Category Archives: Navy

Delaware Joins Fleet

The U.S. Navy commissioned USS Delaware (SSN-791), the 18th Virginia-class attack submarine, April 4.

The Virginia-class attack submarine USS Delaware (SSN-791) transits the Atlantic Ocean after departing Huntington Ingalls Industries Newport News Shipbuilding division during sea trials in August 2019 (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of HII by Ashley Cowan/Released)

Although the traditional public commissioning ceremony was canceled for public health safety and due to restrictions on large public gatherings, the U.S. Navy commissioned USS Delaware (SSN-791) administratively and transitioned the ship to normal operations. Meanwhile, the U.S. Navy is looking at a future opportunity to commemorate the special event with the ship’s sponsor, crew and commissioning committee.

«This Virginia-class fast-attack submarine will continue the proud naval legacy of the state of Delaware and the ships that have borne her name», said Acting Secretary of the Navy Thomas B. Modly. «I am confident that the crew of this cutting edge platform will carry on this tradition, confronting the many challenges of today’s complex world with the professionalism and agility the American people depend on from the warriors of the silent service».

Vice Admiral Daryl Caudle, commander, Submarine Forces, said he is pleased to welcome the ship to the U.S. submarine fleet and contribute to its unmatched undersea warfighting superiority.

«The U.S. Navy values the support of all those who contributed to today’s momentous milestone and will look for a future opportunity to commemorate this special event», Caudle said. «The sailors of USS Delaware hail from every corner of the nation and from every walk of life. This crew, and the crews who follow, will rise to every challenge with unmatched bravery and perseverance to ensure the U.S. Submarine Force remains the best in the world».

The ship’s sponsor, Doctor Jill Biden, offered congratulations to everyone who played a role in delivering USS Delaware (SSN-791) to service.

«I know this submarine and her crew of courageous sailors will carry the steadfast strength of my home state wherever they go», she said. «The sailors who fill this ship are the very best of the Navy, and as you embark on your many journeys, please know that you and those whom you love are in my thoughts».

Delaware’s commanding officer, Commander Matthew Horton, said today marks the culmination of six years of hard work by the men and women who constructed the submarine and are preparing her to become a warship. He said he is especially thankful to the crew and their families, Doctor Biden, the USS Delaware (SSN-791) Commissioning Committee and the U.S. Navy League of Hampton Roads for all their hard work and support.

«As we do our part to maintain the nation’s undersea supremacy well into the future, today marks a milestone for the sailors who serve aboard USS Delaware (SSN-791). Whether they have been here for her initial manning three years ago, or have just reported, they all are strong, capable submariners ready to sail the nation’s newest warship into harm’s way», Horton said. «I am equally proud of the families who have stood by through the long hours of shift work, testing, and sea trials and supported our mission with patriotism and devotion».

This is the first time in nearly 100 years the name «Delaware» has been used for a U.S. Navy vessel. It is the seventh U.S. Navy ship, and first submarine, to bear the name of the state of Delaware. Delaware is a flexible, multi-mission platform designed to carry out the seven core competencies of the submarine force: anti-submarine warfare; anti-surface warfare; delivery of special operations forces; strike warfare; irregular warfare; intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance; and mine warfare.

The submarine is 377 feet/114.8 m long, has a 33 feet/10.0584 m, and will be able to dive to depths greater than 800+ feet/244+ m and operate at speeds in excess of 25+ knots/28+ mph/46.3+ km/h submerged. It will operate for over 30 years without ever refueling. Delaware’s keel was laid April 30, 2016, and was christened during a ceremony October 20, 2018. It is the final Block III Virginia-class submarine, before the next wave of Block IV deliveries.

 

General Characteristics

Builder General Dynamics Electric Boat Division and Huntington Ingalls Industries Inc. – Newport News Shipbuilding
Date Deployed October 3, 2004
Propulsion One GE PWR S9G* nuclear reactor, two turbines, one shaft; 40,000 hp/30 MW
Length 377 feet/114.8 m
Beam 33 feet/10.0584 m
Hull Diameter 34 feet/10.3632 m
Displacement Approximately 7,800 tons/7,925 metric tons submerged
Speed 25+ knots/28+ mph/46.3+ km/h
Diving Depth 800+ feet/244+ m
Crew 132: 15 officers; 117 enlisted
Armament: Tomahawk missiles Two 87-in/2.2 m Virginia Payload Tubes (VPTs), each capable of launching 6 Tomahawk cruise missiles
Armament: MK-48 ADCAP (Advanced Capability) Mod 7 heavyweight torpedoes 4 torpedo tubes
Weapons MK-60 CAPTOR (Encapsulated Torpedo) mines, advanced mobile mines and UUVs (Unmanned Underwater Vehicles)

* – Knolls Atomic Power Laboratories

 

Nuclear Submarine Lineup

 

Block III

Ship Yard Christening Commissioned Homeport
SSN-784 North Dakota EB 11-2-13 10-25-14 Groton, Connecticut
SSN-785 John Warner NNS 09-06-14 08-01-15 Norfolk, Virginia
SSN-786 Illinois EB 10-10-15 10-29-16 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
SSN-787 Washington NNS 03-05-16 10-07-17 Norfolk, Virginia
SSN-788 Colorado EB 12-03-16 03-17-18 Groton, Connecticut
SSN-789 Indiana NNS 04-29-17 09-29-18 Groton, Connecticut
SSN-790 South Dakota EB 10-14-17 02-02-19 Groton, Connecticut
SSN-791 Delaware NNS 10-20-18 04-04-20 Norfolk, Virginia

 

Fort Lauderdale
Launched

The future USS Fort Lauderdale (LPD-28) was successfully launched at the Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) Ingalls Division shipyard in Pascagoula, Mississippi on March 28. The USS Fort Lauderdale (LPD-28) is the Navy’s 12th San Antonio class amphibious transport dock ship.

The future USS Fort Lauderdale (LPD-28) was successfully launched at the Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) Ingalls Division shipyard in Pascagoula, Mississippi on March 28 (Photo by Huntington Ingalls Industries)

On March 7 2020, the ship was translated from the land level facility to the dry dock in preparation of floating off. During the launch, the dry dock was slowly flooded until the ship floated off the blocks.

«I am thrilled to get Fort Lauderdale in the water, so we can begin final outfitting and eventually take the ship out to sea for trials», said Captain Scot Searles, LPD-17 class program manager for Program Executive Office (PEO), Ships. «The San Antonio class has proven essential to expeditionary warfighters, and we are eager to deliver another ship to the fleet».

San Antonio class ships support embarking, transporting, and landing elements of 650 Marines by landing craft or air cushion vehicles. The ship’s capabilities are further enhanced by its flight deck and hangar, which can operate CH-46 Sea Knight helicopters and the Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft (MV-22 Osprey). Because of the ships inherent capabilities, they are able to support a variety of amphibious assault, special operations or expeditionary warfare missions, operating independently or as part of Amphibious Readiness Groups (ARGs), Expeditionary Strike Groups, or Joint Task Forces.

Ingalls Shipbuilding is also in production on the future USS Richard M. McCool (LPD-29) and USS Harrisburg (LPD-30). LPD-28 and LPD-29 will serve as transition ships to LPD-30, the first LPD-17 Flight II ship.

As one of the Defense Department’s largest acquisition organizations, PEO Ships is responsible for executing the development and procurement of all destroyers, amphibious ships, special mission and support ships, and boats and craft.

 

Ship Facts and Characteristics

Propulsion Four sequentially turbocharged marine Colt-Pielstick Diesels, two shafts, 41,600 shaft horsepower/31,021 kW
Length 684 feet/208.5 m
Beam 105 feet/32 m
Displacement Approximately 24,900 long tons/25,300 metric tons full load
Draft 23 feet/7 m
Speed In excess of 22 knots/24.2 mph/38.7 km/h
Crew Ship’s Company: 380 Sailors (29 officers, 351 enlisted) and 3 Marines. Embarked Landing Force: 699 (66 officers, 633 enlisted); surge capacity to 800
Armament Two Mk-46 30-mm close in Guns, fore and aft; two Rolling Airframe Missile (RAM) launchers, fore and aft: ten .50 caliber/12.7-mm machine guns
Aircraft Launch or land two CH-53E Super Stallion helicopters or two MV-22 Osprey tilt rotor aircraft or up to four AH-1 Cobra or UH-1Y Venom helicopters
Landing/Attack Craft Two Landing Craft Air Cushions (LCACs) or one Landing Craft Utility (LCU); and 14 Amphibious Assault Vehicles

 

San Antonio-class

 

Flight I

Ship Builder Launched Commissioned Homeport
USS San Antonio (LPD-17) Avondale 07-12-2003 01-14-2006 Norfolk, Virginia
USS New Orleans (LPD-18) Avondale 12-11-2004 03-10-2007 San Diego, California
USS Mesa Verde (LPD-19) Ingalls 11-19-2004 12-15-2007 Norfolk, Virginia
USS Green Bay (LPD-20) Avondale 08-11-2006 01-24-2009 San Diego, California
USS New York (LPD-21) Avondale 12-19-2007 11-07-2009 Norfolk, Virginia
USS San Diego (LPD-22) Ingalls 05-07-2010 05-19-2012 San Diego, California
USS Anchorage (LPD-23) Avondale 02-12-2011 05-04-2013 San Diego, California
USS Arlington (LPD-24) Ingalls 11-23-2010 02-08-2013 Norfolk, Virginia
USS Somerset (LPD-25) Avondale 04-14-2012 05-01-2014 San Diego, California
USS John P. Murtha (LPD-26) Ingalls 11-02-2014 10-08-2016 San Diego, California
USS Portland (LPD-27) Ingalls 02-13-2016 12-14-2017 San Diego, California
USS Fort Lauderdale (LPD-28) Ingalls 03-28-2020
USS Richard M. McCool (LPD-29) Ingalls

 

Flight II

Ship Builder Launched Commissioned Homeport
USS Harrisburg (LPD-30) Ingalls

 

1000th Arrestment

An F/A-18E Super Hornet, attached to «Blue Blasters» of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 34, landed aboard USS Gerald R. Ford’s (CVN-78) flight deck marking the 1,000th recovery of a fixed wing aircraft using Ford’s Advanced Arresting Gear (AAG) March 19, 2020 at 5:13 p.m.

Lieutenant Scott «Gameday» Gallagher lands an F/A-18F Super Hornet, attached to «Blue Blasters» of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 34, for the 1,000th trap on USS Gerald R. Ford’s (CVN-78) flight deck during flight operations. Ford is currently underway conducting its flight deck and combat air traffic control center certifications (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Gary Prill)

Minutes later, the crew celebrated a second milestone launching an F/A18 E Super Hornet attached to «Warhawks» of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 97 from Ford’s Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System (EMALS) catapults for the 1,000th time.

This significant milestone in the ships’ history began on July 28, 2017 with Ford’s first fixed wing recovery and launch using its first-in-class AAG and EMALS technologies.

Captain J.J. «Yank» Cummings, Ford’s commanding officer, explained how the entire Ford crew has worked together over the last few years to reach this achievement.

«I couldn’t be more proud of our crew, their motivation is amazing», said Cummings. «We’ve been working extremely hard to get here today, and to see this 1,000th trap completely validates their efforts and the technology on this warship».

Boasting the Navy’s first major design investment in aircraft carriers since the 1960s, Ford’s AAG and EMALs support greater launch and recovery energy requirements of future air wings, increasing the safety margin over legacy launch and arresting gear found on Nimitz-class carriers.

Lieutenant Scott Gallagher, assigned to VFA 34, has landed on five other carriers, but became a part of Ford’s history with his, and the ship’s 1,000, recovery.

«There are a lot of people who are working night and day to make sure that this ship is ready to go be a warship out in the world», said Gallagher. «To be a part of that; and this deck certification is super cool. Also getting the 1,000th trap helps the ship get one step closer to being the warship that it needs to be».

Captain Joshua Sager, commander, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 8, explained why his squadron’s integration with the ship’s personnel is important and how their relationship impacts operations.

«It’s great to share this moment in history with Ford. Integration between the air wing and ship’s company is crucial to the everyday success of carrier operations», said Sager. «Completion of the 1,000th catapult and arrestment shows that the ship and her crew have tested and proven the newest technology the Navy has, and together we are ready to meet the operational requirements of our nation».

With 1,000 launches and recoveries complete, USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN-78) will continue its flight deck and combat air traffic control certifications in preparation to deliver to the fleet regular flight operations in support of East Coast carrier qualifications.

Acceptance Trials

Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) announced on March 17, 2020 that its Ingalls Shipbuilding division completed the third and final round of sea trials for Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer USS Delbert D. Black (DDG-119).

The Arleigh Burke-class destroyer USS Delbert D. Black (DDG-119) maneuvers in the Gulf of Mexico during the ship’s acceptance trials in February (Photo by Lance Davis/HII)

«DDG-119 just completed a very successful sea trial demonstrating shipboard systems to ensure the future delivery of another quality, state-of-the-art surface combatant», Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias said. «From the start of fabrication to final sea trials, our shipbuilders have continuously demonstrated remarkable proficiency and craftsmanship in building Delbert D. Black and in preparing the ship for service in the world’s greatest Navy».

USS Delbert D. Black (DDG-119) is the first ship named in honor of U.S. Navy veteran Delbert D. Black, who served as a gunner’s mate and was aboard the battleship USS Maryland (BB-46) during the attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

Ingalls has delivered 31 Arleigh Burke-class destroyers to the U.S. Navy. The shipyard currently has four DDGs under construction, including USS Delbert D. Black (DDG-119), USS Frank E. Petersen Jr. (DDG-121), USS Lenah H. Sutcliffe Higbee (DDG-123) and USS Jack H. Lucas (DDG-125), the U.S. Navy’s first Flight III destroyer.

Arleigh Burke-class destroyers are highly capable, multi-mission ships and can conduct a variety of operations, from peacetime presence and crisis management to sea control and power projection, all in support of the United States military strategy. Guided missile destroyers are capable of simultaneously fighting air, surface and subsurface battles. The ship contains myriad offensive and defensive weapons designed to support maritime defense needs well into the 21st century.

 

CHARACTERISTICS

Length Overall 510 feet/156 m
Beam – Waterline 59 feet/18 m
Draft 30.5 feet/9.3 m
Displacement – Full Load 9,217 tons/9,363 metric tons
Power Plant 4 General electric LM 2500-30 gas turbines; 2 shafts; 2 CRP (Contra-Rotating) propellers; 100,000 shaft horsepower/75,000 kW
Speed in excess of 30 knots/34.5 mph/55.5 km/h
Range 4,400 NM/8,149 km at 20 knots/23 mph/37 km/h
Crew 380 total: 32 Officers, 27 CPO (Chief Petty Officer), 321 OEM
Surveillance SPY-1D Phased Array Radar (Lockheed Martin)/AN/SPY-6 Air and Missile Defense Radar (Raytheon Company) and Aegis Combat System (Lockheed Martin); SPS-73(V) Navigation; SPS-67(V)3 Surface Search; 3 SPG-62 Illuminator; SQQ-89(V)6 sonar incorporating SQS-53C hull mounted and SQR-19 towed array sonars used with Mark-116 Mod 7 ASW fire control system
Electronics/Countermeasures SLQ-32(V)3; Mark-53 Mod 0 Decoy System; Mark-234 Decoy System; SLQ-25A Torpedo Decoy; SLQ-39 Surface Decoy; URN-25 TACAN; UPX-29 IFF System; Kollmorgen Mark-46 Mod 1 Electro-Optical Director
Aircraft 2 embarked SH-60 helicopters ASW operations; RAST (Recovery Assist, Secure and Traverse)
Armament 2 Mark-41 Vertical Launching System (VLS) with 96 Standard, Vertical Launch ASROC (Anti-Submarine Rocket) & Tomahawk ASM (Air-to-Surface Missile)/LAM (Loitering Attack Missile); 5-in (127-mm)/54 (62) Mark-45 gun; 2 (1) CIWS (Close-In Weapon System); 2 Mark-32 triple 324-mm torpedo tubes for Mark-46 or Mark-50 ASW torpedos

 

GUIDED MISSILE DESTROYERS LINEUP

 

Flight IIA: Technology Insertion

Ship Yard Launched Commissioned Homeport
DDG-116 Thomas Hudner GDBIW 04-23-17 12-01-18 Mayport, Florida
DDG-117 Paul Ignatius HIIIS 11-12-16 07-27-19 Mayport, Florida
DDG-118 Daniel Inouye GDBIW 10-27-19 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-119 Delbert D. Black HIIIS 09-08-17
DDG-120 Carl M. Levin GDBIW
DDG-121 Frank E. Peterson Jr. HIIIS 07-13-18
DDG-122 John Basilone GDBIW
DDG-123 Lenah H. Sutcliffe Higbee HIIIS
DDG-124 Harvey C. Barnum Jr. GDBIW
DDG-127 Patrick Gallagher GDBIW

 

HELIOS system

Lockheed Martin and the U.S. Navy moved one step closer to integrating a laser weapon system onto an Arleigh Burke destroyer after successfully conducting a Critical Design Review (CDR) for the High Energy Laser with Integrated Optical-dazzler and Surveillance (HELIOS) system.

Artist’s rendering of Lockheed Martin’s HELIOS system (Image courtesy Lockheed Martin)

«Our adversaries are rapidly developing sophisticated weapons and the threats to the U.S. Navy’s fleet are getting more challenging», said Hamid Salim, vice president, Advanced Product Solutions at Lockheed Martin Rotary and Mission Systems. «Our warfighters need this capability and capacity now to effectively counter threats such as unmanned aerial systems and fast attack vessels».

This year, HELIOS will undergo system integration in Moorestown, New Jersey – the home of Aegis Combat System development for 50 years. The HELIOS system will then be tested at the Wallops Island Navy land-based test site which will significantly reduce program risk before being delivered to a shipyard for integration into an Arleigh Burke destroyer next year. In addition to being built into the ship’s structure, HELIOS will become an integrated component of the ship’s Aegis combat system.

«HELIOS will provide an additional layer of protection for the fleet – deep magazine, low cost per kill, speed of light delivery, and precision response. Additional HELIOS systems will accelerate the warfighter learning curve, provide risk reduction for future laser weapon system increments and provide a stronger demand signal to the supply base», said Brendan Scanlon, HELIOS program director, Lockheed Martin Rotary and Mission Systems.

Lockheed Martin has more than 40 years of experience developing laser weapon systems. HELIOS leverages technology building blocks from internal research and development projects that continue to advance the U.S. Navy’s goal to field laser weapon systems aboard surface ships.

Manta Ray Program

DARPA’s Manta Ray Program aims to demonstrate critical technologies for a new class of long duration, long range, payload-capable Unmanned Underwater Vehicles (UUVs). UUVs that operate for extended durations without the need for on-site human logistics support or maintenance offer the potential for persistent operations during longer term deployments.

Artist’s concept of Manta Ray UUV

DARPA has selected three companies to focus on development of an integrated solution for Manta Ray technology and operational areas. They are:

  • Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Laboratories;
  • Northrop Grumman Systems Corporation;
  • Navatek, LLC.

A fourth company, Metron, Inc., will work toward critical technology and solutions specific to the field of undersea energy harvesting techniques at depths necessary for successful operations.

«The Manta Ray program aims to increase at-sea operational capacity and capabilities for the combatant commander while minimizing disruptions to current operations by remaining independent of crewed vessels and ports once deployed», said CDR Kyle Woerner, the Manta Ray program manager in DARPA’s Tactical Technology Office. «If successful, this new class of UUVs would allow operational flexibility and relief of workload for both traditional host ships and servicing ports».

The Manta Ray program plans to advance key technologies that will benefit future UUV designs, including, but not limited to new energy management and energy harvesting techniques at operationally relevant depths; low-power, high-efficiency propulsion; and new approaches to mitigate biofouling, corrosion, and other material degradation for long duration missions. The program also seeks process improvements, including mission management approaches for extended durations while accounting for dynamic maritime environments; unique methods for leveraging existing maritime datasets and new maritime parameters for high-efficiency navigation; and new low-power means of underwater detection and classification of hazards.

Manta Ray is targeting three phases of development, culminating with a fully integrated demonstration vehicle completing an underwater mission in a dynamic, open-ocean environment.

Ship to Shore Connector

Textron Systems Corporation, a Textron Inc. company, announced on March 9, 2020 the successful delivery of its first next-generation air cushion vehicle, Ship to Shore Connector (SSC), Craft 100 to the U.S. Navy on February 6.

Textron Systems first next generation Ship to Shore Connector delivered

«We are proud to deliver the first of many Ship to Shore Connectors to the U.S. Navy», said Henry Finneral, Senior Vice President, Textron Systems. «This delivery is the result of the dedication by the joint Navy and industry team and will provide the Navy with a needed capability to rapidly transport material, personnel and humanitarian assistance to shore lines».

Prior to delivery, Craft 100 underwent integrated testing to demonstrate the capability of its fly-by-wire steering, electrical and propulsion systems and completed its Acceptance Trials in December 2019.

As the replacement for the existing fleet of Landing Craft, Air Cushion (LCAC) vehicles, follow-on SSCs will primarily transport weapon systems, equipment, cargo, and personnel through tough environmental conditions to the beach. The craft can travel at a sustained 35 knots/40 mph/65 km/h and shares less than one percent of legacy LCAC original parts, representing a true upgrade for the LCAC forces at Assault Craft Unit (ACU) 4, ACU 5, and NBU 7. The SSC also has an increased payload and service life of 30 years.

The SSC is constructed at Textron Systems in New Orleans and built with similar configurations, dimensions, and clearances to existing LCAC, ensuring the compatibility of this next-generation air cushion vehicle with existing well deck-equipped amphibious ships, as well as Expeditionary Transfer Dock and Expeditionary Sea Bases.

The Navy will continue to utilize Craft 100 as a test and training craft. There are currently thirteen additional SSCs in various states of production. Builder’s Trials for Craft 101 are scheduled for the first quarter of this year, with Acceptance Trials following in the spring.

 

SPECIFICATIONS

Payload 74 t/ 163,142 lbs.
Speed 35 knots/40 mph/65 km/h at Sea State 3
Deck Area 67 x 24 feet (1,608 sq feet)/20.42 x 7.32 m (149.39 sq m)
Operating Crew Four (pilot, co-pilot, load master and deck engineer)
Overall Height 5 feet/1.52 m
Overall Length 92 feet/28.04 m
Overall Beam 48 feet/14.63 m
Propulsion Four gas turbine engines
Service Life 30 years

 

Tamandaré Class

On March 5th, in Rio de Janeiro, Emgepron, an independent state company, linked to the Ministry of Defense through the Brazilian Navy Command, and Águas Azuis, a company created by ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems, Embraer Defense & Security and Atech, signed the contract for building four state-of-the-art Tamandaré Class Ships, with deliveries scheduled between 2025 and 2028.

Thyssenkrupp Marine Systems, Embraer and Atech sign a contract to build Brazilian

The construction will take place 100% in Brazil, in Itajaí, Santa Catarina State, and is expected to have local content rates above 30% for the first vessel and 40% for the others. Thyssenkrupp Marine Systems will supply the naval technology of its proven MEKO Class shipbuilding platform of defence vessels that is already in operation in 15 countries. Embraer will integrate sensors and weaponry into the combat system, bringing also to the program its 50 years’ experience in systems technology solutions and in-service support.

Atech, an Embraer Group company, will be the supplier of the Combat Management System (CMS) and Integrated Platform Management System (IPMS), from L3 MAPPS, and the recipient of technology transfer in cooperation with ATLAS ELEKTRONIK, a ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems subsidiary that produces the CMS and sonar systems.

«We are grateful to participate again in such important milestone in the history of Brazil’s naval defence with the most advanced ships in their class. Looking back the great achievements we had since the construction of Tupi Class submarines in 1980s, it is a recognition of the technological excellence, reliability and longevity solutions we have offered for almost two centuries. The Tamandaré Class Programme will strengthen our ties by transferring technology and generating highly qualified jobs for the country», said Doctor Rolf Wirtz, CEO of ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems.

«The partnership validates our efforts to expand our defence and security portfolio beyond the aeronautical segment. Over the past few years, we have acquired expertise in developing and integrating complex systems, among others, in order to qualify Embraer to meet the needs of the Brazilian Navy, further strengthening our position as a strategic partner of the Brazilian State», said Embraer Defense & Security President and CEO Jackson Schneider.

In addition to construction, the contract includes a sustained transfer of technology in naval engineering for building military ships and combat and platform management systems, as well as integrated logistical support and lifecycle management.

The Tamandaré Class Programme has the potential to generate direct and indirect job opportunities of high level of qualification. It provides for a solid national partnership model with proven ability to transfer technology and qualify local labour, which guarantees the development of future strategic defence projects in Brazil.

The naval alliance between thyssenkrupp Marine Systems and Embraer Defense & Security can also enable creating a base for exporting naval defence products from Brazil.

Expeditionary Sea Base

The U.S. Navy commissioned its newest Expeditionary Sea Base (ESB), USS Hershel «Woody» Williams (T-ESB-4), during a 10 a.m. EST ceremony Saturday, March 7, in Norfolk, Virginia.

The Military Sealift Command expeditionary sea base USS Hershel «Woody» Williams (T-ESB-4) is at anchor in the Chesapeake Bay, September 15, 2019 during mine countermeasure equipment testing (U.S. Navy photo by Bill Mesta/Released)

The USS Hershel «Woody» Williams (T-ESB-4) is the first ship to bear the name of Marine Corps Chief Warrant Officer Four Hershel Woodrow Williams, the last surviving Medal of Honor recipient recognized for heroism at the Battle of Iwo Jima during World War II.

U.S. Senator Joe Manchin of West Virginia delivered the commissioning ceremony’s principal address. The ceremony was highlighted by a time-honored Navy tradition when Ms. Tracie Jean Ross and Ms. Travie Jane Ross, ship sponsors and daughters of Hershel «Woody» Williams, gave the first order to «man our ship and bring her to life»!

«This ship honors a man who dedicated his life to service – heroic service as a Marine, and continued service to his fellow veterans», said Acting Secretary of the U.S. Navy Thomas Modly. «This dedication will live on in USS Hershel ‘Woody’ Williams as the ship is deployed around the world bringing additional capability to our growing fleet. The ceremony on Saturday will also represent the dedication to service demonstrated by the men and women who worked tirelessly to build this ship and their commitment to quality and innovation».

The USS Hershel «Woody» Williams (T-ESB-4) is optimized to support a variety of maritime-based missions and designed around four core capabilities: aviation facilities, berthing, equipment staging support, and command and control assets. ESBs can be enhanced to meet special operations force missions through increased communications, aviation and unmanned aircraft system support.

Built by General Dynamics National Steel and Shipbuilding Company (NASSCO), the Montford Point-class is comprised of five ships across two variants: Expeditionary Transfer Docks and Expeditionary Sea Bases. Acting as a mobile sea base, ESBs are part of the critical access infrastructure that supports the deployment of forces and supplies to provide prepositioned equipment and sustainment with flexible distribution.

The platform has an aviation hangar and flight deck that include four operating spots capable of landing V-22 Osprey and MH-53E Super Stallion equivalent helicopters, accommodations, work spaces, and ordnance storage for an embarked force. The platform will also provide unmanned aviation vehicle operations, enhanced command and control, communications, computers, and intelligence capabilities to support embarked force mission planning and execution. The reconfigurable mission deck area can store embarked force equipment including mine sleds and rigid hull inflatable boats.

Flight III Destroyer

Construction of the future USS Louis H. Wilson Jr. (DDG-126) officially began at General Dynamics Bath Iron Works (BIW) shipyard on March 3. The milestone was marked by a ceremony at BIW’s structural fabrication facility in Brunswick, Maine. USS Louis H. Wilson Jr. (DDG-126) will be the first Arleigh Burke-class destroyer built in the Flight III configuration at BIW.

Construction begins on Bath Iron Works’ first Flight III Arleigh Burke-Class destroyer

Flight III destroyers will have improved capability and capacity to perform Anti-Air Warfare and Ballistic Missile Defense in support of the Integrated Air and Missile Defense mission. This system delivers quick reaction time, high firepower, and increased electronic countermeasures capability for Anti-Air Warfare. The ship will honor Marine Corps General Louis Hugh Wilson, Jr., who was awarded the Medal of Honor for his indomitable leadership and daring combat tactics in the Battle of Guam in 1944.

During a prolonged firefight with Japanese forces, Wilson led Marines under his command across rugged terrain to secure a strategic objective. Despite being wounded three times, Wilson and his men defended their position for more than 10 hours of combat. The following day, Wilson led a 17-man patrol to capture, secure, and hold a second position.

«This is a tremendous occasion as we mark the start of construction on BIW’s first Flight III Arleigh Burke class destroyer». said Captain Seth Miller, DDG-51 class program manager, Program Executive Office (PEO) Ships. «General Wilson embodied the spirit of our nation in his will to protect his fellow Marines and countrymen. What better way to honor him than to build a highly capable warship that advances our Navy’s ability to protect and defend our Nation».

When operational, this multi-mission surface combatant will serve as an integral player in global maritime security, engaging in air, undersea, surface, strike and ballistic missile defense as well as providing increased capabilities in anti-submarine warfare, command and control, and anti-surface warfare. BIW is currently in production on the future Arleigh Burke class destroyers USS Daniel Inouye (DDG-118), USS Carl M. Levin (DDG-120), USS John Basilone (DDG-122), USS Harvey C. Barnum Jr. (DDG-124), and USS Patrick Gallagher (DDG-127), as well as the Zumwalt class destroyer USS Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG-1002). As one of the Defense Department’s largest acquisition organizations, PEO Ships is responsible for executing the development and procurement of all destroyers, amphibious ships, special mission and support ships, boats and craft.

 

CHARACTERISTICS

Length Overall 510 feet/156 m
Beam – Waterline 59 feet/18 m
Draft 30.5 feet/9.3 m
Displacement – Full Load 9,217 tons/9,363 metric tons
Power Plant 4 General electric LM 2500-30 gas turbines; 2 shafts; 2 CRP (Contra-Rotating) propellers; 100,000 shaft horsepower/75,000 kW
Speed in excess of 30 knots/34.5 mph/55.5 km/h
Range 4,400 NM/8,149 km at 20 knots/23 mph/37 km/h
Crew 380 total: 32 Officers, 27 CPO (Chief Petty Officer), 321 OEM
Surveillance SPY-1D Phased Array Radar (Lockheed Martin)/AN/SPY-6 Air and Missile Defense Radar (Raytheon Company) and Aegis Combat System (Lockheed Martin); SPS-73(V) Navigation; SPS-67(V)3 Surface Search; 3 SPG-62 Illuminator; SQQ-89(V)6 sonar incorporating SQS-53C hull mounted and SQR-19 towed array sonars used with Mark-116 Mod 7 ASW fire control system
Electronics/Countermeasures SLQ-32(V)3; Mark-53 Mod 0 Decoy System; Mark-234 Decoy System; SLQ-25A Torpedo Decoy; SLQ-39 Surface Decoy; URN-25 TACAN; UPX-29 IFF System; Kollmorgen Mark-46 Mod 1 Electro-Optical Director
Aircraft 2 embarked SH-60 helicopters ASW operations; RAST (Recovery Assist, Secure and Traverse)
Armament 2 Mark-41 Vertical Launching System (VLS) with 96 Standard, Vertical Launch ASROC (Anti-Submarine Rocket) & Tomahawk ASM (Air-to-Surface Missile)/LAM (Loitering Attack Missile); 5-in (127-mm)/54 (62) Mark-45 gun; 2 (1) CIWS (Close-In Weapon System); 2 Mark-32 triple 324-mm torpedo tubes for Mark-46 or Mark-50 ASW torpedos

 

GUIDED MISSILE DESTROYERS LINEUP

 

Flight III

Ship Yard Launched Commissioned Homeport
DDG-125 Jack H. Lucas HIIIS
DDG-126 Louis H. Wilson, Jr. GDBIW
DDG-128 Ted Stevens HIIIS
DDG-129 Jeremiah Denton HIIIS
DDG-130 William Charette GDBIW
DDG-131 George M. Neal HIIIS
DDG-132 Quentin Walsh GDBIW
DDG-133 Sam Nunn HIIIS
DDG-134 John E. Kilmer GDBIW
DDG-135 Thad Cochran HIIIS
DDG-136 Richard G. Lugar GDBIW
DDG-137
DDG-138