Category Archives: Navy

Hyper Velocity

According to Sam LaGrone, the editor of USNI News, last summer USS Dewey (DDG-105) fired 20 Hyper Velocity Projectiles (HVPs) from a standard Mk-45 5-inch/127-mm deck gun in a quiet experiment that’s set to add new utility to the weapon found on almost every U.S. warship.

Guided-missile destroyer USS Dewey (DDG-105) transits the Pacific Ocean while underway in the U.S. 3rd Fleet area of operations (U.S. Navy Photo)
Guided-missile destroyer USS Dewey (DDG-105) transits the Pacific Ocean while underway in the U.S. 3rd Fleet area of operations (U.S. Navy Photo)

The test, conducted by the U.S. Navy and the Pentagon’s Strategic Capabilities Office (SCO) as part of the Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2018 international exercise, was part of a series of studies to prove the U.S. Navy could turn the more than 40-year-old deck gun design into an effective and low-cost weapon against cruise missiles and larger unmanned aerial vehicles.

While the HVP was originally designed to be the projectile for the electromagnetic railgun, the U.S. Navy and the Pentagon see the potential for a new missile defense weapon that can launch a guided round at near-hypersonic speeds.

Currently, the fleet uses a combination of missiles – like the Evolved SeaSsparrow Missile (ESSM), the Rolling Airframe Missile (RAM) and the Standard Missile-2 (SM-2) – to ward off cruise missile threats. The missiles are effective but also expensive, Bryan Clark with the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments told USNI News.

In 2016, guided-missile destroyer USS Mason (DDG-87) fired three missiles to ward off two suspected Iranian cruise missiles fired from Houthi rebels in the Red Sea, in what amounted to a multi-million dollar engagement.

«So if you think about the kinds of threats you might face in the Middle East, the lower-end cruise missiles or a larger Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV), now you have a way to shoot them down that doesn’t require you use a $2 million ESSM or $1 million RAM because a hyper velocity projectile – even in the highest-end estimates have it in the $75,000 to $100,000 range, and that’s for the fanciest version of it with an onboard seeker», he said.

An added benefit of using HVP in powder guns is the gun’s high rate of fire and a large magazine capacity.

«You can get 15 rounds a minute for an air defense mission as well as a surface-to-surface mission», Clark said. «That adds significant missile defense capacity when you think that each of those might be replacing an ESSM or a RAM missile. They’re a lot less expensive».

The HVP is also being investigated to use with ground-based 155-mm artillery pieces for the Army and the Marines to provide limited air defense options for forward-deployed troops in austere environments. HVPs could also find a home aboard the U.S. Navy’s Zumwalt-class destroyers as a replacement round for the classes 155-mm Advanced Gun System (AGS).

While officials confirmed to USNI News that the RIMPAC test was unclassified, both the Office of the Secretary of Defense and the Office of Naval Research would not acknowledge the test when asked by USNI News. A spokeswoman for OSD referred USNI News to the U.S. Navy.

«I don’t have anything for you», an ONR spokesman told USNI News. HVP manufacturer BAE Systems referred USNI News to the U.S. Navy when contacted.

In 2016, William Roper, who then headed the SCO, said the promise of ONR’s HVP work had been recognized by the U.S. Navy and the Army and changed the way the Pentagon office thought about the evolution of the railgun.

«We now think that we can do pretty revolutionary things with existing powder guns – think howitzers, Paladins, the Navy’s five-inch guns. We’ve shifted emphasis to that», Roper said during a 2016 talk at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. «We have more than a 1,000 powder guns, we have very few railguns».

Bring her to life!

The U.S. Navy commissioned its newest Freedom-variant Littoral Combat Ship (LCS), the USS Wichita (LCS-13), during a 10 a.m. ceremony Saturday, January 12, at Naval Station Mayport, Florida, near Jacksonville, where the ship will be homeported.

Navy commissioned the USS Wichita (LCS-13)
Navy commissioned the USS Wichita (LCS-13)

U.S. Senator Jerry Moran of Kansas delivered the commissioning ceremony’s principal address. Kate Lehrer, author and wife of Wichita native Jim Lehrer, the former anchor of «The MacNeil-Lehrer News Hour» on PBS, is the ship’s sponsor. The ceremony was highlighted by a time-honored Navy tradition when Mrs. Lehrer gave the first order to «man our ship and bring her to life»!

«This commissioning represents USS Wichita’s entry into the active fleet and is a testament to the increased capabilities made possible by a true partnership between the Department of the Navy and our industrial base», said Secretary of the Navy Richard V. Spencer. «This ship honors the citizens of Wichita, Kansas for their longstanding support of the Navy and Marine Corps team and I am confident USS Wichita and crew will make our Navy and nation stronger».

The USS Wichita (LCS-13) is the third naval vessel to honor Kansas’s largest city. The first was a heavy cruiser in service from 1939 to 1947. Active during World War II, Wichita supported amphibious landings during Operation Torch in November 1942 in the European Theater. She later participated in the Battles of the Philippine Sea and Leyte Gulf and the invasion of Okinawa in 1944 in the Pacific Theater. Wichita earned 13 battle stars for wartime service. The second USS Wichita (AOR-1) was a first-in-class replenishment oiler in service from 1969 to 1993. During her first three deployments, the ship made numerous trips to replenish ships on «Yankee Station», earning four battle stars for service during the Vietnam War.

The USS Wichita (LCS-13) is a fast, agile, focused-mission platform designed for operation in near-shore environments as well as the open-ocean. It is designed to defeat asymmetric «anti-access» threats such as mines, quiet diesel submarines and fast surface craft.

The LCS class consists of two variants, the Freedom variant and the Independence variant, designed and built by two industry teams. The Freedom variant team is led by Lockheed Martin, Marinette, Wisconsin, (for the odd-numbered hulls). The Independence variant team is led by Austal USA, Mobile, Alabama, (for LCS-6 and the subsequent even-numbered hulls).

 

Ship Design Specifications

Hull Advanced semiplaning steel monohull
Length Overall 389 feet/118.6 m
Beam Overall 57 feet/17.5 m
Draft 13.5 feet/4.1 m
Full Load Displacement Approximately 3,200 metric tons
Top Speed Greater than 40 knots/46 mph/74 km/h
Range at top speed 1,000 NM/1,151 miles/1,852 km
Range at cruise speed 4,000 NM/4,603 miles/7,408 km
Watercraft Launch and Recovery Up to Sea State 4
Aircraft Launch and Recovery Up to Sea State 5
Propulsion Combined diesel and gas turbine with steerable water jet propulsion
Power 85 MW/113,600 horsepower
Hangar Space Two MH-60 Romeo Helicopters
One MH-60 Romeo Helicopter and three Vertical Take-off and Land Tactical Unmanned Air Vehicles (VTUAVs)
Core Crew Less than 50
Accommodations for 75 sailors provide higher sailor quality of life than current fleet
Integrated Bridge System Fully digital nautical charts are interfaced to ship sensors to support safe ship operation
Core Self-Defense Suite Includes 3D air search radar
Electro-Optical/Infrared (EO/IR) gunfire control system
Rolling-Airframe Missile Launching System
57-mm Main Gun
Mine, Torpedo Detection
Decoy Launching System

 

Freedom-class

Ship Laid down Launched Commissioned Homeport
USS Freedom (LCS-1) 06-02-2005 09-23-2006 11-08-2008 San Diego, California
USS Fort Worth (LCS-3) 07-11-2009 12-07-2010 09-22-2012 San Diego, California
USS Milwaukee (LCS-5) 10-27-2011 12-18-2013 11-21-2015 San Diego, California
USS Detroit (LCS-7) 08-11-2012 10-18-2014 10-22-2016 San Diego, California
USS Little Rock (LCS-9) 06-27-2013 07-18-2015 12-16-2017 San Diego, California
USS Sioux City (LCS-11) 02-19-2014 01-30-2016 11-17-2018 Mayport, Florida
USS Wichita (LCS-13) 02-09-2015 09-17-2016 01-12-2019 Mayport, Florida
USS Billings (LCS-15) 11-02-2015 07-01-2017 Mayport, Florida
USS Indianapolis (LCS-17) 07-18-2016 04-18-2018
USS St. Louis (LCS-19) 05-17-2017 12-15-2018
USS Minneapolis/St. Paul (LCS-21) 02-22-2018
USS Cooperstown (LCS-23) 08-14-2018
USS Marinette LCS-25
USS Nantucket (LCS-27)
USS Beloit (LCS-29)

 

Vietnam War POW

Secretary of the U.S. Navy Richard V. Spencer named a future Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer in honor of U.S. Navy Vietnam veteran, Navy Cross recipient, and former U.S. Senator from Alabama, Admiral Jeremiah Denton.

An artist rendering of the future Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Jeremiah Denton (DDG-129) (U.S. Navy photo illustration/Released)
An artist rendering of the future Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Jeremiah Denton (DDG-129) (U.S. Navy photo illustration/Released)

«Admiral Denton’s legacy is an inspiration to all who wear our nation’s uniform», said Secretary of the Navy Richard V. Spencer. «His heroic actions during a defining period in our history have left an indelible mark on our Navy and Marine Corps team and our nation. His service is a shining example for our Sailors and Marines and this ship will continue his legacy for decades to come».

In 1947, Denton graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy and served as a test pilot, flight instructor, and squadron leader, and developed operational tactics still in use, such as the Haystack Concept, which calls for the dispersing of carrier fleets to make it more difficult for the enemy to find the fleets on RADAR.

On July 18, 1965, Denton was shot down over North Vietnam and spent nearly eight years as a POW (Prisoner Of War), almost half in isolation. During an interview with a Japanese media outlet, Denton used Morse code to blink «torture», confirming that American POWs were being tortured. He suffered severe harassment, intimidation and ruthless treatment, yet he refused to provide military information or be used by the enemy for propaganda purposes.

In recognition of his extraordinary heroism while a prisoner-of-war, he was awarded the Navy Cross. Denton was released from captivity in 1973, retired from the U.S. Navy in 1977 and in 1980 was elected to the U.S. Senate where he represented Alabama.

Arleigh Burke-class destroyers conduct a variety of operations from peacetime presence and crisis response to sea control and power projection. The future USS Jeremiah Denton (DDG-129) will be capable of fighting air, surface and subsurface battles simultaneously, and will contain a combination of offensive and defensive weapon systems designed to support maritime warfare, including integrated air and missile defense and vertical launch capabilities.

The ship will be constructed at Huntington Ingalls Industries’ Ingalls shipbuilding division in Pascagoula, Mississippi. The ship will be 509 feet/155 m long, have a beam length of 59 feet/18 m and be capable of operating at speeds in excess of 30 knots/34.5 mph/55.5 km/h.

 

Guided Missile Destroyers Lineup

 

Flight III

Ship Yard Launched Commissioned Homeport
DDG-125 Jack H. Lucas HIIIS
DDG-126 Louis H. Wilson, Jr. GDBIW
DDG-128 Ted Stevens HIIIS
DDG-129 Jeremiah Denton HIIIS
DDG-130
DDG-131
DDG-132
DDG-133
DDG-134
DDG-135
DDG-136
DDG-137
DDG-138

 

Against fast boats

At the end of 2018, MBDA successfully demonstrated the use of the Mistral missile against fast boats such as FIACs (Fast Inshore Attack Crafts). A number of foreign delegations attended the demonstration firing that was performed from a SIMBAD-RC automated naval turret firing from the land against a fast moving remotely-controlled semi-rigid boat more than 3 kilometres/1.86 miles off the coast. The scenario was intended to be representative of the self-protection of a vessel against an asymmetric threat (commando or terrorist attack).

The turret is remotely-operated, allowing the operator to remain under cover in the vessel’s operation centre
The turret is remotely-operated, allowing the operator to remain under cover in the vessel’s operation centre

In its latest version currently in service with the French armed forces, the Mistral is an air defence missile equipped with an imaging infrared seeker with advanced image processing capabilities that allow it to engage low thermal signature targets from a long distance (such targets include Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), missiles and fast boats), whilst at the same time offering excellent resistance to countermeasures.

The SIMBAD-RC is a remotely-controlled very short range naval air defence system that provides highly efficient capacities against a wide range of threats, from combat aircraft through anti-ship missiles to small-sized threats such as UAVs.

The system is easy to install and thus provides small units or support vessels with a true self-defence capacity, or can even ensure reinforced defence for the other types of surface vessels. Each turret supports two ready-to-fire Mistral missiles. The turret is remotely-operated, allowing the operator to remain under cover in the vessel’s operation centre, and thus ensures longer operational availability in case of a combat alert.

«MBDA is constantly striving to help armed forces make optimum use of their investments in our products», said MBDA CEO Antoine Bouvier. «The demonstration of the SIMBAD-RC Mistral combination against surface targets reflects our policy of giving our systems additional capacities to supplement those they were originally designed to provide».

At the end of 2018, MBDA successfully demonstrated the use of the Mistral missile against fast boats such as FIACs (Fast Inshore Attack Crafts)

Senator from Alaska

Secretary of the Navy Richard V. Spencer named a future Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer in honor of U.S. Senator Ted Stevens, who represented Alaska from 1968 to 2009.

An artist rendering of the future Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Ted Stevens (DDG-128) (U.S. Navy photo illustration/Released)
An artist rendering of the future Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Ted Stevens (DDG-128) (U.S. Navy photo illustration/Released)

«Senator Stevens was a staunch supporter of a strong Navy and Marine Corps team who served our nation with distinction as a pilot during World War II, and later as a Senator of Alaska», said Secretary of the Navy Richard V. Spencer. «I am pleased that his legacy of service and dedication to national security will live on in the future USS Ted Stevens (DDG-128)».

Stevens served as a pilot in the Army Air Corps from 1943 to 1946 and was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross before being discharged in 1946. Stevens was elected as a state representative in Alaska in 1964, re-elected in 1966, and in 1968 he was appointed to fill a vacancy in the U.S. Senate. In 1970, Stevens was elected to the seat in a special election and was subsequently re-elected five times. He left office in 2009 as the then-longest serving Republican U.S. Senator in history.

Arleigh Burke-class destroyers conduct a variety of operations from peacetime presence and crisis response to sea control and power projection. The future USS Ted Stevens (DDG-128) will be capable of fighting air, surface and subsurface battles simultaneously, and will contain a combination of offensive and defensive weapon systems designed to support maritime warfare, including integrated air and missile defense and vertical launch capabilities.

The ship will be constructed at Huntington Ingalls Industries’ Ingalls shipbuilding division in Pascagoula, Mississippi. The ship will be 509 feet/155 m long, have a beam length of 59 feet/18 m and be capable of operating at speeds in excess of 30 knots/34.5 mph/55.5 km/h.

 

Guided Missile Destroyers Lineup

 

Flight III

Ship Yard Launched Commissioned Homeport
DDG-125 Jack H. Lucas HIIIS
DDG-126 Louis H. Wilson, Jr. GDBIW
DDG-128 Ted Stevens HIIIS
DDG-129
DDG-130
DDG-131
DDG-132
DDG-133
DDG-134
DDG-135
DDG-136
DDG-137
DDG-138

 

Egyptian MEKO

According to Navy Recognition, the German Federal Security Council has approved the export of a MEKO A-200 frigate to the Egyptian Navy. The frigate, produced by ThyssenKrupp, likely costs around 500 million euros, sources told the publication. Spiegel noted that Egypt may buy another frigate from the manufacturer in addition to the one it is approved for.

MEKO A-200 frigate (source: ThyssenKrupp Marine)
MEKO A-200 frigate (source: ThyssenKrupp Marine)

Over the last few years, Egypt has considered a new surface vessel buy, looking primarily at French and German products. The Egyptian Navy operates GOWIND 2500 corvettes and a FREMM frigate purchased recently from France, but has evidently favored the German MEKO A-200 for its new purchase.

In November 2018, La Tribune reported that a deal between Egypt and Germany for four MEKO A-200s – worth up to 2 billion euros – had been inked two months prior. The publication noted that the Egyptian government was initially looking to purchase two MEKO A-200s, both to be built in Germany, but later adjusted its requirement to four vessels, one to be built in Egypt.

However, the deal was frozen soon after signing, according to La Tribune, stemming from Saudi pressure. The deterioration of Saudi-German relations, particularly after Saudi Arabia’s killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi, reportedly led to Riyadh putting a hold on providing funding for Egypt’s purchase. Even so, Handelsblatt reported later in the month in November that a deal for two frigates at one billion euros had been finalized and a contract awarded for ThyssenKrupp.

Next Generation

According to Navy Recognition, South Korea approved a basic plan to develop a homegrown Aegis-equipped destroyer that will enhance the Navy’s capabilities to defend greater maritime interests, Seoul’s arms procurement agency said.

South Korea approves Korea Destroyer Next Generation development plan (DAPA Image)
South Korea approves Korea Destroyer Next Generation development plan (DAPA Image)

The Defense Project Promotion Committee decided on the Korea Destroyer Next Generation (KDDX) project, under which the country will locally develop the destroyer by the late 2020s with a budget of around 1.8 trillion won (US$1.59 billion), the Defense Acquisition Program Administration (DAPA) said.

Seoul plans to deploy six KDDX destroyers by the mid or late 2030s. The total cost of developing and producing the six vessels is expected to top 7 trillion won, observers said.

«The KDDX is a project to procure destroyers for the purpose of safeguarding maritime interests and responding to potential disputes at sea», the DAPA said in a press release following the committee session presided over by Defense Minister Jeong Kyeong-doo.

The committee also approved a plan to upgrade the Link 16, a tactical data link system installed on warplanes or warships to ensure the smooth sharing of information with the U.S. military during training or other combined operations.

To upgrade it, Seoul will purchase an enhanced encryption device through a government-to-government Foreign Military Sale (FMS) program with Washington. Three U.S. defense firms are expected to vie for the project, worth 400 billion won, to procure the device by the mid-2020s.

Fifth DDG-51 Destroyer

Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine, is being awarded a $910,723,811 fixed-price incentive firm target modification to previously awarded contract (N00024-18-C-2305) to exercise the fiscal 2019 option for construction of a DDG-51 class ship (DDG-132).

General Dynamics Bath Iron Works awarded contract for fifth DDG-51 destroyer
General Dynamics Bath Iron Works awarded contract for fifth DDG-51 destroyer

This modification also includes options for engineering change proposals, design budgeting requirements, and post-delivery availabilities on the fiscal 2019 option ship which, if exercised, would bring the cumulative value of the fiscal 2019 option ship to $921,990,345.

Work will be performed in

  • Bath, Maine (65 percent);
  • Cincinnati, Ohio (5 percent);
  • Atlanta, Georgia (3 percent);
  • York, Pennsylvania (2 percent);
  • Coatesville, Pennsylvania (2 percent);
  • Falls Church, Virginia (2 percent);
  • South Portland, Maine (1 percent);
  • Walpole, Massachusetts (1 percent);
  • Erie, Pennsylvania (1 percent);
  • Charlottesville, Virginia (1 percent);
  • and other locations below 1 percent (collectively totaling 17 percent),

and is expected to be completed by May 2026.

Fiscal 2019 shipbuilding and conversion (U.S. Navy) funding in the amount of $900,723,811 will be obligated at time of award and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year.

The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, District of Columbia, is the contracting activity.

 

In the most recent multi-year competition, BIW was awarded four ships. The Navy held a separate competition for an option ship as part of its commitment to growing the fleet. The Arleigh Burke class destroyer will be funded in the Fiscal Year 2019 budget.

«Bath Iron Works is privileged to continue producing state-of-the-art surface combatants for the longest running naval shipbuilding program in our nation’s history», said Dirk Lesko, President of Bath Iron Works. «This award demonstrates the vital role the DDG-51 plays in the security posture of the United States and the confidence the Navy has in our shipyard to produce these important assets».

There are currently five DDG-51 destroyers in production at Bath Iron Works: USS Daniel Inouye (DDG-118), USS Carl M. Levin (DDG-120), USS John Basilone (DDG-122), USS Harvey C. Barnum (DDG-124) and USS Patrick Gallagher (DDG-127). The shipyard’s backlog includes USS Louis H. Wilson Jr. (DDG-126) and the five ships that are part of the multi-year contract awarded this fall. BIW also is building the third Zumwalt-class destroyer, USS Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG-1002).

 

Guided Missile Destroyers Lineup

 

Flight III

Ship Yard Launched Commissioned Homeport
DDG-125 Jack H. Lucas HIIIS
DDG-126 Louis H. Wilson, Jr. GDBIW
DDG-128
DDG-129
DDG-130
DDG-131
DDG-132
DDG-133
DDG-134
DDG-135
DDG-136
DDG-137
DDG-138

 

Acceptance trials

The future USS Paul Ignatius (DDG-117) successfully completed acceptance trials December 20, returning to Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Pascagoula shipyard after spending two days at sea in the Gulf of Mexico.

Future USS Paul Ignatius (DDG-117) successfully completes acceptance trials
Future USS Paul Ignatius (DDG-117) successfully completes acceptance trials

During acceptance trials, the ship and its crew performed a series of demonstrations for review by the U.S. Navy’s Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV). These demonstrations are used by INSURV to validate the quality of construction and compliance with Navy specifications and requirements prior to delivery of the ship to the U.S. Navy.

«The ship performed very well, which is a testament to the preparation and commitment of the Navy-shipbuilder team», said Captain Casey Moton, DDG-51 class program manager, Program Executive Office (PEO) Ships. «The ship also previously performed a successful SM-2 shoot during builder’s trials, further demonstrating the readiness of the ship’s Aegis weapon system and ship’s force. These trials put the ship on a solid path towards delivery to the U.S. Navy».

The DDG-51 class ships currently being constructed are Aegis Baseline 9 Integrated Air and Missile Defense destroyers with increased computing power and radar upgrades that improve detection and reaction capabilities against modern air warfare and Ballistic Missile Defense threats. When operational, USS Paul Ignatius (DDG-117) and her sister ships will serve as integral assets in global maritime security.

The future USS Paul Ignatius (DDG-117) is expected to be delivered to the Navy early next year. HII’s Pascagoula shipyard is also currently in production on the future destroyers USS Delbert D. Black (DDG-119), USS Frank E. Peterson Jr. (DDG-121), USS Lenah H. Sutcliffe Higbee (DDG-123) and USS Jack H. Lucas (DDG-125), the first Flight III ship. HII was recently awarded a contract for the design and construction of six additional DDG-51 class Flight III ships.

As one of the Defense Department’s largest acquisition organizations, PEO Ships is responsible for executing the development and procurement of all destroyers, amphibious ships, special mission and support ships, and boats and craft.

 

Ship Characteristics

Length Overall 510 feet/156 m
Beam – Waterline 59 feet/18 m
Draft 30.5 feet/9.3 m
Displacement – Full Load 9,217 tons/9,363 metric tons
Power Plant 4 General electric LM 2500-30 gas turbines; 2 shafts; 2 CRP (Contra-Rotating) propellers; 100,000 shaft horsepower/75,000 kW
Speed in excess of 30 knots/34.5 mph/55.5 km/h
Range 4,400 NM/8,149 km at 20 knots/23 mph/37 km/h
Crew 380 total: 32 Officers, 27 CPO (Chief Petty Officer), 321 OEM
Surveillance SPY-1D Phased Array Radar and Aegis Combat System (Lockheed Martin); SPS-73(V) Navigation; SPS-67(V)3 Surface Search; 3 SPG-62 Illuminator; SQQ-89(V)6 sonar incorporating SQS-53C hull mounted and SQR-19 towed array sonars used with Mark-116 Mod 7 ASW fire control system
Electronics/Countermeasures SLQ-32(V)3; Mark-53 Mod 0 Decoy System; Mark-234 Decoy System; SLQ-25A Torpedo Decoy; SLQ-39 Surface Decoy; URN-25 TACAN; UPX-29 IFF System; Kollmorgen Mark-46 Mod 1 Electro-Optical Director
Aircraft 2 embarked SH-60 helicopters ASW operations; RAST (Recovery Assist, Secure and Traverse)
Armament 2 Mark-41 Vertical Launching System (VLS) with 96 Standard, Vertical Launch ASROC (Anti-Submarine Rocket) & Tomahawk ASM (Air-to-Surface Missile)/LAM (Loitering Attack Missile); 5-in (127-mm)/54 (62) Mark-45 gun; 2 (1) CIWS (Close-In Weapon System); 2 Mark-32 triple 324-mm torpedo tubes for Mark-46 or Mark-50 ASW torpedos

 

Guided Missile Destroyers Lineup

 

Flight IIA: Technology Insertion

Ship Yard Launched Commissioned Homeport
DDG-116 Thomas Hudner GDBIW 04-23-17 12-01-18 Mayport, Florida
DDG-117 Paul Ignatius HIIIS 11-12-16
DDG-118 Daniel Inouye GDBIW
DDG-119 Delbert D. Black HIIIS 09-08-17
DDG-120 Carl M. Levin GDBIW
DDG-121 Frank E. Peterson Jr. HIIIS 07-13-18
DDG-122 John Basilone GDBIW
DDG-123 Lenah H. Sutcliffe Higbee HIIIS
DDG-124 Harvey C. Barnum Jr. GDBIW

 

NSC 11

Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division has received two fixed-price incentive contracts from the U.S. Coast Guard to build two additional National Security Cutters (NSCs) for the U.S. Coast Guard. The contract values for the a 10th and 11th ships in the program are $468.75 million for NSC-10 and $462.13 million for NSC-11.

Ingalls Shipbuilding's seventh U.S. Coast Guard National Security Cutter, USCGC Kimball (WMSL-756), during sea trials in the Gulf of Mexico (HII photo)
Ingalls Shipbuilding’s seventh U.S. Coast Guard National Security Cutter, USCGC Kimball (WMSL-756), during sea trials in the Gulf of Mexico (HII photo)

«This additional funding for two NSCs is a great accomplishment on which to end the year», said Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias. «The outstanding work being done by skilled men and women of Ingalls, as well as the recognition by Congress and the U.S. Coast Guard as to the important contributions these ships make to our nation’s defense, are the reason for this success. These ships provide capable assets that our Coast Guard customer uses to perform essential homeland security missions, and we look forward to delivering two more quality NSCs to help with this important work».

Ingalls has delivered seven NSCs, the flagships of the Coast Guard’s cutter fleet, designed to replace the 12 Hamilton-class high-endurance cutters that entered service in the 1960s. The seventh ship, USCGC Kimball (WMSL-756), will be commissioned in Hawaii on January 19.

Both the eighth ship, USCGC Midgett (WMSL-757), and the ninth, USCGC Stone (WMSL-758), are currently under construction at Ingalls. USCGC Midgett (WMSL-757) is scheduled for its first set of sea trials in the first quarter of 2019. USCGC Stone (WMSL-758) is scheduled to launch in 2019. NSCs are 418 feet/127 m long with a 54-foot/16-meter beam and displace 4,500 tons with a full load. They have a top speed of 28 knots/32 mph/52 km/h, a range of 12,000 NM/13,809 miles/22,224 km, an endurance of 60 days and a crew of 120.

The Legend-class NSC is capable of meeting all maritime security mission needs required of the high-endurance cutter. The cutter includes an aft launch and recovery area for two rigid hull inflatable boats and a flight deck to accommodate a range of manned and unmanned rotary wing aircraft. It is the largest and most technologically advanced class of cutter in the U.S. Coast Guard, with robust capabilities for maritime homeland security, law enforcement, marine safety, environmental protection and national defense missions. This class of cutters plays an important role in enhancing the Coast Guard’s operational readiness, capacity and effectiveness at a time when the demand for their services has never been greater.

 

Facts

Displacement 4,500 long tons
Length 418 feet/127 m
Beam 54 feet/16 m
Speed 28 knots/32 mph/52 km/h
Range 12,000 NM/13,809 miles/22,224 km
Endurance 60 days
Crew 120
Equipped with Mk-110 57-mm turret mounted gun
6 × 12.7-mm/.50 caliber machine guns
3D air search radar
2 level 1, class 1 aircraft hangers
A stern launch ramp for mission boats
Aviation carried (2) MCH, or (4) Vertical-Launch Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (VUAV) or (1) MCH and (2) VUAV
Stern launch Two cutter boats (Long Range Interceptor and/or Short Range Prosecutor)
Electronic Warfare and Decoys AN/SLQ-32 Electronic Warfare System, Two Super Rapid Bloom Offboard Countermeasures (SRBOC)/2 NULKA countermeasures chaff rapid decoy launcher
Communications HF, VHF & UHF
Sensors and Processing Systems X and S band radar, 3D air search radar, AN/SPQ-9 radar, Identification, Friend or Foe (IFF)

 

Ship list

Ship Hull Number Laid down Launched Commissioned
Bertholf WMSL-750 03-29-2005 09-29-2006 08-04-2008
Waesche WMSL-751 09-11-2006 07-12-2008 05-07-2010
Stratton WMSL-752 07-20-2009 07-23-2010 03-31-2012
Hamilton WMSL-753 09-05-2012 08-10-2013 12-06-2014
James WMSL-754 05-17-2013 05-03-2014 08-08-2015
Munro WMSL-755 10-07-2013 09-12-2015 04-01-2017
Kimball WMSL-756 03-04-2016 12-17-2016
Midgett WMSL-757 01-27-2017 11-22-2017
Stone WMSL-758 09-14-2018
WMSL-759
WMSL-760