Category Archives: Navy

Anechoic chamber

An MQ-4C Triton is lifted inside Patuxent River’s anechoic chamber on August 12, 2015 for ElectroMagnetic Compatibility (EMC) testing. This event marked the first time that an unmanned aircraft inside the chamber was controlled from an external ground control station. Triton’s EMC testing will continue for the next eight weeks to verify the aircraft’s subsystems can operate without interfering with each other.

The program portfolio includes the MQ-4C Triton UAS and the Broad Area Maritime Surveillance – Demonstrator (BAMS-D), advanced sensors and technology, and international programs
The program portfolio includes the MQ-4C Triton UAS and the Broad Area Maritime Surveillance – Demonstrator (BAMS-D), advanced sensors and technology, and international programs

 

MQ-4C Triton

Northrop Grumman’s MQ-4C Triton Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) provides real-time Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance over vast ocean and coastal regions. Supporting missions up to 24 hours, the high-altitude UAS is equipped with a sensor suite that provides a 360-degree view of its surroundings at a radius of over 2,000 nautical miles/3,704 km.

Triton builds on elements of the Global Hawk UAS while incorporating reinforcements to the airframe and wing, along with de-icing and lightning protection systems. These capabilities allow the aircraft to descend through cloud layers to gain a closer view of ships and other targets at sea when needed. The current sensor suite allows ships to be tracked over time by gathering information on their speed, location and classification.

Built to support the U.S. Navy’s Broad Area Maritime Surveillance program, Triton will support a wide range of intelligence gathering and reconnaissance missions, maritime patrol and search and rescue. The Navy’s program of record calls for 68 aircraft to be built.

The Persistent Maritime Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Program Office (PMA-262), located at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, is responsible for the development, production, fielding and sustainment of the Navy's high-altitude, long-endurance UAS
The Persistent Maritime Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Program Office (PMA-262), located at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, is responsible for the development, production, fielding and sustainment of the Navy’s high-altitude, long-endurance UAS

 

Key Features

  • Provides persistent maritime ISR at a mission radius of 2,000 NM/3,704 km; 24 hours/7 days per week with 80% Effective Time On Station (ETOS)
  • Land-based air vehicle and sensor command and control
  • Afloat Level II payload sensor data via line-of-sight
  • Dual redundant flight controls and surfaces
  • 51,000-hour airframe life
  • Due Regard Radar for safe separation
  • Anti/de-ice, bird strike, and lightning protection
  • Communications bandwidth management
  • Commercial off-the-shelf open architecture mission control system
  • Net-ready interoperability solution

 

Payload (360-degree Field of Regard)

Multi-Function Active Sensor Active Electronically Steered Array (MFAS AESA) radar:

  • 2D AESA;
  • Maritime and air-to-ground modes;
  • Long-range detection and classification of targets.

MTS-B multi-spectral targeting system:

  • Electro-optical/infrared;
  • Auto-target tracking;
  • High resolution at multiple field-of-views;
  • Full motion video.

AN/ZLQ-1 Electronic Support Measures:

  • All digital;
  • Specific Emitter Identification.

Automatic Identification System:

  • Provides information received from VHF broadcasts on maritime vessel movements.
PMA-262 is overseen by the Program Executive Office for Unmanned Aviation and Strike Weapons (PEO(U&W))
PMA-262 is overseen by the Program Executive Office for Unmanned Aviation and Strike Weapons (PEO(U&W))

 

Specifications

Wingspan 130.9 feet/39.9 m
Length 47.6 feet/14.5 m
Height 15.4 feet/4.6 m
Gross Take-Off Weight (GTOW) 32,250 lbs/14,628 kg
Maximum Internal Payload 3,200 lbs/1,452 kg
Maximum External Payload 2,400 lbs/1,089 kg
Self-Deploy 8,200 NM/9,436 miles/15,186 km
Maximum Altitude 56,500 feet/17,220 m
Maximum Velocity, TAS (True Air Speed) 331 knots/381 mph/613 km/h
Maximum Endurance 24 hours

 

MQ-4C Triton Unmanned Aircraft System flies from Palmdale, California, to Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Maryland

 

Upgrade Mk-45

The U.S. Navy has awarded BAE Systems a contract to overhaul and upgrade Mk-45 systems on U.S. Navy Destroyer Class (DDG) ships. The initial contract of approximately $80 million includes the upgrade of six guns to the Mod 4 configuration, with an option for four additional guns expected to be exercised in 2016, bringing the full value of the contract to $130 million.

Mk-45 Mod 4 Naval Gun System
Mk-45 Mod 4 Naval Gun System

The Mod 4 capability upgrades include a 62-caliber barrel, strengthened gun and mount subsystems, enhanced advanced control systems, a reduced signature, and low maintenance gun shield. The operational and performance improvements are designed to support potential increased ranges for Naval Surface Fire Support achieved through future extended range guided munitions.

«Our combat-proven Mk-45 Naval Gun System provides ships with an effective weapon for anti-surface, strike, fire support, and anti-air warfare combat», said Joseph Senftle, vice president and general manager of Weapon Systems at BAE Systems. «This award strengthens our position in large caliber guns and promotes the United States’ naval gun industrial base».

Work on this contract will be performed in Louisville, Kentucky, with support from Minneapolis, Minnesota. Delivery of the first upgraded gun will take place in October 2017 with the last delivery scheduled for January 2020.

BAE Systems has more than 40 years of experience with Mk-45 Mods 0-4, including more than 260 deliveries to the U.S. Navy and 10 fleets worldwide. The company’s Louisville facility houses its Naval Guns Center of Excellence for Naval Gun System manufacturing, providing component and spares fabrication, as well as final system assembly and test of new and modernized Mk-45 Naval Gun Systems.

The most compact 5-inch/127-mm fully automatic naval gun in the world
The most compact 5-inch/127-mm fully automatic naval gun in the world

 

System Data

GENERAL SYSTEM AND AMMUNITION DATA
Barrel One-piece (Mk-36 Mod 4)
Loading-pointing-operation Fully automatic
CONVENTIONAL AMMUNITION
Ready service complement Conventional 20 rounds
Extended Range 10 rounds
Projectile weight 70 lbs/31.75 kg
110 lbs/50 kg Extended Range Munition (ERM)
Muzzle velocity of service round 2,700 feet/sec/823 m/sec
3,450 feet/sec/1051.56 m/sec
Ammunition types All separate loading 5-inch 62-caliber ammunition have point detonating (PDF), proximity (VTF and IR), mechanical time (MTF) and electronically settable (ESF) fuzes. In addition, the ammunition has extended length munitions handling capability
Signal input for fuze setter Continuous function to 1X and 5X synchros
Target capability Naval Surface Fire Support (NSFS), Airborne and surface
Misfire removal Automatic
WEIGHT DATA
Gun System (w/o fluids/lower hoist) 53,770 lbs/24,389 kg
Gun System and four-flight lower hoist (w/o fluids) 57,722 lbs/26,182 kg
Gun System and four-flight lower hoist, Extended Range Guided Munition (ERGM) Handling Mechanism Mod 0 (w/o fluids) 63,767 lbs/28,924 kg
Barrel one-piece 4,316 lbs/1,958 kg
PERSONNEL REQUIREMENTS
Gun captain One
Panel operator One
Ammunition handlers Four
Above deck None
FIRE CONTROL SYSTEM APPLICATIONS
Mk-160; Fiber-optic high-speed digital fire control interface accommodates integration of existing and future/improved Fire-Control Systems (FCSs), and provides for growth requirements to accommodate integration of future munitions types and ancillary capabilities
SHIP APPLICATION
Escort ships, frigates, destroyers, cruisers and landing helicopter assault ships
TRAIN AND ELEVATION DATA
Train Elevation
Preset limits +170 deg from stow -15 deg, +65 deg
Velocity 30 deg/sec 20 deg/sec
Acceleration 38 deg/sec2 31 deg/sec2
POWER REQUIREMENTS
Electrical
Main power from ship supply 440 volts 60 Hz 3 ph
Average (rms) standby load 21 kW
Average (rms) firing load 185 kW
Peak running load (including anti-icing circuits) 200 kW
Pneumatic
Train or elevation motor (during maintenance) 1,274 cu m/min (45 cu feet/min) free air supplied at 7.03 kg/cm2 (100 psig)
Gas ejector system 1,379 cu m/min (48.7 cu feet/min) Gun reduces free air supply at 12.3 kg/cm2 (175 psig) to 7.03 kg/cm2 (100 psig) for air motors
MAINTENANCE AND AVAILABILITY DATA
Operability tests and scheduled maintenance (average daily) 1.6 hours
Regunning time 1.0 hour
Availability (inherent) 99.6%
The most widely deployed 5-inch/127-mm naval gun in the U.S. Navy
The most widely deployed 5-inch/127-mm naval gun in the U.S. Navy

Artful sets sail

The latest technologically advanced attack submarine HMS Artful (S121) built by BAE Systems set sail from its facility in Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria, for sea trials on August 13. Commander Bower said: «I am immensely proud and honoured to be leading the crew of Artful. Her capabilities are extraordinary and represent the next step in our country’s century-long history of operating submarines».

HMS Artful (S121) will now join HMS Astute (S119) and HMS Ambush (S120)
HMS Artful (S121) will now join HMS Astute (S119) and HMS Ambush (S120)

Tony Johns, Managing Director, BAE Systems Submarines said: «Seeing Artful exit from Barrow on August 13 is the culmination of a huge amount of hard work from everyone at BAE Systems, our partners and the hundreds of businesses in our supply chain network. BAE Systems in Barrow is a world-class facility, designing and building submarines that are some of the most sophisticated engineering projects in the world. Everyone involved in the Astute programme should feel immensely proud of their achievements as the third in class Astute submarine reaches this significant milestone».

The design and build of the Astute class is a highly complex engineering feat. The 7,400-tonne attack submarines measure 318 feet/97 metres and are powered by nuclear reactors. Each submarine is armed with Spearfish torpedoes and Tomahawk land attack missiles.

Artful is the third Astute class submarine to have been built by BAE Systems. Seven of the class have been commissioned in total and the remaining four boats are currently under construction.

Commander Bower said: «The crew, alongside the workers at BAE Systems have done a sterling job in generating more than a million parts into a submarine. Artful will be home to more than 100 men, and can spend months at a time submerged. She is able to generate her own air and water; food will be her only limiting factor. Having left Barrow, a period of trials begins to put the submarine through her paces, proving all of her systems before she officially becomes part of the Royal Navy’s fleet».

The Astute submarine programme is a key part of our £163 billion plan
The Astute submarine programme is a key part of our £163 billion plan

Artful will follow her sister submarines to Her Majesty’s Naval Base Clyde in Scotland.

  1. HMS Astute (S119)
  2. HMS Ambush (S120)
  3. HMS Artful (S121)
  4. Audacious (S122)
  5. Anson (S123)
  6. Agamemnon (S124)
  7. Ajax (S125)

 

Artful, the latest Astute class submarine built by BAE Systems setting sail from Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria, for sea trials

Combat Ship 6

Austal Limited is pleased to announce it has successfully delivered Littoral Combat Ship 6 (LCS-6), the future USS Jackson, to the U.S. Navy. USS Jackson (LCS-6) is the first ship in its class built by Austal as prime contractor at its shipyard in Mobile, Alabama, under a 10 vessel, US$3.5 billion contract the U.S. Navy awarded to Austal in 2010.

The future USS Jackson (LCS-6) will soon be operating alongside her two sister ships of the Austal variant of the Littoral Combat Ship design, which has so far escaped the technical glitches that have affected the single-hulled variant
The future USS Jackson (LCS-6) will soon be operating alongside her two sister ships of the Austal variant of the Littoral Combat Ship design, which has so far escaped the technical glitches that have affected the single-hulled variant

Austal Chief Executive Officer Andrew Bellamy said the delivery is testament to the dedication and skill of our workforce. «Delivering the third ship of its class and the first as prime contractor is a significant milestone in the growth of the LCS program and for Austal Limited», Mr. Bellamy said. «Our workforce continues to demonstrate superior design, construction and execution building the Littoral Combat Ship. The program is well positioned for a smooth transition from LCS to frigate».

Six additional Independence-variant LCS are at various stages of construction at Austal’s shipyard in Mobile, Alabama. USS Montgomery (LCS-8) is preparing for sea trials later this year while USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS-10) was recently christened. USS Omaha (LCS-12) is preparing for launch in CY2015 and final assembly is well underway on USS Manchester (LCS-14). Modules for USS Tulsa (LCS-16) and USS Charleston (LCS-18) are both under construction. The first cut for USS Cincinnati (LCS 20) is slated for later this year.

SUW Configured Independence
SUW Configured Independence

 

The Independence Variant of the LCS Class

PRINCIPAL DIMENSIONS
Construction Hull and superstructure – aluminium alloy
Length overall 417 feet/127.1 m
Beam overall 103 feet/31.4 m
Hull draft (maximum) 14.8 feet/4.5 m
PAYLOAD AND CAPACITIES
Complement Core Crew – 40
Mission crew – 36
Berthing 76 in a mix of single, double & quad berthing compartments
Maximum mission load 210 tonnes
Mission Bay Volume 118,403 feet3/11,000 m3
Mission packages Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW)
Surface Warfare (SUW)
Mine Warfare (MIW)
PROPULSION
Main engines 2 × GE LM2500
2 × MTU 20V 8000
Waterjets 4 × Wartsila steerable
Bow thruster Retractable azimuthing
PERFORMANCE
Speed 40 knots/46 mph/74 km/h
Range 3,500 NM/4,028 miles/6,482 km
Operational limitation Survival in Sea State 8
MISSION/LOGISTICS DECK
Deck area >21,527.8 feet2/2,000 m2
Launch and recovery Twin boom extending crane
Loading Side ramp
Internal elevator to hanger
Launch/Recover Watercraft Sea State 4
FLIGHT DECK AND HANGER
Flight deck dimensions 2 × SH-60 or 1 × CH-53 or multiple Unmanned Aerial Vehicles/Vertical Take-off and Land Tactical Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs/VTUAVs)
Hanger Aircraft stowage & maintenance for 2 × SH-60
Launch/Recover Aircraft Sea State 5
WEAPONS AND SENSORS
Standard 1 × 57-mm gun
4 × 12.7-mm/.50 caliber guns
1 × Surface-to-Air Missile (SAM) launcher
3 × weapons modules
The Independence Variant of the LCS Class is a high speed, agile, shallow draft and networked surface ship
The Independence Variant of the LCS Class is a high speed, agile, shallow draft and networked surface ship

Modular Radio

The U.S. Navy has ordered 56 AN/USC-61(C) Digital Modular Radios (DMRs) and related equipment from General Dynamics. The newly built DMR radios will be capable of using the Mobile User Objective System (MUOS) waveform, the digital dial tone needed to make voice calls to the U.S. Department of Defense’s next generation, narrowband MUOS satellite communications system. The four-channel radios form the foundation of the Navy’s network communications aboard submarines, surface ships and on-shore locations. This order, valued at over $29 million, exercises option five on a contract awarded to General Dynamics in 2010.

Built using open architecture standards, General Dynamics’ Digital Modular Radios continue to provide improved functionality and interoperability while setting the stage to incorporate next-generation communications, including forthcoming waveforms and advanced network connectivity
Built using open architecture standards, General Dynamics’ Digital Modular Radios continue to provide improved functionality and interoperability while setting the stage to incorporate next-generation communications, including forthcoming waveforms and advanced network connectivity

«DMR is an extremely versatile radio and we continue to update its capabilities to ensure that Navy communications networks have the most advanced and secure technologies», said Mike DiBiase, vice president and general manager of C4IRS Technologies for General Dynamics Mission Systems. «MUOS is an excellent example of an advanced capability that will provide smartphone-like connectivity among military personnel working in some of the toughest, most remote environments».

Earlier this year, General Dynamics announced a software upgrade for existing DMRs that turns the radio’s four channels into eight virtual channels. This expanded communications capacity is available when sailors are using high frequency (HF) communication frequencies. As a software upgrade, the added capacity keeps the existing onboard DMR, saving the U.S. Navy the cost of replacing the physical radio or changing the configuration in space-constrained radio rooms.

The software-defined DMRs are one of the only military approved radios to communicate with Ultra-High Frequency SATCOM, Single-Channel Ground and Airborne Radio Systems (SINCGARS), Line of Sight and High Frequency radios on Navy vessels and land locations. General Dynamics has delivered more than 550 DMRs since 1998.

The compact, multi-channel DMR provides multiple waveforms and multi-level information security for voice and data communications from the core of the network to the tactical edge
The compact, multi-channel DMR provides multiple waveforms and multi-level information security for voice and data communications from the core of the network to the tactical edge

 

Benefits

  • Single radio for the entire 2 MHz – 2 GHz band
    • Lower spares cost and inventory
    • Single depot and common logistic
    • Common operations and maintenance training
    • Common manuals
    • Single point of control
    • Low life-cycle costs
  • Dramatically simplified shipboard communications system architecture
    • Embedded Type 1 Encryption
    • Embedded red/black baseband switching and routing
  • Superior co-site performance
  • Reduced manpower requirements
    • Single point of control for entire HF/VHF/UHF/SATCOM system
    • High reliability
    • Built-In Test (BIT)
  • Full logistical support in the U.S. Navy system

 

Technical Specifications Communication

  • Reprogrammable Waveform Capabilities
    • SATCOM – MIL-STD-188-181B, 182A, and 183A
    • SINCGARS SIP/ESIP
    • Havequick I/II
    • HF/UHF Link-11
    • UHF Link-4A
    • MIL-STD-188-110B HF Modem
    • MIL-STD-188-141B HF ALE
    • VHF/UHF LOS
    • AM Civil and Military Aviation (WB/NB)
    • FM Voice and Data (WB/NB)
    • FSK/BPSK/SBPSK/QPSK/CPM
    • Others as Required
  • Reprogrammable Voice and Data Security Options
    • KY-57/58
    • KGV-11
    • KGV-10
    • KG-84A/C
    • KYV-5 (ANDVT)
    • KY-99A
    • KWR-46
    • Others as Required
  • Key Fill Devices
    • DS-101
    • DS-102
  • Configuring, controlling, and operating
    • Single HMI can control up to 128 DMR channels
    • Single DMR can be controlled from up to 15 networked operator stations

 

System Characteristics

Frequency Range 2 MHz – 2 GHz, contiguous
Size 17.5×19.25×22 inch (EIA-310-D Clearance) (44.45×48.90×55.9 cm)
Input Power 100 – 140 VAC, (47 – 63 Hz)
Operating Temperature 0° to 55° C
Vibration MIL-STD-167
Shock M-S-901
EMI MIL-STD-461, and MIL-STD-1399

 

Expanding the Boundaries with the U.S. Navy’s Digital Modular Radio

Japan AEGIS

The U.S. State Department has made a determination approving a possible Foreign Military Sale to Japan for DDG 7 and 8 AEGIS Combat System (ACS), Underwater Weapon System (UWS), Cooperative Engagement Capability (CEC) and associated equipment, parts and logistical support for an estimated cost of $1.5 billion. The Defense Security Cooperation Agency delivered the required certification notifying Congress of this possible sale on August 4, 2015.

A new ship class of Japan DDGs based upon a modified Atago-class hull (Ship Class not yet named)
A new ship class of Japan DDGs based upon a modified Atago-class hull (Ship Class not yet named)

The Government of Japan has requested a possible sale of two (2) ship sets of the Mk-7 AEGIS Weapon System, AN/SQQ-89A(V) 15J UWS and CEC. Additional items include associated equipment, training and support for its Japan Fiscal Year (JFY) 2015 and JFY2016 new construction destroyers (DDGs). The ACS and associated support will be procured over a six (6) to seven (7) year period, as approved by Japan in budgets for JFY2015 and JFY2016. The estimated value of this proposed sale is $1.5 billion.

The ACS/UWS/CEC support ship construction for a new ship class of DDGs based upon a modified Atago-class hull (Ship Class not yet named) and a new propulsion system. The equipment and services to be provided include: two (2) ship sets of installation support material and special purpose test equipment, as well as the systems engineering, technical services, on-site vendor assistance, spare parts, systems training and staging services necessary to support ship construction and delivery. Post-construction Combat System Qualification Testing is expected to be procured in a future Foreign Military Sales (FMS) case.

 

Major Defense Equipment (MDE) includes:

-Two (2) AEGIS Weapon Systems (AWS) Mk-7

-One (1) J7 AWS Computer Program

-Two (2) ship sets Multi-Mission Signal Processor (MMSP)

-Two (2) ship sets AN/Mk-8 Mod 4 AEGIS Common Display System (CDS)

-Two (2) ship sets AN/SPQ-15 Digital Video Distribution System and Common Processor System (CPS)

-Two (2) ship sets AWS Computing Infrastructure Mk-1 Mod 4

-Two (2) ship sets Operational Readiness Test System (ORTS) hosted in AWS computing infrastructure

-Two (2) Mk-99 Mod 8 Fire Control Systems

-Two (2) ship sets AN/SPG-62A Radar, Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) including Mission Planner blade server processors hosted in the CPS

-Two (2) Kill Assessment System/Weapon Data Recording Cabinets (KAS/WDRC)

-Two (2) ship sets Mode 5/S capable Identification Friend or Foe (IFF) System

-Two (2) ship sets Mk-36 Mod 6 Decoy Launching System

-Two (2) ship sets AN/SQQ-89A(V) 15 Underwater Surveillance and Communication System

-Two (2) Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) Navigation systems with OE-553/U antenna

-Two (2) ship sets AN/SSN-6F(V) 4 Navigation Sensor System Interface (NAVSSI)

-Two (2) ship sets WSN-7(V) Inertial Navigation System (INS)

-Two (2) ship sets AN/URC-141(V) 3(C) Multifunctional Information Distribution System (MIDS) Radio Set

-Two (2) ship sets AN/UYQ-86(V) 6 Common Data Link Management System (CDLMS)

-Two (2) ship sets AN/SQQ-89A(V) 15J UWS

-Two (2) ship sets Gigabit Ethernet Data Multiplex System (GEDMS)

-Two (2) ship sets Maintenance Assist Modules (MAMs) cabinets for Fire Control and Combat Systems equipment

-Two (2) ship sets Multi-Function Towed Array (MFTA) and associated OK-410(V)3/SQR handling equipment

-Two (2) ship sets of Vertical Launching System (VLS)

-MK41 components for Direct Commercial Sales (DCS) launcher to support BMD missions employing the Standard Missile-3 (SM-3)

-Two (2) ship sets Launch Control Units (LCU) Mk-235 Mod 9 with Vertical Launching System (VLS) Global Positioning System (GPS) Integrator (VGI)

-VLS launcher components including twenty-four (24) Mk-448 Mod 1 Motor Control Panel

-Four (4) Programmable Power Supplies Mk-179 Mod 0

-Twenty-four (24) Launch Sequencers Mk-5 Mod 1

-Four (4) Fiber Optic Distribution Boxes (FODB)

-Twenty-four (24) Single Module Junction Boxes

-Two (2) ship sets Gun Weapon System Mk-34

-Two (2) ship sets Mk-20 Electro-Optical Sensor System (EOSS)

-Two (2) ship sets of Cooperative Engagement Capability (CEC)

-Two (2) ship sets Global Command and Control System-Maritime (GCCS-M)

-Two (2) ship sets AN/SPQ-9B Radar

-Two (2) ship sets Enhanced AEGIS Combat Systems Trainer (ACTS) with communication suite

-Two (2) ship sets technical documentation

Japan continues to modernize its fleet to support Integrated Air and Missile Defense (IAMD) roles and special mission requirements. The addition of two (2) new AEGIS DDGs will fulfill Japan’s mission goal of acquiring eight (8) ballistic missile defense capable ships and will further enhance interoperability with the U.S. Navy, build upon a longstanding cooperative effort with the United States, and provide enhanced capability with a valued partner in a geographic region of critical importance to Japan and the U.S. Government.

The proposed sale to Japan will represent an important commitment by the U.S. Government in furtherance of foreign policy and national security goals for both the United States and Japan. Japan is one of the major political and economic powers in East Asia and the Western Pacific and a key partner of the United States in ensuring peace and stability in that region. It is vital to the U.S. national interest to assist Japan in developing and maintaining a strong and ready self-defense capability. This proposed sale is consistent with U.S. foreign policy and national security objectives and the 1960 Treaty of Mutual Cooperation and Security.

The addition of two (2) new AEGIS DDGs to Japan’s fleet will afford more flexibility and capability to counter regional threats and continue to enhance stability in the region. Japan currently operates AEGIS ships and is proficient at using evolving ballistic missile defense capability and effective at employing the AN/SQQ-89 UWS for undersea surveillance and detection. Japan has demonstrated the capability and commitment necessary to incorporate CEC into its fleet and will capably assimilate this technology into its operations.

The proposed sale of these combat systems will not alter the basic military balance in the region.

The prime contractors will be Lockheed Martin, with offices based in Moorestown, New Jersey; Syracuse, New York; and Manassas, Virginia per sole source request from Japan as the primary AEGIS System Contractor for JFY 2015 and JFY 2016 DDG Class Ships. Japan has also requested Data Link Solutions, Cedar Rapids, IA be designated as the sole source prime contractor for the Multifunctional Information Distribution System (MIDS) on Ships (MOS) to reduce the cost of sparing and logistics for its AEGIS Ships. There are also a significant number of companies under contract with the U. S. Navy that will provide components and systems as well as engineering services during the execution of this effort.

Japanese industry has requested participation with U.S. industry as sub-contractors under the FMS case on a limited basis to provide selected components and software. Japanese industry sourced items are:

1) TR-343 Equivalent Replacement Sonar Transducers for SQS-53C sonar by NEC;

2) Partial AEGIS Display System application software by MHI;

3) Partial AEGIS Display System Hardware and Common Display System hardware by Fujitsu.

The Japan sourced products will be subject to product qualification, export control or other requirements for use in FMS-provided systems. The U.S. Navy retains the option to use U.S. Navy Programs of Record to source products or services as required to meet program requirements. There are no known offset agreements in connection with this potential sale.

Implementation of this proposed sale will require travel of U.S. Government or contractor representatives to Japan on a temporary basis for program technical support and management oversight.

There will be no adverse impact on U. S. defense readiness as a result of this proposed sale.

This notice of a potential sale is required by law and does not mean the sale has been concluded.

 

Type 26

BAE Systems has awarded the first equipment manufacturing contracts for the Type 26 Global Combat Ships (GCSs), worth in excess of £170 million. With the contracts awarded to seven companies in the supply chain, there are now more than 1,250 people across the UK working on the programme to deliver the Royal Navy’s next generation warships.

The first vessel is due to enter service as soon as possible after 2020
The first vessel is due to enter service as soon as possible after 2020

The contracts, awarded from the Demonstration Phase contract funding, cover key equipment such as propulsion, communications and electrical systems for the first three Type 26 ships. The commitment to long lead items keeps the programme on track and means the equipment will be delivered to Glasgow at the point it is needed in the ship’s manufacturing phase, which is expected to begin next year. The contracts include the creation of onshore testing facilities to test the equipment prior to installation on the ships. The contracts are awarded to:

  • Babcock for the ship’s air weapons handling system;
  • David Brown Gear Systems Ltd for the propulsion gearbox and the test facility;
  • General Electric (GE) Power Conversion for the electric propulsion motor and drive system and testing facility;
  • Raytheon for the integrated navigation and bridge system;
  • Rolls Royce Power Engineering for the gas turbine;
  • Rohde & Schwarz UK Ltd for the communications systems;
  • WR Davis for the uptakes and downtakes.
Type 26 Global Combat Ship, Design concept only
Type 26 Global Combat Ship, Design concept only

BAE Systems has also confirmed a subcontract to its Combat Systems team for the Meteorological and Oceanographic (METOC) system, which collates and analyses environmental information to support operations.

Geoff Searle, Type 26 Programme Director at BAE Systems, said: «Today’s announcement is exciting for everyone involved in the Type 26 programme, as it will enable our partners in the supply chain to start manufacturing key equipment for the first three ships. This reinforces the strong momentum behind the programme and is an important step towards the start of manufacturing the Type 26 ships for the Royal Navy in Glasgow next year».

These contracts are helping to support the UK’s vibrant industrial base, as Steve Watson, Managing Director, David Brown Gear Systems Ltd, explains: «The contract to supply the gearboxes for the Type 26 ships is the largest single order in our firm’s 150 history. As a result of our involvement in this programme, we have made significant investments in our infrastructure and we have transformed a semi-derelict area of our Huddersfield site into new state of the art manufacturing, assembly and test facilities. This means we can provide the latest generation of gearing technology to the Royal Navy’s Type 26 ships and it creates a strong platform to secure future orders across the defence, oil and gas, and power generation sectors».

Type 26 Global Combat Ship
Type 26 Global Combat Ship

The £859 million Demonstration Phase contract for the Type 26 programme began in April 2015. The new manufacturing contracts build on the existing 15 design development agreements across the supply chain, which means that a total of 17 companies across the UK, Europe and Canada already have contracts in place under the Type 26 programme. A joint team from BAE Systems, the Ministry of Defence, and the supply chain are working together to complete the detailed design for the ships, procure key equipment and prepare the manufacturing proposal to be submitted to the Ministry of Defence.

Under current planning assumptions, 13 Type 26 ships will be delivered to the Royal Navy. The first vessel is due to enter service in the early 2020s and the Type 26 class will remain in service into the middle of this century and beyond.

The Type 26 Global Combat Ship will be a globally deployable, multi-mission warship capable of undertaking a wide range of roles from high intensity warfare to humanitarian assistance, either operating independently or as part of a task group. The ship will take full advantage of modular design and open systems architecture, ensuring it can be easily upgraded as new technology develops and can accommodate different sub-systems and equipment suited to potential overseas customer needs.

 

Latest footage of the Type 26 Global Combat Ship

 

Tomahawk flight test

The U.S. Navy and Raytheon Company demonstrated new capabilities for the Tomahawk Block IV cruise missile in a successful flight test conducted from the guided missile cruiser USS Anzio (CG-68). The test proved that the Block IV can operate with an improved, more flexible mission planning capability.

The guided missile-cruiser USS Anzio (CG-68) is en route to Scotland to participate in Joint Warrior, a United Kingdom-led semi-annual multinational cooperative training exercise. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Ryan U. Kledzik/Released)
The guided missile-cruiser USS Anzio (CG-68) is en route to Scotland to participate in Joint Warrior, a United Kingdom-led semi-annual multinational cooperative training exercise. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Ryan U. Kledzik/Released)

«Together with our U.S. Navy partners, we continue to modernize the Tomahawk Baseline IV weapon system to outpace threats and provide warfighters with a tactical edge», said Mike Jarrett, Raytheon Air Warfare Systems vice president. «Tomahawk continues to be our nation’s weapon of choice for long-range, precision strikes against high-value targets».

The flight test validated recent updates to the mission planning system software, enabling planners to more rapidly design dynamic missions. This was also the first significant software update to the tactical Tomahawk missile in more than five years.

The mission missile scored a direct hit on its target. These capabilities will be disseminated throughout the fleet for use in overseas contingency operations.

Tomahawk Block IV cruise missile can circle for hours, shift course instantly on command and beam a picture of its target to controllers halfway around the world before striking with pinpoint accuracy
Tomahawk Block IV cruise missile can circle for hours, shift course instantly on command and beam a picture of its target to controllers halfway around the world before striking with pinpoint accuracy

 

Tomahawk cruise missile

Description

The Tomahawk Land Attack Missile (TLAM) is an all-weather, long range, subsonic cruise missile used for land attack warfare, launched from U. S. Navy surface ships and U.S. Navy and Royal Navy submarines.

Features

Tomahawk carries a nuclear or conventional payload. The conventional, land-attack, unitary variant carries a 1,000-pound-class (453.6 kg) warhead (TLAM-C) while the submunitions dispenser variant carries 166 combined-effects bomblets (TLAM-D).

The Block III version incorporates engine improvements, an insensitive extended range warhead, time-of-arrival control and navigation capability using an improved Digital Scene Matching Area Correlator (DSMAC) and Global Positioning System (GPS), which can significantly reduce mission-planning time and increase navigation and terminal accuracy.

Tomahawk Block IV (TLAM-E) is the latest improvement to the Tomahawk missile family. Block IV capability enhancements include:

  1. increased flexibility utilizing two-way satellite communications to reprogram the missile in-flight to a new aimpoint or new preplanned mission, send a new mission to the missile enroute to a new target, and missile health and status messages during the flight;
  2. increased responsiveness with faster launch timelines, mission planning capability aboard the launch platform, loiter capability in the area of emerging targets, the ability to provide battle damage indication in the target area, and the capability to provide a single-frame image of the target or other areas of interest along the missile flight path;
  3. improved affordability with a production cost of a Block IV significantly lower than the cost of a new Block III and a 15-year Block IV recertification interval compared to the eight-year interval for Block III.

Background

Tomahawk cruise missiles are designed to fly at extremely low altitudes at high subsonic speeds, and are piloted over an evasive route by several mission tailored guidance systems. The first operational use was in Operation Desert Storm, 1991, with immense success. The missile has since been used successfully in several other conflicts. In 1995 the governments of the United States and United Kingdom signed a Foreign Military Sales Agreement for the acquisition of 65 missiles, marking the first sale of Tomahawk to a foreign country.

The latest variant (Tomahawk Block IV) includes a two-way satellite data-link that enables the missile to be retargeted in flight to preprogrammed, alternate targets
The latest variant (Tomahawk Block IV) includes a two-way satellite data-link that enables the missile to be retargeted in flight to preprogrammed, alternate targets

 

General Characteristics

Primary Function Long-range subsonic cruise missile for striking high value or heavily defended land targets
Contractor Raytheon Systems Company, Tucson, Arizona
Date Deployed
Block II TLAM-A IOC* 1984
Block III TLAM-C, TLAM-D IOC* 1994
Block IV TLAM-E IOC* 2004
Unit Cost Approximately $569,000
Propulsion Williams International F107 cruise turbo-fan engine; ARC/CSD solid-fuel booster
Length 18 feet 3 inch/5.56 m; 20 feet 6 inch/6.25 m with booster
Diameter 20.4 inch/51.81 cm
Wingspan 8 feet 9 inch/2.67 m
Weight 2,900 lbs/1,315.44 kg; 3,500 lbs/1,587.6 kg with booster
Speed about 478 knots/550 mph/880 km/h
Range
Block II TLAM-A 1,350 NM/1,500 statute miles/2,500 km
Block III TLAM-C 900 NM/1,000 statute miles/1,600 km
Block III TLAM-D 700 NM/800 statute miles/1,250 km
Block IV TLAM-E 900 NM/1,000 statute miles/1,600 km
Guidance System
Block II TLAM-A INS**, TERCOM***
Block III TLAM-C, D & Block IV TLAM-E INS**, TERCOM***, DSMAC****, GPS
Warhead
Block II TLAM-N W80 nuclear warhead
Block III TLAM-D conventional submunitions dispenser with combined effect bomblets
Block III TLAM-C and Block IV TLAM-E unitary warhead

* Initial Operational Capability

** Inertial Navigation System

*** TERrain COtour Matching

**** Digital Scene-Mapping Area Correlator

The U.S. Navy has conducted more than 70 successful Tomahawk flight tests since 2006
The U.S. Navy has conducted more than 70 successful Tomahawk flight tests since 2006

Four-for-Four

The Missile Defense Agency (MDA), U.S. Pacific Command, and U.S. Navy Sailors aboard the USS John Paul Jones (DDG-53) – the third Arleigh Burke-class Guided Missile Destroyer – successfully conducted a series of four flight test events exercising the Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) element of the nation’s Ballistic Missile Defense System (BMDS). The flight test, designated Multi-Mission Warfare (MMW) Events 1 through 4, demonstrated successful intercepts of short-range ballistic missile and cruise missile targets by the USS John Paul Jones (DDG-53), configured with Aegis Baseline 9.C1 (BMD 5.0 Capability Upgrade) and using Standard Missile-6 (SM-6) Dual I and SM-2 Block IV missiles. All flight test events were conducted at the Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF), Kauai, Hawaii.

SM-6 has been selected to fulfill the U.S. Navy's Sea-Based Terminal (SBT) role and will provide defense against ballistic missiles in their terminal phase of flight, succeeding the SM-2 Block IV missile
SM-6 has been selected to fulfill the U.S. Navy’s Sea-Based Terminal (SBT) role and will provide defense against ballistic missiles in their terminal phase of flight, succeeding the SM-2 Block IV missile

MDA Director Vice Admiral James D. Syring said, «This important test campaign not only demonstrated an additional terminal defense layer of the BMDS, it also proved the robustness of the multi-use SM-6 missile on-board a U.S. Navy destroyer, further reinforcing the dynamic capability of the Aegis Baseline 9 weapon system».

 

Event 1

On July 28, at approximately 10:30 p.m. Hawaii Standard Time (July 29, 4:30 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time), a short-range ballistic missile (SRBM) target was launched from PMRF in a northwesterly trajectory. The USS John Paul Jones (DDG-53), positioned west of Hawaii, detected, tracked, and launched a SM-6 Dual I missile, resulting in a successful target intercept.

USS John Paul Jones (DDG-53) – the third Arleigh Burke-class Guided Missile Destroyer
USS John Paul Jones (DDG-53) – the third Arleigh Burke-class Guided Missile Destroyer

 

Event 2

On July 29, at approximately 8:15 p.m. Hawaii Standard Time (July 30, 2:15 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time), a short-range ballistic missile (SRBM) target was launched from PMRF in a northwesterly trajectory. The USS John Paul Jones (DDG-53) detected, tracked, and launched a SM-2 Block IV missile, resulting in a successful target intercept.

 

Event 3

On July 31, at approximately 2:30 p.m. Hawaii Standard Time, (8:30 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time) an AQM-37C cruise missile target was air-launched to replicate an air-warfare threat. The USS John Paul Jones (DDG-53) detected, tracked, and successfully engaged the target using an SM-6 Dual I missile.

 

Event 4

On August 1, at approximately 3:45 p.m. Hawaii Standard Time, (9:45 p.m. Eastern Standard Time), a BQM-74E cruise missile target was launched from PMRF. The USS John Paul Jones (DDG-53) detected, tracked, and successfully engaged the target using an SM-6 Dual I missile. The SM-6’s proximity-fuze warhead was programmed not to detonate after reaching the lethal distance from the target, thus providing the ability to recover and reuse the BQM-74E target.

The USS John Paul Jones (DDG-53) used a Standard Missile-6 to destroy a supersonic high altitude target drone in live fire tests
The USS John Paul Jones (DDG-53) used a Standard Missile-6 to destroy a supersonic high altitude target drone in live fire tests

 

Facts

  • MMW Event 1 was the first live fire event of the SM-6 Dual I missile.
  • MMW Events 1 and 2 were the 30th and 31st successful ballistic missile defense intercepts in 37 flight test attempts for the Aegis BMD program since flight-testing began in 2002.
  • The MDA will use test results to improve and enhance the Ballistic Missile Defense System (BMDS).
  • Aegis BMD is the naval component of the BMDS. The MDA and the U.S. Navy cooperatively manage the Aegis BMD program.
  • Operational elements of the BMDS are currently deployed, protecting the nation, our allies, and friends against ballistic missile attack.
  • The BMDS continues to undergo development and testing to provide a robust layered defense against ballistic missiles of all ranges in all phases of flight.
A Standard Missile-6 is loaded into a specialized container at the Raytheon Redstone Missile Integration Facility for delivery to the U.S. Navy
A Standard Missile-6 is loaded into a specialized container at the Raytheon Redstone Missile Integration Facility for delivery to the U.S. Navy

Commission Submarine

The Navy commissioned its newest fast attack submarine, the USS John Warner (SSN-785), during a 10 a.m. EDT ceremony Saturday, August 1, 2015, at Naval Station Norfolk, in Norfolk, Virginia.

She will be the first in the class to be named after a person
She will be the first in the class to be named after a person

John Warner, designated SSN-785, honors Senator John W. Warner for a lifetime of service to the Commonwealth of Virginia and to the United States of America as a trusted leader, statesman and public servant. He wore the uniform of American nation as both a Marine and sailor and served as the 61st Secretary of the Navy, 1972-1974.

Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Jonathan Greenert delivered the ceremony’s principal address. Jeanne Warner, wife of Senator Warner, is serving as the ship’s sponsor. In a time-honored Navy tradition, she gave the order to «man our ship and bring her to life»!

«The commissioning of USS John Warner marks the beginning of what is expected to be 33 years of distinguished service for this great submarine – a fitting tribute to a man who served his nation for so long as a sailor, a Marine, a United States Senator and, as one of my most esteemed predecessors as Secretary of the Navy», said the Honorable Ray Mabus, Secretary of the U.S. Navy. «This ceremony is not only a celebration of a man who dedicated so much of his life to his country and to the Department of the Navy, but also a reminder of the partnership our Navy shares with the shipbuilding industry in Senator Warner’s home state of Virginia and the continued success of the Virginia-class attack submarine program».

USS John Warner (SSN-785) is the 12th Virginia-class fast attack submarine. While other Virginia-class submarines have been named after U.S. states, SSN-785 holds the distinction of being the first to be named after a person. This next-generation attack submarine provides the U.S. Navy with the capabilities required to maintain the nation’s undersea supremacy well into the 21st century. It will have improved stealth, sophisticated surveillance capabilities and special warfare enhancements that will enable them to meet the Navy’s multi-mission requirements.

USS John Warner (SSN-785) has the capability to attack targets ashore with highly accurate Tomahawk cruise missiles and conduct covert long-term surveillance of land areas, littoral waters or other sea-based forces. Other missions include anti-submarine and anti-ship warfare; mine delivery and minefield mapping. It is also designed for Special Forces delivery and support, a subject senator John Warner worked on throughout his career in the U.S. Senate.

Virginia-class submarines are built with a reactor plant that will not require refueling during the planned life of the ship – reducing lifecycle costs while increasing underway time.

 

General Characteristics

Builder Huntington Ingalls Industries Inc. – Newport News Shipbuilding
Date Deployed Jun 25, 2015
Propulsion One GE PWR S9G(*) nuclear reactor, two turbines, one shaft; 40,000 hp/30 MW
Length 377 feet/114.8 m
Beam 33 feet/10.0584 m
Hull Diameter 34 feet/10.3632 m
Displacement Approximately 7,800 tons/7,925 metric tons submerged
Speed 25+ knots/28+ mph/46.3+ km/h
Diving Depth 800+ feet/244+ m
Crew 132: 15 officers; 117 enlisted
Armament: Tomahawk missiles two 87-inch/2.2-meter Virginia Payload Tubes (VPTs), each capable of launching 6 Tomahawk cruise missiles
Armament: MK-48 ADCAP (Advanced Capability) Mod 7 heavyweight torpedoes 4 torpedo tubes
Weapons MK-60 CAPTOR (Encapsulated Torpedo) mines, advanced mobile mines and UUVs (Unmanned Underwater Vehicles)

* – Knolls Atomic Power Laboratories

The Virginia-class submarine USS John Warner (SSN-785) completed alpha sea trials on Saturday. All systems, components and compartments were tested. The submarine also submerged for the first time and operated at high speeds on the surface and underwater (Photo by Chris Oxley/HII)
The Virginia-class submarine USS John Warner (SSN-785) completed alpha sea trials on Saturday. All systems, components and compartments were tested. The submarine also submerged for the first time and operated at high speeds on the surface and underwater (Photo by Chris Oxley/HII)

 

Nuclear Submarine Lineup

Ship Yard Christening Commissioned Homeport
SSN-774 Virginia EB 8-16-03 10-23-04 Portsmouth, New Hampshire
SSN-775 Texas NNS 7-31-05 9-9-06 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
SSN-776 Hawaii EB 6-19-06 5-5-07 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
SSN-777 North Carolina NNS 4-21-07 5-3-08 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
SSN-778 New Hampshire EB 6-21-08 10-25-08 Groton, Connecticut
SSN-779 New Mexico NNS 12-13-08 11-21-09 Groton, Connecticut
SSN-780 Missouri EB 12-5-09 7-31-10 Groton, Connecticut
SSN-781 California NNS 11-6-10 10-29-11 Groton, Connecticut
SSN-782 Mississippi EB 12-3-11 6-2-12 Groton, Connecticut
SSN-783 Minnesota NNS 10-27-12 9-7-13 Norfolk, Virginia
SSN-784 North Dakota EB 11-2-13 10-25-14 Groton, Connecticut
SSN-785 John Warner NNS 09-06-14 08-01-15 Norfolk, Virginia

EB – Electric Boat, Groton, Connecticut

NNS – Newport News Shipbuilding, Newport News, Virginia