Category Archives: Navy

Sėlis commissioned

On January 11, 2017, Patrol ship LNS Sėlis (P15) Lithuania had bought from Denmark was commissioned and named at a ceremony in Klaipėda. All moored Naval Flotilla ships flew signal flags and Lithuanian Navy crews paraded on the flotilla square.

Lithuanian Navy patrol ship LNS Sėlis (P15) commissioned and named at a ceremony in Klaipėda
Lithuanian Navy patrol ship LNS Sėlis (P15) commissioned and named at a ceremony in Klaipėda

Lithuanian Navy Chaplain blessed the ship and the crew according to a tradition. Representatives of Utena district council, partner LNS (Lithuanian Navy Ship) Sėlis crew since 2001 when patrol ship LNS Sėlis (P32) was commissioned, unveiled the name plaque of LNS Sėlis (P15) and signed a symbolic act of blessing.

Danish-built Flyvefisken-class patrol ship LNS Sėlis (P15) replaces technically obsolete LNS Sėlis (P32) which is planned to be written off.

From now on the Patrol Ship Squadron of the Naval Flotilla consists of four Flyvefisken-class ships of the same type: LNS Žemaitis (P11), LNS Dzūkas (P12), LNS Aukštaitis (P14), and LNS Sėlis (P15). Multifunctional and modern ships of the same type will ensure efficiency of the implementation of tasks.

The ceremony was attended by Minister of National Defence Raimundas Karoblis, Chief of Defence of Lithuania Lieutenant General Jonas Vytautas Žukas, Ambassador od Denmark in Lithuania HE Dan Eddie Frederiksen, commanders of services and units of the Lithuanian Armed Forces, foreign defence attachés in Lithuania, mayor of Utena district council Alvydas Katinas and a delegation.

Khanderi Launched

INS Khanderi (S51), the second of Indian Navy’s Scorpene’ class stealth submarine, was «launched» by the Hon’ble Raksha Rajya Mantri, Doctor Subhash Bhamre paving the way for her sea trials. Admiral Sunil Lanba, Chief of the Naval Staff and a host of other dignitaries witnessed the launch at Mazagon Dock Shipyard Limited on 12 January, 2017.

INS Khanderi (S51), second of the six Kalvari Class submarines leaves MDL for docking and floating and will thereafter commence her sea trials
INS Khanderi (S51), second of the six Kalvari Class submarines leaves MDL for docking and floating and will thereafter commence her sea trials

The submarine is expected to be delivered to Navy by the year end. She has been christened after her illustrious predecessor, an erstwhile «Foxtrot» class submarine decommissioned in 1989, which is as per the traditions of Indian Navy. The construction of six Scorpene submarines is presently being progressed at Mazagon Dock Shipyard Limited (MDL), under Project 75 with Transfer of Technology from M/s DCNS, France as the Collaborator. The first of the class submarine, INS Kalvari (S50) is presently undergoing sea trials and likely to be commissioned into Navy by Mid-2017. These submarines, post induction, would form the core of Navy’s conventional Submarine Arm.

Speaking on the occasion Doctor Subhash Bhamre said that Project 75 Kalvari is a key milestone in self-reliance and indigenization for the country. Admiral Sunil Lanba, Chief of the Naval Staff said during his address that the fact that Submarine INS Khanderi (S51) compares with the best in the world, speaks highly of the experience and expertise our shipbuilders have gained over the years. He added that as Indian Navy celebrates Golden Jubilee of the submarine arm in 2017, the induction of Project 75 submarines would mark the beginning of a new chapter in our submarine capabilities.

The launching of Khanderi also marks a critical milestone event for the Shipyard which earlier has delivered two Shishumar class submarines in the 90’s and has now strengthened its position as a submarine building yard for Indian Navy. Started as a small dry dock facility for East India Company, MDL today has established itself as a forefront Defence Public Sector Undertaking, with indigenous construction of several ships and submarines for Navy such as P 15 B Destroyers and P 17 A class stealth Frigates being the latest.

Submarine INS Khanderi (S51) launched
Submarine INS Khanderi (S51) launched

Undersea Network

DARPA’s Tactical Undersea Network Architecture (TUNA) program recently completed its initial phase, successfully developing concepts and technologies aimed at restoring connectivity for U.S. forces when traditional tactical networks are knocked offline or otherwise unavailable. The program now enters the next phase, which calls for the demonstration of a prototype of the system at sea.

Artist’s concept showing the TUNA architecture with an undersea fiber-optic backbone enabling a temporary communications network when traditional tactical data links are unavailable
Artist’s concept showing the TUNA architecture with an undersea fiber-optic backbone enabling a temporary communications network when traditional tactical data links are unavailable

TUNA seeks to develop and demonstrate novel, optical-fiber-based technology options and designs to temporarily restore radio frequency (RF) tactical data networks in a contested environment via an undersea optical fiber backbone. The concept involves deploying RF network node buoys – dropped from aircraft or ships, for example – that would be connected via thin underwater fiber-optic cables. The very-small-diameter fiber-optic cables being developed are designed to last 30 days in the rough ocean environment – long enough to provide essential connectivity until primary methods of communications are restored.

«Phase 1 of the program included successful modeling, simulation, and at-sea tests of unique fiber-cable and buoy-component technologies needed to make such an undersea architecture work», said John Kamp, program manager in DARPA’s Strategic Technology Office. «Teams were able to design strong, hair-thin, buoyant fiber-optic cables able to withstand the pressure, saltwater, and currents of the ocean, as well as develop novel power generation concepts».

Supplying power to floating buoy nodes on the open sea presents a particular challenge. During the first phase of the program, the University of Washington’s Applied Physics Lab (APL) developed a unique concept called the Wave Energy Buoy that Self-deploys (WEBS), which generates electricity from wave movement. The WEBS system is designed to fit into a cylinder that could be deployed from a ship or aircraft.

Having now entered its second and final phase, the program is advancing to design and implement an integrated end-to-end system, and to test and evaluate this system in laboratory and at-sea demonstrations. As a test case for the TUNA concept, teams are using Link 16—a common tactical data network used by U.S. and allied forces’ aircraft, ships, and ground vehicles.

DARPA wraps up first phase of program developing temporary underwater fiber-optics communications networks to ensure connectivity when tactical networks are unavailable

Ninth Legend-class NSC

Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division has received a $486 million fixed-price incentive contract from the U.S. Coast Guard to build a ninth National Security Cutter (NSC).

National Security Cutter USCGC Munro (WMSL-755) Successfully Completes Builder's Sea Trials
National Security Cutter USCGC Munro (WMSL-755) Successfully Completes Builder’s Sea Trials

«With the experience and knowledge our shipbuilders bring to this program, I am confident NSC 9 will be another great ship and continue the great success on this program», said Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias. «These ships remain in high demand by our Coast Guard customer, and we look forward to delivering another quality NSC to help them accomplish their vital homeland security missions».

NSCs are the flagships of the Coast Guard’s cutter fleet, designed to replace the 12 Hamilton-class high-endurance cutters, which entered service during the 1960s. Ingalls has delivered six NSCs and has two more under construction: USCGC Kimball (WMSL-756) and USCGC Midgett (WMSL-757). These ships are scheduled to be delivered in 2018 and 2019, respectively.

«We are extremely proud of the quality of the NSCs we’ve built for the U.S. Coast Guard», said Derek Murphy, Ingalls’ NSC program manager. «As we continue to be the sole builder in this class, the benefits of serial production are apparent: technologically advanced, dependable ships that are built at cost and on schedule».

Legend-Class National Security Cutters are the flagships of the U.S. Coast Guard. They are the most technologically advanced ships in the Coast Guard’s fleet, with capabilities for maritime homeland security, law enforcement and national security missions. NSCs are 418 feet/127 m long with a 54-foot/16-meter beam and displace 4,500 tons/4,572 metric tons with a full load. They have a top speed of 28 knots/32 mph/52 km/h, a range of 12,000 NM/13,809 miles/22,224 km, an endurance of 60 days and a crew of 120. The Legend class of cutters plays an important role in enhancing the Coast Guard’s operational readiness, capacity and effectiveness at a time when the demand for their services has never been greater.

 

Facts

Displacement 4,500 long tons/4,572 metric tons
Length 418 feet/127 m
Beam 54 feet/16 m
Speed 28 knots/32 mph/52 km/h
Range 12,000 NM/13,809 miles/22,224 km
Endurance 60 days
Crew 110
Equipped with Mk-110 57-mm turret mounted gun
6 × 12.7-mm/.50 caliber machine guns
3D air search radar
2 level 1, class 1 aircraft hangers
A stern launch ramp for mission boats

 

Ship list

Ship Hull Number Laid down Launched Commissioned
Bertholf WMSL-750 03-29-2005 09-29-2006 08-04-2008
Waesche WMSL-751 09-11-2006 07-12-2008 05-07-2010
Stratton WMSL-752 07-20-2009 07-23-2010 03-31-2012
Hamilton WMSL-753 09-05-2012 08-10-2013 12-06-2014
James WMSL-754 05-17-2013 05-03-2014 08-08-2015
Munro WMSL-755 10-07-2013 09-12-2015
Kimball WMSL-756 03-04-2016 12-17-2016
Midgett WMSL-757
Stone WMSL-758

Translation and launch of U.S. Coast Guard National Security Cutter Kimball

Acceptance Trials

The future USS Rafael Peralta (DDG-115) successfully completed acceptance trials December 16 after spending two days underway off the coast of Maine.

The future USS Rafael Peralta (DDG-115) sets sail for the first time to conduct initial at-sea builder's trials off the coast of Maine (U.S. Navy Photo/Released)
The future USS Rafael Peralta (DDG-115) sets sail for the first time to conduct initial at-sea builder’s trials off the coast of Maine (U.S. Navy Photo/Released)

The U.S. Navy’s Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) reviewed the ship and its crew during a series of demonstrations while underway. INSURV evaluates the ship’s construction and compliance with Navy specifications and is the governing body that recommends the ship be delivered to the U.S. Navy.

The trials were conducted both pier-side and underway. Many of the ship’s onboard systems tested to validate performance, including navigation, damage control, mechanical and electrical systems, combat systems, communications, and propulsion applications, met or exceeded Navy specifications.

«DDG-115 performed exceedingly well during acceptance trials and throughout the test and trials period», said Captain Casey Moton, DDG-51 class program manager, Program Executive Office (PEO) Ships. «This ship is another example of the excellent work performed by our Navy, waterfront, and industry teams. As we continue with serial production of the Arleigh Burke class, I look forward to delivering more of these world-class ships to the fleet».

USS Rafael Peralta (DDG-115) is equipped with the Aegis Baseline 9 Combat System which includes an Integrated Air and Missile Defense (IAMD) capability incorporating Ballistic Missile Defense 5.0 Capability Upgrade and Naval Integrated Fire Control-Counter Air capability. The ship’s IAMD radar will provide increased computing power and radar upgrades that improve detection and reaction capabilities against modern air warfare threats. The Aegis Combat System will enable the ship to link radars with other ships and aircraft to provide a composite picture of the battlespace and effectively increase the theater space.

Following delivery, USS Rafael Peralta (DDG-115) will be the 65th Arleigh Burke class destroyer and the first of the DDG-51 Flight IIA Restart ships to be built at Bath Iron Works. The shipyard is currently in production on future Flight IIA Technology Insertion destroyers USS Thomas Hudner (DDG-116), USS Daniel Inouye (DDG-118) and USS Carl M. Levin (DDG-120) and under contract for three additional ships awarded as part of the five-ship multi-year procurement for FY13-17.

As one of the Defense Department’s largest acquisition organizations, PEO Ships is responsible for executing the development and procurement of all destroyers, amphibious ships, special mission and support ships, and boats and craft.

 

Ship Characteristics

Length Overall 510 feet/156 m
Beam – Waterline 59 feet/18 m
Draft 30.5 feet/9.3 m
Displacement – Full Load 9,217 tons/9,363 metric tons
Power Plant 4 General electric LM 2500-30 gas turbines; 2 shafts; 2 CRP (Contra-Rotating) propellers; 100,000 shaft horsepower/75,000 kW
Speed in excess of 30 knots/34.5 mph/55.5 km/h
Range 4,400 NM/8,149 km at 20 knots/23 mph/37 km/h
Crew 380 total: 32 Officers, 27 CPO (Chief Petty Officer), 321 OEM
Surveillance SPY-1D Phased Array Radar and Aegis Combat System (Lockheed Martin); SPS-73(V) Navigation; SPS-67(V)3 Surface Search; 3 SPG-62 Illuminator; SQQ-89(V)6 sonar incorporating SQS-53C hull mounted and SQR-19 towed array sonars used with Mark-116 Mod 7 ASW fire control system
Electronics/Countermeasures SLQ-32(V)3; Mark-53 Mod 0 Decoy System; Mark-234 Decoy System; SLQ-25A Torpedo Decoy; SLQ-39 Surface Decoy; URN-25 TACAN; UPX-29 IFF System; Kollmorgen Mark-46 Mod 1 Electro-Optical Director
Aircraft 2 embarked SH-60 helicopters ASW operations; RAST (Recovery Assist, Secure and Traverse)
Armament 2 Mark-41 Vertical Launching System (VLS) with 90 Standard, Vertical Launch ASROC (Anti-Submarine Rocket) & Tomahawk ASM (Air-to-Surface Missile)/LAM (Loitering Attack Missile); 5-in (127-mm)/54 (62) Mark-45 gun; 2 (1) CIWS (Close-In Weapon System); 2 Mark-32 triple 324-mm torpedo tubes for Mark-46 or Mark-50 ASW torpedos

 

Flight IIA: Restart

Ship Yard Launched Commissioned Homeport
DDG-113 John Finn HIIIS 03-28-15
DDG-114 Ralph Johnson HIIIS 12-12-15
DDG-115 Rafael Peralta GDBIW 10-31-15

 

Gabrielle delivered

Austal Limited (Austal) is pleased to announce the future USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS-10) has been delivered to the United States Navy (USN) during a ceremony held aboard the ship at Austal USA’s shipyard in Mobile, Alabama.

The future USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS-10) is the fifth Independence-variant Littoral Combat Ship to be delivered by Austal to the U.S. Navy (Photo: Austal)
The future USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS-10) is the fifth Independence-variant Littoral Combat Ship to be delivered by Austal to the U.S. Navy (Photo: Austal)

The future USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS-10) is the fifth Independence-variant Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) delivered to the USN since 2009 and the fourth naval vessel delivered to the USN by Austal USA in 2016; including 2 × Littoral Combat Ships (USS Montgomery LCS-8 and USS Gabrielle Giffords LCS-10) and 2 × Expeditionary Fast Transport (USNS Brunswick T-EPF-6 and USNS Carson City T-EPF-7).

Designed in Australia by the team bidding for the Commonwealth of Australia’s Offshore Patrol Vessel (SEA1180) program, the 417-foot/127-meter frigate-sized Littoral Combat Ships are constructed in Mobile, Alabama utilizing Austal’s Module Manufacturing Facility (MMF), which offers production-line efficiencies and industry leading productivity.

Announcing the delivery, Austal Chief Executive Officer David Singleton said: «Gabrielle Giffords joins Independence, Coronado, Jackson and Montgomery as the fifth Littoral Combat Ship Austal USA has delivered to the U.S. Navy. This vessel further demonstrates our capability to successfully deliver large, complex naval programs and reinforces our ability to transition an innovative, effective design not just across shipyards but continents».

«The Independence-variant LCS platform has gone from strength to strength, as the first LCS variant to be fitted with a Harpoon Anti-ship Missile System and the first U.S. Navy class of vessel to successfully pass shock testing since 2008», Singleton added.

Six additional Independence-variant LCS are under construction at Austal USA under an 11 ship contract worth approximately US$4 billion. The future USS Omaha (LCS-12) and USS Manchester (LCS-14) are preparing for sea-trials, USS Tulsa (LCS-16) and USS Charleston (LCS-18) are in Assembly and modules for USS Cincinnati (LCS-20) and USS Kansas City (LCS-22) are underway in the MMF. Austal delivered USS Jackson (LCS-6) in August 2015 and USS Montgomery (LCS-8) in June 2016.

LCS10 Completes Acceptance Trials with Dolphins in tow

 

The Independence Variant of the LCS Class

PRINCIPAL DIMENSIONS
Construction Hull and superstructure – aluminium alloy
Length overall 417 feet/127.1 m
Beam overall 103 feet/31.4 m
Hull draft (maximum) 14.8 feet/4.5 m
PAYLOAD AND CAPACITIES
Complement Core Crew – 40
Mission crew – 36
Berthing 76 in a mix of single, double & quad berthing compartments
Maximum mission load 210 tonnes
Mission Bay Volume 118,403 feet3/11,000 m3
Mission packages Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW)
Surface Warfare (SUW)
Mine Warfare (MIW)
PROPULSION
Main engines 2 × GE LM2500
2 × MTU 20V 8000
Waterjets 4 × Wartsila steerable
Bow thruster Retractable azimuthing
PERFORMANCE
Speed 40 knots/46 mph/74 km/h
Range 3,500 NM/4,028 miles/6,482 km
Operational limitation Survival in Sea State 8
MISSION/LOGISTICS DECK
Deck area >21,527.8 feet2/2,000 m2
Launch and recovery Twin boom extending crane
Loading Side ramp
Internal elevator to hanger
Launch/Recover Watercraft Sea State 4
FLIGHT DECK AND HANGER
Flight deck dimensions 2 × SH-60 or 1 × CH-53 or multiple Unmanned Aerial Vehicles/Vertical Take-off and Land Tactical Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs/VTUAVs)
Hanger Aircraft stowage & maintenance for 2 × SH-60
Launch/Recover Aircraft Sea State 5
WEAPONS AND SENSORS
Standard 1 × 57-mm gun
4 × 12.7-mm/.50 caliber guns
1 × Surface-to-Air Missile (SAM) launcher
3 × weapons modules

 

Independence-class

Ship Laid down Launched Commissioned Homeport
USS Independence (LCS-2) 01-19-2006 04-26-2008 01-16-2010 San Diego, California
USS Coronado (LCS-4) 12-17-2009 01-14-2012 04-05-2014 San Diego, California
USS Jackson (LCS-6) 08-01-2011 12-14-2013 12-05-2015 San Diego, California
USS Montgomery (LCS-8) 06-25-2013 08-06-2014 09-10-2016 San Diego, California
USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS-10) 04-16-2014 02-25-2015
USS Omaha (LCS-12) 02-18-2015 11-20-2015
USS Manchester (LCS-14) 06-29-2015 05-12-2016
USS Tulsa (LCS-16) 01-11-2016
USS Charleston (LCS-18) 06-28-2016
USS Cincinnati (LCS-20)
USS Kansas City (LCS-22)
USS Oakland (LCS-24)
USS Mobile (LCS-26)

 

Kimball is Launched

Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division launched the National Security Cutter (NSC) USCGC Kimball (WMSL-756) on Saturday, December 17. Kimball is the seventh NSC Ingalls has built for the U.S. Coast Guard; christening is scheduled for March 4, 2017.

Ingalls Shipbuilding launched the National Security Cutter USCGC Kimball (WMSL-756) on Saturday, December 17. Kimball is the seventh NSC Ingalls has built for the U.S. Coast Guard; christening is scheduled for March 4
Ingalls Shipbuilding launched the National Security Cutter USCGC Kimball (WMSL-756) on Saturday, December 17. Kimball is the seventh NSC Ingalls has built for the U.S. Coast Guard; christening is scheduled for March 4

«This is an important milestone for Kimball and the National Security Cutter program», Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias said. «The hot NSC production line we have at Ingalls, with six ships delivered and two more under construction, is allowing us to build these highly capable ships in the most efficient and cost-effective manner possible».

Kimball was translated via Ingalls’ rail car system to the floating dry dock last week, and the dock was moved away from the pier on Saturday morning. With the assistance of tugboats, Kimball launched off the dock on Saturday afternoon.

«Our crew works hard to make sure these translations and launches go as smoothly as possible, while incorporating lessons learned from previous ships so we become that much more efficient», said Derek Murphy, Ingalls’ NSC program manager. «After a successful launch, there is still much work to be done. We are now focused on the upcoming milestones such as first fuel, generator and engine light-offs, and sea trials».

The ship is named in honor of Sumner Kimball, who organized and directed the U.S. Life Saving Service. He was a pioneer in organizing all of the different facilities associated with the service into what eventually became the U.S. Coast Guard.

NSCs are 418 feet/127 m long with a 54-foot/16-meter beam and displace 4,500 long tons/4,572 metric tons with a full load. They have a top speed of 28 knots/32 mph/52 km/h, a range of 12,000 NM/13,809 miles/22,224 km, an endurance of 60 days and a crew of 110.

The Legend-class NSC is capable of meeting all maritime security mission needs required of the High Endurance Cutter. The cutter includes an aft launch and recovery area for two rigid hull inflatable boats and a flight deck to accommodate a range of manned and unmanned rotary wing aircraft. It is the largest and most technologically advanced class of cutter in the U.S. Coast Guard, with robust capabilities for maritime homeland security, law enforcement, marine safety, environmental protection and national defense missions. This class of cutters plays an important role in enhancing the Coast Guard’s operational readiness, capacity and effectiveness at a time when the demand for their services has never been greater.

USCGC Kimball (WMSL-756) moved across land to the dry dock
USCGC Kimball (WMSL-756) moved across land to the dry dock

 

Facts

Displacement 4,500 long tons/4,572 metric tons
Length 418 feet/127 m
Beam 54 feet/16 m
Speed 28 knots/32 mph/52 km/h
Range 12,000 NM/13,809 miles/22,224 km
Endurance 60 days
Crew 110
Equipped with Mk-110 57-mm turret mounted gun
6 × 12.7-mm/.50 caliber machine guns
3D air search radar
2 level 1, class 1 aircraft hangers
A stern launch ramp for mission boats

 

Ship list

Ship Hull Number Laid down Launched Commissioned
Bertholf WMSL-750 03-29-2005 09-29-2006 08-04-2008
Waesche WMSL-751 09-11-2006 07-12-2008 05-07-2010
Stratton WMSL-752 07-20-2009 07-23-2010 03-31-2012
Hamilton WMSL-753 09-05-2012 08-10-2013 12-06-2014
James WMSL-754 05-17-2013 05-03-2014 08-08-2015
Munro WMSL-755 10-07-2013 09-12-2015
Kimball WMSL-756 03-04-2016 12-17-2016
Midgett WMSL-757
Stone WMSL-758

Translation and launch of U.S. Coast Guard National Security Cutter Kimball

 

Construction of LPD-28

Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) announced today that its Ingalls Shipbuilding division was awarded a $1.46 billion, fixed-price incentive contract for the detail design and construction of the amphibious transport dock USS Fort Lauderdale (LPD-28).

HII's Ingalls Shipbuilding division was awarded a $1.46 billion, fixed-price incentive contract for the detail design and construction of the amphibious transport dock USS Fort Lauderdale (LPD-28) (HII rendering)
HII’s Ingalls Shipbuilding division was awarded a $1.46 billion, fixed-price incentive contract for the detail design and construction of the amphibious transport dock USS Fort Lauderdale (LPD-28) (HII rendering)

«This contract demonstrates the confidence the Navy has in our shipbuilders’ performance in this program», said Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias. «Building LPD-28 allows the entire LPD industrial base to maintain a hot production line so that our sailors and Marines receive quality amphibious warships as efficiently and affordably as possible».

Ingalls has built and delivered 10 ships in the San Antonio class of amphibious warships. The 11th, USS Portland (LPD-27), launched last year and is scheduled for sea trials in mid-2017.

LPD-28 is named Fort Lauderdale to honor the Florida city’s historic ties to the U.S. Navy, which date to the 1830s and include an important naval training center during World War II.

The San Antonio class is a major part of the Navy’s 21st century amphibious assault force. The 684-foot/208-meter-long, 105-foot/32-meter-wide ships are used to embark and land Marines, their equipment and supplies ashore via air cushion or conventional landing craft and amphibious assault vehicles, augmented by helicopters or vertical takeoff and landing aircraft such as the MV-22 Osprey. The ships support a Marine Air Ground Task Force across the spectrum of operations, conducting amphibious and expeditionary missions of sea control and power projection to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief missions throughout the first half of the 21st century.

Officially named

HMS Audacious (S122), the fourth submarine in the Astute class, was officially named on 16 December 2016 during a ceremony at our Submarines site in Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria. Guests watched as Lady Jones, Audacious’ sponsor and wife of Admiral Sir Phillip Jones, the First Sea Lord and Chief of Naval Staff, named the 7,400 tonne, 318-foot/97-metre-long attack submarine. In keeping with tradition, she then smashed a bottle of locally brewed beer against her hull.

Fourth submarine in Astute class named at Barrow-in-Furness
Fourth submarine in Astute class named at Barrow-in-Furness

Tony Johns, Managing Director of BAE Systems Submarines, said: «Today marks an important milestone in Audacious’ build programme and is the culmination of many years’ hard work. We have already delivered three highly-capable Astute class submarines to the Royal Navy and Audacious now takes another significant step towards joining her sister submarines. This is a fitting end to a very important year for our business, in which we also began construction on the Dreadnought submarine programme and opened the first of our new facilities. The focus for Audacious now turns to getting her ready for launch next year».

Defence Minister Harriett Baldwin said: «HMS Audacious is the fourth in our fleet of Astute Class submarines, the largest and most advanced attack submarines in service with the Royal Navy, already providing unprecedented levels of stealth and attack capability across the world. Backed by a rising defence budget and a £178 billion equipment plan, Barrow will remain the hub of our submarine building programmes for years to come».

HMS Audacious (S122) will stay inside the Company’s main construction facility – the Devonshire Dock Hall – following today’s ceremony, before being launched next year.

BAE Systems is the prime contractor responsible for the design, build, test and commissioning of the seven Astute class nuclear-powered attack submarines. It is also the industrial lead for the Dreadnought programme, the Royal Navy’s next generation of submarines that will carry the continuous at-sea nuclear deterrent.

The Company’s Submarine operation employs approximately 8,000 people and spends more than £300 M per year with over 3,000 suppliers – 85 per cent of whom are based in the UK.

Facts and stats
Facts and stats

Munro delivered

Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division delivered the National Security Cutter (NSC) USCGC Munro (WMSL-755) to the U.S. Coast Guard on December 16, 2016. Munro is scheduled to sail away in February and will be commissioned in Seattle on April 1, 2017.

Huntington Ingalls Industries Delivers National Security Cutter USCGC Munro (WMSL-755) to the U.S. Coast Guard
Huntington Ingalls Industries Delivers National Security Cutter USCGC Munro (WMSL-755) to the U.S. Coast Guard

«Three years ago, this ship consisted of nothing more than steel plates, raw pipe and bundled wire», said Derek Murphy, Ingalls’ NSC 6 program manager. «Since then, we’ve seen an amazing transformation, made possible by the thousands of people who poured their heart and soul into this ship. We have a mission statement in the NSC program that says during the construction of each NSC we will provide the men and women of the United States Coast Guard with the finest ship in their fleet. This excellence will be provided by our shipbuilders through working safely, attention to detail and ownership of work».

Munro is the sixth Legend-class National Security Cutter Ingalls has built for the Coast Guard. Ingalls currently has two more NSCs under construction: USCGC Kimball (WMSL-756) and USCGC Midgett (WMSL-757). These ships are scheduled to be delivered in 2018 and 2019, respectively.

«This is a remarkable achievement in my career and the career of the personnel serving on Munro», said Thomas King, commanding officer of Munro. «National Security Cutters are a great benefit to the Coast Guard because they have the capabilities to fulfill missions while acting independently offshore».

Munro is named to honor Signalman First Class Douglas A. Munro, the Coast Guard’s sole recipient of the Medal of Honor. He was mortally wounded on September 27, 1942, while evacuating a detachment of Marines from Guadalcanal.

Legend-class NSCs are the flagships of the Coast Guard’s cutter fleet. Designed to replace the 378‐foot/115-meter Hamilton-class high-endurance cutters that entered service in the 1960s, they are 418 feet/127 m long with a 54-foot/16-meter beam and displace 4,500 long tons/4,572 metric tons with a full load. They have a top speed of 28 knots/32 mph/52 km/h, a range of 12,000 NM/13,809 miles/22,224 km, an endurance of 60 days and a crew of 110.

NSCs are capable of meeting all maritime security mission needs required of the high-endurance cutter. They include an aft launch and recovery area for two rigid hull inflatable boats and a flight deck to accommodate a range of manned and unmanned rotary wing aircraft. The Legend class is the largest and most technologically advanced class of cutter in the Coast Guard, with robust capabilities for maritime homeland security, law enforcement, marine safety, environmental protection and national defense missions. NSCs play an important role enhancing the Coast Guard’s operational readiness, capacity and effectiveness at a time when the demand for their services has never been greater.

Derek Murphy (right), Ingalls’ NSC program manager, presents the key plaque to Captain Thomas King, Munro’s commanding officer, with Christopher Webb, commanding officer of the U.S. Coast Guard’s Project Resident Office Gulf Coast, observing (Photo by Andrew Young/HII)
Derek Murphy (right), Ingalls’ NSC program manager, presents the key plaque to Captain Thomas King, Munro’s commanding officer, with Christopher Webb, commanding officer of the U.S. Coast Guard’s Project Resident Office Gulf Coast, observing (Photo by Andrew Young/HII)

 

Facts

Displacement 4,500 long tons/4,572 metric tons
Length 418 feet/127 m
Beam 54 feet/16 m
Speed 28 knots/32 mph/52 km/h
Range 12,000 NM/13,809 miles/22,224 km
Endurance 60 days
Crew 110
Equipped with Mk-110 57-mm turret mounted gun
6 × 12.7-mm/.50 caliber machine guns
3D air search radar
2 level 1, class 1 aircraft hangers
A stern launch ramp for mission boats
USCGC Kimball (WMSL-756) moved across land to the dry dock
USCGC Kimball (WMSL-756) moved across land to the dry dock

 

Ship list

Ship Hull Number Laid down Launched Commissioned
Bertholf WMSL-750 03-29-2005 09-29-2006 08-04-2008
Waesche WMSL-751 09-11-2006 07-12-2008 05-07-2010
Stratton WMSL-752 07-20-2009 07-23-2010 03-31-2012
Hamilton WMSL-753 09-05-2012 08-10-2013 12-06-2014
James WMSL-754 05-17-2013 05-03-2014 08-08-2015
Munro WMSL-755 10-07-2013 09-12-2015
Kimball WMSL-756 03-04-2016 12-17-2016
Midgett WMSL-757
Stone WMSL-758