Category Archives: Navy

Polish Silesian

According to the Defense-aerospace.com, on July 2, Minister Siemoniak launched and christened the ORP Ślązak (Silesian) patrol boat at the Naval Shipyard in Gdynia. The ORP Ślązak is the first new Polish-built Navy ship in 21 years.

Laid down as a missile corvette, the Gawor proved to be beyond the financial capabilities of the Polish navy, which finally decided to turn it into an OPV, the Ślązak, which was launched on July 2 in Gdansk (Polish MoD photo)
Laid down as a missile corvette, the Gawor proved to be beyond the financial capabilities of the Polish navy, which finally decided to turn it into an OPV, the Ślązak, which was launched on July 2 in Gdansk (Polish MoD photo)

«Thanks to Polish shipyard workers in particular. We believed that they would be able to perform this task, and they acquitted themselves well. We look forward to further ships from Polish shipyards», said the head of the Defense Ministry.

On Thursday, Defence Minister Tomasz Siemoniak participated in the ceremony of launching and christening of the ship patrol ORP Ślązak, which was held in the Naval Shipyard in Gdynia.

The Minister said that, in accordance with the schedule, the ship should begin to serve late next year. «Now you need to fit it out. We must also train the crew. We anticipate that by the end of next year it will normally come into service. She must also undergo sea trials at this time. This is the plan», the Deputy Prime Minister said, and he added that he is confident about the continuation of work and schedule adherence.

Minister Siemoniak also said that negotiations are continuing with Polish Armament Group for the next six ships – patrol and coast guard vessels. He added that in his opinion, Polish shipyards are absolutely ready for such projects.

«Expansion of the Navy is the need of our time. We need new capability in the Baltic Sea, and to cooperate in the framework of NATO. The Alliance, because of what is happening in Europe and around Europe, looks completely different at sea, as was shown is the recent BALTOPS-2015 exercise. The Baltic Sea is of strategic importance for our interests and the interests of NATO. This is an indication that we should develop our naval forces», stressed the Deputy Prime Minister during the ceremony.

Construction of the ship patrol in the basic version of Ślązak is implemented by the Minister of Defence’s decision to use the platform on the multi-purpose corvette platform Gawron. Upon completion in 2012 of the requisite analysis and consultations, the minister decided that the best solution would be to complete the construction of Gawron as a patrol ship, retrofitting it with equipment and other naval systems required for its re-tasking.

In February of 2013, Defence Minister Tomasz Siemoniak signed a decision ordering the negotiations for the supply of an Integrated Combat System, and annexing an existing agreement taking into account the new requirements for the ship.

On September 23, 2013 was signed an annex to the original contract directing that the ship be completed by the Naval Shipyard using the existing platform as the patrol ship ORP Ślązak. The contract annex clarifies issues of completing the ship and changing its mission from multipurpose corvettes to patrol boat.

The Polish Navy is growing, but more can be done said the Polish Defence Minister Tomasz Siemoniak
The Polish Navy is growing, but more can be done said the Polish Defence Minister Tomasz Siemoniak

 

General characteristics:

Total length – 312.3 feet/95.2 m;

Width – 44.3 feet/13.5 m;

Height to deck – 30.7 feet/9.35 m;

Draught – 11.8 feet/3.6 m;

Standard displacement – approximately 1,800 tonnes;

Autonomy – 30 days;

2 main engines with a capacity of 2 × 3,240 kW;

Turbine peak power of 25,000 kW;

Marine Power Station – 4 generating sets with the 4 × 600 kW;

Maximum speed – 30+ knots/34.5+ mph/55.5+ km/h;

Endurance speeds of 18 knots/20.7 mph/33.3 km/h – 2,000 NM/ 2,301 miles/3,704 km range;

Economical speed of 14 knots/16 mph/26 km/h – 4,500 NM/5,178 miles/8,334 km range;

Accessories – bow thruster azimuth and active stabilizers swings.

 

Planned armament:

Command system with consoles – supplier company THALES;

Sea cannon OTO Melara – 76-mm;

2 guns Marlin – WS – 30-mm;

4 missile launchers – Grom;

4 small-bore – 12.7-mm machine guns;

Radar Station;

Navigational sonar – warning;

Optoelectronic head;

Fire control system;

Means of communication and navigation.

Minister Siemoniak launched and christened the ORP Ślązak (Silesian) patrol boat at the Naval Shipyard in Gdynia
Minister Siemoniak launched and christened the ORP Ślązak (Silesian) patrol boat at the Naval Shipyard in Gdynia

Multifunctional Ship

Fincantieri, one of the world’s largest shipbuilding groups and reference player in the naval shipbuilding industry, and Finmeccanica, Italy’s leading manufacturer in the high technology sector, have been awarded the contract for the construction and equipment of one multipurpose amphibious unit (LHD – Landing Helicopter Dock) for the Italian Navy.

A computer-generated image of the Italian Navy’s future LHD, which is expected to displace about 20,000 tonnes
A computer-generated image of the Italian Navy’s future LHD, which is expected to displace about 20,000 tonnes

The total value of the contract is over 1.1 billion euros, with Fincantieri’s share amounting to approximately 853 million euros and Finmeccanica’s to about 273 million euros. The delivery of the unit is scheduled in 2022.

The contract with the consortium Raggruppamento Temporaneo di Impresa (RTI), consisting of Fincantieri, agent, and Finmeccanica, through its subsidiary Selex ES, principal, was signed on behalf of the Ministry of Defence by the Central Unit for Naval Armament (NAVARM) of the General Secretariat.

The consortium RTI was established in accordance with the tight cooperation agreement in the field of naval vessels construction signed between Fincantieri and Finmeccanica last October. Pursuant to the agreement, Fincantieri acts as a sole interface to the client, while at the same time allowing to enhance Finmeccanica’s products range in the naval field and the technical and commercial synergies between the two largest national groups in the naval field.

In general, this multi-year programme for the renewal of the Navy’s fleet (known as the «Defence Act») employs a total funding of 5.4 billion euros and, in addition to the aforementioned LHD unit, foresees the construction of six patrol vessels, with four more in option, and one logistic support unit.

In particular:

  • one multipurpose amphibious unit (LHD or Landing Helicopter Dock);
  • one logistic support unit (LSS or Logistic Support Ship);
  • six patrol vessels (PPA or Multipurpose Offshore Patrol Ship) and four more in option.

The fundamental characteristic common to all three classes of ships is their high level of innovation providing them with a considerable degree of efficiency and flexibility in serving different mission profiles. In particular, these are dual use vessels, meaning that they may be used for both standard military purposes and for civil protection and rescue at sea operations. They also have a low environmental impact thanks to a state-of-the-art auxiliary propulsion system generating a low level of pollution emissions (electric engines) and biological waste control system.

In addition to building the vessels at its shipyards, Fincantieri will provide support over the lifecycle of the vessels in the first ten years, through the supply of logistic services (training courses, spare parts, technical documentation) during the construction of the vessels and of In-Service Support (ISS), (maintenance services), carried out during post-delivery operations, as well as components and naval machinery produced by the Marine Systems and Components Business Unit, such as shaft lines, wheelhouse, maneuvering propellers, fin stabilizers and other handling systems.

Finmeccanica, through Selex ES, will act as prime contractor for the new unit’s entire combat system. The system will support landing craft, provide vessel self-defence and coordinate and control operations in concert with other naval and ground forces. Selex ES will also provide all the sensor systems including the X band, four-fixed-face, multifunctional scanned-array radar system and also the latest generation integrated communications. Finmeccanica-Selex ES will deliver and integrate all systems, including those of OTO Melara, WASS, and Elettronica, and is also responsible for the provision of support throughout the first decade of use including Integrated Logistic Support (ILS) and In-Service Support (ISS).

Fincantieri’s Chief Executive Officer, Giuseppe Bono, commented: «The announcement of this additional unit completes the first part of the renewal of our Navy’s Fleet, one of the world’s most significant defence programmes of the last years. We are extremely satisfied and excited to be leaders of such an important project, both technically and industrially. It confirms that we are a reference producer worldwide as well in the naval segment, either for the domestic and foreign markets. Fincantieri all will work at this programme with the highest commitment in order to realize on time extremely high quality products».

Finmeccanica’s Chief Executive Officer and General Manager, Mauro Moretti, said: «The contract award represents a new and significant contribution by Finmeccanica and Fincantieri to the Italian Navy’s important fleet renewal programme. All of the systems designed and developed for the new dual-use LHD naval unit are based on the most advanced technology, boosting the efficiency of solutions proposed by Finmeccanica and strengthening its position in the naval sector. The group will continue to invest in this sector, with the goal of increasing the value of its products and solutions able to achieve significant success, also in international markets».

 

LHD – Landing Helicopter Dock

The unit will be approximately 623 feet/190 meters long with a maximum speed of 20 knots/23 mph/37 km/h. It will be equipped with a combined diesel and gas turbine plant (CODOG) and will be able to accommodate on board over 950 people, of whom more than 750 military or civilian transported people.

The LHD’s main mission is the transport of people, vehicles and loads of different kinds and in their transfer on land in port areas through on board systems and in not equipped areas with various kinds of vessels: such as the small Landing Craft Mechanized (LCM) – landing craft units with a load capacity up to 60 tonnes, four of which can be admitted, launched, and recovered through a flooded basin, located on the stern of the vessel.

The Landing Helicopter Dock’s military profile use provides transport and landing, in equipped and non-equipped areas, of troupes, military vehicles, logistic equipment, using the provided features and means of transfer.

The civil profile use provides:

  • healthcare and hospital support;
  • transfer and landing of people and wheeled or crawled means of transport in equipped and non-equipped areas;
  • supply of drinking water to land through onboard desalination plants or storages;
  • supply of electricity to land with 2,000 kW of power and its distribution through containerized conversion and distribution units;
  • possibility of accommodating specialized staff on board or hosting up to 750 civilian personnel, plus the same number in containerized residential units;
  • rescue operations base through helicopters and boar staffing vessels.

Equipped with wide embarkment areas of about 4,500 m2 within dock-garage and hangar-garage and a continuous open deck, able to receive wheeled vehicles of various kinds, containers and helicopters, the unit can perform several military and civil missions.

The different areas of cargo securing are accessible through stern and side ramps, and cargo handling will be managed by internal ramps and elevators.

On board there will be a fully equipped hospital, complete with operating rooms, radiology and analysis rooms, a dentist’s office, and a hospital rooms capable of hosting 28 seriously injured patients (further admissions are possible through duly equipped container modules).

 

Main Characteristics

Length overall 623 feet/190 m
Length Between Perpendicular 548 feet/167 m
Maximum breadth 108 feet/33 m
Breadth 92 feet/28 m
Full Load Displacement 20,000 tonnes
Propulsion Diesel engines 10,000 kWm
Diesel Generators sets 4 × 2,500 kWe
Operational speed 20 knots/23 mph/37 km/h
Range at 16 knots/18 mph/30 km/h 7,000 NM/8,055 miles/12,964 km
Flight deck for up to 6 helicopters EH-101 type
Helicopters hangar for up to 6 EH-101 type
Vehicle deck capability up to 1200 metric lanes
Hospital area about 1,000 m² plus 1,000 m² of convertible areas
Floodable dock about 50 × 15 m
Vehicle ramps 1 stern + 1 side
Accommodation 200 crew + 750 troops

 

Combat System

  • Air & Surface surveillance system (combined air/surface surveillance radar or air + surface surveillance radar’s).
  • Mine avoidance sonar.
  • Artillery: 3 Short Range Gun 25-mm + 2 76-mm OTO Melara 62 caliber (acting also as CIWS – Close-In Weapon System).
  • Electronic Warfare (EW) system (ESM/ECM – Electronic Support Measures/Electronic CounterMeasures + 2 AAW DLS – Anti Air Warfare Decoy Launcher System).
  • Torpedo defense (Towed Array + 2 ASW DLS – Anti Submarine Warfare Decoy Launcher System).
  • Open architectural command & control system able to be implemented also in later phase (i.e. adding operational functions & operator consoles) (400 m² avaible).
  • Integrated communication system (including also the means for landing troops).
  • Integrated navigation system (including X and S band navigation radar’s).

 

Keel for Manchester

Austal and the U.S. Navy held a keel-laying ceremony on June 29 for the future USS Manchester (LCS-14), marking the first significant milestone in its construction. This new ship is the fifth Independence variant Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) built at Austal under the 10-ship, $3.5 billion block buy contract awarded to Austal in 2010.

Keel Laying for USS Manchester (LCS 14)
Keel Laying for USS Manchester (LCS 14)

«It has been said that building a high-tech Littoral Combat Ship is more akin to making a spacecraft than a traditional warship», said Senator Jeanne Shaheen (D-N.H.), sponsor of the Manchester. «These ships and their technology are impressive. However, what is always most impressive, to me is the professionalism and excellence of the officers and sailors who serve on these remarkable vessels. We are also grateful to the engineers, the welders, the machinists, the metalworkers and electricians – all the men and women who are working as a team to build the USS Manchester (LCS-14). I am honored and humbled to be her official ship sponsor».

Shaheen, the only woman to serve as both a U.S. senator and state governor, authenticated the keel by welding her initials onto an aluminum plate that will be placed in the keel – a beam around which the hull, or body, of a ship is built. The keel runs lengthwise down the middle of the ship serving as the basic foundation or spine of the structure, providing the major source of the hull’s strength. Shaheen has been part of New Hampshire’s leadership fabric by representing her state in Congress since 2009.

Due to Austal’s modular approach to ship manufacturing, 36 of 37 modules used to form this 127-meter (419-foot) aluminum trimaran are already being fabricated. For Austal, keel laying marks the beginning of final assembly. Nineteen modules have been moved from Austal’s Module Manufacturing Facility (MMF) and erected in the final assembly bay in their pre-launch position. The remaining 18 modules will follow over the coming months.

Austal is a global defense prime contractor and a designer and manufacturer of defense and commercial ships
Austal is a global defense prime contractor and a designer and manufacturer of defense and commercial ships

«With 19 modules of Manchester already erected, and the christening of Gabrielle Giffords just a few short weeks ago, it’s exciting to see just how well the LCS program is maturing here», said Craig Perciavalle, president of Austal USA. «This milestone would not have been possible without the hard work and dedication of Austal’s talented design and production team».

Austal’s LCS program delivered USS Independence (LCS-2) in 2009 and USS Coronado (LCS-4) in 2013. Seven additional LCS are under construction at the Mobile, Alabama shipyard. The U.S. Navy conducted acceptance trials on the future USS Jackson (LCS-6) last week, while the future USS Montgomery (LCS-8) is preparing for builders trials later this year. The future USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS-10) was christened June 13, and the future USS Omaha (LCS-12) will complete final assembly and prepare for launch later this summer. Modules for the future USS Tulsa (LCS-16) and the future USS Charleston (LCS-18) are in the early phases of construction.

Austal is also building ten 103-meter (338-foot) Joint High Speed Vessels (JHSVs) for the U.S. U.S. Navy under a $1.6 billion block-buy contract. USNS Trenton (JHSV-5) marked the fifth vessel in this class to be delivered since the inception of the program. Both USNS Spearhead (JHSV-1) and USNS Millinocket (JHSV-3) are on humanitarian missions, in Central America and Southwest Asia, respectively.

Austal USA is a full-service shipyard offering design, construction and high-speed vessel service and repair. As Austal USA continues to expand its service and repair capabilities, the company is well positioned for new business with engineering, test and trials capabilities, and a new warehouse and office location in San Diego, California.

Austal also designs, constructs, integrates and maintains an extensive range of patrol and auxiliary vessels for government agencies globally
Austal also designs, constructs, integrates and maintains an extensive range of patrol and auxiliary vessels for government agencies globally

Naval interceptor

It is said in the Jane’s Defence Weekly that the Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN) has unveiled a new high-speed and stealthy naval interceptor designed to perform a range of missions, including base defence for the service’s two naval facilities, force protection, as well as maritime security operations alongside its existing Fearless-class patrol vessels and future Littoral Mission Vessels (LMV).

The vessel on parade is visibly less equipped than the model shown in a video, suggesting that this particular example is either a prototype or a newly built hull awaiting further outfitting
The vessel on parade is visibly less equipped than the model shown in a video, suggesting that this particular example is either a prototype or a newly built hull awaiting further outfitting

The new interceptor, called the Specialized Marine Craft (SMC), will be officially revealed to the public as part of the military display aimed at showcasing the Singapore Armed Forces’ latest capabilities during the country’s National Day celebration on 9 August. The SMC replaces the service’s Fast Boats, which were retired in 2008.

According to specifications provided by the Ministry of Defence (MoD), the 40-tonne SMC – which is based on an aluminium hullform with a low Radar Cross Section (RCS) design – measures 72 feet/22 m in length and has a beam of 18 feet/5.5 m. Kelvin Wong, Jane’s Defence Weekly correspondent understands that the draft of the vessel is approximately 4 feet/1.2 m.

Major Lee Pui Yau, commander of the SMC squadron, told reporters during a media preview event on 27 June that development of the SMC began in 2003 in collaboration with Singapore Technologies (ST) Marine, with the first vessel entering service in 2009 after extensive trials and design refinements in the intervening years.

Maj Lee said the vessel’s complement of four comprises a commander, a coxswain, a navigator, and a weapons specialist. He added that the SMC is not designed to embark additional personnel. Propulsion is achieved with two Hamilton waterjets, likely the HM series that are designed for marine craft ranging from 56 to 197 feet/17 to 60 m, which enable unfettered operation in shallow waters, while enabling the vessel to attain maximum speeds in excess of 30 knots/34.5 mph/55.5 km/h.

The vessel's electro-optical sensor and what is likely to be a navigation radar can be seen mounted on its starboard mast
The vessel’s electro-optical sensor and what is likely to be a navigation radar can be seen mounted on its starboard mast

The SMC is armed with a foredeck-mounted stabilised OTO Melara Hitrole G remote weapons station that is equipped with a 12.7-mm FN Herstal M2HB QCB machine gun and complements the stealthy profile of the SMC with its low-RCS shield. According to company literature, the Hitrole G weapon station is capable of engaging surface and aerial targets and has an internal capacity for 400 rounds of ammunition. Additional ammunition can be stored under the mount. The company also stated that the Hitrole G is also equipped with a daylight camera, a cooled infrared imager, and a laser rangefinder.

Specifics of the SMC’s electronic systems were not disclosed, although MoD said the vessel features «advanced sensors» that provide «state-of-the-art surveillance capabilities» as well as a communications suite that enables improved integration with other RSN fleet assets and facilities. However, Kelvin Wong understands from Maj Lee that the vessel is equipped with a mast-mounted electro-optical sensor turret as well as a radar system, although he declined to elaborate further on their origins.

According to Maj Lee, the RSN currently operates three vessels with a further five expected to enter service by 2017.

The Specialised Marine Craft is armed with a stabilised 12.7-mm OTO Melara Hitrole G remote weapons station, which features a low radar cross section shield design
The Specialised Marine Craft is armed with a stabilised 12.7-mm OTO Melara Hitrole G remote weapons station, which features a low radar cross section shield design

Travelling to Sydney

NUSHIP Adelaide, one of two Landing Helicopter Dock (LHD) ships being built for the Royal Australian Navy (RAN), left BAE Systems Williamstown (17 June) to begin sea trials. After some initial trials in Port Phillip Bay, HMAS Adelaide (L01) will spend ten days on the water travelling to Sydney.

The second ship, HMAS Adelaide, is planned to commission in 2016
The second ship, HMAS Adelaide, is planned to commission in 2016

The current testing precedes a second period of sea trials in August, ahead of delivery to the Royal Australian Navy later this year. The sea trials are conducted under a number of scenarios; some require the ship in certain conditions and/or water depths while others require the ship’s systems in specific configurations.

In Sydney, HMAS Adelaide (L01) will be dry docked so her hull and flight deck can be cleaned and painted. NUSHIP Adelaide will then set sail and undertake more sea trials on the return voyage to Williamstown, arriving in mid-July. The August sea trials will focus on communication and combat systems.

BAE Systems Director of Maritime, Bill Saltzer said: «We will undertake approximately 240 hours of testing over 20 days to ensure all systems perform to their capability. Some of the trials will run concurrently and cover everything from basic systems operations such as alarms, to the ship’s manoeuvrability while at sea. We are on track to deliver NUSHIP Adelaide at the end of September this year. The ship is even more ready than HMAS Canberra (L02) was for her first sea trials, reinforcing that we have implemented lessons learned from the first of class and we have continued to improve our productivity».

The LHDs are the largest warships ever to be built for the RAN. As the prime contractor, BAE Systems has worked closely with the Defence Materiel Organization to deliver the project with subcontractors Navantia, which constructed the hulls in Spain, SAAB and L3, which supplied the combat and communications systems respectively.

These 27,000-tonne ships will be able to land a force of over 1,000 personnel by helicopter and watercraft, along with all their weapons, ammunition, vehicles and stores
These 27,000-tonne ships will be able to land a force of over 1,000 personnel by helicopter and watercraft, along with all their weapons, ammunition, vehicles and stores

 

Platform Characteristics

Length Overall                                                                          757 feet/230.8 m

Length Waterline                                                                     680 feet/207.2 m

Beam                                                                                               105 feet/32 m

Design Draft                                                                                23.5 feet/7.18 m

Full Load Displacement                                                         27,831 tonnes

Crew and Embarked Forced Accommodation         1,403

 

Machinery

Propulsion                 2 × Siemens 11,000 kW PODs

Bowthruster             2 × 1,500 kW Brunvoll/Siemens motors

Stabilisers                   2 × Fincantieri

Generators                         1 × 22,000 kW GE LM2500 Gas Turbine and                                                      2 × 7,680 kW Diesel

Integrated Platform Management System              Navantia – Sistemas

Fresh Water              6 × Reverse Osmosis Plants (each 25 tonnes/day)

Sewage                         2 × Treatment Plants

The largest ships ever built for the Royal Australian Navy, the LHDs are being built as a collaboration between Navantia and BAE Systems – Maritime
The largest ships ever built for the Royal Australian Navy, the LHDs are being built as a collaboration between Navantia and BAE Systems – Maritime

 

Performance

Maximum Speed                                   20+ knots/23+ mph/37+ km/h

Economic Speed                                    15 knots/17 mph/28 km/h

Maximum Range                                   9,250 NM/10,644 miles/17,131 km

Endurance                                                45+ days

 

Capacity

Flight Deck                                                            4,750 m²/51,128.57 feet²

Dock (including ramp)                                    1,165 m²/12,540 feet²

Heavy Cargo Garage                                       1,410 m²/12,270.86 feet²

Light Cargo Garage                                          1,880 m²/20,236 feet²

Hangar                                                                      990 m²/10,656.27 feet²

Garages, Hangar and Well Dock               1,350 lane metre (2.9 m wide)

General Store Rooms                                       1,079 m²/11,614.26 feet²

Future Growth Margin                                    672 tonnes

The flight deck has been configured with six spots on the port side for medium sized aircraft such as the NRH 90 or Blackhawk, which allows for simultaneous take-off and landing operations; alternatively it can support simultaneous take-off and landing operations of four CH-47 Chinooks
The flight deck has been configured with six spots on the port side for medium sized aircraft such as the NRH 90 or Blackhawk, which allows for simultaneous take-off and landing operations; alternatively it can support simultaneous take-off and landing operations of four CH-47 Chinooks

Mighty engine

The 65,000-tonne future flagship of the Royal Navy has undergone months of preparation work by the Aircraft Carrier Alliance (ACA) to start the first of her four diesel engines, which are directly coupled to the generators. Together, each power unit weighs approximately 200 tonnes – the weight of two medium size passenger jets.

The first, HMS Queen Elizabeth, was named on 4 July 2014, with her ship commissioning planned for 2017, and an initial operating capability expected in 2020
The first, HMS Queen Elizabeth, was named on 4 July 2014, with her ship commissioning planned for 2017, and an initial operating capability expected in 2020

Minister of State for Defence Procurement, Philip Dunne, officially started the first of the ship’s four diesel generators at the home of the UK’s aircraft carrier programme in Rosyth, Scotland on June 25, bringing the ship to life for the first time.

He also announced that BAE Systems has been awarded a £5.5 million contract to install a new Vessel Traffic Management System (VTMS) to assist in the controlling and monitoring of all ship movements within Portsmouth Harbour and the Eastern Solent to prepare for the arrival of the carrier, around the end of 2016, beginning of 2017.

Mr. Dunne said: «It is a real pleasure to be back in Scotland, home of the UK’s shipbuilding industry, to witness the impressive progress that is being made on our new aircraft carriers. Powering up the diesel generator today marks an important milestone on the journey to bring these highly versatile ships into service with our Armed Forces. They will be the largest, most capable and effective surface warships ever constructed in the United Kingdom. The build programme is supporting thousands of jobs across the country, with over 4,000 of those jobs at Rosyth and the Clyde».

The diesel generator sets will provide sufficient electrical power to drive the ship at cruise speeds (25 knots/29 mph/46.3 km/h), but when higher speed is required, two Gas Turbine Alternators will also be used. Together they will produce 109 MW of power, enough to power a medium-sized town.

Rear Admiral Henry Parker, DE&S Director of Ship Acquisition, said: «Every milestone achieved on HMS Queen Elizabeth brings us a step closer to her becoming an operational warship. A great deal of hard work has taken place to bring us to this stage and, with good progress also being made on HMS Prince Of Wales, we are moving ever closer towards these magnificent ships joining the Fleet and becoming the centerpiece of Britain’s future military capability».

The separation and distribution of power generation machinery on the QE Class increases the survivability of the ships, while the electric propulsion system enables the prime movers to operate more efficiently, reducing less fuel consumption and running costs
The separation and distribution of power generation machinery on the QE Class increases the survivability of the ships, while the electric propulsion system enables the prime movers to operate more efficiently, reducing less fuel consumption and running costs

To the end of May 2015, the Ministry of Defence had paid around £3.12 billion to BAE Systems on the Clyde (c. £1.925 billion) and to Babcock at Rosyth (c £1.194 billion) on the Queen Elizabeth Carrier (QEC) programme. Our estimates for the level of remaining work in Scottish yards are currently being updated. QEC work is estimated to support directly some 4,000 jobs and hundreds of apprentices at the Rosyth and Clyde-based shipyards.

The VTMS contract is the latest development in the partnering agreement between BAE Systems, the Royal Navy and Ministry of Defence (MoD) to modernise HM Naval Base Portsmouth and prepare for the arrival of HMS Queen Elizabeth (R08).

The new system installation, which is to be completed early 2016, is designed to provide the Queen’s Harbour Master and the Vessel Traffic Service team with the situational awareness they require to control the vessels in their operational area.

Following sea trials (from 2017) and First of Class Flying Trials for helicopters and the F-35B Lightning II (starting in 2018), HMS Queen Elizabeth (R08) will undertake a coherent build up towards achieving an Initial Carrier Strike Capability in 2020.

Second of class HMS Prince Of Wales (R09) is now almost half-complete at 30,000 tonnes, the forward island was installed in May 2015 forming the iconic carrier shape of the vessel. Initial Operating Capability (IOC) of HMS Prince Of Wales (R09) is expected in 2023.

The aircraft carriers HMS Queen Elizabeth (R08) and HMS Prince Of Wales (R09) are being delivered by the Aircraft Carrier Alliance, a unique partnering relationship between BAE Systems, Thales UK, Babcock and the Ministry of Defence.

Main Diesel Generator Installation
Main Diesel Generator Installation

 

Weapons and sensors

Mission systems complex

Artisan 3D medium range radar

S1850m long-range radar

Navigation radar

Highly mechanized weapon handling system

Phalanx automated close-in weapons systems

30-mm guns & mini guns to counter seaborne threats

 

Mission capability

Capacity to accommodate up to 40 aircraft

280-m flight deck, capable of landing Chinook and Merlin helicopters

Aviation store

Hangar, capable of accommodating and maintaining fixed and rotary wing aircraft

Aircraft lifts (forward and aft)

Diesel generator on board HMS Queen Elizabeth
Diesel generator on board HMS Queen Elizabeth

 

Propulsion

2 × Rolls Royce MT30 gas turbines (36 MW/48,000 hp)

4 × Wartsila diesel generator sets (2× 9 MW/12,000 hp & 2 × 11 MW/15,000 hp)

2 × 33 tonne propellers

4 × advanced induction motors

 

Accommodation

Accommodation for 1,600 personnel

Dedicated accommodation and facilities for embarked forces

Hospital area incorporating eight bed medical suite, operating theatre and dental surgery

Recreational facilities including fitness suites and cinema

HMS Queen Elizabeth (R08)
HMS Queen Elizabeth (R08)

 

Main dimensions

Displacement                                65,000 tonnes

Length                                               280 m/918.63 feet

Maximum beam                           70 m/229.66 feet

Crew size                                         679

Embarked forces up to            921

 

Performance

Top speed                                        25 knots/29 mph/46 km/h

Range                                                 10,000 NM/11,508 miles/18,520 km

 

Minister of State for Defence Procurement, Philip Dunne, officially started the first of the ship’s four diesel generators at the home of the UK’s aircraft carrier programme in Rosyth, Scotland today bringing the ship to life for the first time

 

John Warner Delivered

Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Newport News Shipbuilding division delivered the nuclear-powered fast attack submarine USS John Warner (SSN-785) to the U.S. Navy on Jun 25, 2015. The Virginia-class submarine, the first to be named for a person, was delivered two and a half months ahead of schedule.

The submarine USS John Warner (SSN-785) delivered on June 25, 2015, two and a half months ahead of schedule (Photo by Chris Oxley/HII)
The submarine USS John Warner (SSN-785) delivered on June 25, 2015, two and a half months ahead of schedule (Photo by Chris Oxley/HII)

«This submarine embodies the spirit of Senator Warner and symbolizes his unwavering support for the Navy and the shipyard», said Jim Hughes, Newport News’ vice president of submarines and fleet support. «It’s truly special to have a boat named after a living person, and we as shipbuilders are proud to deliver John Warner to the Navy because this submarine will continue Senator Warner’s enduring legacy».

John Warner is the 12th Virginia-class submarine and the sixth to be delivered by Newport News. Nearly 4,000 shipbuilders have worked on the submarine since construction began in 2010. The nuclear-powered fast attack submarine was named for John Warner, who served as Secretary of the Navy and represented Virginia in the Senate for 30 years. USS John Warner (SSN-785) was christened by Senator Warner’s wife, Jeanne Warner, on September 6, 2014. Commissioning is scheduled on August 1.

«Today, we are excited to join the operational fleet and to bring Senator Warner’s legacy back to the Navy, carrying on his tradition of service to our nation», said Commander Dan Caldwell, the submarine’s commanding officer. «The crew and the ship have performed exceptionally well during the acceptance trials, and we are prepared and excited to conduct the operational missions which await us».

Newport News is teamed with General Dynamics Electric Boat to build Virginia-class submarines, which use advanced technologies to increase firepower, maneuverability and stealth. The 377-foot-long/114.8-meter-long submarines are capable of submerged speeds of more than 25 knots/28 mph/46.3 km/h and can stay submerged for up to three months at a time.

She will be the first in the class to be named after a person
She will be the first in the class to be named after a person

 

General Characteristics

Builder Huntington Ingalls Industries Inc. – Newport News Shipbuilding
Date Deployed Jun 25, 2015
Propulsion One S9G* nuclear reactor, one shaft
Length 377 feet/114.8 m
Beam 33 feet/10.0584 m
Hull Diameter 34 feet/10.5156 m
Displacement Approximately 7,800 tons/7,925 metric tons submerged
Speed 25+ knots/28+ mph/46.3+ km/h
Diving Depth 800+ feet/244+ m
Crew 132: 15 officers; 117 enlisted
Armament: Tomahawk missiles two 87-inch/2.2-meter Virginia Payload Tubes (VPTs), each capable of launching 6 Tomahawk cruise missiles
Armament: MK-48 ADCAP (Advanced Capability) Mod 7 heavyweight torpedoes 4 torpedo tubes
Weapons MK-60 CAPTOR (Encapsulated Torpedo) mines, advanced mobile mines and UUVs (Unmanned Underwater Vehicles)

* – Knolls Atomic Power Laboratories

The Virginia-class submarine USS John Warner (SSN-785) completed alpha sea trials on Saturday. All systems, components and compartments were tested. The submarine also submerged for the first time and operated at high speeds on the surface and underwater (Photo by Chris Oxley/HII)
The Virginia-class submarine USS John Warner (SSN-785) completed alpha sea trials on Saturday. All systems, components and compartments were tested. The submarine also submerged for the first time and operated at high speeds on the surface and underwater (Photo by Chris Oxley/HII)

 

Nuclear Submarine Lineup

Ship Yard Christening Commissioned Homeport
SSN-774 Virginia EB 8-16-03 10-23-04 Portsmouth, New Hampshire
SSN-775 Texas NNS 7-31-05 9-9-06 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
SSN-776 Hawaii EB 6-19-06 5-5-07 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
SSN-777 North Carolina NNS 4-21-07 5-3-08 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
SSN-778 New Hampshire EB 6-21-08 10-25-08 Groton, Connecticut
SSN-779 New Mexico NNS 12-13-08 11-21-09 Groton, Connecticut
SSN-780 Missouri EB 12-5-09 7-31-10 Groton, Connecticut
SSN-781 California NNS 11-6-10 10-29-11 Groton, Connecticut
SSN-782 Mississippi EB 12-3-11 6-2-12 Groton, Connecticut
SSN-783 Minnesota NNS 10-27-12 9-7-13 Norfolk, Virginia
SSN-784 North Dakota EB 11-2-13 10-25-14 Groton, Connecticut
SSN-785 John Warner NNS 09-06-14

EB – Electric Boat, Groton, Connecticut

NNS – Newport News Shipbuilding, Newport News, Virginia

The Second FREMM

On June 12th in Brest, DCNS delivered the FREMM multi-mission frigate D652 Provence to the French Navy, as stipulated in the contract. This frigate is the second of the series ordered by OCCAR (l’Organisation Conjointe de Coopération en matière d’Armement – Organisation for Joint Armament) on behalf of the DGA (Direction Générale de l’Armement – French armament procurement agency).

The D652 Provence, the French navy’s second FREMM-class multipurpose frigate, leaves Lorient after being officially handed over. DCNS now has four similar frigates in various stages of completion, and additional orders are planned (DCNS photos)
The D652 Provence, the French navy’s second FREMM-class multipurpose frigate, leaves Lorient after being officially handed over. DCNS now has four similar frigates in various stages of completion, and additional orders are planned (DCNS photos)

Delivery of the FREMM multi-mission frigate Provence is the result of a design and construction process managed by DCNS in close cooperation with the French Navy, DGA and OCCAR teams. All DCNS sites, its partners and subcontractors took part to this technological and industrial success to ensure compliance with the industrial milestones, in particular the launching in September 2013 and the first sea outing in September 2014.

The delivery of the second series to the French Navy took place just a few weeks after the first successful firing in Europe of a naval cruise missile from the first-of-class, the FREMM D650 Aquitaine. The sale of a frigate to the Royal Moroccan Navy and the Egyptian Navy, as well as the announcement of the launch of the intermediate-size frigates programme, boost DCNS ambitions for international development thanks to a broader offer of first of rank surface ships.

«The delivery of the FREMM Provence represents an opportunity to applaud the industrial and technological prowess of DCNS and its subcontractors. It underlines our ability to produce first of rank combat ships that meet our client navies needs, such as those of Morocco and Egypt», stated Anne Bianchi, Director of FREMM programmes. «Today, we are proud to deliver this second ship to the French Navy».

DCNS designs, builds and maintains submarines and surface vessels
DCNS designs, builds and maintains submarines and surface vessels

 

SETIS, one of the most effective sea-proven combat systems on the market

The delivery of the FREMM Provence marks the culmination in the ramping up of SETIS (Ship Enhanced Tactical Information System), the latest-generation combat system developed by DCNS. The ship is now equipped with a cutting-edge solution that is perfectly integrated on board. Indeed, the successful firing of the naval cruise missile on May 19th 2015 from the FREMM Aquitaine is a demonstration of the anti-land warfare capabilities directed at targets located deep in enemy territory. Added to the anti-submarine, anti-surface and anti-air warfare capabilities, the FREMM has now reached its full technological capabilities.

«DCNS has successfully accomplished this essential step for the FREMM SETIS combat system. We are proud to have contributed to the successful firing of a cruise missile from a surface ship, a first in Europe. This result is a demonstration of DCNS expertise in the area of the design and integration of combat systems», stressed Anne Bianchi.

The FREMM D652 Provence delivered on 12 June 2015
The FREMM D652 Provence delivered on 12 June 2015

 

Four FREMM at different stages of construction at DCNS Lorient Shipyard

For DCNS, the FREMM programme currently involves the construction of ten frigates, eight of them for the French Navy. Six of these are to be delivered by 2019 and the remaining two frigates, equipped with extended anti-aircraft capabilities, will be delivered before 2022. Two other were sold for export clients: the Royal Moroccan Navy and the Egyptian Navy.

The delivery of the FREMM Provence takes place at a time when the FREMM programme is powering ahead on the DCNS site in Lorient. To date, three FREMM frigates are under construction and one is being prepared before being delivered:

The FREMM D650 Aquitaine, first in series, delivered in 2012.

The FREMM 701 Mohammed VI, for the Royal Moroccan Navy, delivered in 2014.

The FREMM D652 Provence, delivered on 12 June 2015.

The FREMM intended for the Egyptian Navy, formerly the FREMM D651 Normandie, will be delivered in summer 2015.

The FREMM D653 Languedoc will make its first sea outing in autumn 2015.

The FREMM D654 Auvergne is currently in the final stages of construction and will be launched in September 2015.

The FREMM D656 Bretagne is currently being assembled.

D651 «Normandie» FREMM multi-mission frigate (right side view)
D651 «Normandie» FREMM multi-mission frigate (right side view)

 

Technical characteristics of the FREMMs

The FREMM multi-mission frigate is one of the most technologically advanced and competitive ships on the market. Its versatility and manoeuvrability meet the operational requirements of numerous navies around the world. Equipped with high-tech sensors and weapons, integrated with the SETIS latest-generation combat system developed by DCNS, the frigate can counter all types of threats, whether air, surface, submarine or land-based.

The heavily armed FREMM frigate is equipped with the most effective weapons systems and equipment, such as the Herakles multifunction radar, the Aster and Exocet MM 40 missiles, or the MU 90 torpedoes. It is innovative and offers unequalled levels of interoperability and availability. This combat ship is capable of meeting the expectations of numerous navies.

Total length: 466 feet/142 m

Width: 65.6 feet/20 m

Displacement: 6,000 tonnes

Maximum speed: 27 knots/31 mph/50 km/h

Operation: 108 persons (including helicopter detachment)

Accommodation capacity: 145 men and women

Range: 6,000 nautical miles/6,905 miles/11,112 km at 15 knots/17 mph/28 km/h

Provence 's broader weapons and equipment fit includes: the Thales HERAKLES multifunction radar and ARTEMIS panoramic surveillance system; the Terma Scanter 2001 navigation and surveillance radars; Thales' UMS 4110 CL and CAPTAS 4 hull-mounted and towed sonar systems; the DCNS SETIS combat management system; Sagem's Vigy MM fire-control system; Thales' SIC 21 command-and-control information system; 16 Aster 15 surface-to-air missiles, 16 Missile de Croisiere Naval (MdCN) long-range cruise missiles, and eight Exocet MM 40 Block 3 anti-ship missiles, all from MBDA; Oto Melara's 76/62 Super Rapid gun; 19 Eurotorp MU90 lightweight torpedoes; Sagem's NGDS decoy launchers; and Thales Surfsat-L SATCOM terminals
Provence ‘s broader weapons and equipment fit includes: the Thales HERAKLES multifunction radar and ARTEMIS panoramic surveillance system; the Terma Scanter 2001 navigation and surveillance radars; Thales’ UMS 4110 CL and CAPTAS 4 hull-mounted and towed sonar systems; the DCNS SETIS combat management system; Sagem’s Vigy MM fire-control system; Thales’ SIC 21 command-and-control information system; 16 Aster 15 surface-to-air missiles, 16 Missile de Croisiere Naval (MdCN) long-range cruise missiles, and eight Exocet MM 40 Block 3 anti-ship missiles, all from MBDA; Oto Melara’s 76/62 Super Rapid gun; 19 Eurotorp MU90 lightweight torpedoes; Sagem’s NGDS decoy launchers; and Thales Surfsat-L SATCOM terminals

Christening of Gabby

The U.S. Navy christened its tenth Littoral Combat Ship (LCS), the future USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS-10), during a midday ceremony June 13 at Austal USA shipyard in Mobile, Alabama. LCS 10 is named after former United States Representative Gabrielle Giffords.

The future USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS-10), a Littoral Combat Ship built at the Austal USA shipyards in Mobile, Alabama, is christened during a ceremony Saturday, June 13, 2015, on the Mobile River
The future USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS-10), a Littoral Combat Ship built at the Austal USA shipyards in Mobile, Alabama, is christened during a ceremony Saturday, June 13, 2015, on the Mobile River

«The christening of the future USS Gabrielle Giffords marks the beginning of what is certain to be a long life for this great ship», said Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus. «It is also a celebration of the skill and dedication of the men and women who have built LCS 10 and the courage of her namesake. This ship truly embodies the Navy motto of Semper Fortis – Always Courageous».

During the event, Second Lady of the United States Doctor Jill Biden, the ship’s sponsor, smashed a champagne bottle on the bow as other dignitaries, including Austal USA President Craig Perciavalle and former U.S. Representative Gabrielle Giffords of Arizona and her husband Captain Mark Kelly, USN (Retired), were watching from the platform.

Though Gabby’s comments were brief, Giffords’ excitement shown through every word during Saturday’s christening ceremony. «Thank you to all the people who built this ship. She’s stealthy. She will defend freedom around the world. Go Navy», Giffords said.

The LCS class consists of the Freedom variant and Independence variant, each designed and built by different industry teams. The Freedom variant team is led by Lockheed Martin (for odd-numbered hulls, e.g., LCS-1). The Independence variant team is led by General Dynamics (LCS-2 and LCS-4) and Austal USA (for the subsequent even-numbered hulls). Purchased under the innovative block-buy acquisition strategy, there are 12 ships currently under construction.

While capable of open-ocean tasking, LCS is intended to operate in the littorals – shallow, coastal waters. As such, the ships can operate in water as shallow as 20 feet/6 meter deep and can travel at speeds in excess of 40 knots/46 mph/74 km/h. USS Freedom (LCS-1) and USS Fort Worth (LCS-3) recently demonstrated these critical capabilities as part of their operational deployments to U.S. 7th Fleet in the Asia-Pacific region.

The ship is Austal's fifth in a $3.5 billion, 10-ship Independence-class LCS contract with the Navy
The ship is Austal’s fifth in a $3.5 billion, 10-ship Independence-class LCS contract with the Navy

 

The Independence Variant of the LCS Class

Principal dimensions

Construction:                         Hull and superstructure – aluminium alloy

Length overall:                       417 feet/127.1 m

Beam overall:                          103 feet/31.4 m

Hull draft (maximum):        14.8 feet/4.5 m

 

Payload and capacities

Complement:                          Core Crew – 40

Mission crew – 36

Berthing:                                   76 in a mix of single, double & quad berthing compartments

Maximum mission load:   210 tonnes

Mission packages:               ASW, SUW, MIW

 

Propulsion

Main engines:                        2 × GE LM2500

2 × MTU 20V 8000

Waterjets:                                4 × Wartsila steerable

Bow thruster:                         Retractable azimuthing

It is 16th U.S. naval ship to be named for a woman and only the 13th since 1850 to be named for a living person
It is 16th U.S. naval ship to be named for a woman and only the 13th since 1850 to be named for a living person

Performance

Speed:                                         40 knots/46 mph/74 km/h

Range:                                         3,500 NM/4,028 miles/6,482 km

Operational limitation:      Survival in Sea State 8

 

Mission/Logistics deck

Deck area:                                  >21,527.8 feet2/2,000 m2

Launch and recovery:          Twin boom extending crane

Loading:                                       Side ramp

Internal elevator to hanger

 

Flight deck and hanger

Flight deck dimensions:      2 × SH-60 or 1 × CH-53

Hanger:                               Aircraft stowage & maintenance for 2 × SH-60

 

Weapons and sensors

Standard:

1 × 57-mm gun

4 × 12.7-mm/.50 caliber guns

1 × Surface-to-Air Missile (SAM) launcher

3 × weapons modules

The ship is a 417-foot trimaran designed to destroy mines, hunt submarines, interdict drugs and rush humanitarian relief to distant shores
The ship is a 417-foot trimaran designed to destroy mines, hunt submarines, interdict drugs and rush humanitarian relief to distant shores

Mobile Landing Platform

On June 12, 2015 General Dynamics NASSCO, a wholly owned subsidiary of General Dynamics (GD), delivered the U.S. Navy’s newest ship, the USNS Lewis B. Puller (MLP-3/AFSB-1). The ship is named in honor of the late U.S. Marine Corps Lieutenant General Lewis «Chesty» Puller, the most decorated Marine and the only one to be awarded five Navy Crosses. Construction on the USNS Lewis B. Puller began in 2013.

The USNS Lewis B. Puller (MLP-3/AFSB-1) sails past Point Loma during its Builders Trials on April 9th, 2015
The USNS Lewis B. Puller (MLP-3/AFSB-1) sails past Point Loma during its Builders Trials on April 9th, 2015

«Today’s delivery of the USNS Lewis B. Puller (MLP-3/AFSB-1) to the U.S. Navy symbolizes an immense culmination of efforts made by the hard-working men and women of the General Dynamics NASSCO shipbuilding team», said Kevin Mooney, vice president of operations at the General Dynamics NASSCO shipyard. «At NASSCO we are building and delivering affordable ships that are providing new and revolutionary capabilities for America’s Navy and Marine Corps».

The Afloat Forward Staging Base (ASFB) modifications add a 52,000 square-foot/4,831 square-meter flight deck, fuel and equipment storage, repair spaces, magazines, mission planning spaces and accommodations for up to 250 personnel. The ship is capable of supporting multiple missions including Air Mine Counter Measures (AMCM), counter-piracy operations, maritime security operations, humanitarian aid and disaster relief missions and Marine Corps crisis response. The ship is designed to support MH-53 and MH-60 helicopters, and will be upgraded to support MV-22 tilt rotor aircraft.

Earlier this year, NASSCO shipbuilders christened the ship with a ceremony at the company’s shipyard in San Diego. The commandant of the Marine Corps, General Joseph F. Dunford, Jr., was the ceremony’s principal speaker. Ms. Martha Puller Downs, daughter of General Puller, served as the ship’s sponsor.

The U.S. Navy has awarded NASSCO a contract for the detail design and construction of a fourth Mobile Landing Platform (MLP), to be configured as another Afloat Forward Staging Base. Construction of the fourth MLP-4/AFSB-2 is scheduled to begin in the fourth quarter of 2015.

The USNS Lewis B. Puller (MLP-3/AFSB-1) undergoes Builders Trials April 9th, 2015
The USNS Lewis B. Puller (MLP-3/AFSB-1) undergoes Builders Trials April 9th, 2015

 

General Characteristics

Builder:                                              NASSCO

Propulsion:                                      Commercial Diesel Electric Propulsion

Length:                                              785 feet/239.3 m

Beam:                                                 164 feet/50 m

Displacement:                               78,000 tons (fully loaded)

Draft:                        29.5 feet/9 m (fully loaded); 39 feet/12 m (load line)

Speed:                                                15 knots/17 mph/28 km/h

Range:                      9,500 nautical miles/10,932 miles/17,594 km

Crew:                                                 34 Military Sealift Command personnel

Accommodations:                      250 personnel

 

Ships:

USNS Montford Point (MLP-1)

USNS John Glenn (MLP-2)

USNS Lewis B. Puller (MLP-3/AFSB-1)

USNS (MLP-4/AFSB-2) – Under construction

General Dynamics NASSCO Delivers USNS Lewis B. Puller (MLP-3/AFSB-1)
General Dynamics NASSCO Delivers USNS Lewis B. Puller (MLP-3/AFSB-1)