Category Archives: Navy

Ralph Johnson Launched

Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division launched USS Ralph Johnson (DDG-114), the company’s 30th Arleigh Burke-class (DDG-51) guided missile destroyer, on December 12. «The last week of translating this quality ship across land and then launching it from our drydock is no small task, and our shipbuilders accomplished it in a very efficient manner», said George Nungesser, Ingalls’ DDG-51 program manager. «All crafts and personnel making up this DDG shipbuilding crew have performed very well, and we were able to launch USS Ralph Johnson (DDG-114) ahead of schedule. It’s a nice milestone to accomplish as we end the year».

As a «restart» ship, Ralph Johnson will primarily feature upgraded avionics; she is scheduled to be delivered in August 2016
As a «restart» ship, Ralph Johnson will primarily feature upgraded avionics; she is scheduled to be delivered in August 2016

Captain Mark Vandroff, the Navy’s DDG-51 class program manager, added, «This is an exciting milestone and represents a significant amount of effort by our Navy and industry team to get the ship to this point. We’re looking forward to completing outfitting efforts, undergoing test and trials and delivering another highly capable asset to our fleet».

Ingalls has built and delivered 28 Arleigh Burke-class destroyers. There are currently four more under construction at Ingalls, including USS Ralph Johnson (DDG-114), which is scheduled to be christened in the spring of 2016. USS John Finn (DDG-113) was christened in May and is expected to undergo sea trials in 2016. USS Paul Ignatius (DDG-117) celebrated her keel-authentication milestone in October and is expected to launch in the first half of 2017. USS Delbert D. Black (DDG-119) started construction in July and is scheduled for keel laying in the second quarter of 2016.

USS Ralph Johnson (DDG-114) is named to honor Pfc. Ralph Henry Johnson, who was awarded the Medal of Honor for his heroic actions that saved others during the Vietnam War. Johnson shouted a warning to his fellow Marines and hurled himself on an explosive device, saving the life of one Marine and preventing the enemy from penetrating his sector of the patrol’s perimeter. Johnson died instantly. The Charleston, S.C., native had only been in Vietnam for two months and a few days when he was killed at the age of 20.

On April 20, 1970, President Richard M. Nixon posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor, the highest recognition and honor a member of the United States military can receive. On September 5, 1991, 23 years after his heroic act, the Veterans Hospital in Charleston was renamed the Ralph H. Johnson Veterans Hospital.

In September 2014, Georgeann McRaven, ship sponsor and wife of retired Admiral William McRaven, former commander, U.S. Special Operations Command, attended the Ralph Johnson keel laying and proclaimed the ship to be «truly and fairly laid».

The highly capable, multi-mission ship can conduct a variety of operations, from peacetime presence and crisis management to sea control and power projection, all in support of the United States’ military strategy. Arleigh Burke-class destroyers are capable of simultaneously fighting air, surface and subsurface battles. The ship contains myriad offensive and defensive weapons designed to support maritime defense needs well into the 21st century.

Ingalls Shipbuilding launched the Arleigh Burke-class destroyer DDG-114 on December 12. The ship is scheduled to be christened in the spring of 2016 (Photo by Andrew Young/HII)

 

Ship Characteristics

Length Overall 510 feet/156 m
Beam – Waterline 59 feet/18 m
Draft 30.5 feet/9.3 m
Displacement – Full Load 9,217 tons/9,363 metric tons
Power Plant 4 General electric LM 2500-30 gas turbines; 2 shafts; 2 CRP (Contra-Rotating) propellers; 100,000 shaft horsepower/75,000 kW
Speed in excess of 30 knots/34.5 mph/55.5 km/h
Range 4,400 NM/8,149 km at 20 knots/23 mph/37 km/h
Crew 380 total: 32 Officers, 27 CPO (Chief Petty Officer), 321 OEM
Surveillance SPY-1D Phased Array Radar and Aegis Combat System (Lockheed Martin); SPS-73(V) Navigation; SPS-67(V)3 Surface Search; 3 SPG-62 Illuminator; SQQ-89(V)6 sonar incorporating SQS-53C hull mounted and SQR-19 towed array sonars used with Mark-116 Mod 7 ASW fire control system
Electronics/Countermeasures SLQ-32(V)3; Mark-53 Mod 0 Decoy System; Mark-234 Decoy System; SLQ-25A Torpedo Decoy; SLQ-39 Surface Decoy; URN-25 TACAN; UPX-29 IFF System; Kollmorgen Mark-46 Mod 1 Electro-Optical Director
Aircraft 2 embarked SH-60 helicopters ASW operations; RAST (Recovery Assist, Secure and Traverse)
Armament 2 Mark-41 Vertical Launching System (VLS) with 90 Standard, Vertical Launch ASROC (Anti-Submarine Rocket) & Tomahawk ASM (Air-to-Surface Missile)/LAM (Loitering Attack Missile); 5-in (127-mm)/54 Mark-45 gun; 2 CIWS (Close-In Weapon System); 2 Mark-32 triple 324-mm torpedo tubes for Mark-46 or Mark-50 ASW torpedos

 

Flight IIA: Restart

Ship Yard Launched Commissioned Homeport
DDG-113 John Finn HIIIS 03-28-15
DDG-114 Ralph Johnson HIIIS 12-12-15
DDG-115 Rafael Peralta GDBIW 10-31-15

GDBIW – General Dynamics Bath Iron Works

HIIIS – Huntington Ingalls Industries Ingalls Shipbuilding

 

Royal Moroccan

In a third recent construction contract with Damen Shipyards Group, the Royal Moroccan Navy has ordered five Interceptor 1503 vessels. The vessels will be mobilised to combat illegal activities such as terrorism and smuggling in Moroccan waters.

Speeds of 50 to 60 knots are achieved through the combination of raw power, low weight and efficient hull form
Speeds of 50 to 60 knots are achieved through the combination of raw power, low weight and efficient hull form

Designed for ultra-fast operations, the Interceptor 1503 can reach speeds of up to 60 knots/69 mph/111 km/h. This impressive figure is achieved by combining an outstanding propulsion system with cutting edge lightweight composite materials.

The power originates from three diesel engines, each driving a separate stern drive. The hull is constructed from fibre-reinforced plastic in an epoxy resin matrix – renowned for its resistance to impact and fatigue as well as its lightweight properties.

Perfectly suited for tracking down and taking appropriate action on illegal activities, the highly manoeuvrable Interceptors have additional space in the cockpit for search and rescue survivors.

As international security issues have heightened over the last decade, Damen has witnessed growing interest in its range of Interceptor vessels. To respond to this demand, the company is continuing to invest in a substantial Research and Development programme to design and build safe, strong and ultra-fast composite vessels.

Although the Interceptor has been in Damen’s portfolio for some time, this latest order for such a highly valued customer is a prime example of such committed research. The five vessels are in fact the first in a new series of reengineered vessels.

All five Interceptor 1503 vessels will be constructed at Damen’s state-of-the-art shipyard specialising in composite vessel construction. The first vessel will be delivered in June 2016 followed thereafter by one vessel every six weeks.

The dependable hard-chined, non-stepped hull design guarantees predictable and safe operations at high speed
The dependable hard-chined, non-stepped hull design guarantees predictable and safe operations at high speed

 

SPECIFICATION

GENERAL
HULL & DECK MATERIAL Glass & carbon reinforced epoxy
SUPERSTRUCTURE Aluminium 5083 and 6000 series
BASIC FUNCTIONS Anti-smuggling interceptor duties
CLASSIFICATION (OPTIONAL) Bureau Veritas & MCA
Special Service/Interceptor, Coastal area
DIMENSIONS
LENGTH O.A. 47.8 feet/14.57 m
BEAM O.A. 9.55 feet/2.91 m
DRAUGHT (DRIVES UP/DOWN) 2.62/3.94 feet/0.8/1.2 m
HULL TYPE 26º deep-V
DISPLACEMENT 7-9 tonnes
CAPACITIES
FUEL OIL (TOTAL) 317 Gallon/1,200 L
CREW 6 persons
PASSENGERS (SLOW SPEED) 10 persons
ENDURANCE (AT 45 KNOTS/52 MPH/83 KM/H) 155 NM/178 miles/287 km
PERFORMANCE (TRIALS)
CRUISING SPEED 45 knots/52 mph/83 km/h
MAXIMUM SPEED 60 knots/69 mph/111 km/h
PROPULSION SYSTEM
MAIN ENGINES 3 × MDS VGT-32 diesel
TOTAL POWER 3 × 373 kW/3500 rpm
GEARBOXES ZF
STERNDRIVES Konrad 660 DP
PROPELLERS Stainless steel
ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT
NETWORKS 12V DC
DECK LAY-OUT
ANCHOR EQUIPMENT 1 × SHHP
FENDERING Resilient deck fender
SAFETY Operator Protection Zone with 6 saddle seats
AUXILIARY SYSTEMS
BILGE PUMPS 3 × hand operated
2 × electrically driven
CATHODIC PROTECTION Impressed current
STEERING Full power steering, manual back-up
TRIM TABS Twin electro-hydraulic
FIRE EXTINGUISHING Aerosol system in engine room
NAUTICAL, SURVEILLANCE AND COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT
SEARCHLIGHTS 2 × 100W 12V
COMPASS GPS/Magnetic
RADAR Marine type, X-band
VHF’S 2 × watertight IMO
GPS/DGPS Chart plotter with C-Map memory cartridge
CREW INTERCOM Intercom 6-way system
6 voiceducers
2 radio operators
UHF/FM TRANSCEIVER Portable 403-433 MHz
Portable 440-470 MHz
Damen Interceptors are rugged workboats, not upgraded and grey painted pleasure boats
Damen Interceptors are rugged workboats, not upgraded and grey painted pleasure boats

Next generation RHIB

At this year’s Europort event in Rotterdam, the Damen Shipyards Group unveiled the latest addition to its extensive portfolio. The RHIB 1050 represents the next generation in rigid hull inflatable boats. A 34.4 × 11 feet/10.5 × 3.35 metre multi-mission vessel that can serve as an independent platform or as support for a larger patrol vessel, the RHIB 1050 presents a design that leaves no stone unturned. The end result is a robust package fronting safety, comfort and outstanding performance.

RHIB is quick too – able to sail at speeds of over 50 knots/57.5 mph/92.6 km/h
RHIB is quick too – able to sail at speeds of over 50 knots/57.5 mph/92.6 km/h

The RHIB 1050 was developed at Damen Shipyards Hardinxveld – no stranger to such vessels having provided numerous examples to the Royal Netherlands Navy over the years. Newbuild Project Manager at the yard Roel Foolen is happy with a job well done: «This is not your average RHIB», he states. «For starters, it’s Lloyds approved. The hull is made of glass reinforced epoxy as opposed to polyester and provided with Lloyd’s approved closed cell, foam core».

Damen’s use of epoxy for the hull will see the RHIB 1050 produced at the group’s specialist composite yard in Antalya, Turkey. The RHIB will be produced in series with a standard hull, open to flexible, client-specified outfitting requirements.

«Further to this, we are also able to provide training in its use», continues Mr. Foolen. «Damen has many years’ experience in building boats for navies and other defence and security bodies», he explains.

Ergonomics are a strong theme running throughout the design. Damen developed the layout using a mock-up console, constantly tweaking the positioning of instrumentation, seating and controls until completely satisfied with comfort levels. Consequently, the wheel and throttle are perfectly aligned with the suspension seating and handles and grips are located strategically throughout the RHIB.

«We’ve aimed to cover every detail – for example including steps to facilitate easy, fast exit of the RHIB in boarding ops and integration of hoisting eyes into the bollards, simultaneously removing a trip hazard and taking advantage of every available bit of space».

Damen is currently building a second RHIB 1050, which will feature 2 × 400 hp
Damen is currently building a second RHIB 1050, which will feature 2 × 400 hp

Another example of this philosophy at work is the unique use of D-shaped tubing, rather than the conventional cylindrical tubing. «Doing this allows us to combine the console and the engines into a single, space saving unit. Usually this would not be possible as such a unit would impede access to the fore of the vessel. However, with a section of tubing removed, there is still space for on board personnel to pass safely and comfortably fore to aft», explains Mr. Foolen.

This focused planning has also brought about a vessel that is notably easy to maintain. The 2 x 350 litre/2 x 94 gallon fuel tanks are located beneath the 10 deck-based seats. The seats are fitted to a dedicated hatch so, in the event the tanks require removing, the seating is simply lifted clear.

Similarly, the entire console unit is hinged at the aft so that it can be very easily moved clear when access is necessary to the 2 × 370 hp/2 × 276 kW Volvo Penta engines. The mast is also hinged so that it can be quickly folded away for transport height.

«As well as easy maintenance, the RHIB 1050 is also low maintenance», states Mr. Foolen. «We’ve used high-end materials and taken every step to ensure components are protected. Console instrumentation is located behind a heated, watertight window for example. And all electrics are housed in a dedicated, heated and ventilated compartment inside the dry storage area. Furthermore, the stern platform, as well as being perfectly situated for diving and man overboard operations, works in combination with the tube ends to form a protective barrier for the stern drives. At the front of the vessel, the nose is flattened to serve as a fender during boarding operations and the tubing is fitted to the vessel with aluminium extrusions, as opposed to glue. This not only offers a better grip, but also makes it easier to remove and replace when necessary», Mr. Foolen explains.

Of course, with such a vessel, performance is also of fundamental importance. Here too, the RHIB 1050 is not found wanting. «During sea trials, the handling, manoeuvrability and balance have proven to be excellent. It is very safe also, very forgiving and perfect in rough, harsh water. She’s quick too – able to sail at speeds of over 50 knots/57.5 mph/92.6 km/h».

Damen is currently building a second RHIB 1050, which will feature 2 × 400 hp/2 × 298 kW outboard engines.

 

With a cutting-edge, ergonomically designed layout and highly efficient, top quality performance, the Damen RHIB 1050 represents the next generation in rigid hull inflatable boats

 

Procurement Contract

Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) announced today that its Ingalls Shipbuilding division has received a $200 million, cost-plus-fixed-fee advance procurement contract from the U.S. Navy for LPD-28, the 12th amphibious transport dock of the USS San Antonio (LPD-17) class. The funds will be used to purchase long-lead-time material and major equipment, including main engines, diesel generators, deck equipment, shafting, propellers, valves and other long-lead systems.

The Ingalls-built amphibious transport dock USS Somerset (LPD-25) sails through the Gulf of Mexico during builder's sea trials (Photo by Steve Blount)
The Ingalls-built amphibious transport dock USS Somerset (LPD-25) sails through the Gulf of Mexico during builder’s sea trials (Photo by Steve Blount)

«This funding demonstrates the priority the Navy places on Ingalls getting started on this important ship», said Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias. «Our shipbuilders have made great strides in the LPD program, and we are performing well. Building LPD-28 is key to maintaining a reliable supplier base and leverages our hot production line, enabling our team of shipbuilders to build this ship and future amphibious warships as efficiently and as affordably as possible».

Ingalls’ 10th San Antonio-class LPD, USS John P. Murtha (LPD-26), was the most complete and lowest-cost LPD when launched, with many key systems finished months ahead of the shipyard’s historic best in the program.

The San Antonio class is the latest addition to the Navy’s 21st century amphibious assault force. The 684-foot-long/208-meter-long, 105-foot-wide/32-meter-wide ships are used to embark and land Marines, their equipment and supplies ashore via air cushion or conventional landing craft and amphibious assault vehicles, augmented by helicopters or vertical takeoff and landing aircraft such as the MV-22 Osprey. The ships support a Marine Air Ground Task Force across the spectrum of operations, conducting amphibious and expeditionary missions of sea control and power projection to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief missions throughout the first half of the 21st century.

The ships will support amphibious assault, special operations, expeditionary warfare or humanitarian missions throughout the first half of this century
The ships will support amphibious assault, special operations, expeditionary warfare or humanitarian missions throughout the first half of this century

 

General Characteristics

Builder Huntington Ingalls Industries
Propulsion Four sequentially turbocharged marine Colt-Pielstick Diesels, two shafts, 41,600 shaft horsepower
Length 684 feet/208 m
Beam 105 feet/32 m
Displacement Approximately 24,900 long tons (25,300 metric tons) full load
Draft 23 feet/7 m
Speed In excess of 22 knots/24.2 mph/38.7 km/h
Crew Ship’s Company: 374 Sailors (28 officers, 346 enlisted) and 3 Marines. Embarked Landing Force: 699 (66 officers, 633 enlisted); surge capacity to 800
Armament Two Bushmaster II 30-mm Close in Guns, fore and aft; two Rolling Airframe Missile (RAM) launchers, fore and aft: ten .50 calibre/12.7-mm machine guns
Aircraft Launch or land two CH-53E Super Stallion helicopters or two MV-22 Osprey tilt rotor aircraft or up to four CH-46 Sea Knight helicopters, AH-1 or UH-1 helicopters
Landing/Attack Craft Two LCACs or one LCU; and 14 Expeditionary Fighting Vehicles/Amphibious Assault Vehicles

 

Ships:

USS San Antonio (LPD-17), Norfolk, VA

USS New Orleans (LPD-18), San Diego, CA

USS Mesa Verde (LPD-19), Norfolk, VA

USS Green Bay (LPD-20), San Diego, CA

USS New York (LPD-21), Norfolk, VA

USS San Diego (LPD-22), San Diego, CA

USS Anchorage (LPD-23), San Diego, CA

USS Arlington (LPD-24), Norfolk, VA

USS Somerset (LPD-25), San Diego, CA

USS John P. Murtha (LPD-26), San Diego, CA

USS Portland (LPD-27), Authorized for U.S. Navy construction

 

While on U.S. Navy acceptance sea trials, the Ingalls-built amphibious landing platform dock, USS Arlington (LPD-24), met its sister ship, USS Anchorage (LPD-23) in the Gulf of Mexico

 

Jackson Commissioned

The crew of USS Jackson (LCS-6) ushered in a new era in naval warfare, December 5, as the ship was brought to life before a crowd of nearly 10,000. «I hereby place United States Ship Jackson in commission. May God bless and guide this warship and all who sail in it», said Secretary of the U.S. Navy Ray Mabus, who helped name the ship in 2011. «This certainly ranks right up there with great days that I’ve had».

USS Jackson (LCS-6) during its christening ceremony at Austal USA shipyard in Mobile, Alabama in 2014 (U.S. Navy Photo)
USS Jackson (LCS-6) during its christening ceremony at Austal USA shipyard in Mobile, Alabama in 2014 (U.S. Navy Photo)

Mississippi Senator Thad Cochran’s daughter, Dr. Kate Cochran, was the ship’s sponsor. It is the first ship to bear the name of Mississippi’s capital city. The name held a special meaning for many of those at the commissioning.

«For it to be named after the city, the capital of the state in which you were born, is even more of a phenomenal feeling», said Command Senior Chief Ken Ballard. Ballard and 52 other crewmembers will man missions aboard the Jackson, one of the fastest and most technologically advanced warships in the world.

«They’re providing incredible presence. They are providing lethality. They’re providing a lot of things that the United States Navy needs today and is going to need for years in the future», said Mabus. For the crew, the commissioning was the culmination of three years of hard work.

A fast, agile, and high-technology surface combatant, Freedom will act as a platform for launch and recovery of manned and unmanned vehicles. Its modular design will support interchangeable mission packages, allowing the ship to be reconfigured for antisubmarine warfare, mine warfare, or surface warfare missions on an as-needed basis.

The littoral combat ship (LCS) will be able to swap out mission packages, adapting as the tactical situation demands. These ships will also feature advanced networking capability to share tactical information with other Navy aircraft, ships, submarines and joint units.

The brand new 417-foot/127-meter ship weighs in at 3,100 tons. It can travel at speeds in excess of 40 knots/46 mph/74 km/h. The USS Jackson will be home ported at Naval Base San Diego.

The Independence variant team is led by Austal USA (for LCS-6 and the subsequent even-numbered hulls) and was originally led by General Dynamics, Bath Iron Works (LCS-2 and LCS-4)
The Independence variant team is led by Austal USA (for LCS-6 and the subsequent even-numbered hulls) and was originally led by General Dynamics, Bath Iron Works (LCS-2 and LCS-4)

 

The Independence Variant of the LCS Class

PRINCIPAL DIMENSIONS
Construction Hull and superstructure – aluminium alloy
Length overall 417 feet/127.1 m
Beam overall 103 feet/31.4 m
Hull draft (maximum) 14.8 feet/4.5 m
PAYLOAD AND CAPACITIES
Complement Core Crew – 40
Mission crew – 36
Berthing 76 in a mix of single, double & quad berthing compartments
Maximum mission load 210 tonnes
Mission Bay Volume 118,403 feet3/11,000 m3
Mission packages Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW)
Surface Warfare (SUW)
Mine Warfare (MIW)
PROPULSION
Main engines 2 × GE LM2500
2 × MTU 20V 8000
Waterjets 4 × Wartsila steerable
Bow thruster Retractable azimuthing
PERFORMANCE
Speed 40 knots/46 mph/74 km/h
Range 3,500 NM/4,028 miles/6,482 km
Operational limitation Survival in Sea State 8
MISSION/LOGISTICS DECK
Deck area >21,527.8 feet2/2,000 m2
Launch and recovery Twin boom extending crane
Loading Side ramp
Internal elevator to hanger
Launch/Recover Watercraft Sea State 4
FLIGHT DECK AND HANGER
Flight deck dimensions 2 × SH-60 or 1 × CH-53 or multiple Unmanned Aerial Vehicles/Vertical Take-off and Land Tactical Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs/VTUAVs)
Hanger Aircraft stowage & maintenance for 2 × SH-60
Launch/Recover Aircraft Sea State 5
WEAPONS AND SENSORS
Standard 1 × 57-mm gun
4 × 12.7-mm/.50 caliber guns
1 × Surface-to-Air Missile (SAM) launcher
3 × weapons modules
Six additional Independence-variant LCS are at various stages of construction at Austal’s shipyard in Mobile, Alabama
Six additional Independence-variant LCS are at various stages of construction at Austal’s shipyard in Mobile, Alabama

Adelaide enters service

HMAS Adelaide (L01), the second of two Landing Helicopter Docks (LHDs) built for the Royal Australian Navy, was commissioned into the Fleet 04 December 2015, alongside Garden Island, Sydney. The Governor-General, His Excellency General the Honourable Sir Peter Cosgrove, together with the Minister for Defence, Senator the Honourable Marise Payne, and Chief of Navy, Vice Admiral Tim Barrett, attended the traditional ceremony held on Adelaide’s aircraft hangar deck.

The Governor General of Australia, His Excellency General, the Honourable Sir Peter Cosgrove, AK, MC, (Retd), receives a Royal Salute from the band and Commissioning Guard during HMAS Adelaide's Commissioning ceremony
The Governor General of Australia, His Excellency General, the Honourable Sir Peter Cosgrove, AK, MC, (Retd), receives a Royal Salute from the band and Commissioning Guard during HMAS Adelaide’s Commissioning ceremony

Around 1,000 guests made up of family, industry and government representatives from Australia and Spain watched the proud Commissioning crew of Navy, Army and Air Force members march onboard and saw the Australian White Ensign being raised for the first time, signifying Adelaide’s entry into naval service.

Commanding Officer of HMAS Adelaide (L01), Captain Paul Mandziy, said it was a historic day. «This is a proud and momentous occasion that symbolises the culmination of the amount of time, support and hard work that has gone into realising this capability», Captain Mandziy said. «As the second of class, lessons learnt from HMAS Canberra (L02), our sister ship, has sped up our introduction into service, but a lot of effort and energy was still required from my ship’s company to get us prepared for today», Captain Mandziy said. «Our work doesn’t stop with commissioning. In the New Year we will conduct further trials at sea before commencing our work-up cycle. It is humbling to bring back the proud name Adelaide into the Fleet for a third time», Captain Mandziy said.

Commanding Officer of HMAS Adelaide (L01), Captain Paul Mandziy, CSC, RAN, addresses guests during the ship's Commissioning Ceremony
Commanding Officer of HMAS Adelaide (L01), Captain Paul Mandziy, CSC, RAN, addresses guests during the ship’s Commissioning Ceremony

Seaman Sahara McClellan, the youngest member of Adelaide’s crew at age 19, was selected to cut the commissioning cake with the Commanding Officer and says it will be a lasting memory. «It’s such an experience. I’ve only been in for just over a year so to be part of a commissioning crew in that amount of time – it is a pretty big deal», Seaman McClellan said. «Cutting the commissioning cake beside the CO was a proud moment and one I’ll look back on».

The capable air-land-sea amphibious asset joins her sister ship HMAS Canberra (L02) in service and marks the transformation of Navy capability. The LHDs are the next generation of Navy ships and are the first ships in a major fleet expansion.

Over the coming decades, the Navy will undergo its most significant period of recapitalisation since World War II, with new submarines, frigates, offshore patrol vessels and other specialist vessels. In 2016, the first of three Hobart Class Destroyers will also join the fleet.

The 757 feet/230.8 metre long LHDs are the largest ships ever built for the Navy. The 27,831 tonne amphibious assault ships are designed with the shallowest possible draft to manoeuvre in littoral waters and ports and can deploy an embarked force of over 1,000 personnel and their equipment, landing ashore via landing craft or helicopters. In addition to two operating theatres, the LHDs have an eight bed Critical Care Unit, resuscitation, and a variety of wards, pathology, radiology, x-ray, pharmacy and dental facilities.

Members of the ship's company of HMAS Adelaide (L01) raise the Australian White Ensign up the ship's mast for the first time, during the Landing Helicopter Dock's Commissioning ceremony
Members of the ship’s company of HMAS Adelaide (L01) raise the Australian White Ensign up the ship’s mast for the first time, during the Landing Helicopter Dock’s Commissioning ceremony

 

Characteristics

PLATFORM CHARACTERISTICS
Length Overall 757 feet/230.8 m
Length Waterline 680 feet/207.2 m
Beam 105 feet/32 m
Design Draft 23.5 feet/7.18 m
Full Load Displacement 27,831 tonnes
Crew and Embarked Forced Accommodation 1,403
MACHINERY
Propulsion 2 × Siemens 11,000 kW PODs
Bowthruster 2 × 1,500 kW Brunvoll/Siemens motors
Stabilisers 2 × Fincantieri
Generators 1 × 22,000 kW GE LM2500 Gas Turbine and 2 × 7,680 kW Diesel
Integrated Platform Management System Navantia – Sistemas
Fresh Water 6 × Reverse Osmosis Plants (each 25 tonnes/day)
Sewage 2 × Treatment Plants
PERFORMANCE
Maximum Speed 20+ knots/23+ mph/37+ km/h
Economic Speed 15 knots/17 mph/28 km/h
Maximum Range 9,250 NM/10,644 miles/17,131 km
Endurance 45+ days
CAPACITY
Flight Deck 51,128.57 feet²/4,750 m²
Dock (including ramp) 12,540 feet²/1,165 m²
Heavy Cargo Garage 12,270.86 feet²/1,410 m²
Light Cargo Garage 20,236 feet²/1,880 m²
Hangar 10,656.27 feet²/990 m²
Garages, Hangar and Well Dock 1,350 lane meter (2.9 m wide)
General Store Rooms 11,614.26 feet²/1,079 m²
Future Growth Margin 672 tonnes
HMAS Adelaide's Ship's Company marches out during their Commissioning ceremony, alongside Garden Island, Sydney
HMAS Adelaide’s Ship’s Company marches out during their Commissioning ceremony, alongside Garden Island, Sydney

Funding for Freedom

The U.S. Navy has issued a Lockheed Martin led industry team the balance of funding of $279 million for the construction of the future USS Cooperstown (LCS-23). The funding approved by Congress provides the financing required to maintain the cost and schedule of this critical national asset. Congress provided $79 million in advanced procurement funding for LCS-23 in March 2015.

Slicing its way through the choppy waters of Lake Michigan, the future USS Milwaukee (LCS-5) passed its final test, earning high marks and a thumbs-up from the U.S. Navy after successfully completing its acceptance trial September 18
Slicing its way through the choppy waters of Lake Michigan, the future USS Milwaukee (LCS-5) passed its final test, earning high marks and a thumbs-up from the U.S. Navy after successfully completing its acceptance trial September 18

«By providing this funding, the U.S. Navy demonstrates its commitment to the Lockheed Martin-led team in building the advanced Freedom-variant littoral combat ship», said Joe North, vice president of Littoral Ships and Systems at Lockheed Martin Mission Systems and Training. «We have delivered three of these ships to the fleet so far, and we stand committed on the remaining block buy deliveries».

The award comes just days after the Navy commissioned the Freedom-variant USS Milwaukee (LCS-5) in the city of Milwaukee.

The Lockheed Martin-led industry team, which includes shipbuilder Fincantieri Marinette Marine and naval architect Gibbs & Cox, has already delivered three Freedom-variant littoral combat ships to the U.S. Navy. USS Freedom (LCS-1) conducted a successful deployment to Southeast Asia in 2013 and is currently operating out of her homeport in San Diego. USS Fort Worth (LCS-3) is currently deployed in Southeast Asia, serving in the U.S. 7th Fleet.

There is current interest in hull lengths from 85 meters to 118 meters; the hull is proved from 67 meters to 150 meters at various displacements
There is current interest in hull lengths from 85 meters to 118 meters; the hull is proved from 67 meters to 150 meters at various displacements

 

Ship Design Specifications

Hull Advanced semiplaning steel monohull
Length Overall 389 feet/118.6 m
Beam Overall 57 feet/17.5 m
Draft 13.5 feet/4.1 m
Full Load Displacement Approximately 3,200 metric tons
Top Speed Greater than 40 knots/46 mph/74 km/h
Range at top speed 1,000 NM/1,151 miles/1,852 km
Range at cruise speed 4,000 NM/4,603 miles/7,408 km
Watercraft Launch and Recovery Up to Sea State 4
Aircraft Launch and Recovery Up to Sea State 5
Propulsion Combined diesel and gas turbine with steerable water jet propulsion
Power 85 MW/113,600 horsepower
Hangar Space Two MH-60 Romeo Helicopters
One MH-60 Romeo Helicopter and three Vertical Take-off and Land Tactical Unmanned Air Vehicles (VTUAVs)
Core Crew Less than 50
Accommodations for 75 sailors provide higher sailor quality of life than current fleet
Integrated Bridge System Fully digital nautical charts are interfaced to ship sensors to support safe ship operation
Core Self-Defense Suite Includes 3D air search radar
Electro-Optical/Infrared (EO/IR) gunfire control system
Rolling-Airframe Missile Launching System
57-mm Main Gun
Mine, Torpedo Detection
Decoy Launching System
SUW Configured Freedom
SUW Configured Freedom

 

Ship list

USS Freedom (LCS-1)

USS Fort Worth (LCS-3)

USS Milwaukee (LCS-5)

USS Detroit (LCS-7)

USS Little Rock (LCS-9)

USS Sioux City (LCS-11)

USS Wichita (LCS-13)

USS Billings (LCS-15)

USS Indianapolis (LCS-17)

USS St. Louis (LCS-19)

USS Minneapolis/St. Paul (LCS-21)

USS Cooperstown (LCS-23)

The U.S. Navy’s Freedom class littoral combat ship, a revolutionary surface combatant being built by a Lockheed Martin team achieved multiple operational and production milestones

 

Future Submarine

Evaluation of Australia’s Future Submarine program proposals will now commence with all three potential international partners submitting their proposals in full, Minister for Defence Senator the Hon Marise Payne announced.

Japan will present three options for building the subs: in Australia, in Japan or in a split arrangement
Japan will present three options for building the subs: in Australia, in Japan or in a split arrangement

«The Government’s Competitive Evaluation Process remains on schedule with Defence receiving submissions from DCNS of France, TKMS of Germany, and the Government of Japan by the 30 November 2015 closing deadline»,’ Senator Payne said. «Since the CEP began in February, all three participants have worked closely with Defence and they should be congratulated for the hard work and significant investment they have made to reach this point».

Defence will now assess the ability of the participants to work closely with us, including how each proposal would meet our capability and sustainment needs, and how cost, schedule and risk would be managed throughout the program.

This program offers a once in a generation opportunity for Australian industry to innovate and be part of Australia’s Future Submarine. That is why the assessment will include the level of Australian industry involvement that will be possible under each option.

«Submarines are Defence’s most complex, sensitive, and expensive capability, so it is important that the evaluation process is thorough and robust»,’ Senator Payne said. «The evaluation process will be overseen by the Expert Advisory Panel to ensure it is conducted fairly and equitably, with advice to be provided to Government in 2016».

DCNS Australia is a subsidiary of DCNS, a French naval shipbuilding company and European leader in naval defence
DCNS Australia is a subsidiary of DCNS, a French naval shipbuilding company and European leader in naval defence

 

DCNS

DCNS on 27 November lodged its final deliverables to the Australian Government’s Competitive Evaluation Process to select an International Program partner for the SEA1000 Future Submarine Program.

The proposal includes a Government to Government Agreement from The French Ministère of Defence’s Direction Générale de l’Armement (DGA) to the Commonwealth of Australia’s Department of Defence and a binding written commitment on key aspects of the deliverables.

This milestone has been achieved on schedule and marks the beginning of the Commonwealth of Australia’s evaluation phase.

Mr. Sean Costello, CEO DCNS Australia, said, «DCNS acknowledges the dedication from hundreds of people in France and Australia to the development of the Shortfin Barracuda Block 1A and a sovereign industry in Australia. We have worked as a team to create the best possible solution for Australia’s future».

HDW Class 216 Submarine is a long-range multi-mission two-deck fuel cell submarine with exceptional endurance
HDW Class 216 Submarine is a long-range multi-mission two-deck fuel cell submarine with exceptional endurance

Four LLC to Australia

Navantia has the pleasure in delivering to the Commonwealth in Sydney the final batch of four LLCs. This is a major achievement, where Navantia has played an important role – that of Prime Contractor for the first time in an Australian program. Since 2007, Navantia has been working in three important programs for the ADF, namely the Air Warfare Destroyers (AWDs), Landing Helicopter Docks (LHDs), and the LHD Landing Craft (LLCs), under different contractual schemes to deliver to the best of its ability.

HMAS Canberra docks down in Sydney Harbour in order to receive the ship’s LHD Landing Craft for the very first time
HMAS Canberra docks down in Sydney Harbour in order to receive the ship’s LHD Landing Craft for the very first time

On 16th December 2011, Navantia signed a contract with the then Defence Materiel Organisation (DMO) under JP 2048 Phase 3 to build and deliver twelve LHD Landing Craft (LLCs) to the Commonwealth. All twelve have now been delivered to HMAS Waterhen in Sydney on or ahead of schedule and to budget. The LLCs were built and tested in Cádiz, Spain, and shipped out to Australia.

Navantia understands that the first eight units are in operation with the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) and are performing to the full satisfaction of Navy, having achieved various missions during sea trials with HMAS Canberra (L02), which has also been commissioned into the RAN. Her sister ship, HMAS Adelaide (L01), is due to be commissioned in Sydney on 4th December 2015. Since delivery of the LLCs, Navantia has provided in-country support and is committed to ensuring its availability for service at all times. This commitment will be maintained by Navantia Australia Pty Ltd, which is also assisting BAE Systems with Through Life Support of the LHDs.

Navantia is fully committed to Australia and will contribute to projects as far as possible within its proven capacity and ability to supply. We look forward to working with the Commonwealth and industry even more closely than before, to achieve the program goals that we totally share. In this regard, Navantia is currently engaged in the SEA 1654 Phase 3 Maritime Operational Support Capability tender process, and is working in a collaborative environment in the SEA 5000 Future Frigate program and the SEA 1180 Offshore Patrol Vessels project.

The Royal Australian Navy's first four LCM-1E landing craft for the LHD have arrived at their new home HMAS Waterhen in Sydney
The Royal Australian Navy’s first four LCM-1E landing craft for the LHD have arrived at their new home HMAS Waterhen in Sydney

 

LHD Landing Craft (LLC)

The LCM-1E is a class of amphibious Landing Craft, Mechanized (LCM) manufactured by Navantia who also build the LHD hulls. In Royal Australian Navy service these craft are purpose built for the Landing Helicopter Dock (LHD) and are referred to as LHD Landing Craft (LLC).

These landing craft are intended to deliver troops and equipment onshore where there are no fixed port facilities. They have the ability to be used Over The Horizon, which means that the LCM-1E can transport between the ship and the coast starting at a distance greater than that marks the horizon, i.e. greater than 20 nautical miles (23 miles/37 km). To perform this type of landing, the LCM-1E are equipped with a radar navigation, GPS, gyro needle/magnetic and HF communications equipment, VHF and UHF.

Another important point is the speed and autonomy. The propulsion is by two engines MAN of 806 kW and two water jet propellers (waterjets), offering a speed of 22 knots/25 mph/41 km/h without load and 13.5 knots/15.5 mph/25 km/h laden, with a range of 190 nautical miles (219 miles/352 km).

The LCM-1E incorporates a stern gate, facilitating the loading/unloading of rolling stock within the flood levee, not necessary the output of the front two boats to load/unload the rear, with a limit of 12 tonnes maximum for the transfer of vehicles one barge to another.

The watercraft will enable transport of troops and equipment from the LHDs to the shore including where there are no fixed port facilities.

 

Characteristics

Type Amphibious Warfare Ancillary Craft
Displacement 56.6 tonnes (light)
110 tonnes (full load)
Length 76.4 feet/23.3 m
Beam 21 feet/6.4 m
Main Machinery 2 × MAN D-2842 LE 402X diesel engines (809 kW each)
2 × waterjets
Speed 22 knots/25 mph/41 km/h (light)
13.5 knots/15.5 mph/25 km/h (full load)
Company 4
Range 190 NM/219 miles/352 km

 

Marine selected BAE

The U.S. Marine Corps has awarded BAE Systems’ team a contract worth $103.7 million for the Engineering, Manufacturing, and Development (EMD) phase of the Amphibious Combat Vehicle (ACV) 1.1 program. The company, along with teammate IVECO Defence Vehicles, will deliver a solution that will be built from the ground up to be an amphibious vehicle and will provide significant capability improvements to satisfy the Marine Corps’ current and future needs.

BAE Systems’ Amphibious Combat Vehicle 1.1 (BAE Systems photo)
BAE Systems’ Amphibious Combat Vehicle 1.1 (BAE Systems photo)

«We are proud to continue our long history of providing the Marine Corps with superior amphibious capabilities», said Deepak Bazaz, director of new and amphibious vehicles at BAE Systems. «Our vehicle was designed to be fully amphibious with exceptional ground mobility and protection. Our ACV solution will provide the Marine Corps with a mature, cost-effective solution with significant growth capacity».

The award is one of two EMD contracts issued. During this phase, BAE Systems will produce 16 prototypes that will be tested by the Marine Corps beginning in the third quarter of 2016. Work on the vehicles will take place at BAE Systems’ facilities in Quantico, Virginia; San Jose, California; and York, Pennsylvania.

The ACV 1.1 is not required to self-deploy from the well deck of an amphibious ship to the shore, since the Marine Corps decided to wait and introduce that requirement into ACV 1.2, which will also feature mission-based variants of the vehicle
The ACV 1.1 is not required to self-deploy from the well deck of an amphibious ship to the shore, since the Marine Corps decided to wait and introduce that requirement into ACV 1.2, which will also feature mission-based variants of the vehicle

BAE Systems’ ACV 1.1 solution is an advanced 8×8 open ocean-capable vehicle that is based on a platform developed by IVECO Defence Vehicles. It is equipped with a new 6-cylinder, 700HP power pack, which provides a significant power increase over the current Assault Amphibious Vehicle. The vehicle performs best in class mobility in all terrains and has a suspended interior seat structure for 13 embarked Marines, blast-mitigating positions for a crew of three, and improved survivability and force protection over currently fielded systems. The team has conducted extensive risk mitigation testing and evaluation for swim, land mobility, and survivability capabilities that have proven the solution’s capabilities.

BAE Systems has more than 70 years of experience designing and building amphibious vehicles and is a leading provider of combat vehicles, having produced more than 100,000 systems for customers worldwide. IVECO Defence Vehicles brings additional proven experience, having designed and built more than 30,000 multi-purpose, protected, and armored military vehicles in service today.

Part of the success of the program has been the streamlined transition from MPC to ACV 1.1 and eventually into 1.2
Part of the success of the program has been the streamlined transition from MPC to ACV 1.1 and eventually into 1.2