Category Archives: Navy

Magen

On May 23, 2019, the world’s most modern corvette was named INS Magen at a ceremony in Kiel. This marks another important milestone in the ongoing program of ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems as General Contractor to build four next-generation SA’AR-6 class missile corvettes for the Israeli Navy. The ship was named by Mrs. Eti Sharvit, wife of Vice Admiral Eli Sharvit, Chief of the Israeli Navy, in presence of high-level representatives from the Israeli Government and Navy as well as high-ranking German Navy officials.

Naming world’s most modern corvette for the Israeli Navy

Doctor Rolf Wirtz, CEO of ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems: «We are very proud to be contributing to Israel’s security. The corvettes are the most advanced and most sizeable vessels that ever served in the Israeli Navy. With the final fitting out being conducted by Israeli industry, the ships will also largely contribute to the country’s economy».

The ships have the stealthy design of a low-signature missile corvette with tailor-made solutions and numerous new technologies on board. The contract for the delivery of four SA’AR 6 corvettes was signed in May 2015. After the design phase, the construction phase started with the steel cutting ceremony of the first-of-class in February 2018. Only 15 months after the first steel cut, the ship was undocked, fulfilling its very ambitious

schedule. The INS Magen is planned to be delivered in spring 2020 after completion of construction and testing. The other three ships will follow subsequently in intervals of a few months.

This program proofs once more: The project partners ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems and German Naval Yards Kiel implement complex ship building programs not only with the highest quality, but also within highly ambitious schedules.

 

Key data for SA’AR 6 corvettes

Length o.a. approximately 295 feet/90 m
Beam 42.6 feet/13 m
Full load displacement approximately 1,900 t
The first SA’AR 6 corvette for the Israeli Navy was named INS Magen at a ceremony at the TKMS yard in Kiel. This is a major milestone in the company’s contract to build four next-gen missile corvettes for the Israeli Navy (TKMS photo)

12 minehunters

On May 22, 2019, the Belgium Naval & Robotics consortium, composed of Naval Group and ECA Group, was awarded the contract to supply twelve mine-hunting vessels to the Belgian and Dutch navies. Equipped with around 100 drones, constituting approximately ten drone systems (toolboxes), six ships are destined for the Belgian Navy, while the other six will be delivered to the Dutch Navy.

An artist’s impression of the future minehunters jointly ordered for the Belgian and Dutch navies from France’s Belgium Naval & Robotics consortium at a cost of €2 billion. Each navy will operate six ships with UAVs and UUVs (NG image)

The contract, worth nearly two billion euros, will last ten years. After a three-year design phase, Belgium Naval & Robotics will launch the production phase of the ships and drone systems with a first delivery expected in 2024.

The Belgium Naval & Robotics consortium as well as the Naval Group and ECA Group teams are honored by the confidence of the Belgian and Dutch navies and look forward to this upcoming collaboration.

 

An innovative solution for robotic mine warfare

Belgium Naval & Robotics, thanks to Naval Group’s recognized expertise, offers a 2800-ton militarized ship specialized in mine warfare with military characteristics (acoustic and electromagnetic discretion, shock resistance) perfectly adapted to the operational use targeted by the Belgian and Dutch navies. In particular, this vessel incorporates a launch and recovery system for ECA Group’s Inspector 125 Unmanned Surface Vehicles (USV). This innovative, robust and reliable system ensures the safety of operators and maneuvers to protect the ship, the USV and its payloads, while offering a high level of mission availability.

The drone systems on board these innovative vessels are the latest generation of drones developed by ECA Group over the past four years. They are integrated into the C2 MCM Umisoft system connected to the Naval Group’s I4drones system to form the mine-warfare mission system integrated into the ship’s combat system.

The solution includes A18-M Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUV), T18-M towed sonars and Mine Identification & Destruction Systems (MIDS) composed of SEASCAN and KSTER-C Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV). All these drones can be operated autonomously from the USV Inspector 125. The drone system also includes Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) and influence sweeps.

The program provides for the supply of drone systems that can also be projected. Containerized and equipped with handling and communication systems, mine-hunting drone systems can be airlifted and deployed directly from the coast without a ship.

 

A vast cooperation plan with the Belgian industry

Belgium Naval & Robotics will carry out a significant part of the contract in Belgium, in particular the production of certain equipment for the ship and all naval drones. Ship maintenance will be carried out in Zeebrugge in partnership with Flanders Ship Repair (FSR). The maintenance of naval drones will also be carried out in Zeebrugge according to the needs of the customer, who already has maintenance facilities on his naval base.

The cooperation plan already includes 39 Belgian partners and the notification of the contract will make it possible to finalize the last ones and reach some 50 agreements.

The contract should thus generate an average of 350 jobs per year in the three regions of Belgium.

 

A reference on export markets

The Belgian and Dutch navies being a reference in mine warfare within NATO, the choice of our consortium is a major asset for export.

The tripartite mine hunter program at the time had generated sales of self-propelled PAP robots in several dozen navies, as well as the export of mine-hunting vessels.

This new success in Belgium should generate many export trade benefits in the coming years. The drones for these customers will be produced by ECA Group in Belgium. Similarly, Naval Group expects a significant number of additional sales of mine-hunting vessels in the near future.

Corvette Vessel

According to defense-aerospace.com, launching ceremony of first state of the art 2,300 tons corvette vessel being built for Pakistan Navy was held at M/s Damen Shipyard in Galati, Romania.

The Dutch Damen shipbuilding group has launched the first of two corvettes at its shipyard in Galati, Romania; she is due to enter service by the end of this year, with the second to follow in 2020

Chief of Staff (Personnel), Vice Admiral Abdul Aleem graced the occasion as Chief Guest.

Corvettes are multi-purpose platforms of medium size and tonnage. Subsequent to the signing of contract for construction of two corvettes for Pakistan Navy in 2017, the first ship is expected to join Pakistan Navy Fleet by end of this year and the second would be delivered by mid-2020.

Speaking on the occasion, the Chief Guest underscored the importance of Corvettes in the maritime domain. He further added that these platforms will act as force multipliers in enhancing Navy’s capability of safeguarding maritime frontiers and would offer more flexibility in the conduct of Pakistan Navy’s initiative of independent Regional Maritime Security Patrols in the Indian Ocean Region.

The Chief Guest also lauded the professionalism of M/s DAMEN Shipyards and cooperation in delivering cutting edge technologies to Pakistan Navy in the form of Corvettes.

The launching ceremony was also attended by Chief Naval Overseer (Romania), senior management of M/s DAMEN Shipyards, Gorinchem & Galati and Pakistan Navy officials.

Keel Authenticated

The keel for the future USNS John Lewis (T-AO-205), the Navy’s first John Lewis-class fleet replenishment oiler, was ceremonially laid at General Dynamics-National Steel and Shipbuilding Company (NASSCO) May 13.

Future USNS John Lewis (T-AO-205) Keel Authenticated

A keel laying is the ceremonial recognition of the start of a ship’s construction. It is the joining together of a ship’s modular components and the authentication or etching of an honoree’s initials into a ceremonial keel plate. The ship’s namesake, U.S. Representative John Lewis, and the ship’s sponsor, actress Alfre Woodard, etched their initials into the keel plate.

«We’re honored to have Representative Lewis and Ms. Woodard with us today as we lay the foundation for recapitalizing our nation’s critical fuel-replenishment-at-sea capabilities», said Mike Kosar, Support Ships, Boats and Craft program manager, Program Executive Office (PEO) Ships. «These ships are steadfast, reliable and allow our warships to defend our freedoms for which Representative Lewis has dedicated his life to protecting».

The John Lewis-class ships are based on commercial design standards and will recapitalize the current T-AO 187-class fleet replenishment oilers to provide underway replenishment of fuel to U.S. Navy ships at sea. These ships are part of the Navy’s Combat Logistics Force.

John Lewis will be operated by the Navy’s Military Sealift Command and is the first ship named after the civil rights leader and Presidential Medal of Freedom recipient. Construction of John Lewis began in September 2018, with delivery planned in late 2020.

As one of the Defense Department’s largest acquisition organizations, PEO Ships is responsible for executing the development and procurement of all destroyers, amphibious ships, sealift ships, support ships, boats and craft.

Patrol Vessel

The first of Australia’s Arafura Class Offshore Patrol Vessels (OPVs) will celebrate a naval tradition with the keel-laying ceremony to bring good luck for the shipbuilders and future crew members.

First Arafura Class marks ceremonial keel-laying
First Arafura Class marks ceremonial keel-laying

In the second major milestone of Australia’s newest warship construction program, the keel laying ceremony will see a commemorative coin placed under the keel of the vessel by the youngest shipbuilders in the Osborne Naval Shipyard, followed by the Chief of Navy wedging the coin under the keel.

Luerssen Australia Chairman Tim Wagner said the milestone marked the official start of the ship’s life, and demonstrated the significant progress made already on the Arafura Class program.

«This is another reminder of the importance of the Arafura Class program towards Australia building a sovereign naval shipbuilding capability», Mr. Wagner said. «As the prime contractor and designer for the SEA1180 program, we have been delighted with progress so far, and remain confident that we will deliver all 12 vessels on time and on budget for the Royal Australian Navy».

ASC Chief Executive Officer Stuart Whiley said the Arafura Class shipbuilding program is progressing well, employing more than 150 shipbuilders.

«The Arafura Class is ASC’s second shipbuilding program, commenced as we continue to successfully complete the Air Warfare Destroyer program, and we are very pleased at its progress to date», said Mr. Whiley. «I would also like to pay tribute to the skilled and experienced workforce of ASC Shipbuilding, who are carrying out the shipbuilding work on this program, under contract to ASC».

The youngest male and female shipyard workers, Boilermaker Kane Ramsay and Document Editor Lauren Pitman, will feature in today’s ceremony.

«I’m excited to be part of this new program – it’s great to be looking to the future of shipbuilding», said Kane. «The lead ship is coming together well and it’s great to be a part of today’s traditional milestone. I’m looking forward to seeing the ship completed in the coming months», said Lauren.

Construction of the first of 12 Arafura Class OPVs commenced last November, on time, by prime contractor Luerssen Australia and shipbuilding subcontractor ASC.

The Arafura Class marks the commencement of continuous naval shipbuilding in Australia, which will see major warships and submarines constructed in Osborne, South Australia, and minor warships in Henderson, Western Australia.

The first two OPVs will be constructed at the Osborne Naval Shipyard in South Australia by ASC, with the Australian steel, cut in Western Australia by Civmec. The remaining ten warships will be constructed at Civmec’s facility in Henderson. It is Luerssen’s intention that the joint venture between Civmec and Luerssen Australia known as Australian Maritime Shipbuilding and Export Group (AMSEG) will play a major role in the construction.

Navigation system

Northrop Grumman Corporation has released SeaFIND (Sea Fiber Optic Inertial Navigation with Data Distribution), a next generation maritime inertial navigation system succeeding the company’s MK-39 Mod 3 and 4 series Inertial Navigation System product line.

SeaFIND is significantly smaller, lighter and uses less power than its predecessor, the MK-39 Mod 3A
SeaFIND is significantly smaller, lighter and uses less power than its predecessor, the MK-39 Mod 3A

SeaFIND provides proven navigation capabilities in a compact and affordable package, making it ideal for applications where low cost as well as reduced size, weight and power requirements are critical. It is the first maritime inertial navigation system to move from the existing ring laser technology to Northrop Grumman’s new enhanced fiber optic gyro technology (eFOG). The system has embedded navigation data distribution capabilities, leveraging Northrop Grumman’s proprietary algorithms for low data latency and allowing for the system to interface with a multitude of users that require accurate position and timing.

«SeaFIND allows us to meet a critical customer need where low size, weight and power requirements, as well as reliable position-keeping performance in GPS-denied environments, are critical», said Todd Leavitt, vice president, maritime systems, Northrop Grumman. «This new approach features eFOG technology, which allows us to maintain performance equivalent to our ring laser gyro-based systems, but in a much smaller footprint and at a reduced cost».

The system is designed using a modular system architecture and is comprised of an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and a separate Electronics Unit (EU) connected via a single cable. Its smaller coil size and denser IMU package allows for flexible installation in tight places.

Applications include guidance systems for unmanned underwater vehicles and unmanned surface vehicles, coastal and offshore patrol vessels, as well as small, medium and large surface vessels. SeaFIND is non ITAR (International Traffic in Arms Regulations) and available for use by domestic and international navies.

Indian Scorpene

According to Financial Express Online, INS Vela (S40), Indian Navy’s 4th Scorpene-class submarine, launched! In a boost to the Indian Navy’s underwater capabilities, INS Vela (S40), a Scorpene-class submarine was rolled out in the waters on Monday in the presence of the Defence Secretary Production.

Indian Navy’s 4th Scorpene-class made in India submarine launched
Indian Navy’s 4th Scorpene-class made in India submarine launched

This is the fourth submarine in the series of the six submarines being built at Mazagon Dock Ltd (MDL), Mumbai under Project 75. The Scorpene-class submarine in the Indian Navy has been termed as the Kalvari-class.

The submarine after completing its out fittings at the dock based on the ocean tide was launched for extensive trials.

At the MDL, the balance two submarines INS Vagir (S41) and INS Vagsheer (S43) are in the advance stages of construction on the assembly line. The Ministry of Defence (MoD) has also approved the acquisition of more than 100 heavyweight torpedoes to be equipped on six Scorpene-class submarines.

 

What is INS Vela (S40) submarine?

INS Vela (S40) is the fourth in the series of the six Scorpene class submarines being constructed at the Mazagon Dock Ltd (MDL) in Mumbai. The out fittings on the submarine have been completed at MDL as per the contract inked between DCNS (now known as Naval Group) of France and MDL as part of Project 75.

Project 75 is already witnessing delays. Out of the six submarines under Project 75, INS Kalvari (S23) has been commissioned in Indian Navy last December. Both INS Khanderi (S22) and INS Karanj (S21) is likely to be commissioned in the Indian Navy. INS Vagir (S41) and INS Vagsheer (S43) are already in the «advanced stages of manufacturing».

As per the contract French Company DCNS (now Naval Group) and the MDL had inked in 2005, the $3.75 billion agreement for the licensed production of six submarines under Project-75 for the Indian Navy and the French Company had decided to transfer technology and jointly build in India. The contract is expected to be completed by next year.

Two other submarines INS Khanderi (S22) and INS Karanj (S21) built at MDL are in line to be commissioned in the Indian Navy. According to senior naval officers INS Khanderi (S22) has completed all trials and is in the final stages of acceptance. According to the 30-year submarine building plan approved in 1999, the Indian Navy needs at least 24 submarines to meet the growing presence of the Chinese presence in the waters.

The Scorpene class submarines which have the capability to be operational in any theatre also have the capability of undertaking different types of missions, which include anti-surface warfare, anti-submarine warfare, intelligence gathering, mine laying and area surveillance. They have top end stealth features which includes advanced acoustic silencing techniques, low radiated noise levels, hydro-dynamically optimised shape and the ability to launch a crippling attack on the enemy using precision-guided weapons.

The Indian Navy is currently operating 4 German HDW-class and 9 Russian Kilo-class submarines. In 2000 July, it had inducted a conventional diesel-electric submarine, INS Sindhushastra (S65), procured from Russia.

Made in Germany

The third of four 209/1400mod class submarines for the Navy of the Arab Republic of Egypt was named and launched on May 3, 2019 at the shipyard of ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems in Kiel. As part of the ceremony, Vice Admiral Ahmed Khaled, Commander-in-Chief of the Egyptian Navy, officially named the boat «S43». The boat will now be intensively tested.

Naming and launching of third Egyptian submarine «made in Germany»
Naming and launching of third Egyptian submarine «made in Germany»

Doctor Rolf Wirtz, CEO of ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems: «This significant milestone in the construction program for the Egyptian Navy is based on an open and trusting dialogue with our customer as well as the competence of our employees and suppliers. These are key factors on our successful way to become Europe’s most modern naval company».

The contract for the delivery of the first two 209/1400mod class submarines to the Arab Republic of Egypt was signed in 2011. In 2015, Egypt decided to take the option for two additional units of the most recent version of the class 209 «family»: A compact submarine featuring reliability, high combat strength, long submerged range, high submerged speeds, low signatures and excellent handling characteristics.

The first submarine, named «S41», was handed over in December 2016 and the second submarine, named «S42», in August 2017. The program is planned to end with the handover of the fourth ship in 2021.

 

Key data for the S43

Length overall (o.a.) approximately 62 m/203.4 feet
Pressure hull diameter approximately 6.2 m/20.3 feet
Surface displacement approximately 1,450 t
Dived displacement approximately 1,600 t
Crew 30

 

Security Cutter

Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division delivered the National Security Cutter (NSC) Midgett (WMSL-757) to the U.S. Coast Guard on May 01, 2019. USCGC Midgett (WMSL-757) is scheduled to sail away in June and will be commissioned later this year.

With the signing of the ceremonial documents, custody of the National Security Cutter USCGC Midgett (WMSL-757) is officially transferred to the U.S. Coast Guard. Pictured (left to right): Commander Brian Smicklas, executive officer, USCGC Midgett (WMSL-757); Captain Travis Carter, commanding officer, Project Resident Office Gulf Coast; and Derek Murphy, Ingalls’ NSC program manager (Photo by Derek Fountain/HII)
With the signing of the ceremonial documents, custody of the National Security Cutter USCGC Midgett (WMSL-757) is officially transferred to the U.S. Coast Guard. Pictured (left to right): Commander Brian Smicklas, executive officer, USCGC Midgett (WMSL-757); Captain Travis Carter, commanding officer, Project Resident Office Gulf Coast; and Derek Murphy, Ingalls’ NSC program manager (Photo by Derek Fountain/HII)

«We have a mission statement in the NSC program that says during the construction of each NSC we will provide the men and women of the United States Coast Guard with the finest ship in their fleet», said Derek Murphy, NSC program manager. «This excellence will be provided by our shipbuilders through working safely, attention to detail and ownership of work. Since the beginning of construction on NSC 8, we’ve seen an amazing transformation, made possible by the thousands of people who poured their heart and soul into this ship».

Ingalls has now delivered eight Legend-class NSCs and has one more under construction and two more under contract. USCGC Stone (WMSL-758) is scheduled for delivery in 2020. In December of 2018, Ingalls received two fixed-price incentive contracts with a combined value of $931 million to build NSCs 10 and 11.

«From a homeland security and defense perspective, this ship provides unmatched command and control», said Commander Brian Smicklas, Midgett’s executive officer and acting commanding officer. «We’ve reached a number of accomplishments and milestones up to this point; however, there’s more work to do on the water. We have record drug flows in the eastern Pacific, and there are traditional Western Hemisphere missions that our Coast Guard brothers and sisters are conducting on the water every day. We also see a large increase in demand for the geographic combatant commanders for this specific National Security Cutter capability, and we’re excited to fill that and be a part of the national fleet».

NSC 8 is named to honor the hundreds of members of the Midgett family who have served in the U.S. Coast Guard and its predecessor services. At least 10 members of the Midgett family earned high honors from the U.S. Coast Guard for their heroic lifesaving deeds. Seven Midgett family members were awarded the Gold Lifesaving Medal, the U.S. Coast Guard’s highest award for saving a life, and three were awarded the Silver Lifesaving Medal.

NSCs are capable of meeting all maritime security mission needs required of the high-endurance cutter. They include an aft launch and recovery area for two rigid hull inflatable boats and a flight deck to accommodate a range of manned and unmanned rotary wing aircraft. The Legend class is the largest and most technologically advanced class of cutter in the Coast Guard, with robust capabilities for maritime homeland security, law enforcement, marine safety, environmental protection and national defense missions. NSCs play an important role enhancing the Coast Guard’s operational readiness, capacity and effectiveness at a time when the demand for their services has never been greater.

 

Facts

Displacement 4,500 long tons
Length 418 feet/127 m
Beam 54 feet/16 m
Speed 28 knots/32 mph/52 km/h
Range 12,000 NM/13,809 miles/22,224 km
Endurance 60 days
Crew 120
Equipped with Mk-110 57-mm turret mounted gun
6 × 12.7-mm/.50 caliber machine guns
3D air search radar
2 level 1, class 1 aircraft hangers
A stern launch ramp for mission boats
Aviation carried (2) MCH, or (4) Vertical-Launch Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (VUAV) or (1) MCH and (2) VUAV
Stern launch Two cutter boats (Long Range Interceptor and/or Short Range Prosecutor)
Electronic Warfare and Decoys AN/SLQ-32 Electronic Warfare System, Two Super Rapid Bloom Offboard Countermeasures (SRBOC)/2 NULKA countermeasures chaff rapid decoy launcher
Communications HF, VHF & UHF
Sensors and Processing Systems X and S band radar, 3D air search radar, AN/SPQ-9 radar, Identification, Friend or Foe (IFF)

 

Ship list

Ship Hull Number Laid down Launched Commissioned
Bertholf WMSL-750 03-29-2005 09-29-2006 08-04-2008
Waesche WMSL-751 09-11-2006 07-12-2008 05-07-2010
Stratton WMSL-752 07-20-2009 07-23-2010 03-31-2012
Hamilton WMSL-753 09-05-2012 08-10-2013 12-06-2014
James WMSL-754 05-17-2013 05-03-2014 08-08-2015
Munro WMSL-755 10-07-2013 09-12-2015 04-01-2017
Kimball WMSL-756 03-04-2016 12-17-2016
Midgett WMSL-757 01-27-2017 11-22-2017
Stone WMSL-758 09-14-2018
WMSL-759
WMSL-760

 

HMS King George VI

This year marks the 50th anniversary of Continuous At Sea Deterrent – CASD50 – the longest unbroken operation ever delivered by the UK. It is known as Operation Relentless.

Continuous At Sea Deterrent
Continuous At Sea Deterrent

For five decades we have worked side-by-side with the Royal Navy to help keep our nation safe. At BAE Systems, we are proud of our heritage in manufacturing and engineering excellence, of our role in delivering the world’s most advanced and complex defence programmes and of the dedication, passion and innovation of our people.

Today, we remain as proud to work alongside the Royal Navy in defending our nation as we design, build and deliver the next class of deterrent submarines – Dreadnought. Over the next five weeks we will be shining the spotlight on our heritage, our people, our use of technology, our contribution to the UK and the future of our business.

The Defence Secretary has announced the fourth Dreadnought submarine as HMS King George VI ahead of a special service at Westminster Abbey today to recognise the Royal Navy’s Continuous at Sea Deterrent (CASD) over the past 50 years.

Since April 1969, a Royal Navy ballistic missile submarine has patrolled every single day, without interruption, providing the nation’s deterrent and helping keep the UK and our allies safe. This is the UK’s longest sustained military operation ever undertaken and is known as Operation Relentless.

Defence Secretary Penny Mordaunt said: «Operation Relentless has seen generations of submariners from HMS Resolution to HMS Vengeance on constant watch, for every minute of every day for the last five decades. This is the longest military operation we have ever undertaken and continues right this minute deep under the sea. We pay tribute to those incredible crews, their supportive families, the Royal Navy and the thousands of industry experts who will continue to sustain this truly national endeavour for many years to come».

CASD50 provides a chance to not only remember the national endeavour of the past half century but to look to the next-generation of ballistic missile submarines, the Dreadnought class. This will consist of four boats helping to ensure the security of generations to come. The Dreadnought-class are expected to enter service in the early 2030s, helping to maintain Operation Relentless.