Category Archives: Navy

Offshore Patrol Ship

The steel cutting ceremony of the Multipurpose Offshore Patrol Ship (PPA) took place on February 13, 2017, at Fincantieri’s shipyard in Muggiano (La Spezia), officially marking the beginning of construction works on the first unit.

Multipurpose Offshore Patrol Ship
Multipurpose Offshore Patrol Ship

The ceremony was attended among others by the Undersecretary of State for Defence, Domenico Rossi, by the Chief of Staff of the Italian Navy, Admiral Valter Girardelli, by the General Manager of Fincantieri, Alberto Maestrini, and by the Senior Vice President Naval Vessels Business Unit & Italy Business Unit of Fincantieri, Angelo Fusco.

The PPA, first of seven units, will be delivered in 2021 and it is part of the renewal plan of the operational lines of the Italian Navy vessels, approved by the Government and Parliament and started in May 2015.

The project as a whole involves the construction of nine units, including seven PPAs, one multipurpose amphibious unit (LHD or Landing Helicopter Dock), and one logistic support unit (LSS or Logistic Support Ship).

RINA Services is also involved in the program. The experience gained in a number of past projects, as well as the close cooperation with the Italian Navy at international level for the development of the Naval Ship Code (a standard equivalent to the SOLAS – Safety of Life at Sea, but applicable to naval vessels, developed by the International Naval Safety Association which includes RINA, the Italian Navy and the main NATO’s Navies) have allowed to fine-tune the ways of cooperating, overcoming the traditional concept of class and taking the specific technical and operational needs of the Navy into greater account.

 

Vessel’s characteristics: PPA – Multipurpose Offshore Patrol Ship

The multipurpose offshore patrol vessel is a highly flexible ship with the capacity to serve multiple functions, ranging from patrol with sea rescue capacity to Civil Protection operations and, in its most highly equipped version, first line fighting vessel. There will be indeed different configurations of combat system: starting from a «soft» version for the patrol task, integrated for self-defence ability, to a «full» one, equipped for a complete defence ability. The vessel is also capable of operating high-speed vessels such as RHIB (Rigid Hull Inflatable Boat) up to 11 meters long through lateral cranes or a hauling ramp located at the far stern.

  • 436 feet/133 meters long
  • Speed more than 33 knots/38 mph/61 km/h according to vessel configuration and operational conditions
  • 171 persons of the crew
  • Equipped with a combined diesel, a gas turbine plant (CODAG) and an electric propulsion system
  • Capacity to supply drinking water to land
  • Capacity to provide electricity to land with 2,000 kW of power
  • 2 modular zones at the stern and at the center of the ship that allow the embarking of various types of containerized operating/logistic/residential/healthcare modules (in particular, the stern area may receive and handle within a covered area up to 5 modules in ISO 20” containers, while the central zone may receive and handle up to 8 ISO 20” containers)

The PPAs will be built at the Integrated Shipyard of Riva Trigoso and Muggiano, with delivery expected, for the first vessel of the class, in 2021, while the following deliveries will take place in 2022, 2023, 2024 (two units), 2025 and 2026.

 

TECHNICAL INFORMATION

MAIN CHARACTERISTICS
Length overall abt. 469 feet/143 m
Length between perpendiculars 436 feet/133 m
Beam 54 feet/16.5 m
Depth 34.5 feet/10.5 m
Speed (maximum/range) 32/15 knots – 37/17 mph – 59/28 km/h
Range 5,000 NM/5,754 miles/9,260 km
Endurance 30 days
Crew 171 people
ENERGY AND PROPULSION SYSTEMS
Propulsion system Combined Diesel and Gas Turbine (CODAG) CC: 2 × DE + 1 TAG/2 × Featherable Controllable Pitch Propellers (FCPP)
Generating sets 4 + 2 Shaft Generators / Electric Motors
HELO CAPABILITIES
Flight deck for SH90 or EH101
Hangar for 2 SH90 or 1 EH101

 

COMBAT SYSTEM

1 × Cockpit Control System

1 × Internal Networking System

1 × Combat Management System (CMS)

1 × Integrated Int/Ext Communication System

1 × Integrated Navigation System

2 × Navigation Radars

1 × Dual Band (C-X) Radar

1 × Identification, Friend or Foe (IFF) Interrogator/Transponder System

1 × IR Surveillance System (2 turrets)

2 × Secondary Caliber Guns – 25-mm

2 × Long Range Acoustic Devices

1 × Electronic Warfare (EW) System (Radar Electronic Support Measures, RESM/Communication Electronic Support Measures, CESM)

1 × Fire Control System (ADT)

1 × Quick Point Device System

1 × Surface Anti Air Missile SAAM-ESD System

1 × Anti-Ship Missile System TESEO*

1 × Main Caliber Gun – 127-mm – Vulcano

1 × Medium Caliber Gun – 76-mm SP – Davide

1 × Decoy Launching System (2 Launchers)

1 × Torpedo Detection System

1 × Active Towed Array System*

1 × Torpedo Launching System*

1 × Heavy-Weight Torpedo System

1 × Obstacle Avoidance Sonar**

1 × Diver Detection Sonar

1 × BathyTermograph Unit

* fitted for

** space foreseen for

Army MSV-L Proposal

Fincantieri Marine Group announced today the submission of its proposal for the United States Army Maneuver Support Vessel – Light (MSV-L). Fincantieri leads an elite industry team comprised of CNIM, the designer of the Catamaran Landing Craft (L-CAT); Oshkosh Defense, a leading provider of tactical wheeled vehicles and life sustainment services; and other specialist partners, including Watercraft Logistics and FEDITC. Fincantieri Marinette Marine, the prime contractor, has extensive experience in managing U.S. Government programs of great complexity and requiring serial production, such as the U.S. Navy’s Littoral Combat Ship and the U.S. Coast Guard’s Response Boat-Medium, under construction at its shipyards in Wisconsin.

Atlantic Ocean (February 6, 2012): Fincantieri MSV(L)’s reference design vessel (L‐CAT) going ashore during U.S.‐hosted multinational littoral warfare exercise Bold Alligator
Atlantic Ocean (February 6, 2012): Fincantieri MSV(L)’s reference design vessel (L‐CAT) going ashore during U.S.‐hosted multinational littoral warfare exercise Bold Alligator
Fincantieri Marine Group President and Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Francesco Valente, commented on the submission: «We’ve assembled a world-class team of industry partners in order to deliver to the U.S. Army a highly reliable, low-risk, low total-life-cycle cost solution». Mr. Valente further spoke to the advantages of choosing a reference design based on seven L-CAT vessels, in service for more than 5 years, conducting global combat force missions for the French Navy. «We used a host of real-world maintenance and operational data to further develop the design into a flexible and reliable solution fit for the U.S. Army needs of today and tomorrow», he said. Fincantieri is one of the world’s largest shipbuilding groups and number one by diversification and innovation. It is leader in cruise ship design and construction and a reference player in all high-tech shipbuilding industry’s sectors, from naval to offshore vessels, from high-complexity special vessels and ferries to mega-yachts, ship repairs and conversions, systems and components production and after-sales services. Headquartered in Trieste Italy, the Group has built more than 7,000 vessels in over 230 years of maritime history. With around 19,000 employees, of whom more than 7,800 are in Italy, and 20 shipyards on four continents, today Fincantieri is the leading Western shipbuilder. It has among its clients the major cruise operators, the Italian and the U.S. Navy, in addition to several foreign navies, and it is partner of some of the main European defense companies within supranational programs. Fincantieri operates in the United States through its subsidiary Fincantieri Marine Group (FMG). This company, which serves government customers, including the U.S. Navy and Coast Guard, has three shipyards (Fincantieri Marinette Marine, Fincantieri Bay Shipbuilding and Fincantieri ACE Marine) all located in the Great Lakes Region.

Christening of Tulsa

The U.S. Navy christened its newest Independence-variant Littoral Combat Ship (LCS), USS Tulsa (LCS-16), during a 10 a.m. CST ceremony Saturday, February 11, in Mobile, Alabama. Tulsa, designated LCS-16, honors the city of Tulsa, Oklahoma.

Austal Celebrates Christening of USS Tulsa (LCS-16)
Austal Celebrates Christening of USS Tulsa (LCS-16)

Admiral William F. Moran, vice chief of naval operations, delivered the ceremony’s principal address. Kathy Taylor, former mayor of Tulsa, was serving as the ship’s sponsor. The ceremony was highlighted by Taylor observing a time-honored U.S. Navy tradition of breaking a bottle of sparkling wine across the bow to formally christen the ship. «The christening of the future USS Tulsa serves as a tribute to the extraordinary work done by our nation’s shipbuilders and brings this great ship one step closer to joining our fleet», said the Honorable Sean Stackley, acting secretary of the U.S. Navy. «Our nation can be proud of this crew as they ready the ship to represent the city of Tulsa and the United States, around the world for years to come». The future USS Tulsa (LCS-16) is the second U.S. Navy ship to be named in honor of the city of Tulsa. The first USS Tulsa was an Asheville-class gunboat designated as PG-22 that served from 1923 to 1944 before being renamed Tacloban. She earned two battle stars for World War II service. A cruiser to be named USS Tulsa was also authorized for construction during World War II, but the contract was canceled before it was built. The future USS Tulsa (LCS-16) is a fast, agile, focused-mission platform designed for operation in near-shore environments yet capable of open-ocean operation. It is designed to defeat asymmetric «anti-access» threats such as mines, quiet diesel submarines and fast surface craft. The LCS class consists of two variants, the Freedom variant and the Independence-variant – designed and built by two industry teams. The Freedom-variant team is led by Lockheed Martin (for the odd-numbered hulls, e.g. LCS-1) while the Independence variant team is led by Austal USA (for LCS-6 and the subsequent even-numbered hulls). Each LCS seaframe is outfitted with a single mission package made up of mission modules containing warfighting systems and support equipment. A dedicated ship crew will combine with aviation assets to deploy manned and unmanned vehicles and sensors in support of mine countermeasures, anti-submarine warfare or surface warfare missions.

The Independence Variant of the LCS Class

PRINCIPAL DIMENSIONS
Construction Hull and superstructure – aluminium alloy
Length overall 417 feet/127.1 m
Beam overall 103 feet/31.4 m
Hull draft (maximum) 14.8 feet/4.5 m
PAYLOAD AND CAPACITIES
Complement Core Crew – 40
Mission crew – 36
Berthing 76 in a mix of single, double & quad berthing compartments
Maximum mission load 210 tonnes
Mission Bay Volume 118,403 feet3/11,000 m3
Mission packages Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW)
Surface Warfare (SUW)
Mine Warfare (MIW)
PROPULSION
Main engines 2 × GE LM2500
2 × MTU 20V 8000
Waterjets 4 × Wartsila steerable
Bow thruster Retractable azimuthing
PERFORMANCE
Speed 40 knots/46 mph/74 km/h
Range 3,500 NM/4,028 miles/6,482 km
Operational limitation Survival in Sea State 8
MISSION/LOGISTICS DECK
Deck area >21,527.8 feet2/2,000 m2
Launch and recovery Twin boom extending crane
Loading Side ramp
Internal elevator to hanger
Launch/Recover Watercraft Sea State 4
FLIGHT DECK AND HANGER
Flight deck dimensions 2 × SH-60 or 1 × CH-53 or multiple Unmanned Aerial Vehicles/Vertical Take-off and Land Tactical Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs/VTUAVs)
Hanger Aircraft stowage & maintenance for 2 × SH-60
Launch/Recover Aircraft Sea State 5
WEAPONS AND SENSORS
Standard 1 × 57-mm gun
4 × 12.7-mm/.50 caliber guns
1 × Surface-to-Air Missile (SAM) launcher
3 × weapons modules

 

Independence-class

Ship Laid down Launched Commissioned Homeport
USS Independence (LCS-2) 01-19-2006 04-26-2008 01-16-2010 San Diego, California
USS Coronado (LCS-4) 12-17-2009 01-14-2012 04-05-2014 San Diego, California
USS Jackson (LCS-6) 08-01-2011 12-14-2013 12-05-2015 San Diego, California
USS Montgomery (LCS-8) 06-25-2013 08-06-2014 09-10-2016 San Diego, California
USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS-10) 04-16-2014 02-25-2015
USS Omaha (LCS-12) 02-18-2015 11-20-2015
USS Manchester (LCS-14) 06-29-2015 05-12-2016
USS Tulsa (LCS-16) 01-11-2016
USS Charleston (LCS-18) 06-28-2016
USS Cincinnati (LCS-20)
USS Kansas City (LCS-22)
USS Oakland (LCS-24)

 

Austal USA – USS Tulsa (LCS-16) Number Painting

Acceptance Trials

Future expeditionary fast transport USNS Yuma (T-EPF-8) successfully completed acceptance trials January 26, 2017 after two days of underway evaluation in the Gulf of Mexico.

USNS Yuma (T-EPF-8) completes acceptance trials
USNS Yuma (T-EPF-8) completes acceptance trials
The ship returned to the Austal USA shipyard after demonstrating the readiness of its equipment and system operations for the Navy’s Board of Inspection and Survey. By conducting numerous tests, both dockside and underway, surveyors were able to evaluate and determine the ship met all criteria required for final acceptance. «The EPF program continues to be a successful model of serial ship production», said Captain Henry Stevens, Strategic and Theater Sealift program manager, Program Executive Office (PEO), Ships. «The class continues to grow and advance the U.S. Navy, expanding U.S. presence across the maritime theater. I look forward to seeing EPF-8 deliver this year and the continued success of the program». Expeditionary fast transports are versatile, noncombatant vessels designed to operate in shallow-draft ports and waterways. They provide increased operational flexibility for a wide range of activities including maneuver and sustainment, relief operations in small or damaged ports, flexible logistics support, or as the key enabler for rapid transport. They are capable of interfacing with roll-on/roll-off discharge facilities, as well as on-loading/off-loading vehicles such as a fully combat-loaded Abrams main battle tank. Each vessel includes a flight deck to support day and night aircraft launch and recovery operations. Yuma will have airline-style seating for 312 embarked forces with fixed berthing for 104. As one of the Defense Department’s largest acquisition organizations, PEO Ships is responsible for executing the development and procurement of all destroyers, amphibious ships, special mission and support ships, and special warfare craft.  

SPECIFICATIONS

PRINCIPAL DIMENSIONS
Material Hull and superstructure – aluminium alloy
Length overall 103 m/337.9 feet
Beam overall 28.5 m/93.5 feet
Hull draft (maximum) 3.83 m/12.57 feet
MISSION BAY
Area (with tie-downs) 1,863 m2/20,053 feet2
Clear Height 4.75 m/15.6 feet
Turning diameter 26.2 m/86.0 feet
ISO TEU (Twenty Equivalent Units) Stations 6 Interface Panels
ACCOMMODATIONS
Crew 41
Single SR 2
Double SR 6
Quad SR 7
Troop Seats 312
Troop Berths Permanent: 104
Temporary: 46
Galley and Messing 48
PROPULSION
Main Engines 4 × MTU 20V8000 M71L Diesel Engines 4 × 9.1 MW
Gear boxes 4 × ZF 60000NR2H Reduction Gears
Waterjets 4 × Wartsila WLD 1400 SR
PERFORMANCE
Average Speed 35 knots/40 mph/65 km/h @ 90% MCR with 635 mt (700 st) payload
Maximum Speed 43 knots/50 mph/80 km/h without payload
Maximum Transit Range 1,200 NM/1,381 miles/2,222 km
Self-Deployment Range 5,600 NM/6,444 miles/10,371 km
Survival Through SS-7
AVIATION FACILITIES
NAVAIR Level 1 Class 2 Certified Flight Deck for one helicopter
Centreline parking area for one helicopter
NAVAIR Level 1 class 4 Type 2 Certified VERTREP (Vertical Replenishment)
Helicopter Control Station
AUXILIARY SYSTEMS
Active Ride Control Transcom Interceptors
Foils: 3.24 m2/34.9 feet2 each, forward on inboard sides of demi-hulls
Vehicle Ramp Articulated Slewing Stern Ramp
Straight aft to 45 Starboard
Telescoping Boom Crane 12.3 mt @ 15 m, 18.2 mt @ 10 m/13.6 Lt @ 49.2 feet, 20.1 Lt @ 32.8 feet

 

Ships

USNS Spearhead (EPF-1), Delivered USNS Choctaw County (EPF-2), Delivered USNS Millinocket (EPF-3), Delivered USNS Fall River (EPF-4), Delivered USNS Trenton (EPF-5), Delivered USNS Brunswick (EPF-6), Delivered USNS Carson City (EPF-7), Delivered USNS Yuma (EPF-8), Completed acceptance trials USNS Bismark (EPF-9), Under construction USNS Burlington (EPF-10), Under construction USNS Puerto Rico (EPF-11), Under construction USNS EPF-12, On order

Rafael Peralta

The U.S. Navy accepted delivery of future guided-missile destroyer USS Rafael Peralta (DDG-115) during a ceremony February 3, 2017.

The future USS Rafael Peralta (DDG-115) successfully completed acceptance trials after spending two days underway off the coast of Maine (U.S. Navy photo/Released)
The future USS Rafael Peralta (DDG-115) successfully completed acceptance trials after spending two days underway off the coast of Maine (U.S. Navy photo/Released)
Rafael Peralta is the first Arleigh Burke-class destroyer constructed at the General Dynamics-Bath Iron Works shipyard since the program was restarted in 2010. USS Rafael Peralta (DDG-115) is the second restart ship to deliver to the Navy, following delivery of future USS John Finn (DDG-113) from Huntington Ingalls Industries in December 2016. The U.S. Navy accepted delivery of USS Rafael Peralta (DDG-115) following a series of at-sea and pierside trials which demonstrated the ship’s operational readiness. «Arleigh Burke-class destroyers continue to provide the most critical warfighting technologies to our Sailors, equipping them with the capabilities they require to meet our missions at sea», said Captain Casey Moton, DDG-51 class program manager, Program Executive Office (PEO) Ships. «As the 65th Arleigh Burke-class destroyer to join the fleet, Rafael Peralta will continue the proud legacy of this class». Rafael Peralta is equipped with the Aegis Baseline 9 Combat System, which includes an integrated air and missile defense (IAMD) capability incorporating Ballistic Missile Defense 5.0 Capability Upgrade and Naval Integrated Fire Control-Counter Air. The ship’s IAMD radar will provide increased computing power and radar upgrades which improve detection and reaction capabilities against modern air warfare threats. The Aegis Combat System will enable the ship to link radars with other ships and aircraft to provide a composite picture of the battle space and effectively increase the theater space. The destroyer honors Sergeant Rafael Peralta, one of the most heralded Marines from 2004’s Battle of Fallujah. In November 2010, Peralta pulled a grenade tossed by insurgents towards himself and absorbed most of the blast with his body, thus saving the lives of two fellow marines. He was mortally wounded from the grenade blast. Future USS Rafael Peralta (DDG-115) will officially join the fleet during a commissioning ceremony in San Diego later this year. As one of the Defense Department’s largest acquisition organizations, PEO Ships is responsible for executing the development and procurement of all destroyers, amphibious ships, special mission and support ships, and boats and craft.  

Ship Characteristics

Length Overall 510 feet/156 m
Beam – Waterline 59 feet/18 m
Draft 30.5 feet/9.3 m
Displacement – Full Load 9,217 tons/9,363 metric tons
Power Plant 4 General electric LM 2500-30 gas turbines; 2 shafts; 2 CRP (Contra-Rotating) propellers; 100,000 shaft horsepower/75,000 kW
Speed in excess of 30 knots/34.5 mph/55.5 km/h
Range 4,400 NM/8,149 km at 20 knots/23 mph/37 km/h
Crew 380 total: 32 Officers, 27 CPO (Chief Petty Officer), 321 OEM
Surveillance SPY-1D Phased Array Radar and Aegis Combat System (Lockheed Martin); SPS-73(V) Navigation; SPS-67(V)3 Surface Search; 3 SPG-62 Illuminator; SQQ-89(V)6 sonar incorporating SQS-53C hull mounted and SQR-19 towed array sonars used with Mark-116 Mod 7 ASW fire control system
Electronics/Countermeasures SLQ-32(V)3; Mark-53 Mod 0 Decoy System; Mark-234 Decoy System; SLQ-25A Torpedo Decoy; SLQ-39 Surface Decoy; URN-25 TACAN; UPX-29 IFF System; Kollmorgen Mark-46 Mod 1 Electro-Optical Director
Aircraft 2 embarked SH-60 helicopters ASW operations; RAST (Recovery Assist, Secure and Traverse)
Armament 2 Mark-41 Vertical Launching System (VLS) with 90 Standard, Vertical Launch ASROC (Anti-Submarine Rocket) & Tomahawk ASM (Air-to-Surface Missile)/LAM (Loitering Attack Missile); 5-in (127-mm)/54 (62) Mark-45 gun; 2 (1) CIWS (Close-In Weapon System); 2 Mark-32 triple 324-mm torpedo tubes for Mark-46 or Mark-50 ASW torpedos

 

Flight IIA: Restart

Ship Yard Launched Commissioned Homeport
DDG-113 John Finn HIIIS 03-28-15    
DDG-114 Ralph Johnson HIIIS 12-12-15    
DDG-115 Rafael Peralta GDBIW 10-31-15    

 

Advance fabrication

Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) was awarded a $25.5 million modification to an existing advance planning contract in support of advance fabrication of the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN-80) on Tuesday, February 01, 2017. The initial structural fabrication and shop work on the third Gerald R. Ford-class carrier will be performed at the company’s Newport News Shipbuilding division through March 2018.

Rendering of the third ship in the Gerald R. Ford-class of aircraft carriers, USS Enterprise (CVN-80)
Rendering of the third ship in the Gerald R. Ford-class of aircraft carriers, USS Enterprise (CVN-80)

«This award authorizes us to begin fabrication of structural components, sub-components, sub-units and pre-assemblies in our manufacturing shops to support the 2018 construction of Enterprise», said Mike Shawcross, Newport News’ vice president, USS John F. Kennedy (CVN-79) and USS Enterprise (CVN-80) construction. «This is an important step in getting this next Gerald R. Ford-class ship off to a great start, as it allows us to continue implementation of lessons learned, and the initial steel work will allow us to utilize our aircraft carrier steel production line in an efficient manner».

Huntington Ingalls Industries shipbuilders have captured thousands of lessons learned and developed new build approaches during construction of USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN-78), most of which are being implemented as cost-saving initiatives in building the second ship in the class, USS John F. Kennedy (CVN-79). These initiatives will also apply to USS Enterprise (CVN-80), and Huntington Ingalls Industries will work with the U.S. Navy to identify additional cost-saving initiatives for future Ford-class carrier construction.

 

General Characteristics

Builder Huntington Ingalls Industries Newport News Shipbuilding, Newport News, Virginia
Propulsion 2 A1B nuclear reactors, 4 shafts
Length 1,092 feet/333 m
Beam 134 feet/41 m
Flight Deck Width 256 feet/78 m
Flight Deck Square 217,796 feet2/20,234 m2
Displacement approximately 100,000 long tons full load
Speed 30+ knots/34.5+ mph/55.5+ km/h
Crew 4,539 (ship, air wing and staff)
Armament ESSM (Evolved Sea Sparrow Missile), RAM (Rolling Airframe Missile), Mk-15 Phalanx CIWS (Close-In Weapon System)
Aircraft 75+

 

Ships

Ship Laid down Launched Commissioned Homeport
USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN-78) 11-13-2009 11-09-2013
USS John F. Kennedy (CVN-79) 08-22-2015
USS Enterprise (CVN-80)

 

First SIGMA frigate

Damen Schelde Naval Shipbuilding has handed over the first SIGMA 10514 Perusak Kawal Rudal (PKR) frigate to the Indonesian Ministry of Defence, on schedule and on budget. The ceremony took place at the PT PAL shipyard in Surabaya where the vessel was assembled. The Indonesian Ministry of Defence awarded the contract to Damen as main contractor for the construction of the first SIGMA 10514 PKR in December 2012. On receiving the ship, named the Raden Eddy Martadinata after one of the founders of the Indonesian Navy, the Ministry handed it on to the Navy.

DSNS delivers first SIGMA 10514 PKR frigate to Indonesian Ministry of Defence
DSNS delivers first SIGMA 10514 PKR frigate to Indonesian Ministry of Defence

The 345-foot/105-metre, 2,365 tonne PKR frigates are designed to undertake a wide range of missions in and around the waters of Indonesia, an archipelago nation made up of over 18,000 islands. Their primary mission is anti-air, anti-surface and anti-submarine warfare. However, they are also equipped for maritime security, search and rescue, and humanitarian support tasks.

The Raden Eddy Martadinatawas built using a collaborative modular process operating simultaneously at Damen Schelde Naval Shipyard (DSNS) in the Netherlands and PT PAL shipyard. The vessel is made up of six modules, and for the Raden Eddy Martadinata four of these were built at PT PAL while the other two modules – the power plant and the bridge & command center – were built and fully tested at DSNS before being shipped for final assembly at PT PAL.

This process brings many other benefits, including allowing Damen to build top quality vessels anywhere in the world. It also is the best way for Damen to fulfil its contractual obligation to Indonesia’s defence ministry to deliver an exceptionally extensive knowledge and technology transfer programme. This has the explicit aim of establishing a center of naval shipbuilding expertise at the PT PAL shipyard. By collaborating closely on the first two vessels the transfer of skills and upgrading of the yard is taking place smoothly and with a strong spirit of cooperation.

Construction of the second frigate using the same procedure is now well advanced with sea trials due May 2017, and delivery October 2017.

Sigma Class Frigate 10514 Raden Eddy Martadinata
Sigma Class Frigate 10514 Raden Eddy Martadinata

 

CHARACTERISTICS

GENERAL
Customer Indonesian Navy
Basic functions Naval Patrol Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ), deterrence, Search and Rescue (SAR), Anti-Surface Warfare (ASW), Anti-Air Warfare (AAW), Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASUW), Electronic Warfare (EW)
Hull material Steel grade A/AH36
Standards Naval/Commercial, naval intact/damaged stability, noise reduced, moderate shock
Classification Lloyd’s Register of Shipping (supervision) 100 A1 SSC Mono Patrol, G6, LMC UMS
DIMENSIONS
Length overall (o.a.) 345 feet/105.11 m
Beam Moulded (mld) 46.6 feet/14.2 m
Depth no.1 deck 28.7 feet/8.75 m
Draught (dwl) 12.1 feet/3.7 m
Displacement (dwl) 2,365 tonnes
PERFORMANCE
Speed (Maximum power) 28 knots/32 mph/52 km/h
Range at 14 knots/16 mph/26 km/h 5,000 NM/5,754 miles/9,260 km
Endurance 20 days at sea
PROPULSION SYSTEM
Propulsion type Combined Diesel or Electric (CODOE)
Diesel engines 2 × 10,000 kW Maximum Continuous Rating (MCR) Propulsion type
Electric motors 2 × 1300 kW
Gearbox 2 × double input input/single output
Propellers 2 × Controllable Pitch Propellers (CPP) diameter 12 feet/3.65 m
AUXILIARY SYSTEMS
Generator sets 6 × 715 kWE
Emergency gen. set 1 × 180 kWE
Chilled water system 2 × units, redundant distribution
Fire fighting 4 × main pumps +1 x service pump
Degaussing System
DECK EQUIPMENT
Helicopter deck Maximum 10 tons helicopter, with lashing points
Helicopter operations day/night with refueling system
Helicopter hangar
RAS on helicopter deck PS&SB, astern fueling
Boats 2 × Rigid Hull Inflatable Boat (RHIB)
ACCOMMODATION
Fully air-conditioned accommodation for 120 persons
Commanding Officer 1
Officers 26
Chief Petty Officers 10
Petty Officers 36
Junior Ratings 29
Trainee Officers 18
Provisions for Nuclear, Biological and Chemical (NBC) citadel/decontamination
WEAPON & SENSOR SUITE
3D-Surveillance & target indication radar & Friend or Foe Identification (IFF)
Radar/electro optical fire control
Hull Mounted Sonar
Combat management system
Medium caliber gun 76-mm
1 × Close In Weapon System (CIWS)
2 × Surface-to-Surface Missile (SSM) launcher
12 cell Vertical Launching (VL) Short Range Air Defense (SHORADS)
2 × triple Torpedo launcher
Electronic Support Measures (ESM) & Electronic CounterMeasures (ECM)
2 × Decoys/chaff
Integrated internal & external communication system
NAUTICAL EQUIPMENT
Integrated bridge console, 2 × Radar, Electronic Chart Display & Information System (ECDIS), Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS-A3), reference gyro

Sea Trials of first SIGMA 10514 PKR frigate for Indonesian navy

Keel Laid for DDG-1002

A keel laying and authentication ceremony for the future USS Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG-1002) was held January 30 at General Dynamics-Bath Iron Works shipyard in Bath, Maine.

Luci Baines Johnson applauds Timothy Trask, a Bath Iron Works welder, after he helped her authenticate the keel plate of DDG-1002, the future USS Lyndon B. Johnson, by striking an arc to her initials engraved in the plate. She was at BIW with her sister, Lynda Johnson Robb, as the two participated in the keel laying ceremony for the third destroyer in the Zumwalt class
Luci Baines Johnson applauds Timothy Trask, a Bath Iron Works welder, after he helped her authenticate the keel plate of DDG-1002, the future USS Lyndon B. Johnson, by striking an arc to her initials engraved in the plate. She was at BIW with her sister, Lynda Johnson Robb, as the two participated in the keel laying ceremony for the third destroyer in the Zumwalt class

The keel was authenticated by President Johnson’s daughters and ship co-sponsors, Ms. Lynda Johnson Robb and Ms. Luci Baines Johnson, by welding their initials into the keel plate.

«We’ve made tremendous progress on this ship and although we’re celebrating an early production milestone, we’re nearing 60 percent completion on the future Lyndon B. Johnson», said Captain Kevin Smith, DDG-1000 program manager, Program Executive Office (PEO), Ships. «We’re honored to be celebrating this milestone with our 36th President’s daughters and look forward to continued progress on the final ship of the Zumwalt class».

While the keel laying has traditionally represented the formal start of a ship’s construction, advanced modular shipbuilding allows fabrication of the ship to begin months in advance. Today, the keel laying continues to symbolically recognize the joining of the ship’s components and the ceremonial beginning of the ship.

Zumwalt-class destroyers feature a state-of-the-art electric propulsion system, wave-piercing tumblehome hull, stealth design and are equipped with the most advanced warfighting technology and weaponry. These ships will be capable of performing a range of deterrence, power projection, sea control, and command and control missions while allowing the Navy to evolve with new systems and missions.

Bath Iron Works is currently in production on the future USS Michael Monsoor (DDG-1001) as well Arleigh Burke-class destroyers USS Rafael Peralta (DDG-115), USS Thomas Hudner (DDG-116), USS Daniel Inouye (DDG-118) and USS Carl M. Levin (DDG-120).

As one of the Defense Department’s largest acquisition organizations, PEO Ships is responsible for executing the development and procurement of all destroyers, amphibious ships, special mission and support ships, boats and craft.

 

Features unique to DDG 1000:

  • Eighty peripheral Vertical Launch System (VLS) cells, two Advanced Gun System (AGS) 155-mm guns, and two 30-mm Close In Guns (CIGs);
  • A stern boat ramp for two 7-meter Rigid Hull Inflatable Boats (RHIBs), designed with room for two 11-meter RHIBs;
  • Aviation capacity for two MH-60R or one MH-60R and 3 VT Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs);
  • It will be powered by an Integrated Power System (IPS) with an Integrated Fight Through Power (IFTP). This is created by an Advanced Induction Motor (AIM);
  • A superstructure with integrated apertures and low signature profile;
  • Advanced sensors including a SPY-3 Multi-Function Radar;
  • A wave-piercing «Tumblehome» hull form.

 

Ship Characteristics

Length 610 feet/186 m
Beam 80.7 feet/24.6 m
Draft 27.6 feet/8.4 m
Displacement 15,761 long tonnes/16,014 metric tonnes
Speed 30 knots/34.5 mph/55.5 km/h
Installed Power 104,600 hp/78 MW
Crew Size 158 – Includes Aviation Detachment

 

Next-generation destroyer Zumwalt (DDG-1000) underway for the first time conducting at-sea tests and trials in the Atlantic Ocean on December 7, 2015

 

Ships

Ship Laid down Launched Commissioned Homeport
USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000) 11-17-2011 10-28-2013 10-15-2016 San Diego, California
USS Michael Monsoor (DDG-1001) 05-23-2013 06-21-2016
USS Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG-1002) 01-30-2017

 

Truly and fairly laid

Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division authenticated the keel of the eighth U.S. Coast Guard National Security Cutter, USCGC Midgett (WMSL-757) on January 27, 2017.

Ship Sponsor Jazania O’Neal writes her initials onto a steel plate that will be welded inside USCGC Midgett (WMSL-757), the National Security Cutter named in honor of her grandfather, John Allen Midgett. Pictured with O’Neal are (left to right) Capt. Christopher Webb, commanding officer, U.S. Coast Guard Project Resident Office Gulf Coast; Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias; and Jack Beard, a structural welder at Ingalls (Photo by Lance Davis/HII)
Ship Sponsor Jazania O’Neal writes her initials onto a steel plate that will be welded inside USCGC Midgett (WMSL-757), the National Security Cutter named in honor of her grandfather, John Allen Midgett. Pictured with O’Neal are (left to right) Capt. Christopher Webb, commanding officer, U.S. Coast Guard Project Resident Office Gulf Coast; Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias; and Jack Beard, a structural welder at Ingalls (Photo by Lance Davis/HII)

«The National Security Cutter Program is vital to our Coast Guard, our country and to Ingalls Shipbuilding», said Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias. «Today, we lay the foundation upon which this great ship will be built. The Midgett, like her sister ships, is being built to the highest quality standards with outstanding cost and schedule performance, and the NSC team is energized to make this one the best yet».

The ship is named to honor John Allen Midgett, who was awarded the silver cup by the U.K. Board of Trade in 1918 for the renowned rescue of 42 British sailors aboard the British tanker Mirlo after it was torpedoed by a German U-boat off the coast of North Carolina. He was also awarded the Gold Lifesaving Medal by the U.S. Coast Guard in 1924. Midgett was a senior enlisted member of the U.S. Lifesaving Service when it merged with the U.S. Lighthouse Service and U.S. Revenue Cutter Service to become today’s U.S. Coast Guard.

Jazania O’Neal, Midgett’s granddaughter and the ship’s sponsor, spoke today, proclaiming Midgett’s keel to be «truly and fairly laid». O’Neal’s initials were welded onto a keel plate by Jack Beard, a structural welder at Ingalls.

«For my grandfather to be memorialized as the namesake for this ship, in the company of the seven other Legend-class ship namesakes, surpasses validation of our heritage on a worldwide scale», O’Neal said. «We wish you well throughout the remaining construction of this fine ship, and we look forward to seeing you at the christening».

Ingalls has delivered six NSCs to the U.S. Coast Guard, and two more are currently under construction. In addition to USCGC Midgett (WMSL-757), the seventh NSC, USCGC Kimball (WMSL-756), is scheduled to deliver in 2018. In December 2016, Ingalls received a $486 million fixed-price incentive contract from the U.S. Coast Guard to build a ninth National Security Cutter – USCGC Stone (WMSL-758).

«The entire Coast Guard team is appreciative of the Ingalls Shipbuilding team», said Captain Christopher Webb, commanding officer, U.S. Coast Guard Project Resident Office Gulf Coast. «We rely on your talents, skills and masterful crafts to provide the NSCs we utilize to complete our many missions around the world. NSC 8 reached its start fabrication milestone just over 14 and a half months ago, and remains ahead of production schedule. Most importantly, I look forward to seeing the continued emphasis on quality, while maximizing NSC completeness improvements indicative of the planning, hard work, integration and shipbuilding excellence here».

Legend-Class National Security Cutters are the flagships of the U.S. Coast Guard. They are the most technologically advanced ships in the Coast Guard’s fleet, with capabilities for maritime homeland security, law enforcement and national security missions. NSCs are 418 feet/127 m long with a 54-foot/16-meter beam and displace 4,500 tons with a full load. They have a top speed of 28 knots/32 mph/52 km/h, a range of 12,000 nautical miles/13,809 miles/22,224 km, an endurance of 60 days and a crew of 120. The Legend class of cutters plays an important role in enhancing the Coast Guard’s operational readiness, capacity and effectiveness.

 

Facts

Displacement 4,500 long tons/4,572 metric tons
Length 418 feet/127 m
Beam 54 feet/16 m
Speed 28 knots/32 mph/52 km/h
Range 12,000 NM/13,809 miles/22,224 km
Endurance 60 days
Crew 110
Equipped with Mk-110 57-mm turret mounted gun
6 × 12.7-mm/.50 caliber machine guns
3D air search radar
2 level 1, class 1 aircraft hangers
A stern launch ramp for mission boats

 

Ship list

Ship Hull Number Laid down Launched Commissioned
Bertholf WMSL-750 03-29-2005 09-29-2006 08-04-2008
Waesche WMSL-751 09-11-2006 07-12-2008 05-07-2010
Stratton WMSL-752 07-20-2009 07-23-2010 03-31-2012
Hamilton WMSL-753 09-05-2012 08-10-2013 12-06-2014
James WMSL-754 05-17-2013 05-03-2014 08-08-2015
Munro WMSL-755 10-07-2013 09-12-2015
Kimball WMSL-756 03-04-2016 12-17-2016
Midgett WMSL-757  01-27-2017
Stone WMSL-758

 

Fifth Sea Base

On Wednesday, January 25, General Dynamics NASSCO, a wholly owned subsidiary of General Dynamics, began construction on a fifth ship for the U.S. Navy’s Expeditionary Transfer Dock (ESD)/Expeditionary Sea Base (ESB) program.

The ceremony’s honoree, Jackie Ruiz, gives her sign of approval after inspecting the first cut of steel for the ESB-5 as her son watches in the background. Jackie is the wife of Bryan Ruiz, NASSCO’s Director of Planning, and is also a former NASSCO employee
The ceremony’s honoree, Jackie Ruiz, gives her sign of approval after inspecting the first cut of steel for the ESB-5 as her son watches in the background. Jackie is the wife of Bryan Ruiz, NASSCO’s Director of Planning, and is also a former NASSCO employee

Designed to provide advanced flexibility and capability for sea-to-shore missions, the newest ESB will include a 52,000 square-foot/4,831 m2 flight deck, fuel and equipment storage, repair spaces, magazines, mission planning spaces and accommodations for up to 250 personnel. Serving as a «pier at sea», the 784-foot-long/239-meter-long ship is also designed to support MH-53 and MH-60 helicopters and MV-22 tilt rotor aircraft.

The ship, ESB-5, is the fifth to be added to a contract between NASSCO and the U.S. Navy that originally called for two Expeditionary Transfer Docks: USNS Montford Point (T-ESD-1) and USNS John Glenn (T-ESD-2).

The first two ships, formerly classified as Mobile Landing Platforms (MLPs), were designed and constructed by NASSCO to support vehicle staging and transfers, and the movement of LCAC vessels. In 2012, a third ship, USNS Lewis B. Puller (T-ESB-3), was added to the contract and reconfigured as an ESB, formerly known as a MLP Afloat Forward Staging Base, to support a wide range of military operations. All three ships have been delivered to the U.S. Navy, and in October 2015, NASSCO began construction on ESB-4, USNS Hershel «Woody» Williams.

NASSCO is the largest shipyard on the west coast of the United States conducting design, construction and repair of ships. In the past decade, NASSCO delivered more than 30 ocean-going ships to government and commercial customers, including the world’s first LNG-powered containerships and several other lead ships.