Category Archives: Navy

Reconfigurable ship

The Navy commissioned its newest Freedom-variant Littoral Combat Ship (LCS), the future USS Little Rock (LCS-9), during an 11 a.m. EST ceremony Saturday, December 16, at the Canalside waterfront in Buffalo, New York.

The future USS Little Rock (LCS-9) underway during a high-speed run in Lake Michigan during Acceptance Trials. Lockheed Martin and Fincantieri Marinette Marine successfully completed acceptance trials on the future USS Little Rock (LCS-9), August 25 (Photo by Lockheed Martin)
The future USS Little Rock (LCS-9) underway during a high-speed run in Lake Michigan during Acceptance Trials. Lockheed Martin and Fincantieri Marinette Marine successfully completed acceptance trials on the future USS Little Rock (LCS-9), August 25 (Photo by Lockheed Martin)

The future USS Little Rock, designated LCS-9, is the 10th littoral combat ship to enter the fleet and the fifth of the Freedom-variant design. It is the second warship named for the Arkansas state capital and will be commissioned alongside the first USS Little Rock (CL-92), which serves as a museum at the Buffalo and Erie County Naval and Military Park.

Arkansas Senator John Boozman delivered the ceremony’s principal address. Mrs. Janee L. Bonner, spouse of the Honorable Josiah «Jo» Bonner, a former U.S. representative from Alabama, is serving as the ship’s sponsor. In a time-honored Navy tradition, she gave the order to «man our ship and bring her to life»!

«The future USS Little Rock represents much more than the state capital of Arkansas, it represents service», said Secretary of the Navy Richard V. Spencer. «This ship would not exist without the dedicated service of the men and women of Marinette Marine, who can be proud of the accomplishment of putting another warship to sea. Once commissioned, this ship will provide presence around the globe for decades to come».

LCS is a modular, reconfigurable ship, designed to meet validated fleet requirements for Surface Warfare (SUW), Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) and Mine CounterMeasures (MCM) missions in the littoral region. An interchangeable mission package is embarked on each LCS and provides the primary mission systems in one of these warfare areas. Using an open architecture design, modular weapons, sensor systems and a variety of manned and unmanned vehicles to gain, sustain and exploit littoral maritime supremacy, LCS provides U.S. joint force access to critical areas in multiple theaters.

The LCS-class consists of the Freedom variant and Independence variant, designed and built by two industry teams. The Freedom variant team is led by Lockheed Martin (for the odd-numbered ships, e.g. LCS-1). The Independence variant team is led by Austal USA (for LCS-6 and follow-on even-numbered ships). Twenty-nine LCS ships have been awarded to date: 11 have been delivered to the U.S. Navy, five are in various stages of construction and three are in pre-production states.

 

Ship Design Specifications

Hull Advanced semiplaning steel monohull
Length Overall 389 feet/118.6 m
Beam Overall 57 feet/17.5 m
Draft 13.5 feet/4.1 m
Full Load Displacement Approximately 3,200 metric tons
Top Speed Greater than 40 knots/46 mph/74 km/h
Range at top speed 1,000 NM/1,151 miles/1,852 km
Range at cruise speed 4,000 NM/4,603 miles/7,408 km
Watercraft Launch and Recovery Up to Sea State 4
Aircraft Launch and Recovery Up to Sea State 5
Propulsion Combined diesel and gas turbine with steerable water jet propulsion
Power 85 MW/113,600 horsepower
Hangar Space Two MH-60 Romeo Helicopters
One MH-60 Romeo Helicopter and three Vertical Take-off and Land Tactical Unmanned Air Vehicles (VTUAVs)
Core Crew Less than 50
Accommodations for 75 sailors provide higher sailor quality of life than current fleet
Integrated Bridge System Fully digital nautical charts are interfaced to ship sensors to support safe ship operation
Core Self-Defense Suite Includes 3D air search radar
Electro-Optical/Infrared (EO/IR) gunfire control system
Rolling-Airframe Missile Launching System
57-mm Main Gun
Mine, Torpedo Detection
Decoy Launching System

 

Freedom-class

Ship Laid down Launched Commissioned Homeport
USS Freedom (LCS-1) 06-02-2005 09-23-2006 11-08-2008 San Diego, California
USS Fort Worth (LCS-3) 07-11-2009 12-07-2010 09-22-2012 San Diego, California
USS Milwaukee (LCS-5) 10-27-2011 12-18-2013 11-21-2015 San Diego, California
USS Detroit (LCS-7) 08-11-2012 10-18-2014 10-22-2016 San Diego, California
USS Little Rock (LCS-9) 06-27-2013 07-18-2015 12-16-2017 San Diego, California
USS Sioux City (LCS-11) 02-19-2014 01-30-2016
USS Wichita (LCS-13) 02-09-2015 09-17-2016
USS Billings (LCS-15) 11-02-2015 07-01-2017
USS Indianapolis (LCS-17) 07-18-2016
USS St. Louis (LCS-19) 05-17-2017
USS Minneapolis/St. Paul (LCS-21)
USS Cooperstown (LCS-23)
USS Marinette LCS-25

 

Christening of Midgett

December 09, 2017, Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division christened the Legend-class National Security Cutter (NSC) USCGC Midgett (WMSL-757) in front of hundreds of guests.

Ship’s Sponsor Jazania H. O’Neal smashes a bottle of sparkling wine against the bow of the National Security Cutter USCGC Midgett (WMSL-757). Also pictured (left to right) are Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias; Coast Guard Vice Commandant Admiral Charles Michel; Matron of Honor Jonna Midgette; and Captain Anthony Williams, the ship’s prospective commanding officer (Photo by Andrew Young/HII)
Ship’s Sponsor Jazania H. O’Neal smashes a bottle of sparkling wine against the bow of the National Security Cutter USCGC Midgett (WMSL-757). Also pictured (left to right) are Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias; Coast Guard Vice Commandant Admiral Charles Michel; Matron of Honor Jonna Midgette; and Captain Anthony Williams, the ship’s prospective commanding officer (Photo by Andrew Young/HII)

«We often speak of our service as a family, our Coast Guard family», said Admiral Charles Michel, vice commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard, who was the ceremony’s keynote speaker. «The Midgett name takes that seriously with a family legacy unprecedented in the armed services, a family that is all about service before self. Such a special name deserves to be emblazoned on a special platform. The Ingalls Shipbuilding team have built this incredible platform, something to be incredibly proud of and something the men and women of the United States Coast Guard take very proudly».

The ship is named to honor John Allen Midgett, who was awarded the Silver Cup by the U.K. Board of Trade in 1918 for the renowned rescue of 42 British sailors aboard the British tanker Mirlo after it was torpedoed by a German U-boat off the coast of North Carolina. He was also awarded the Gold Lifesaving Medal by the U.S. Coast Guard in 1924. Midgett was a senior enlisted member of the U.S. Lifesaving Service when it merged with the U.S. Lighthouse Service and U.S. Revenue Cutter Service to become today’s U.S. Coast Guard.

«Midgett is the eighth ship we have built in this class», said Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias. «And with her, we’ve proven once again that American workers, Ingalls shipbuilders, can take on some of the most challenging manufacturing projects in the world. All Ingalls ships are built with one goal in mind: to protect the brave men and women who protect our freedom. Our Ingalls/Coast Guard team continues to get stronger and more efficient with every ship we produce. And Midgett will be no exception».

Jazania O’Neal, Midgett’s granddaughter, is the ship’s sponsor. She christened the ship by breaking a bottle of sparkling wine across its bow, saying, «In the name of the United States of America, I christen thee Midgett. May God bless this ship and all who sail in her».

Ingalls is the sole builder of Legend-class NSCs and has successfully delivered six to the Coast Guard. Midgett, the eighth ship in the class, was successfully launched in November. USCGC Kimball (WMSL-756) is scheduled to be delivered to the Coast Guard in 2018.

Legend-class NSCs are the flagships of the U.S. Coast Guard. They are the most technologically advanced ships in the Coast Guard’s fleet, with capabilities for maritime homeland security, law enforcement and national security missions. NSCs are 418 feet/127 m long with a 54-foot/16 m beam and displace 4,500 long tons with a full load. They have a top speed of 28 knots/32 mph/52 km/h, a range of 12,000 NM/13,809 miles/22,224 km, an endurance of 60 days and a crew of 120. The Legend-class of cutters plays an important role in enhancing the Coast Guard’s operational readiness, capacity and effectiveness at a time when the demand for their services has never been greater.

 

Facts

Displacement 4,500 long tons
Length 418 feet/127 m
Beam 54 feet/16 m
Speed 28 knots/32 mph/52 km/h
Range 12,000 NM/13,809 miles/22,224 km
Endurance 60 days
Crew 120
Equipped with Mk-110 57-mm turret mounted gun
6 × 12.7-mm/.50 caliber machine guns
3D air search radar
2 level 1, class 1 aircraft hangers
A stern launch ramp for mission boats
Aviation carried (2) MCH, or (4) Vertical-Launch Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (VUAV) or (1) MCH and (2) VUAV
Stern launch Two cutter boats (Long Range Interceptor and/or Short Range Prosecutor)
Electronic Warfare and Decoys AN/SLQ-32 Electronic Warfare System, Two Super Rapid Bloom Offboard Countermeasures (SRBOC)/2 NULKA countermeasures chaff rapid decoy launcher
Communications HF, VHF & UHF
Sensors and Processing Systems X and S band radar, 3D air search radar, AN/SPQ-9 radar, Identification, Friend or Foe (IFF)

 

Ship list

Ship Hull Number Laid down Launched Commissioned
Bertholf WMSL-750 03-29-2005 09-29-2006 08-04-2008
Waesche WMSL-751 09-11-2006 07-12-2008 05-07-2010
Stratton WMSL-752 07-20-2009 07-23-2010 03-31-2012
Hamilton WMSL-753 09-05-2012 08-10-2013 12-06-2014
James WMSL-754 05-17-2013 05-03-2014 08-08-2015
Munro WMSL-755 10-07-2013 09-12-2015 04-01-2017
Kimball WMSL-756 03-04-2016 12-17-2016
Midgett WMSL-757 27-01-2017 22-11-2017
Stone WMSL-758

 

USCGC Midgett (WMSL-757) Christening, Ingalls Shipbuilding, Pascagoula, Mississippi

The Queen Elizabeth
commissioned

On December 7, 2017, Her Majesty The Queen has commissioned the UK’s new aircraft carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth (R08) into the Royal Navy.

Ten years after it was ordered, the Royal Navy’s new aircraft carrier, HMS Queen Elizabeth (R08), was commissioned into the Royal Navy fleet. It is seen here flying the White Ensign (UK MoD photo)
Ten years after it was ordered, the Royal Navy’s new aircraft carrier, HMS Queen Elizabeth (R08), was commissioned into the Royal Navy fleet. It is seen here flying the White Ensign (UK MoD photo)

The Queen spoke at a ceremony in Portsmouth Naval Base this morning, attended by Her Royal Highness Princess Anne, Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson and military chiefs.

In her role as the ship’s Lady Sponsor Her Majesty addressed guests before the Ship’s Commanding Officer, Captain Jerry Kyd, read the commissioning warrant.

The iconic White Ensign was then raised, symbolising the commissioning of the nation’s future flagship into the Royal Navy’s fleet.

Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson said, «Today marks the start of a hugely significant chapter for the Royal Navy, and indeed the nation, as the future flagship is commissioned into Her Majesty’s fleet. It is an honour to witness the crowning moment of an extraordinarily busy year for the Royal Navy that has seen us name the second carrier, HMS Prince of Wales (R09), cut steel on the first Type 26 frigates and launch the National Shipbuilding Strategy».

Having successfully completed her second stage of sea trials off the south coast of England, the carrier is back alongside at her home port of Portsmouth. Over 10,000 people across the UK have contributed to the delivery of the ship under the Aircraft Carrier Alliance.

Completing final build activity and preparing for helicopter trials in the New Year, HMS Queen Elizabeth (R08) will head to the United States for initial flight trials off the coast in autumn 2018. There are currently 150 Royal Navy and Royal Air Force (RAF) personnel training in the U.S. on our 13 F-35 jets.

The UK has worked closely on both the F-35 and carrier programmes with the U.S., our pre-eminent partner within NATO, enabling us to fly aircraft from each other’s ships. Both of the UK’s new carriers will be able to operate alongside NATO and coalition allies.

Admiral Sir Philip Jones, First Sea Lord and Chief of Naval Staff, said: «In hoisting the White Ensign from HMS Queen Elizabeth today, Britain has confirmed her place among the world’s great maritime powers in the most majestic and muscular terms. The Queen Elizabeth-class carriers will sit at the heart of a modernised and emboldened Royal Navy, capable of projecting power and influence at sea, in the air, over the land and in cyberspace, and offering our nation military and political choice in an uncertain world. But our greatest strength of all is the young sailors and marines upon whose shoulders our continued security and prosperity rests. They are starting their careers as a new chapter opens for the Royal Navy – and like all those who have gone before them, they are ready to serve their Queen and Country».

Both new aircraft carriers will be able to perform a wide range of tasks, from humanitarian and disaster relief to fighting terrorism and high-end warfighting. In what has been termed, ‘the Year of the Royal Navy’ the second carrier, HMS Prince of Wales (R09), was named in Rosyth and is structurally complete.

The honour of raising the White Ensign for the first time fell to 20-year-old Able Seaman Ellie Smith, from Hull.

That moment, said Captain Jerry Kyd, announced to the world that «we are here, we have arrived». He said: «The White Ensign is synonymous with British warships and British seapower. For centuries it has said a lot about our country».

PO(ETME) Ben Kern helped bring destroyer HMS Dragon (D35) out of build before joining HMS Queen Elizabeth (R08) in January. One of two section heads responsible for the high-voltage electrical system aboard, he described the occasion as the pinnacle of his career to date.

«I am serving on the biggest, most modern warship in the Navy. That’s never going to happen again. It’s been hard work and challenging to get the ship up to speed. We are the ones who are laying the foundations for everything which is yet to come. But that is also hugely rewarding. We’ve been working to this day all year, so I would say the mood aboard is buoyant».

This year the Royal Navy has also had steel cut on the first of the Type 26 frigates and Dreadnought submarines, the launch of the National Shipbuilding Strategy, provisioning for a new class of frigate, the Type 31e, float out of the fourth Astute submarine, HMS Audacious (S122), the naming of two Offshore Patrol Vessels and the arrival of our first two MARS Tankers in the UK.

Last month the Defence Secretary visited HMS Queen Elizabeth (R08) for the first time while at sea, meeting the crew and thanking them for their work towards UK defence.

Her Majesty The Queen welcomes HMS Queen Elizabeth (R08) into the Royal Navy fleet
Her Majesty The Queen welcomes HMS Queen Elizabeth (R08) into the Royal Navy fleet

Proposal for CSC

Navantia team has announced the submission of its proposal for the Canadian Surface Combatant (CSC) program.

Navantia team submits proposal for CSC
Navantia team submits proposal for CSC

«We are pleased to announce that Navantia-led team has submitted its tender response for the Canadian Surface Combatant program, with Saab Australia as the Combat Systems Integrator (CSI) and CEA Technologies providing key elements of the proposed solution. With a strong heritage in designing and building frigates and destroyers and proven technology transfer in global programs, the Navantia team offers a compliant solution with the best capability for the Royal Canadian Navy and the Canadian shipbuilding industry», said Navantia Chairman Esteban García Vilasánchez.

The team’s proposal is focused on delivering an operationally proven design and leveraging the capabilities key Canadian companies to deliver a ship that is ideally suited to Canada’s requirement. A solution based on the proven F-105 frigate design for the Spanish Navy has been proposed. Navantia has a proud history of delivering for partner navies around the world variants of this design that are currently in service for Norwegian Navy and, most recently, the destroyer HMAS Hobart to the Royal Australian Navy (RAN).

This modern Anti-Submarine Warfare ship will incorporate Saab’s globally recognised 9LV Combat Management Systems (CMS), elements of which are in service on over 240 platforms in 16 navies across the globe, including Canada’s own Halifax class frigates. Demonstrating the proven capabilities Saab Australia and the 9LVCMS it was recently mandated by the Australian Government for use on all major surface combatants of the Royal Australian Navy.

«Our expertise in developing high quality solutions for Australian programs in partnership with CEA Technologies, Navantia and others allows us to provide a low-risk, high capability solution for Canada, which will be fully interoperable with partner navies. The confidence of the Australian Government in mandating Saab combat systems and tactical interfaces across the whole RAN fleet demonstrates the strength of our capability and we look forward to continuing to work with the Royal Australian and Royal Canadian Navies to continue to develop our world-leading systems».

The submission of the CSC bid is also a significant moment for CEA Technologies, providing further opportunities for global partnership, and recognition of the radar expertise the company has built.

«We are excited about the opportunity to collaborate with Canada in the CSC program», said CEA Technologies CEO Merv Davis.

«We can deliver a mature radar which is outperforming the expectations of the Royal Australian Navy and has substantial potential for future growth. Building partnerships through international programs such as CSC is an opportunity for CEA to continue to demonstrate the performance of our innovative solutions. We are proud to be able to provide our Australian technologies to our international partners and allies».

«Other key suppliers engaged by Saab to support the CSC program include Lockheed Martin (Moorestown, New Jersey), General Dynamic Mission Systems – Canada (GDMS-C), DRS Technologies Limited Canada (DRS TCL), OSI Maritime Service and Rheinmetall Canada».

«Our solution will utilise and develop the unique capabilities of over fifty Canadian companies and will create over one thousand long-term, high tech jobs in Canada. Our proposal includes a full technology transfer of Navantia’s design and Saab’s 9LV CMS to Canada to be integrated and maintained by Canadian companies».

«The F-105 is far beyond the conceptual stage of a slowly evolving design process, and is marketed based on proven operational performance as opposed to claims of wishful thinking.  Selection of the Navantia solution will ensure Canada is not burdened with unnecessary cost and risk concerns as CSC transitions from design, to production and ultimately, to a proven operational capability».

«An exciting opportunity, the Navantia team looks forward to having the opportunity to work with Canada in developing and delivering the full capability of the Canadian Surface Combatant to the Royal Canadian Navy».

Under the CSC program, the Royal Canadian Navy will acquire up to 15 frigates to replace the Iroquois Class destroyers and Halifax Class frigates. Construction of the frigates will begin in the early 2020s.

Lockheed-Martin-CSC

Two days prior to the procurement closure date, Lockheed Martin Canada has confirmed delivery of the proposal for the Canadian Surface Combatant (CSC) program signifying that the acquisition has moved to the next critical phase.

Canada's Combat Ship Team: BAE Systems, CAE, Lockheed Martin Canada, L3 Technologies, MDA and Ultra Electronics Join Forces to Deliver Canadian Surface Combatant Proposal
Canada’s Combat Ship Team: BAE Systems, CAE, Lockheed Martin Canada, L3 Technologies, MDA and Ultra Electronics Join Forces to Deliver Canadian Surface Combatant Proposal

BAE Systems, CAE, Lockheed Martin Canada, L3 Technologies, MDA and Ultra Electronics are partnering as Canada’s Combat Ship Team for the Royal Canadian Navy’s future fleet of surface combatants. Canada’s Combat Ship Team is offering the most advanced and modern warship design, the Type 26 Global Combat Ship (GCS), with high-tech platform innovations from prominent Canadian companies. The solution includes the internationally renowned Canadian-developed combat management system, CMS 330.

Canada’s Combat Ship Team’s approach to the CSC project exclusively parallels the Canadian Government’s Defence Policy, which is the foundation for the offering: Strong, Secure and Engaged.

STRONG. Canada’s Combat Ship Team’s approach to the strategic objective STRONG is to provide the right ship for the Royal Canadian Navy that surpasses baseline requirements with minimal change. This solution represents the lowest development risk and is underpinned by Canadian doctrine; interoperability with five-eyes nations and other NATO allies; ability to achieve safety certification and security accreditation; ease of operation, maintenance and sustainment; and ease of upgradeability to address future capabilities.

SECURE. Under the pillar of SECURE, Canada’s Combat Ship Team’s offering focuses on ensuring successful program execution by bringing together a pan-Canadian team who have proven, demonstrated and current pedigree in performing complex defence contracts in Canada; who have well-established infrastructure, employees, security clearances and facilities in place today; who have demonstrated their commitment and reliability to successfully execute the project by their substantial investments in CSC and in meeting all procurement deadlines; and therefore who are poised to perform the CSC program, Ready on Day One.

ENGAGED. Embodied throughout Canada’s Combat Ship Team’s offering is our multifaceted approach to achieving the strategic pillar ENGAGED. The underlying principles implemented focus on partnership with all stakeholders and, equally important, maintaining sovereignty of the CSC solution in Canada, which can only be achieved by having the solution and capability developed «at home» by Canadians.

Canada’s Combat Ship Team is living proof that capability investments made in Canada result in sustained jobs not only through long term sustainment of its system and products, but also extend to exports which leverage Canada’s investments to other nations adding more jobs to Canadian industry. This team recognizes the significant benefits that Canada will receive with the implementation of Canada’s Combat Ship Team’s strategic objective to bring the jobs “home” to Canada and therefore collectively become the Home Team.

 

Quotes

«The Type 26 Global Combat Ship is a flexible, next generation warship design which offers a low risk and affordable solution for the Canadian Surface Combatant program. With the UK Type 26 program running ahead of CSC, our Canadian ship will benefit from lessons learnt on the UK program. This schedule also allows Type 26 the opportunity to be the most advanced Canadian Surface Combatant. Canadian companies such as W.R. Davis Engineering in Ottawa, Rolls-Royce in Peterborough and L3 MAPPS in Montréal have already begun work on delivering high-technology systems for the UK’s Type 26, demonstrating the skills and capability available from the Canadian supply chain». Anne Healey, Country Director, Canada, BAE Systems

«Building on our proud Canadian history of more than 70 years, we are honoured to join forces with this pan-Canadian team that has been assembled for CSC. CAE welcomes the opportunity to leverage the strengths of our combined organizations to support the Government of Canada and Irving Shipbuilding to deliver a modern, capable warship with an integrated training system that aligns with the Future Naval Training Strategy. CAE is dedicated to offering customers the most innovative training solutions to achieve the highest levels of operational readiness and performance». Joe Armstrong, Vice President and General Manager – Canada, CAE

«The Defence Policy released earlier this year announced the Government’s new vision for the Canadian Armed Forces, and as a Pan-Canadian team, our approach to CSC implements these Defence Policy pillars where we are offering the right ship for the Navy to enable them to be STRONG; we are offering proven, Canadian pedigree of companies to ensure successful program execution is SECURE; and we are offering a solution that ensures sovereignty is maintained by bringing the direct jobs on CSC home to Canada so that we are ENGAGED and able to sustain the CSC ships throughout their lifespan. Lockheed Martin Canada has been Canada’s trusted Combat System Integrator for more than three decades, and our team can be counted on to deliver affordable solutions, sustained job creation, and technology development in Canada for export potential. We’ll employ our proven collaborative partnership model to successfully manage the highly complex systems integration process – including integrating our CMS 330 Combat Management System with the Type 26 Global Combat Ship – and leverage the innovation and talent here at home which will ultimately result in unprecedented economic outcome for Canada». Rosemary Chapdelaine, Vice President and General Manager, Lockheed Martin Canada Rotary and Mission Systems

«We are proud to be a member of Canada’s Combat Ship Team. With a strong Canadian footprint, we are in a unique position to leverage our established Canadian companies to deliver Canadian marine technologies, systems integration support, and through life in service support to the team in a number of areas including integrated communications, electro optic and infrared sensors, torpedo handling systems, and integrated platform management systems». Mike Greenley, President, L3 WESCAM

«As one of Canada’s leading space and defence companies, MDA’s participation in this team is very strategic. For MDA, in addition to providing world-class operational CSC capability to the Canadian Forces, this project will be a major enabler in achieving significant future MDA exports from Canada and the resulting growth in jobs and business in Canada – a continuous corporate strategy for MDA since 1969». Dave Hargreaves, Vice President – Aerospace and Defence, Surveillance and Intelligence, MDA

«As a long-time participant in Canada’s defence community, Ultra Electronics is delighted to be a member of Canada’s Combat Ship Team. It is truly a privilege to be able to provide our world-leading Canadian designed and developed underwater warfare products to this uniquely assembled team to deliver Canada’s future surface combatant». Ken Walker, President, Ultra Electronics Canada

 

Quick Facts

In June 2016, following Industry engagement, the Government of Canada announced that it would proceed with a procurement package based on a Total Ship Reference Point. For industry, this meant combining the efforts of a warship designer and combat systems integrator into a consolidated proposal.

BAE’s Type 26 has been selected by the Royal Navy and steel has been cut on the first of a planned eight ships. Due to its current stage in the lifecycle, there is no obsolescence in the design and it therefore offers the lowest risk to build in Canada.

The Type 26 Global Combat Ship can undertake a wide range of roles from high intensity conflict to humanitarian assistance, including anti-submarine warfare and air defence. It is flexible, versatile and highly survivable with an extremely low acoustic signature.

Built for the Royal Canadian Navy’s doctrine, tactics and operations, Lockheed Martin Canada’s innovative Combat Management System – CMS 330 – was developed in Canada as a result of 34 years’ experience and knowledge of Canadian and NATO naval operations.

Members of Canada’s Combat Ship Team are currently delivering on the final stages of Canada’s HALIFAX-class Modernization Project.

Collectively, our team employs more than 9,000 Canadians in over 40 facilities across the country with an established presence on both coasts. Our collective Canadian supply chain consists of approximately 4,000 contracts Canada-wide.

 

About BAE Systems

BAE Systems is a world leading shipbuilding, support and maintenance company with the skills and expertise to design, build, integrate, test, commission and support complex warships. BAE Systems has a strong track record of collaboration with customers and industrial partners worldwide to share technology and skills – helping countries grow their naval and industrial capabilities. Canadian industry is already integral to the Type 26 Global Combat Ship program.

 

About CAE

As a globally-recognized training systems integrator, CAE is committed to providing defence and security forces world-class training centres, training services, and a comprehensive portfolio of training solutions. CAE is headquartered in Canada and has employees in 15 locations across the country.

 

About Lockheed Martin Canada

Lockheed Martin Canada has a proud legacy of providing innovative naval systems and sustainment solutions for Canada and abroad. For more than three decades, Lockheed Martin Canada has demonstrated its capability and commitment to the Royal Canadian Navy as the Prime Contractor and Combat System Integrator for the HALIFAX Class Frigates.

 

About L3 Technologies

A leading provider of communication, electronic and sensor systems used on military, homeland security and commercial platforms, L3 Technologies is also a prime contractor in aerospace systems, security and detection systems, and pilot training. With over 50 years of business operations in Canada, L3 has a strong Canadian presence with L3 MAPPS, L3 MAS, L3 Communication Systems Canada and L3 WESCAM that each have experience working on technologies and projects for the Royal Canadian Navy.

 

About MDA

MDA’s business provides technology solutions to commercial and government organizations worldwide. The Company’s established global customer base is served by more than 6,500 employees operating from 21 locations in Canada, the United States and internationally. MDA focusses primarily in the Communications and the Surveillance and Intelligence sectors, and has supported the Royal Canadian Navy for over two decades.

 

About Ultra Electronics

Based in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Ultra Electronics is a part of the Ultra Electronics Group, an international electronics company. Ultra Electronics has been delivering sophisticated, cost-effective, and innovative solutions to the defence market for 70 years. Ultra Electronics has been extremely successful in transforming its research investment into the technologically advanced underwater battlespace sensor systems that it delivers to both Royal Canadian Navy and internationally. Today, Ultra Electronics is recognized worldwide for its expertise in hull mounted sonar, towed active and passive arrays, sonar sensors, and underwater acoustics.

Designed by Lürssen

The much awaited announcement for the replacement to the current Armidale Class patrol boats was announced by Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull at Russell Offices in Canberra on 24 November 2017.

An Offshore Patrol Vessel, designed by Lürssen
An Offshore Patrol Vessel, designed by Lürssen

Lürssen was named as the prime contractor for the 12 new Offshore Patrol Vessels (OPV) with the Australian PV80 variant. It will be 80 meters/262.5 feet in length with a displacement of 1700 tonnes and a draught of 4 meters/13 feet.

The vessels will be fitted with a 40-mm gun for self-protection, three 8.4 m/27.5 feet sea boats, state of the art sensors as well as command and communication systems. This will allow the OPVs to operate alongside Australian Border Force vessels, other Australian Defence Force units and our regional partners.

The vessels will accommodate up to 60 personnel, including a crew of around 40 Navy personnel and have the ability to accept modular mission packs such as unmanned aerial systems.

At the launch the Chief of Navy, Vice Admiral Tim Barrett, said the Lürssen ship will meet the Navy’s needs.

«The new OPV will go further and will be able to be at for sea longer than our current Patrol Boat fleet», Vice Admiral Barrett said. «It will achieve the task that we have already been doing successfully, even better. The decision has been made with the team we acknowledged today and our role is to now deliver on the decision. Now let’s get on with it».

The first ship is due to enter service in 2021.

HII Launches Midgett

Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division launched the National Security Cutter (NSC) USCGC Midgett (WMSL-757) on Wednesday, November 22. Midgett is the eighth NSC Ingalls has built for the U.S. Coast Guard. It will be christened during a ceremony on December 9.

Ingalls Shipbuilding launched the National Security Cutter USCGC Midgett (WMSL-757) on November 22 (Photo by Lance Davis/HII)
Ingalls Shipbuilding launched the National Security Cutter USCGC Midgett (WMSL-757) on November 22 (Photo by Lance Davis/HII)

«As the National Security Cutter program continues to mature, we are providing our Coast Guard customer the best ships in their fleet», said Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias. «Our shipbuilders know and understand the importance of quality in building these highly capable cutters so the men and women of the Coast Guard can perform their important national security missions».

USCGC Midgett (WMSL-757) was translated via Ingalls’ rail car system to the floating dry dock last week, and the dock was moved away from the pier on Tuesday night. With the assistance of tugboats, Midgett launched off the dock early Wednesday morning.

«We’ve become very good at building these ships and continue to improve with the incorporation of lessons learned from previous cutters», said Derek Murphy, Ingalls’ NSC program manager. «Launch is a much-anticipated and exciting event, but it’s still just one step in bringing this cutter to life. Our shipbuilders are ready to get back to work to ensure Midgett is the best NSC to date».

The ship is named to honor John Allen Midgett, who was awarded the Silver Cup by the U.K. Board of Trade in 1918 for the renowned rescue of 42 British sailors aboard the British tanker Mirlo after it was torpedoed by a German U-boat off the coast of North Carolina. He was also awarded the Gold Lifesaving Medal by the U.S. Coast Guard in 1924. Midgett was a senior enlisted member of the U.S. Lifesaving Service when it merged with the U.S. Lighthouse Service and U.S. Revenue Cutter Service to become today’s U.S. Coast Guard.

Legend-class NSCs are the flagships of the Coast Guard’s cutter fleet. Designed to replace the 378-foot/115-meter Hamilton-class high-endurance cutters that entered service in the 1960s, they are 418 feet/127 m long with a 54-foot/16-meter beam and displace 4,500 tons with a full load. They have a top speed of 28 knots/32 mph/52 km/h, a range of 12,000 NM/13,809 miles/22,224 km, an endurance of 60 days and a crew of 110.

NSCs are capable of meeting all maritime security mission needs required of the high-endurance cutter. They include an aft launch and recovery area for two rigid hull inflatable boats and a flight deck to accommodate a range of manned and unmanned rotary wing aircraft. The Legend class is the largest and most technologically advanced class of cutter in the Coast Guard, with robust capabilities for maritime homeland security, law enforcement, marine safety, environmental protection and national defense missions. NSCs play an important role enhancing the Coast Guard’s operational readiness, capacity and effectiveness at a time when the demand for their services has never been greater.

 

Facts

Displacement 4,500 long tons
Length 418 feet/127 m
Beam 54 feet/16 m
Speed 28 knots/32 mph/52 km/h
Range 12,000 NM/13,809 miles/22,224 km
Endurance 60 days
Crew 120
Equipped with Mk-110 57-mm turret mounted gun
6 × 12.7-mm/.50 caliber machine guns
3D air search radar
2 level 1, class 1 aircraft hangers
A stern launch ramp for mission boats

 

Ship list

Ship Hull Number Laid down Launched Commissioned
Bertholf WMSL-750 03-29-2005 09-29-2006 08-04-2008
Waesche WMSL-751 09-11-2006 07-12-2008 05-07-2010
Stratton WMSL-752 07-20-2009 07-23-2010 03-31-2012
Hamilton WMSL-753 09-05-2012 08-10-2013 12-06-2014
James WMSL-754 05-17-2013 05-03-2014 08-08-2015
Munro WMSL-755 10-07-2013 09-12-2015 04-01-2017
Kimball WMSL-756 03-04-2016 12-17-2016
Midgett WMSL-757 27-01-2017 22-11-2017
Stone WMSL-758

 

Second Destroyer

The second Air Warfare Destroyer (AWD) HMAS Brisbane (DDG-41) has entered the first phase of sea trials which will take place over the coming weeks, marking further progress towards her delivery to the Royal Australian Navy next year.

Second Air Warfare Destroyer Enters Sea Trials
Second Air Warfare Destroyer Enters Sea Trials

This first phase of sea trials will test the ship’s propulsion, manoeuvring, control and navigation systems and will be followed by a more advanced phase of sea trials next year to test Brisbane’s combat and communications systems.

«More broadly, the AWD program continues to meet or exceed our milestone targets since the Government’s successful reform initiative, demonstrating our contribution to industry’s role as a fundamental input into Defence capability», said Mr. Evans.

«Our workforce of more than 1,700 in Adelaide has improved and evolved the production and set to work of these ships, with our whole team working hard to achieve this milestone ahead of post-reform schedule targets», said Paul Evans, AWD Alliance General Manager.

AWD Program Manager Commodore Craig Bourke also acknowledged the collaboration between industry and Government on the program. «The AWD program has built the foundation of Australia’s shipbuilding and systems integration industry, with more than 60 per cent Australian Industry Capability to date», he said.

The AWD enterprise partners include the Department of Defence, Raytheon Australia as the combat systems integrator, ASC as the shipbuilder and Navantia as the shipbuilder manager, all whom emphasised the commitment of the AWD workforce.

Raytheon Australia Managing Director Michael Ward commended the team on today’s achievement. «As the combat systems integrator for the AWD program, Raytheon Australia has applied its highly skilled Australian workforce of 350 architects, systems engineers and project managers to the AWD program over the last decade», he said.

«Raytheon Australia is responsible for the integration of ten major subsystems, including the Aegis Weapon System, which is provided through Foreign Military Sales, and associated delivery of more than 3,500 major pieces of combat system equipment required to establish the warfighting capability of the AWD. This will contribute to making the AWD the most sophisticated warship ever operated by the Royal Australian Navy».

«The commencement of Brisbane’s sea trials is a source of tremendous pride for Raytheon Australia and our home-grown Australian workforce that has built a national asset in complex combat system integration», said Mr. Ward.

ASC Shipbuilding Chief Executive Officer Mark Lamarre said that today’s milestone signifies further progress across the program. «Today marks another big step forward on the journey of delivering three complex surface combatants to the Royal Australian Navy, with the commencement of Builders Sea Trials for the second future destroyer Brisbane», he said.

«Fundamentally, shipbuilding is about people – talented, skilled and experienced people. Our shipbuilding team and their immense skill, capability and pride continues to deliver and demonstrate our strength as a highly capable, sovereign shipbuilder», he said.

«In collaboration with our Alliance partners, including Navantia, we are excited by this great achievement – it is something we should all be proud of, and continues to show the way forward for future shipbuilding in Australia», said Mr. Lamarre.

Navantia Australia’s Managing Director Donato Martínez commented on the sense of pride felt throughout the workforce noting today’s achievement. «It is always an exciting moment for a shipbuilder when a new vessel goes to sea for the first time. Following the commissioning of HMAS Hobart (DDG-39) earlier this year, the sea trials phase for Brisbane demonstrates the success of the Adelaide shipbuilding enterprise», said Mr. Martínez.

«We are proud of the role Navantia has played in meeting the goals of the AWD reform initiative and we look forward to successfully delivering a highly capable warship to the Royal Australian Navy next year», said Mr. Martínez.

Mid-next year, HMAS Brisbane (DDG-41) will be delivered to the Royal Australian Navy to join her sister ship, HMAS Hobart (DDG-39), and will be followed in quick succession by the delivery of the third and final Air Warfare Destroyer, Sydney, in 2019.

 

Characteristics

Length 481.3 feet/146.7 m
Beam 61 feet/18.6 m
Draft 23.6 feet/7.2 m
Full load displacement 7,000 tonnes
Main Engine 36 MW/48,276 hp
Top speed 28+ knots/32 mph/52 km/h
Range at 18+ knots/21 mph/33 km/h 5,000+ NM/5,779 miles/9,300 km
Crew 186
Accommodation 234
Combat System Aegis Weapon System Baseline 7.1
AN/SPY-1D(V) Phased Array Radar (81 NM/93 miles/150 km)
AN/SPQ-9B Horizon Search Radar
Mk-41 Vertical Launch System (48 VLS cells: RIM-162 Evolved SeaSparrow Missile (ESSM)/Standard Missile-2 (SM-2)/SM-6)
Mk-45 Mod.4 5” (127-mm) 62 Calibre Gun (Range: 20 NM/23 miles/37 km)
Advanced Harpoon Weapon Control (2 × 4 launchers)
Electronic Warfare (EW) Suite
Very Short Range Air and Surface Defence
Nulka Active Missile Decoy system
Integrated Sonar System incorporating a hull mounted and towed array sonar
Communications Suite
Aviation Flightdeck and hangar for one helicopter
Boats Two Rigid Hulled Inflatable Boats (RHIBs)

 

Navy Accepts Ralph

Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division delivered the guided missile destroyer USS Ralph Johnson (DDG-114) to the U.S. Navy on November 15, 2017, with shipbuilders, ship’s force and representatives of Supervisor of Shipbuilding Gulf Coast in attendance.

Ingalls Shipbuilding completed builder's sea trials for USS Ralph Johnson (DDG-114). The Arleigh Burke (DDG-51) destroyer spent more than three days in the Gulf of Mexico testing the ship’s main propulsion, combat and other ship systems (HII photo)
Ingalls Shipbuilding completed builder’s sea trials for USS Ralph Johnson (DDG-114). The Arleigh Burke (DDG-51) destroyer spent more than three days in the Gulf of Mexico testing the ship’s main propulsion, combat and other ship systems (HII photo)

«Today’s delivery is a culmination of the hard work and dedication of thousands of shipbuilders, industry partners, the Navy and our Gulf Coast shipmates», said George Nungesser, Ingalls’ DDG program manager. «It is a pleasure for our Ingalls team to observe a well-trained crew take ownership of the ship. The shipbuilders of Ingalls will always be watching where you go and celebrating your successes».

The signing of the DD 250 document officially transfers custody of the ship from HII to the U.S. Navy. Ralph Johnson is scheduled to sail away from the shipyard in February and will be commissioned on March 24, 2018, in Charleston, South Carolina.

«This marks an important milestone in this ship’s life with the formal completion of construction», said Commander Jason P. Patterson, the ship’s prospective commanding officer. «I want to thank the shipbuilders for constructing this great ship named after a great man. The crew can sail with confidence that this ship will bring the fight to the enemy and take care of her team just like Ralph did».

USS Ralph Johnson (DDG-114) is named to honor Private First Class (Pfc.) Ralph Henry Johnson, who was awarded the Medal of Honor for his heroic actions that saved lives during the Vietnam War. Johnson shouted a warning to his fellow Marines and hurled himself on an explosive device, saving the life of one Marine and preventing the enemy from penetrating his sector of the patrol’s perimeter. Johnson died instantly. The Charleston native had only been in Vietnam for a little more than two months when he was killed at the age of 19.

Ingalls has now delivered 30 Arleigh Burke-class destroyers to the U.S. Navy. Other destroyers currently under construction at Ingalls include USS Paul Ignatius (DDG-117), USS Delbert D. Black (DDG-119), USS Frank E. Petersen Jr. (DDG-121) and USS Lenah H. Sutcliffe Higbee (DDG-123).

Arleigh Burke-class destroyers are highly capable, multi-mission ships and can conduct a variety of operations, from peacetime presence and crisis management to sea control and power projection, all in support of the United States’ military strategy. The guided missile destroyers are capable of simultaneously fighting air, surface and subsurface battles. The ship contains myriad offensive and defensive weapons designed to support maritime defense needs well into the 21st century.

Ingalls Shipbuilding delivered the guided missile destroyer USS Ralph Johnson (DDG-114) to the U.S. Navy on November 15, 2017. Signing the DD 250 document are (left to right) Commander Jason P. Patterson, the ship’s prospective commanding officer; Commander Scott Williams, program manager representative for Supervisor of Shipbuilding Gulf Coast; and Freddie Joe O’Brien, Ingalls’ DDG-114 ship program manager (Photo by Andrew Young/HII)
Ingalls Shipbuilding delivered the guided missile destroyer USS Ralph Johnson (DDG-114) to the U.S. Navy on November 15, 2017. Signing the DD 250 document are (left to right) Commander Jason P. Patterson, the ship’s prospective commanding officer; Commander Scott Williams, program manager representative for Supervisor of Shipbuilding Gulf Coast; and Freddie Joe O’Brien, Ingalls’ DDG-114 ship program manager (Photo by Andrew Young/HII)

 

Ship Characteristics

Length Overall 510 feet/156 m
Beam – Waterline 59 feet/18 m
Draft 30.5 feet/9.3 m
Displacement – Full Load 9,217 tons/9,363 metric tons
Power Plant 4 General electric LM 2500-30 gas turbines; 2 shafts; 2 CRP (Contra-Rotating) propellers; 100,000 shaft horsepower/75,000 kW
Speed in excess of 30 knots/34.5 mph/55.5 km/h
Range 4,400 NM/8,149 km at 20 knots/23 mph/37 km/h
Crew 380 total: 32 Officers, 27 CPO (Chief Petty Officer), 321 OEM
Surveillance SPY-1D Phased Array Radar and Aegis Combat System (Lockheed Martin); SPS-73(V) Navigation; SPS-67(V)3 Surface Search; 3 SPG-62 Illuminator; SQQ-89(V)6 sonar incorporating SQS-53C hull mounted and SQR-19 towed array sonars used with Mark-116 Mod 7 ASW fire control system
Electronics/Countermeasures SLQ-32(V)3; Mark-53 Mod 0 Decoy System; Mark-234 Decoy System; SLQ-25A Torpedo Decoy; SLQ-39 Surface Decoy; URN-25 TACAN; UPX-29 IFF System; Kollmorgen Mark-46 Mod 1 Electro-Optical Director
Aircraft 2 embarked SH-60 helicopters ASW operations; RAST (Recovery Assist, Secure and Traverse)
Armament 2 Mark-41 Vertical Launching System (VLS) with 90 Standard, Vertical Launch ASROC (Anti-Submarine Rocket) & Tomahawk ASM (Air-to-Surface Missile)/LAM (Loitering Attack Missile); 5-in (127-mm)/54 (62) Mark-45 gun; 2 (1) CIWS (Close-In Weapon System); 2 Mark-32 triple 324-mm torpedo tubes for Mark-46 or Mark-50 ASW torpedos

 

Guided Missile Destroyers Lineup

 

Flight IIA: Restart

Ship Yard Launched Commissioned Homeport
DDG-113 John Finn HIIIS 03-28-15 07-15-17 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-114 Ralph Johnson HIIIS 12-12-15
DDG-115 Rafael Peralta GDBIW 10-31-15 07-29-2017 San Diego, California

 

Keel authentication

Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division authenticated the keel of the Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer USS Lenah H. Sutcliffe Higbee (DDG-123) on November 14, 2017. The ship is named in honor of the first woman to receive the Navy Cross.

Ship’s Sponsors (left to right) Virginia Munford, Louisa Dixon and Pickett Wilson trace their initials onto a steel plate that will be welded inside the guided missile destroyer USS Lenah H. Sutcliffe Higbee (DDG-123) (Photo by Michael Duhe/HII)
Ship’s Sponsors (left to right) Virginia Munford, Louisa Dixon and Pickett Wilson trace their initials onto a steel plate that will be welded inside the guided missile destroyer USS Lenah H. Sutcliffe Higbee (DDG-123) (Photo by Michael Duhe/HII)

«It is always exciting to celebrate the keel authentication of another Arleigh Burke-class destroyer», Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias said during a shipyard ceremony this morning. «The keel authentication is an important milestone in a ship’s life, as we lay the foundation upon which this great ship will be built. Like her namesake, DDG-123 will be strong and capable. Our men and women in the Navy – and Mrs. Higbee’s legacy – deserve nothing less».

Louisa Dixon, Virginia Munford and Pickett Wilson are the ship’s sponsors. The three women played an important role during former Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus’ term as governor of Mississippi.

«We want to thank Ingalls Shipbuilding, its employees and its suppliers for the high standards of design and construction and the strong and important support they give their employees and the state of Mississippi», Dixon said. «We are thrilled and look forward to seeing everyone again at a christening in the very near future».

C.C. Tanner, a structural welder at Ingalls, welded the three sponsors’ initials onto a steel plate, signifying the keel of DDG-123 as being «truly and fairly laid». The plate will remain affixed to the ship throughout its lifetime.

«Today marks the true start of this ship’s construction», said Commander Scott Williams, program manager representative for Supervisor of Shipbuilding Gulf Coast. «With 29 Ingalls-built Arleigh Burke-class destroyers currently in active service and four of her sister ships also in production here at Ingalls, the mere continuity of the Arleigh Burke-class destroyer over the past 25 years shows their importance to our naval forces. To the men and women of Huntington Ingalls Industries who will bring DDG-123 to life, thank you. Thank you to the shipfitters, pipefitters, electricians, welders, testers and engineers who will toil in this historic shipbuilding journey that will carry a pioneer’s name».

USS Lenah H. Sutcliffe Higbee (DDG-123) will be the second ship named for Higbee. The first was a destroyer commissioned in 1945 and was the first U.S. Navy surface combatant named for a female member of the U.S. Navy. Higbee joined the Navy in October 1908 as part of the newly established Navy Nurse Corps, a group of women who would become known as «The Sacred Twenty», and became the second superintendent of the Navy Nurse Corps in January 1911.

Ingalls has delivered 29 Arleigh Burke-class destroyers to the U.S. Navy. Other destroyers currently under construction at Ingalls include USS Ralph Johnson (DDG-114), USS Paul Ignatius (DDG-117), USS Delbert D. Black (DDG-119) and USS Frank E. Petersen Jr. (DDG-121).

Arleigh Burke-class destroyers are highly capable, multi-mission ships that can conduct a variety of operations, from peacetime presence and crisis management to sea control and power projection, all in support of the United States’ military strategy. DDGs are capable of simultaneously fighting air, surface and subsurface battles. The ship contains myriad offensive and defensive weapons designed to support maritime defense needs well into the 21st century.

 

Ship Characteristics

Length Overall 510 feet/156 m
Beam – Waterline 59 feet/18 m
Draft 30.5 feet/9.3 m
Displacement – Full Load 9,217 tons/9,363 metric tons
Power Plant 4 General electric LM 2500-30 gas turbines; 2 shafts; 2 CRP (Contra-Rotating) propellers; 100,000 shaft horsepower/75,000 kW
Speed in excess of 30 knots/34.5 mph/55.5 km/h
Range 4,400 NM/8,149 km at 20 knots/23 mph/37 km/h
Crew 380 total: 32 Officers, 27 CPO (Chief Petty Officer), 321 OEM
Surveillance SPY-1D Phased Array Radar and Aegis Combat System (Lockheed Martin); SPS-73(V) Navigation; SPS-67(V)3 Surface Search; 3 SPG-62 Illuminator; SQQ-89(V)6 sonar incorporating SQS-53C hull mounted and SQR-19 towed array sonars used with Mark-116 Mod 7 ASW fire control system
Electronics/Countermeasures SLQ-32(V)3; Mark-53 Mod 0 Decoy System; Mark-234 Decoy System; SLQ-25A Torpedo Decoy; SLQ-39 Surface Decoy; URN-25 TACAN; UPX-29 IFF System; Kollmorgen Mark-46 Mod 1 Electro-Optical Director
Aircraft 2 embarked SH-60 helicopters ASW operations; RAST (Recovery Assist, Secure and Traverse)
Armament 2 Mark-41 Vertical Launching System (VLS) with 90 Standard, Vertical Launch ASROC (Anti-Submarine Rocket) & Tomahawk ASM (Air-to-Surface Missile)/LAM (Loitering Attack Missile); 5-in (127-mm)/54 (62) Mark-45 gun; 2 (1) CIWS (Close-In Weapon System); 2 Mark-32 triple 324-mm torpedo tubes for Mark-46 or Mark-50 ASW torpedos

 

Guided Missile Destroyers Lineup

 

Flight IIA: Technology Insertion

Ship Yard Launched Commissioned Homeport
DDG-116 Thomas Hudner GDBIW 04-01-17
DDG-117 Paul Ignatius HIIIS 11-12-16
DDG-118 Daniel Inouye GDBIW
DDG-119 Delbert D. Black HIIIS 09-08-17
DDG-120 Carl M. Levin GDBIW
DDG-121 Frank E. Peterson Jr. HIIIS
DDG-122 John Basilone GDBIW
DDG-123 Lenah H. Sutcliffe Higbee HIIIS