Category Archives: Navy

Fourth Scorpene Submarine

According to information published by United News of India on November 9, 2021, the fourth Scorpene class submarine, which has been named INS Vela (S-24) was delivered to the Indian Navy.

INS Vela (S-24)
INS Vela (S-24) during sea trials

The Scorpene-class submarines are 2000 tons conventional-propulsion submarines designed and developed by Naval Group for all types of mission, such as surface vessel warfare, anti-submarine warfare, long-range strikes, special operations, or intelligence gathering.

The class has two diesel generation sets providing 1,250 kW/1,676 hp of power. At the top of the hull immediately above the diesel generator sets is a Dutch Breach machinery shipping hatch. The submarine has an elastically supported 2,900 kW/3,889 hp electronic engine.

The submarines can carry 18 torpedoes and missiles or 30 mines. It is equipped with six bow-located 21-inch/533-mm torpedo tubes providing salvo launch capability. Positive discharge launching is by an air turbine pump. She can launch anti-ship and anti-submarine torpedoes, as well as anti-surface missiles. The handling and loading of weapons are automated.

Christening of New Jersey

Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) on November 13, 2021 christened pre-commissioning unit New Jersey (SSN-796) at the company’s Newport News Shipbuilding division.

USS New Jersey (SSN-796)
Ship’s sponsor Susan DiMarco christens pre-commissioning unit New Jersey (SSN-796) during ceremony on Saturday, November 13, 2021 at Newport News Shipbuilding. Also pictured (left to right) are Commander Carlos Otero, the ship’s prospective commanding officer; Admiral Michael Mullen (U.S. Navy, Ret), former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and former chief of naval operations; and Jennifer Boykin, president of Newport News Shipbuilding division

«The christening is a Navy and shipbuilder tradition that celebrates the hard work and dedication of the women and men who are building this magnificent submarine, readying her for the next phase of construction, which includes launch, testing, sea trials and delivery to the Navy», said Jennifer Boykin, president of Newport News Shipbuilding. «We commemorate these American builders during a challenging time in our nation’s history».

«When New Jersey joins the Navy’s fleet, she will deliver firepower for freedom, taking with her the skill of her shipbuilders, the spirit of her sponsor, the courage of her commander and crew and the pride of her fellow New Jerseyans», Boykin added. «These characteristics, united, forge a strong national defense that defines America».

Susan DiMarco, who is a New Jersey resident, retired dentist and wife of former Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson, serves as the ship’s sponsor and performed the traditional honor of breaking a bottle of American sparkling wine across the submarine’s bow during the ceremony.

«As citizens today, we are more divided and disconnected from one another than at any time in our last 50 years, but the efforts that went into building New Jersey say otherwise», DiMarco said. «In order to complete this great ship, there must have been vital partnership and purpose. As a country, we are cooperative, generous and tenacious, and we can work together on exceptional ideas».

The ceremony took place outside of Newport News Shipbuilding’s Module Outfitting Facility and was attended by more than 1,800 guests, including Newport News Shipbuilding employees who are building New Jersey, members of the submarine’s crew, Navy personnel and other government officials, including Jeh Johnson.

U.S. Representative Bobby Scott, of Virginia, and U.S. Representative Donald Norcross, of New Jersey, both delivered remarks. Other speakers included New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy; Jay Stefany, acting assistant secretary of the Navy for research, development and acquisition; Vice Admiral Johnny Wolfe Jr., director of the Navy’s strategic systems programs; and Kevin Graney, president of General Dynamics Electric Boat.

Ceremony participants included U.S. Representative Elaine Luria, of Virginia; Captain Andrew P. Johnson, commanding officer of Supervisor of Shipbuilding, Conversion and Repair, Newport News; and Commander Carlos Otero, the ship’s prospective commanding officer.

Retired U.S. Navy Admiral Michael Mullen, former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and former chief of naval operations, provided the keynote address.

«Today is a day of gratitude, especially to the 4,000 men and women whose hard work put New Jersey together», said Mullen, adding that the nation must prevail in an ideological battle against an adversary it has not seen before.

«The future USS New Jersey will be a critical – some say the most critical – arrow in our quiver», he said.

The company reached the pressure hull complete milestone in February, meaning that all of the ship’s hull sections were joined to form a single, watertight unit. This was one of the last major milestones before the christening, and is floated off to a pierside berth for additional outfitting and testing at a future date.

New Jersey is the 23rd Virginia-class submarine and the 11th to be delivered by Newport News Shipbuilding. It is first submarine designed with a modification for gender integration. Construction began in March 2016 and is 82% complete. The submarine is scheduled to be delivered to the U.S. Navy in late 2022.

 

General Characteristics

Builder General Dynamics Electric Boat Division and Huntington Ingalls Industries Inc. – Newport News Shipbuilding
Date Deployed October 3, 2004
Propulsion One GE PWR S9G* nuclear reactor, two turbines, one shaft; 40,000 hp/30 MW
Length 377 feet/114.8 m
Beam 33 feet/10.0584 m
Hull Diameter 34 feet/10.3632 m
Displacement Approximately 7,800 tons/7,925 metric tons submerged
Speed 25+ knots/28+ mph/46.3+ km/h
Diving Depth 800+ feet/244+ m
Crew 132: 15 officers; 117 enlisted
Armament: Tomahawk missiles Two 87-in/2.2 m Virginia Payload Tubes (VPTs), each capable of launching 6 Tomahawk cruise missiles
Armament: MK-48 ADCAP (Advanced Capability) Mod 7 heavyweight torpedoes 4 torpedo tubes
Weapons MK-60 CAPTOR (Encapsulated Torpedo) mines, advanced mobile mines and UUVs (Unmanned Underwater Vehicles)

* – Knolls Atomic Power Laboratories

 

Nuclear Submarine Lineup

 

Block IV

Ship Yard Christening Commissioned Homeport
SSN-792 Vermont EB 10-20-18 04-18-20 Groton, Connecticut
SSN-793 Oregon EB 10-05-19
SSN-794 Montana NNS 09-12-20
SSN-795 Hyman G. Rickover EB 07-31-21
SSN-796 New Jersey NNS 11-13-21
SSN-797 Iowa EB Under Construction
SSN-798 Massachusetts NNS Under Construction
SSN-799 Idaho EB Under Construction
SSN-800 Arkansas NNS Under Construction
SSN-801 Utah EB Under Construction

 

The Great-class

Hyundai Heavy Industries (HHI) announced on Thursday that it has signed with the Defense Acquisition Program Administration (DAPA) a KRW 670 billion contract for product engineering and construction for the first vessel of the Gwanggaeto the Great-class III batch-II.

Gwanggaeto
HHI Wins Contract for New Aegis Destroyer

The vessel to be built by HHI under this contract is the first of the three new Aegis destroyers that will be added to the South Korean Navy’s fleet, to be constructed in HHI’s Ulsan-based yard scheduled for delivery by 2024.

With full displacement of 8,100 tons, the new Aegis destroyer has an overall length of 170 meters/558 feet and can sail at a maximum speed of 30 knots/34.5 mph (approximately 55 km/h).

Featuring a newly added Ballistic Missile Defence (BMD) capability, the destroyer can upgrade detecting and tracking capability that has more than doubled as well as an improved submarine-detection range that has more than tripled compared to those of the nation’s first Aegis destroyers, therefore, expected to enhance the naval forces’ operational capabilities. It will also boast a highly formidable combat system equipped with various weapons, including a five-inch gun, guided missiles and torpedoes.

HHI has a successful track record of working on the basic design of and constructing the South Korean Navy’s first Aegis destroyer named Sejong the Great, which was commissioned in 2008. Having also built the nation’s third Aegis destroyer named Seoae Yu Seong-ryong, HHI, with the recently won contract, is now set to be heralded as the builder of three out of the four Aegis destroyers in the nation. To date, it remains the only South Korean shipyard capable of both designing and building Aegis system-equipped vessels on its own.

«This new contract we won is yet another testimony to how HHI is recognized as a rich repository of superior technologies», commented Sang Hoon Nam, Executive Vice President & COO of HHI’s Naval and Special Ship Business Unit. «We aim to help the naval forces secure key weapons systems and its operations go ‘smart’ with enhanced capabilities, by successfully completing this project».

Christening of Harvey

General Dynamics National Steel and Shipbuilding Company (NASSCO) christened and launched the future USNS Harvey Milk (T-AO-206) on November 6, 2021, the second ship for the U.S. Navy’s John Lewis-class fleet oiler program. Mr. Stuart Milk, nephew of the ship’s namesake and Co-Founder and President of the Harvey Milk Foundation, served as the principal speaker at the ceremony in addition to remarks from NASSCO and U.S. Navy representatives.

USNS Harvey Milk (T-AO-206)
General Dynamics NASSCO christens and launches the future USNS Harvey Milk (T-AO-206)

U.S. Senator Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) and Paula Neira, Navy Veteran and Clinical Program Director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Transgender Health were the ship’s sponsors. Prior to launching the 742-foot-long/226-meter-long ship down the ways, Ms. Neira christened the ship with the traditional champagne bottle break alongside the hull.

«We are justifiably proud of every ship we build, but this one is special because of her namesake. Today, we are honoring Stuart’s lifetime of selfless service, his hope for equality, and a world without hate», said David Carver, president of General Dynamics NASSCO. «On behalf of the 35-hundred employees of General Dynamics NASSCO, I am proud to present the future USNS Harvey Milk for christening».

Former Secretary of the U.S. Navy Ray Mabus declared the John Lewis-class of oilers be named after leaders who fought for civil and human rights. The second of six ships honors Harvey Milk, human and civil rights activist who dedicated his life advocating for equality.

«Leaders like Harvey Milk taught us that diversity of backgrounds and experiences help contribute to the strength and resolve of our nation», said Secretary of the U.S. Navy Carlos Del Toro. «There is no doubt that the future Sailors aboard this ship will be inspired by Milk’s life and legacy».

In 2016, General Dynamics NASSCO was awarded the contract by the U.S. Navy for the detailed design and construction of the next generation of fleet oilers, the John Lewis-class (T-AO-205). The contract calls for the design and construction of six 742-foot-long/226-meter-long oilers with a full load displacement of 49,850 tons. Designed to transfer fuel to U.S. Navy carrier strike group ships operating at sea, the oilers have the capacity to carry 157,000 barrels/24,961,005 liters of oil, a significant dry cargo capacity, aviation capability and up to a speed of 20 knots/23 mph/37 km/h. The John Lewis-class ships will replace the current T-AO 187-class fleet replacement oilers.

«The christening of the USNS Harvey Milk (T-AO-206) marks another historic milestone in the history of our Navy and our country. Harvey Milk’s words and actions brought hope and inspiration to many for whom our nation’s lofty rhetoric of equality and inclusion were not yet reality», said ship sponsor Paula Neira. «Today, while we must continue to carry on his work, and much work still needs to be done, by christening and launching this ship we honor his legacy, celebrate the progress that has been made in advancing diversity and inclusion for so many, and we know that wherever the USNS Harvey Milk (T-AO-206) will sail, she will bring that message of hope and inspiration to present and future generations».

In addition to the christening of this ship, two ships in the T-AO class fleet oiler program for the U.S. Navy –the future USNS Earl Warren (T-AO-207), and the future USNS Robert F. Kennedy (T-AO-208) – are currently under construction. The lead ship, the future USNS John Lewis (T-AO-205) was launched earlier this year.

SPY-6(V)3 radar

Raytheon Missiles & Defense, a Raytheon Technologies business, in partnership with the Office of Naval Research, completed successful demonstrations of the Network Cooperative Radar (NCR) program, an advanced radar system solution that supports the U.S. Navy’s goal of creating distributed sensing networks to defend against evolving threats. NCR supports the Navy’s Distributed Maritime Operations concept by giving electromagnetic maneuver warfare capabilities to the fleet.

SPY-6
Raytheon Missiles & Defense’s SPY-6(V)3 radar at the U.S. Navy’s Wallops Island Test Facility in Virginia. Tactical radars like SPY-6 will benefit from concepts developed in the Network Cooperative Radar program

During the demonstration, two surface-based radar emulators detected targets using distributed sensing capabilities. The demonstration proved that tactical radars, like SPY-6, will benefit from advanced distributed radar concepts developed in the NCR program.

«SPY-6 will provide an unprecedented level of protection to naval forces, and software updates like this demonstrate that it’s only getting better», said Rear Adm. Seiko Okano, program executive officer for the U.S. Navy’s Integrated Warfare Systems. «Programs like NCR ensure SPY-6 will be the backbone of our distributed sensing capabilities in the future».

Cooperative radars collaborate using distributed sensing capabilities to create a fuller picture of objects in a given coverage area. NCR-enabled sensors work together to identify and track threats, communicating real-time information to improve system performance and mission success.

«NCR furthers the development of our next-generation software-defined apertures», said Colin Whelan, vice president of Advanced Technology at Raytheon Missiles & Defense. «The continued development of capabilities demonstrated by NCR will ensure SPY-6 remains the most advanced naval radar in the world».

Uncrewed Underwater Vehicle

Underwater obstacle avoidance technology from maritime defence technology companies, Sonardyne and Wavefront, has been successfully demonstrated on board an extra-large, uncrewed, underwater vehicle (XLUUV) built and operated by Plymouth-based MSubs Ltd.

XLUUV
Sonardyne and Wavefront demonstrate obstacle avoidance capability on UK’s test XLUUV

The demonstration of the Vigilant forward-looking sonar was part of the first phase of the UK’s Defence and Security Accelerator’s (DASA) ‘Uncrewed Underwater Vehicle Testbed – Opportunity to Integrate’ competition, run jointly with the Royal Navy and the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl).

The DASA competition is focused on testing and validating Commercial-Off-the-Shelf Technologies (COTS) sensors and payloads, like Vigilant, to help the Royal Navy understand the future roles for XLUUVS for surveillance, reconnaissance and anti-submarine warfare, and deliver new capabilities to the Royal Navy years earlier than otherwise be possible.

Vigilant, developed by Wavefront and manufactured and commercialised by Sonardyne, is a navigation and obstacle avoidance sonar for ships, Uncrewed Surface Vessels (USVs) and underwater vehicles. It provides crews with automated long-range detection of objects in the water column, showing them where it is safe to navigate and alerting them to potential underwater dangers that could result in a collision or grounding.

The system has two operating modes. In 3D mode, Vigilant produces accurate 3D bathymetry and colour-coded depth imagery out to 600 m/1,968.5 feet and to depths down to 100 m/328 feet. In Sonar mode, Vigilant processes the intensity of the acoustic data to extract long-range positional data out to 1.5 km/0.93 mile and over a 120-degree field of view. The sonar returns are used to generate alerts highlighting the presence of a navigationally relevant obstacle.

For the trial, the system’s sonar projector and receiver array were mounted in the bow of the 9 m-long/29.5-foot-long MSubs’ S201 XLUUV. At just 31 cm-wide/12.2 inch-wide and weighing only 14 kg/31 lbs. in air, Vigilant is easy to retrofit on a wide range of platforms including ships, USVs or, as in this case, an XLUUV.

As part of the demonstration, the XLUUV was programmed to travel beyond the breakwater outside Plymouth sound. Vigilant was used to create a bathymetric map that was used by the XLUUV to navigate. The data was also overlaid over existing charts of the area, demonstrating the higher resolution provided by Vigilant.

Ioseba Tena, Head of Defence at Sonardyne, said: «We’re delighted to be playing a role in helping the Royal Navy and programme partners to test and evaluate technologies that will help the UK stay ahead of her adversaries in the underwater battlespace. Seaborne collision avoidance is a vital consideration for autonomous and uncrewed naval platforms. Vigilant can be integrated into these ocean robots to provide essential information to autopilots and command and control systems, to aid safe navigation and manoeuvres around hazardous obstacles».

Tomahawk Block Va

Raytheon Missiles & Defense, a Raytheon Technologies business, was awarded a $20 million contract for low-rate production of the Maritime Strike Tomahawk cruise missile Block Va, which includes navigation and communication upgrades in addition to an advanced multi-mode seeker for engaging moving targets at sea.

Tomahawk Block Va
U.S. Navy awards Raytheon Missiles & Defense $20 million contract for Maritime Strike Tomahawk

«This award is a significant and essential step toward addressing the U.S. Navy’s need to counter moving targets at sea», said Kim Ernzen, vice president of Naval Power at Raytheon Missiles & Defense. «Maritime Strike Tomahawk Block Va production ensures our Sailors have the most advanced long-range, first-strike weapons available to defeat advancing threats».

Tomahawk Block V series:

  • Block V: A modernized TACTOM with upgraded navigation and communication;
  • Block Va: Block V that can strike moving targets at sea;
  • Block Vb: Block V, with a joint multi-effects warhead that can hit more diverse land targets.

The Tomahawk cruise missile is a precision weapon that launches from ships and submarines and can strike targets precisely from 1,000 miles/1,609 km away, even in heavily defended airspace. U.S. and allied militaries have flight-tested the GPS-enabled Tomahawk 550 times and used it in combat more than 2,300 times. Its most recent use came in 2018, when U.S. Navy warships and submarines launched 66 Tomahawk missiles at Syrian chemical weapon facilities.

Full digital radar

Thales Sea Fire, full digital radar is qualified by the DGA after exhaustive and thorough testing in Saint-Mandrier, the reference trial centre for the French naval forces. The radar is now handed over to Naval Group for integration into combat system on-board the FDI frigates.

Thales Sea Fire
Thales digital radar, Sea Fire, qualified and ready for integration on France’s future FDI frigates combat system

Over a period of 18 months, the Sea Fire radar underwent a substantial number of land-based tests, mobilising a vast panel of resources and combined teams from the DGA, Thales and Naval Group. All testing took place at the Shore Integration Facility (SIF) on the DGA’s SESDA site in Saint-Mandrier in the South of France – a major testing reference centre in Europe for the naval sector. Since 1969, this facility has been testing and qualifying ashore every combat system and critical sensors of major ships (frigates and aircraft carriers) in service within the French Navy.

Evaluated and tested against an extensive range of situations including surface targets (light boats, surface vessels…), air targets (helicopters, jets, missiles, drones, etc.) in various environments. – the Sea Fire assured its ground-breaking ability to search simultaneously for air and surface targets in a difficult environment, scanning a range of several hundred kilometres with 90° in elevation and an unmatched refresh rate.

Thanks to the Sea Fire’s unique full digital technology (for instance digital beamforming), the radar delivers enhanced performance for all missions through dynamic radar resource management with very short response time. This digital radar is at the forefront of technological innovation and benefits from all Thales’s Big Data and cybersecurity expertise.

In addition, through its advanced radar software, the digital nature of the Sea Fire made possible the implementation of a high fidelity digital twin. Compared to classical simulations, the digital twin of the Sea Fire truly reproduces the radars’ behaviour and performance. It supports radar development throughout the product life cycle from initial development to in-service support, operation and upgrades. The use of a digital twin played a key role in securing the development schedule of the Sea Fire despite the Covid-19 crisis.

Assembled in Limours, south of Paris, with the contribution of a network of French small and medium- sized companies, Sea Fire production started in May 2018 and the first FDI shipset was delivered in May 2021 (4 panels).

Builder’s Trials

The future USS Fort Lauderdale (LPD-28), the U.S. Navy’s 12th San Antonio class-amphibious transport dock ship, conducted Builder’s sea trials, October 26th.

USS Fort Lauderdale (LPD-28)
Future USS Fort Lauderdale (LPD-28) Completes Builder’s Trials

Builder’s trials consist of a series of in-port and at-sea demonstrations that allow the U.S. Navy and the shipbuilder, Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding Division to assess the ship’s systems and readiness prior to Acceptance trials and delivery to the U.S. Navy.

«The completion of Builder’s trials is a great first step in ensuring operational readiness of the vessel and the capabilities it will soon bring to the fleet», said Captain Scot Searles, San Antonio Class Program Office, program manager, Program Executive Office (PEO) Ships. «The collaboration between the U.S. Navy and our industry partners ensures that we’ll have a capable and ready ship for our Sailors».

The San Antonio-class is designed to support embarking, transporting, and landing Marines and their equipment by conventional or air-cushioned landing craft. The ship’s capabilities are further enhanced by its flight deck and hangar, enabling the ship to operate a variety of Marine Corps helicopters and the Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft (MV-22). Because of the ships inherent capabilities, they are able to support a variety of amphibious assault, special operations, expeditionary warfare, or disaster relief missions, operating independently or as part of Amphibious Readiness Groups (ARGs), Expeditionary Strike Groups, or Joint Task Forces.

HII’s Ingalls Shipbuilding Division is currently in production of the future USS Richard S. McCool (LPD-29) and the future USS Harrisburg (LPD-30). LPD-28 and 29 will serve as transition ships to LPD-30 – the first LPD-17 Flight II ship.

As one of the Defense Department’s largest acquisition organizations, PEO Ships is responsible for executing the development and procurement of all destroyers, amphibious ships, special mission and support ships, and boats and craft.

 

Ship Facts and Characteristics

Propulsion Four sequentially turbocharged marine Colt-Pielstick Diesels, two shafts, 41,600 shaft horsepower/31,021 kW
Length 684 feet/208.5 m
Beam 105 feet/32 m
Displacement Approximately 24,900 long tons/25,300 metric tons full load
Draft 23 feet/7 m
Speed In excess of 22 knots/24.2 mph/38.7 km/h
Crew Ship’s Company: 380 Sailors (29 officers, 351 enlisted) and 3 Marines. Embarked Landing Force: 699 (66 officers, 633 enlisted); surge capacity to 800
Armament Two Mk-46 30-mm close in Guns, fore and aft; two Rolling Airframe Missile (RAM) launchers, fore and aft: ten .50 caliber/12.7-mm machine guns
Aircraft Launch or land two CH-53E Super Stallion helicopters or two MV-22 Osprey tilt rotor aircraft or up to four AH-1 Cobra or UH-1Y Venom helicopters
Landing/Attack Craft Two Landing Craft Air Cushions (LCACs) or one Landing Craft Utility (LCU); and 14 Amphibious Assault Vehicles

 

San Antonio-class

 

Flight I

Ship Builder Launched Commissioned Homeport
USS San Antonio (LPD-17) Avondale 07-12-2003 01-14-2006 Norfolk, Virginia
USS New Orleans (LPD-18) Avondale 12-11-2004 03-10-2007 San Diego, California
USS Mesa Verde (LPD-19) Ingalls 11-19-2004 12-15-2007 Norfolk, Virginia
USS Green Bay (LPD-20) Avondale 08-11-2006 01-24-2009 San Diego, California
USS New York (LPD-21) Avondale 12-19-2007 11-07-2009 Norfolk, Virginia
USS San Diego (LPD-22) Ingalls 05-07-2010 05-19-2012 San Diego, California
USS Anchorage (LPD-23) Avondale 02-12-2011 05-04-2013 San Diego, California
USS Arlington (LPD-24) Ingalls 11-23-2010 02-08-2013 Norfolk, Virginia
USS Somerset (LPD-25) Avondale 04-14-2012 05-01-2014 San Diego, California
USS John P. Murtha (LPD-26) Ingalls 11-02-2014 10-08-2016 San Diego, California
USS Portland (LPD-27) Ingalls 02-13-2016 12-14-2017 San Diego, California
USS Fort Lauderdale (LPD-28) Ingalls 03-28-2020
USS Richard M. McCool (LPD-29) Ingalls

 

Flight II

Ship Builder Launched Commissioned Homeport
USS Harrisburg (LPD-30) Ingalls
USS Pittsburgh (LPD-31) Ingalls

 

The Mk110 gun system

BAE Systems has received a $26 million contract to equip the U.S. Navy’s Constellation class frigates with the fully-automatic 57-mm Mk110 naval gun.

USS Constellation (FFG-62)
57-mm Mk110 selected for U.S. Navy’s new Constellation-class frigates

The contract, awarded earlier this month, includes engineering support and calls for two Mk110s for the USS Constellation (FFG-62) and USS Congress (FFG-63). The new Constellation class of multi-mission guided-missile frigates is designed to operate in blue water and in the littorals, for an increased forward naval presence.

The Mk110 gun system, known internationally as the Bofors 57 Mk3, is the deck gun of choice for the Constellation class. It is a multi-mission, medium-caliber shipboard weapon, effective against air, surface, or ground threats without requiring multiple round types. The system is capable of firing up to 220 rounds per minute at an effective range of more than nine nautical miles using BAE Systems’ six-mode Programmable, Pre-fragmented, and Proximity-fused (3P) ammunition.

«The selection of the Mk110 for the U.S. Navy’s Constellation class frigates signifies confidence in the gun system and its ability to meet current and future needs in shipboard defense», said Brent Butcher, vice president of the weapon systems product line at BAE Systems «The Mk110 gun system provides this next-generation frigate with the continued performance that our surface fleet has come to expect from its intermediate caliber guns».

This contract also includes providing a Mk110 system to the U.S. Coast Guard’s third Argus Class Offshore Patrol Cutter, USCGC Ingham. Deliveries are expected to begin in 2023 under the contract with Naval Sea Systems Command Integrated Warfare Systems 3C (NAVSEA IWS).

The 57-mm Mk110 is currently in service on the Navy’s Littoral Combat Ship and the U.S. Coast Guard’s National Security Cutter. To date, BAE Systems is providing 39 Mk110 guns to the Navy and 15 to the Coast Guard. Worldwide, 103 Mk110/57 Mk3 naval gun systems are under contract with nine nations.

 

Specifications

Rate of fire 220 rounds/min
Maximum range >9 NM/10.36 miles/16.67 km
Ammunition capacity in gun 120 rounds
Time for loading rounds 3-5 minutes
Firing dispersion in remote control
Training (sigma-value) 0.4 mrad
Elevation (sigma-value) 0.4 mrad
Elevation −10° to +77°
Train Unlimited
Maximum elevating speed 44°/sec
Maximum elevating acceleration 115°/sec2
Maximum train speed 57°/sec
Maximum train acceleration 115°/sec2
Power supply 440-VAC
60-Hz 3-phase
Weight, complete without ammunition 14,960 lbs./6,800 kg
Life of air-cooled barrel >4,000 rounds