary spaces masses with Officers seats – 8
P.O./crew seats – 9
Galley
COMBAT SYSTEM
Command & Control Systems based on 4 Multi-functional
Consoles with redundant databus
FULLY INTEGRATED SENSORS
DBQS-40 Sonar System with: Passive Ranging System (PRS), Continuously Active Sonar (CAS), Flank Array Sonar (FAS), Towed Array Sonar (TAS), Mine Avoidance Sonar (MAS), Ice Profiler Sonar (IPS), ONA
Navigation Sensors: Log, Global Positioning System (GPS), Inertial Navigation System (INS), Attitude and Heading Reference System (AHRS), Echograph
Plotting Table
KH 1007 Navigation Radar
Search Periscope
Attack Periscope
Integrated Communication System: Very Low Frequency (VLF), High Frequency (HF), Very High Frequency (VHF), Ultra High Frequency (UHF), Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS)
FL 1800 U Electronic Support Measures (ESM) System
Ultra-Wideband (UW) Telegraphy & Telephony Systems
UHF Satellite Communications (SATCOM) Demand Assigned Multiple Access (DAMA)
WEAPONS
6 × 533-mm launchers for A184 mod. 3 or DM2A4
Mine Laying System (optional)
Torpedo Countermeasure System (optional)
Salvatore Todaro (S526) submarine
Salvatore Todaro (S526) submarine

Smarter, Faster, Sharper

Minister for Defence Dr. Ng Eng Hen officiated at the launching ceremony of the Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN)’s first Littoral Mission Vessel (LMV), Independence, at the Singapore Technologies Marine (ST Marine)’s Benoi shipyard on July 3. The LMV was launched by Mrs. Ivy Ng, wife of Dr. Ng.

The RSN's first-of-class LMV, Independence, during its launch ceremony on 3 July 2015 (Source: IHS/Ridzwan Rahmat)
The RSN’s first-of-class LMV, Independence, during its launch ceremony on 3 July 2015 (Source: IHS/Ridzwan Rahmat)

Speaking at the ceremony, Dr. Ng highlighted that a strong and capable the Republic of Singapore Navy was critical in securing Singapore’s economic lifeline and protecting our sea lines of communication. He commended the professionalism and commitment of the people of the RSN, saying that it was because of their fervent belief of the mission, «that today we are able to stand here together amid peace and security of our surrounding seas». He also recognised the strong partnership between the Singapore Armed Forces (SAF), the defence technology community and local industry partners for the LMV project. Dr. Ng added, «The LMVs are uniquely Singaporean, having been planned, conceptualised and built locally to meet our requirements».

The launch of Independence is a significant milestone in the RSN’s continued transformation to keep Singapore’s seas safe. The new LMVs are smarter and faster ships, equipped with sharper capabilities to further strengthen the RSN’s ability to ensure the seaward defence of Singapore. They possess lethal and non-lethal options to deliver calibrated responses to deter and defend against a wide range of threats. The advanced radars and sensors, as well as the bridge with a 360-degree out-of-window view, enable the LMVs to have an all-round visual awareness of its immediate surroundings in congested waters.

The LMVs – with its Integrated Command Centre comprising the Bridge, Combat Information Centre and Machinery Control Room – will boost operational effectiveness and efficiency, especially during maritime security operations. The networked-centric ships also possess numerous sense making and decision support systems, which are supported by a high level of automation, so that they can be manned by a leaner crew. In addition, logistics and engineering support were considered during the design of the Independence to enhance the operational readiness of the ship.

The first LMV is named «Independence» and continues the tradition set by our pioneers in safeguarding Singapore’s waters. The first ship that was acquired and built for the RSN in 1968 was a patrol craft named RSS Independence. This name was also inherited by the last of RSN’s patrol vessels. The LMV Independence will carry on the legacy of her predecessors to defend Singapore’s independence and protect our maritime interests.

Independence will be delivered to the RSN in 2016 and is expected to be fully operational by 2017. The keel for the second LMV was recently laid in May 2015. All eight LMVs are expected to be fully operational by 2020 and will replace the existing Fearless-class Patrol Vessels (PVs), which have served the RSN well for 20 years.

In addition, present at the ceremony were Second Minister for Defence Mr. Lui Tuck Yew, Minister of State for Defence Dr. Mohamad Maliki Bin Osman, Chief of Navy Rear-Admiral Lai Chung Han, senior officials from Ministry of Defence and the SAF, as well as members of the Government Parliamentary Committee for Defence and Foreign Affairs.

The Republic of Singapore Navy's first Littoral Mission Vessel, Independence, was launched by Mrs. Ivy Ng, wife of Minister for Defence Dr. Ng Eng Hen, at the Singapore Technologies Marine’s Benoi shipyard on July 3
The Republic of Singapore Navy’s first Littoral Mission Vessel, Independence, was launched by Mrs. Ivy Ng, wife of Minister for Defence Dr. Ng Eng Hen, at the Singapore Technologies Marine’s Benoi shipyard on July 3

 

Factsheet: Littoral Mission Vessel

Introduction

In January 2013, Ministry of Defence signed a contract with Singapore Technologies Engineering Ltd for the construction of eight littoral mission vessels (LMVs) for the Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN). The eight LMVs are «uniquely Singapore» – built by ST Engineering’s subsidiary ST Marine (ST Marine) locally, based on a design jointly developed by ST Marine and Saab Kockums AB. The Defence Science and Technology Agency (DSTA) is the overall programme manager and systems integrator for the LMV programme. The eight new LMVs will replace the RSN’s Fearless-class Patrol Vessels (PVs), which have been in service for 20 years.

LMV Overview: Smarter, Faster, Sharper

The new LMVs are highly capable warships designed and equipped with advanced combat capabilities and technologies to further strengthen the RSN’s ability in the seaward defence of Singapore and protecting our sea lines of communication.

(A) Smarter Ship

Innovative Operating Concepts. The LMVs are designed with an Integrated Command Centre where the ships’ Bridge, Combat Information Centre and Machinery Control Room are co-located. The Integrated Command Centre integrates and synergises the management of navigation, engineering, and combat functions to achieve greater operational effectiveness and efficiency, especially during maritime security operations.

Innovative Logistics and Engineering Design. Key design elements for the LMV were incorporated to improve efficiency in logistics and engineering support. In «designing the support», the LMVs’ operational readiness will be enhanced as less time will be required for maintenance of the ships. One example is the stacked mast, where 90 percent of the parts that require regular maintenance are housed in an enclosed environment and easily accessible within the mast, instead of outside in most ships’ designs. The ship’s platform and combat systems’ health status can also be transmitted back to shore for centralised monitoring and prognosis of the systems to detect anomalies and plan for pre-emptive maintenance.

Advanced Sense-Making and Decision Support Systems. Numerous sense making and decision support systems, complemented by a high level of automation in the ship, are incorporated into the LMV’s combat and platform suite. This will enhance situational awareness and accelerate decision-making. The LMVs’ Combat Management System features a fusion and identification engine to better identify, track and manage contacts, and a threat evaluation weapon assignment engine to prioritise and assign the relevant weapons to counter threats. The LMVs are also designed with an advanced Integrated Platform Management System, which enhances operational effectiveness and is able to better manage consequences such as engineering defects, or fire and flooding situations.

Network-Centric Design. The LMVs are equipped with an advanced integrated communication and network system to enable the crew to communicate and share information on board. This includes tracking of the ship’s equipment and logistics status as well as crew movement. In addition, the LMVs will be connected to the larger Integrated Knowledge Command and Control network in the Singapore Armed Forces to share information with deployed forces and tap on the expertise from shore headquarters in areas such as operations and engineering support.

(From left) Second Minister for Defence Mr. Lui Tuck Yew, Mrs. Ng, Dr. Ng, Chief of Navy Rear-Admiral Lai Chung Han, Mrs. Maliki, and Minister of State for Defence Dr. Mohamad Maliki Bin Osman being briefed about the LMV on its deck
(From left) Second Minister for Defence Mr. Lui Tuck Yew, Mrs. Ng, Dr. Ng, Chief of Navy Rear-Admiral Lai Chung Han, Mrs. Maliki, and Minister of State for Defence Dr. Mohamad Maliki Bin Osman being briefed about the LMV on its deck

(B) Faster Speed

In terms of displacement, the LMVs are 2.5 times larger than the PVs and possess better sea-keeping capabilities to operate in higher sea state conditions. The LMVs also have greater endurance and are able to stay at sea for longer periods of time. In addition, the LMV’s ability to respond rapidly to maritime security incidents is further enhanced with its faster speed in excess of 27 knots/31 mph/50 km/h and the ability to support a medium-lift helicopter. The LMVs are also highly manoeuvrable and can operate in confined and congested littoral waters effectively.

(C) Sharper Capabilities

More Versatile. The LMVs are versatile and can be quickly configured with mission modules to take on a wide spectrum of operations. For example, the LMVs can be configured to embark rigid hull inflatable boats, boarding teams and a helicopter to conduct maritime security operations. They could also be configured with medical modules to support Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief and Search-And-Rescue (SAR) operations. In addition, the LMVs may be deployed with unmanned systems for surveillance or mine countermeasure operations.

Calibrated Responses. The LMVs are equipped with both lethal and non-lethal options to deliver calibrated responses to deter or defend a wide range of threats. This ranges from long-range acoustics devices, water cannon system, small and large calibre guns, to anti-missile missiles.

Superior Surveillance Capabilities. Equipped with a three-dimensional surveillance radar system and two high-resolution navigation radars, the LMVs will be able to detect surface targets better in the congested environment. For target identification, the LMVs are equipped with a 360° panoramic day and night camera suite, comprising an all-round surveillance system and four electro-optics directors, and a 360° bridge that offers an unobstructed view to achieve all-round visual awareness of its immediate surroundings. This is essential in our congested waters where there is a high concentration of shipping and fishing activities amidst island groups.

Programme Status

The LMV programme is progressing well. The first LMV, Independence, was launched on 3 July 2015. The launch of Independence marked a significant milestone for the LMV programme. Following the launching, installation of combat systems on board Independence will commence before it undergoes sea trials. Independence is expected to be delivered to the RSN in 2016 and will be fully operational by 2017. All eight LMVs are expected to be fully operational by 2020.

Dr. Ng (left) and Mrs. Ng being briefed by Lieutenant Colonel Chew Chun-Chau, Head of RSN’s LMV Project Office, during a tour of the ship’s Integrated Command Centre
Dr. Ng (left) and Mrs. Ng being briefed by Lieutenant Colonel Chew Chun-Chau, Head of RSN’s LMV Project Office, during a tour of the ship’s Integrated Command Centre

 

Ship Specifications

Length 262.5 feet/80 m
Beam 39.4 feet/12 m
Draught 9.8 feet/3 m
Displacement 1,250 tonnes
Speed in excess of 27 knots/31 mph/50 km/h
Endurance 3,500 NM/4,028 miles/6,482 km (up to 14 days)
Baseline Complement 23 crew
Sensors Thales NS100 3D Surveillance Radar
Kelvin Hughes Sharpeye Navigation Radar
STELOP 360º All-Round Surveillance System
STELOP Compass D Electro-Optic Director
Weapons MBDA MICA Anti-Air/Anti-Missile Missile System
OTO Melara 76-mm Gun
Rafael 25-mm Typhoon Gun
OTO Melara 12.7-mm Hitrole Gun
Remote Control Long Range Acoustic Device and Xenon Light
Water Cannon System
Littoral Mission Vessel
Littoral Mission Vessel