Category Archives: Ground Forces

Boxer for Lithuania

On August 22 the contract of procuring Infantry Fighting Vehicles (IFV) for the Lithuanian Armed Forces was signed at the Ministry of National Defence. 88 IFVs manufactured according to requirements set out by the Lithuanian Armed Forces will be bought for the sum of EUR 385.6 m.

Less than 8 months since selecting the Boxer in December 2015, Lithuania has signed a €400 million contract to buy 88 of the vehicles, becoming the third NATO member to buy the vehicle, which will be delivered from 2017 (ARTEC photo)
Less than 8 months since selecting the Boxer in December 2015, Lithuania has signed a €400 million contract to buy 88 of the vehicles, becoming the third NATO member to buy the vehicle, which will be delivered from 2017 (ARTEC photo)

The contract was endorsed by the Lithuanian Minister of National Defence Juozas Olekas, managing directors of ARTEC GmbH, the Boxer IFV manufacturer, Stefan Lischka and Christoph Heuman, and Organisation Conjointe de Coopération en matière d’Armement (OCCAR) director Tim Rowntree.

By the contract, combat vehicles manufactured by a German-Dutch consortium with Israeli-made turrets and armed with 30-mm cannons and «Spike LR» antitank missiles are bought for the average price of EUR 4.38 m per one.

Lithuania and the IFV manufacturer agreed that the vehicles will be renamed from «Boxer» to IFV «Vilkas» IFVs to retain the ties with the history of Lithuania and the traditions of the Lithuanian Armed Forces.

The first IFVs «Vilkas» are expected to be delivered in late 2017, and the rest would arrive by 2021.

«The signature today crowns the efforts of the Ministry of National Defence to provide the Lithuanian Armed Forces with quality and value for money product. It is a long-term investment into national defence and also a signal that Lithuania takes its security and investments into it seriously», – Minister of National Defence Juozas Olekas said.

«Today’s contract signature is a key milestone in the delivery of a modern and highly effective armoured vehicle capability to Lithuania. Within less than eight months, our strong joint team from Lithuania, Germany, The Netherlands, the BOXER industry and OCCAR have developed this highly capable and value for money package, which will provide Lithuania with world class capability and flexibility for decades to come. I and my team are honoured to play our role in delivering this vital programme for the defence and security of Lithuania and I am delighted to welcome Lithuania to the OCCAR community», – OCCAR director Tim Rowntree said.

The new IFVs will be distributed to the Lithuanian Grand Duke Algirdas Mechanised and the Grand Duchess Birutė Uhlan Battalions of the Mechanised Infantry Brigade Iron Wolf.

«The IFVs will provide greater mobility, force protection and firepower for the battalions and the entire Brigade. In operational terms, we will not only have the ability to take troops to the battlefield safely, but also to be effective on the battlefield as we destroy armoured and unarmoured targets at the distance of up to 4 km/2.5 miles. In technical term, our units will be better at integration and operation side by side with our allies», – Chief of Defence Lieutenant General Jonas Vytautas Žukas said.

Prior to signing the IFV procurement contract the memorandum of understanding between Ministry of National Defence of Lithuania, the Ministry of Defence of the Kingdom of the Netherlands, and the Federal Ministry of Defence of the Federal Republic of Germany was signed.

Another contract signed by representatives of OCCAR and Lithuania defined the scope, guidelines and authority of cooperation of Lithuania and OCCAR.

Lithuania joined the OCCAR Boxer Programme and authorised OCCAR to supervise execution of the procurement project and conduct qualitative expertise of the «Vilkas» IFVs vehicles bought. As part of the Boxer Programme, Lithuania will benefit from all the advantages offered: smaller development and maintenance costs, sharing technologies, and better interoperability with other participants of the programme.

The Boxer IFVs manufactured by ARTEC, a joint venture of German Krauss-MaffeiWegmann and Rheinmetall MAN Military Vehicles, and Dutch Rheinmetall MAN Military Vehicles Nederland, were selected for the needs of the Lithuanian Armed Forces as the best value for money choice and as fulfilling additional Lithuanian Armed Forces’ requirements for maximum personnel protection and delivery time.

First TAPV

Textron Systems Canada Inc., a Textron Inc. company, announced on August 19 the delivery of the first Tactical Armoured Patrol Vehicle (TAPV) to the Canadian Army. The Canadian Army is fielding the first vehicles to the 5th Canadian Division Support Base Gagetown and the 2nd Canadian Division Support Base Valcartier.

COMMANDO Elite is the Canadian Forces vehicle of choice for its Tactical Armoured Patrol Vehicle Program
COMMANDO Elite is the Canadian Forces vehicle of choice for its Tactical Armoured Patrol Vehicle Program

The TAPV is a 4×4 wheeled armoured vehicle specifically engineered and designed to provide survivability, mobility and versatility over the full spectrum of operations. The comprehensive, modern design is aimed at shielding troops from ballistics and roadside blasts while providing large power reserves for future electronics enhancements, with an ergonomically designed interior for optimum comfort and payload.

«We believe the TAPV is the most mobile, survivable and reliable armoured vehicle in the world today», said Textron Systems Vice President of Land Systems Richard Valenti. «We are excited to start these deliveries to the Canadian Army and support the program through operational capability and beyond».

In April 2016, the TAPV completed a very rigorous Reliability, Availability, Maintainability and Durability (RAMD) test program during which it faced multiple operational tests, including driving more than 130,000 kilometers/80,778 miles on challenging terrain representing operational profiles prescribed by the Canadian Army. The TAPV’s RAMD testing also included firing the remote weapons station and conducting more than 4,700 hours of remote weapons station usage, including 1,650 hours of silent watch operations. Testing was conducted over three months, day and night, six days per week. The final results showed that the TAPV exceeded the reliability and maintainability requirements of the contract.

Textron Systems plans to deliver at least 30 vehicles per month to the Canadian Army with all 500 vehicles scheduled to be delivered by December 2017. The fleet will be distributed across seven bases. The Canadian Army expects to declare full operational capability by mid-2020.

 

SPECIFICATIONS

WEIGHT
Gross Vehicle Weight (GVW) 40,700 lbs/18,460 kg
Curb Weight 36,300 lbs/16,460 kg
PERFORMANCE (at 38,000 lbs/17,236.5 kg)
Speed (level hard surface) 65 mph/105 km/h
Range @ 50 mph/80 km/h 400 miles/644 km
Gradient 60%
Side Slope 30%
Vertical Wall 24 inch/0.6 m
Fording 60 inch/1.5 m
TIRES
Michelin 16.00R20 XZL with Hutchinson run flat inserts
SUSPENSION
Fully independent front and rear, upper and lower control arms
POWER TRAIN
Engine Cummins QSL 365, 365 hp, 1,113 lb-ft
Transmission 6-speed, Allison 3200SP
ARMAMENT
Various (depending on customer needs)
SURVIVABILITY
Protects against direct and indirect weapons, mines and Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs)
SITUATIONAL AWARENESS
Unaided 360 degrees
OTHER MISSION EQUIPMENT OPTIONS
Add-on Armor Customer specification
Turret Enhancements Customer specification
Alternator 400- and 575-amp alternator
Anti-lock Braking System (ABS) Customer specification
NAV/GPS Customer specification
Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical (NBC) Individual/Overpressure Customer specification
360-Degree Situational Awareness (Night/Day) Customer specification
SEATING
With turret 3 crew, 2 dismounts
With Objective Gunner Protection Kit (OGPK) or Remote Weapon Station (RWS) 2 crew, 4 dismounts

 

Textron Systems Tactical Armoured Patrol Vehicle (TAPV)

 

A look into the future

Raytheon Company has given the U.S. Army a look into the future of missile defense technology, as the company provided its comprehensive vision for the next generation of air and missile defense radar. The information was supplied to the U.S. Army as part of its process to define the requirements for a future Lower Tier Air and Missile Defense Sensor (LTAMDS).

Raytheon's re-engineered Patriot radar prototype uses two key technologies – active electronically scanned array, which changes the way the radar searches the sky; and gallium nitride circuitry, which uses energy efficiently to amplify the radar's high-power radio frequencies
Raytheon’s re-engineered Patriot radar prototype uses two key technologies – active electronically scanned array, which changes the way the radar searches the sky; and gallium nitride circuitry, which uses energy efficiently to amplify the radar’s high-power radio frequencies

«Raytheon’s solution for the LTAMDS is based on the more than $200 million that the company has invested in Gallium Nitride (GaN) powered Active Electronically Scanned Array (AESA) technology», said Ralph Acaba, vice president of Integrated Air and Missile Defense at Raytheon’s Integrated Defense Systems business. «Raytheon showed it can quickly and affordably design, build, test and field a GaN-based AESA radar capable of defeating all threats when we exhibited a potential LTAMDS solution at the winter AUSA tradeshow this past March».

Raytheon’s GaN-based AESA LTAMDS radar is designed to serve as a sensor on the Integrated Air and Missile Defense Battle Command System (IBCS) network. It will be fully interoperable with NATO, and also retains backwards compatibility with both the current Patriot system and any future system upgrades fielded by any of the 13-nations that currently own Patriot.

«Others may draw on lesson learned from the terminated Medium Extended Air Defense System (MEADS) air and missile defense project or repeatedly re-baselined naval radars; Raytheon’s LTAMDS solution builds on successful programs such as the U.S. Navy’s Next Generation Jammer (NGJ) and the Air and Missile Defense Radar (AMDR)», said Doug Burgess, director of Integrated Air and Missile defense AESA programs. «Our response, and our AESA GaN radar rollout at AUSA show there doesn’t need to be a wait of a decade or longer to get the sensor of the future. It will be available much, much sooner».

 

About GaN

Raytheon has been leading the innovation and development of GaN for 17 years and has invested more than $200 million to get this latest technology into the hands of the military faster and at lower cost and risk. Raytheon has demonstrated the maturity of the technology in a number of ways, including exceeding the reliability requirement for insertion into the production of military systems.

Mighty Mini-Missile

Lockheed Martin’s Miniature Hit-to-Kill (MHTK) interceptor was successfully launched in an engineering demonstration at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico. The demonstration on Friday, July 29, was part of the U.S. Army’s Aviation and Missile Research Development and Engineering Center’s (AMRDEC) Extended Area Protection and Survivability (EAPS) program.

A Lockheed Martin Miniature Hit-to-Kill missile streaks skyward during a successful flight test on July 29
A Lockheed Martin Miniature Hit-to-Kill missile streaks skyward during a successful flight test on July 29

The flight demonstrated the agility and aerodynamic capability of the MHTK missile, which is designed to defeat Rocket, Artillery and Mortar (RAM) targets at ranges greatly exceeding those of current and interim systems. Today’s test advances the program, increasing the level of MHTK maturity.

Janice Booth, program manager at AMRDEC, said, «We still need to review the data gathered, but we are pleased with what we have seen so far. The MHTK has the potential to bring miniaturized capabilities to the warfighter with lower costs and reduced logistic footprints, and opens up a world of opportunities for applications of small interceptors».

«Today’s global security environment demands agile, close-range solutions that protect warfighters and citizens from enemy rockets, artillery and mortars», said Bob Saxer, vice president of Air and Missile Defense at Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control. «This test is another successful milestone demonstrating the interceptor’s maturity as well as performance, and we look forward to continuing to build on this success».

The MHTK interceptor is less than 2.5 feet/72 cm in length and weighs about 5 pounds/2.2 kg at launch. It is designed to be small in size while retaining the range and lethality desired in a counter-RAM (C-RAM) solution, with the reliability of other Lockheed Martin Hit-to-Kill interceptors.

The MHTK uses Hit-to-Kill technology, which destroys threats through kinetic energy in body-to-body contact. Hit-to-Kill technology delivers all of the available interceptor energy, but removes the risk of collateral damage seen in traditional blast-fragmentation interceptors. The MHTK interceptor complements other Lockheed Martin Hit-to-Kill missile interceptors by delivering close-range lethality with proven success for a true layered Hit-to-Kill defense.

As a world leader in systems integration and development of air and missile defense systems and technologies, Lockheed Martin delivers high-quality missile defense solutions that protect citizens, critical assets and deployed forces from current and future threats. The company’s experience spans missile design and production, infrared seekers, command and control/battle management, and communications, precision pointing and tracking optics, radar and signal processing, as well as threat-representative targets for missile defense tests.

Symphony – the jammer

In today’s rapidly changing battlespace, our adversaries are using technology to their advantage to turn the most commonplace devices into explosives. The U.S. Navy recently approved Symphony Block 40, Lockheed Martin’s counter-Improvised Explosive Device (IED) system, which provides enhanced capabilities that allow partner nations to combat ever-changing threats.

Symphony Block 40 is an open architecture design that incorporates cutting edge technology to address new and emerging threats (Photo from Lockheed Martin)
Symphony Block 40 is an open architecture design that incorporates cutting edge technology to address new and emerging threats (Photo from Lockheed Martin)

Symphony Block 40 is an open architecture system developed with the latest technologies to address new and emerging threats. This system simultaneously jams select or multiple electronic signals used to trigger a Radio-Controlled (RC) IED. The jammer is a small, vehicle-mounted system with an open architecture design that provides continuous coverage across the entire threat spectrum, as well as includes updated capabilities for maximum effectiveness, security, and response.

«Symphony Block 40 builds on the proven performance and 10 years of experience protecting warfighters. The system’s enhanced capabilities will give men and women in uniform the latest technology to counter rapidly evolving threats so they can complete their missions», said Joe Ottaviano, Director, Electronic Warfare (EW), Lockheed Martin.

The United States and its allies rely on Symphony to protect warfighters in an unpredictable future. The Symphony product line is the only counter-IED systems of its kind approved by the U.S. government for foreign military sale to allied, coalition and partner nations.

More than 4,500 Symphony Block 10/20 variant systems currently support U.S. and coalition forces in Iraq, Afghanistan, and other areas of conflict.

Work on the Symphony line of products is done in Clearwater, Florida, Manassas, Virginia, and Syracuse, New York, under an Indefinite Delivery Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) contract with the U.S. Navy.

Lockheed Martin provides global electronic warfare solutions through a unique open architecture product platform and open business model. In the air, on land, and at sea, Lockheed Martin pioneers advanced technologies to control the electromagnetic spectrum, and develops disruptive technologies to outpace adversary threats. The key to success lies not only in the capability of the systems, but integration of those systems across platforms to offer a complete picture of the battle space and unimpeded use of the electromagnetic spectrum for the warfighter.

Symphony Block 40 is able to defeat current and emerging IED threats and is designed to protect warfighters in an unpredictable battlespace (Photo from Lockheed Martin)
Symphony Block 40 is able to defeat current and emerging IED threats and is designed to protect warfighters in an unpredictable battlespace (Photo from Lockheed Martin)

Terrex IFV family

According to Kelvin Wong, IHS Jane’s International Defence Review correspondent, Singapore Technologies (ST) Kinetics, the land systems division of state-affiliated defence prime ST Engineering, is seeking to expand its global 8×8 armoured vehicle footprint with the Terrex family of Infantry Fighting Vehicles (IFVs), which now includes three distinct platforms with Gross Vehicle Weight (GVW) ratings ranging from 24-35 tonnes.

All three members of the ST Kinetics 8×8 Terrex armoured vehicle family pictured together for the very first time. From left: the 24-tonne Terrex 1 which is in service with the Singapore Army; the 35-tonne Australian Land 400 Phase 2 contender Terrex 3/Sentinel II; and the 30-tonne Terrex 2 that has been optimised for amphibious operations, one of the two finalists downselected for the US Marine Corps ACV 1.1 programme
All three members of the ST Kinetics 8×8 Terrex armoured vehicle family pictured together for the very first time. From left: the 24-tonne Terrex 1 which is in service with the Singapore Army; the 35-tonne Australian Land 400 Phase 2 contender Terrex 3/Sentinel II; and the 30-tonne Terrex 2 that has been optimised for amphibious operations, one of the two finalists downselected for the US Marine Corps ACV 1.1 programme

Senior ST Kinetics executives asserted during a closed press briefing on 22 July – which also commemorated an occasion where all three current members of the Terrex family were displayed together for the first time – that the company’s sustained efforts in capability development will enable it to meet the growing spectrum of operational requirements from international customers.

Winston Toh, ST Kinetics executive vice-president and chief marketing officer, told that the company’s 8×8 vehicles have also garnered interest from countries in the Middle East as well as North and South America, in addition to the Australian Army Project Land 400 Phase 2 and US Marine Corps (USMC) Amphibious Combat Vehicle Phase 1 Increment 1 (ACV 1.1) programmes that it is currently pursuing with overseas industry partners.

«We have adopted different business models to cater to the customers’ needs», Toh explained. «For example, we are the vehicle OEM but we are providing our partners with design and engineering capabilities to support in-country manufacturing … which helps manage cost and risk for the customer».

Toh admitted that while Terrex has yet to make inroads in the Asia Pacific region outside of Singapore, ST Kinetics has leveraged on its experience with Terrex to provide technical advice and consultancy services to Thailand’s Defence Technical Institute’s (DTI’s) indigenous 24-tonne 8×8 Black Widow Spider armoured vehicle development for the Royal Thai Army (RTA).

Combat vehicle

A live-fire demonstration of weapon systems mounted on a ground mobility vehicle prototype and a light armored vehicle combat reconnaissance vehicle prototype took place on Friday, July 15, at Red Cloud Range on Fort Benning.

The ground mobility vehicle 1.1 prototype fires the M230-LF 30-mm cannon during a live fire demonstration on Friday, July 15, at Red Cloud Range on Fort Benning (Photo Credit: Patrick A. Albright)
The ground mobility vehicle 1.1 prototype fires the M230-LF 30-mm cannon during a live fire demonstration on Friday, July 15, at Red Cloud Range on Fort Benning (Photo Credit: Patrick A. Albright)

The event was sponsored by the Capabilities Development and Integration Directorate Mounted Requirements Division at the Maneuver Center of Excellence, and the General Dynamics Land Systems and General Dynamics Ordnance and Tactical Systems.

«We are in an interwar period here. The interwar period is critical because it is a time when you must leverage an opportunity to get ready for the next conflict», said Major General Eric Wesley, commanding general of the Maneuver Center of Excellence. «If you don’t leverage that opportunity you’re throwing away a resource that has strategic implications».

Wesley explained that cooperation between the U.S. Army and industry is paramount to a successful partnership.

«We need to be cooperating and collaborating with industry and that is what you see here today», said Wesley.

Lieutenant General H. R. McMaster, director of the Army Capabilities Integration Center, spoke about the urgency behind the collaboration with the U.S. Army and industry.

«We are facing threats, enemies and adversaries who have watched us very closely in recent years and have adapted their capabilities and developed new capabilities that have resulted in our forces in the future potentially losing our ability to overmatch the enemy in close combat», said McMaster. «What we are endeavoring to do is to ensure that we stay ahead of these determined and adapted enemies».

McMaster stressed that every combat unit has to have the combination of mobility, protection and lethality in order to overmatch the enemy.

«What we need is a combat vehicle that allows that appropriate combination», said McMaster. «Every time you bump into a U.S. Army formation and you’re the enemy, and you make the unwise choice of taking a shot at us, smoke and boots, that is going to be the result on the other end».

The ground mobility vehicle 1.1 prototype fired an M230-LF 30-mm cannon, while the Light Armored Vehicle (LAV) combat reconnaissance vehicle prototype with a Kongsberg turret fired an integrated MK44 30-mm cannon.

BvS10 for Austria

BAE Systems has been awarded a contract to produce 32 BvS10 military vehicles for Austria under a government-to-government arrangement with Sweden.

The BvS10s feature enhanced crew ergonomics, greater internal volume and advanced protection, building on BAE Systems’ legacy BV206 vehicles
The BvS10s feature enhanced crew ergonomics, greater internal volume and advanced protection, building on BAE Systems’ legacy BV206 vehicles

With this agreement Austria will benefit from the Swedish government’s selection of the BvS10 in an open international competition.

The BvS10 is a highly maneuverable armored vehicle with superior performance for operating in challenging terrain to deliver personnel or cargo in combat and disaster relief scenarios. It is designed with great flexibility to accommodate changing mission requirements and is prepared for advanced battle management and command and control solutions. The contract is for the Armored Personnel Carrier variant of the BvS10 with deliveries beginning in the second half of 2017 and concluding in 2019.

«This investment provides the Austrian Army with a very capable and robust vehicle, and enhances our global position as a leading supplier of military vehicles», said Tommy Gustafsson-Rask, managing director for BAE Systems Hägglunds, which manufactures the BvS10 in Örnsköldsvik, Sweden. «Further, this contract is a result of a close and unique cooperation between the Swedish and Austrian governments and BAE Systems».

The BvS10 will also play a role in Austria’s mission in the European Union Mountain Training Warfare Initiative (EU MTI), and BAE Systems is fully committed to providing all required support. Austria will be hosting schools, training and support services. The EU MTI was created to enhance military effectiveness in mountainous terrains, an environment where the BvS10 excels.

The BvS10s feature enhanced crew ergonomics, greater internal volume and advanced protection, building on BAE Systems’ legacy BV206 vehicles, of which more than 10,000 have been sold to more than 40 countries. The BvS10 has been deployed to Afghanistan, Central Africa, the Balkans, and the Middle East.

With the contract Austria is joining France, the Netherlands, Sweden, and the United Kingdom as operators of the BvS10.

The BvS10 is a highly maneuverable armored vehicle with superior performance for operating in challenging terrain to deliver personnel or cargo in combat and disaster relief scenarios
The BvS10 is a highly maneuverable armored vehicle with superior performance for operating in challenging terrain to deliver personnel or cargo in combat and disaster relief scenarios

Air Portability Trials

General Dynamics Land Systems-UK has completed initial air portability trials for the AJAX family of vehicles at the Joint Air Delivery Test and Evaluation Unit (JADTEU) at Royal Air Force (RAF) Brize Norton.

The trials assessed the loading of the ARES prototype platform into the cargo hold of an RAF C-17A Globemaster III
The trials assessed the loading of the ARES prototype platform into the cargo hold of an RAF C-17A Globemaster III

The trials, which took place at the end of May, assessed the loading of the ARES prototype platform, which will be used to deliver and support specialist troops across the battlefield, into the cargo hold of an RAF C-17A Globemaster III and A400M Atlas aircraft. These aircraft provide the RAF with a long-range, strategic, heavy-lift capability, which enables it to project and sustain an effective force close to a potential area of operations for combat, peacekeeping or humanitarian missions worldwide.

The ARES prototype platform was driven onto real-size mock-ups of each aircraft, in order for JADTEU to develop a tie down scheme. These trials form part of the process, which, combined with additional trials, will ensure that the AJAX family of vehicles, when in-service, can be transported anywhere in the world in rapid time to support the British Army.

Chief of Materiel (Land) for the UK’s Defence Equipment and Support organisation, Lieutenant General Paul Jaques, said: «AJAX is the biggest armoured vehicle programme for a generation for the British Army. These trials mark significant progress in the programme; it is essential that these fully-digitised fighting vehicles, which will sit at the heart of the UK’s agile Strike Brigades, can be deployed at short notice worldwide to protect the UK and our interests».

Kevin Connell, vice president of General Dynamics Land Systems-UK, said: «The AJAX programme continues to make excellent progress during this trials period, with these successful trials following quickly on the back of early live fire trials in April. Thanks to the hard work of the project partners and our supply chain, we have been able to successfully demonstrate that the AJAX family meets a key requirement for air portability».

The range of AJAX variants will allow the British Army to conduct sustained, expeditionary, full-spectrum and network-enabled operations with a reduced logistics footprint. It can operate in combined-arms and multinational situations across a wide-range of future operating environments. The first British Army squadron will be equipped by mid-2019 to allow conversion to begin with a brigade ready to deploy from the end of 2020.

AJAX can operate in combined-arms and multinational situations across a wide-range of future operating environments
AJAX can operate in combined-arms and multinational situations across a wide-range of future operating environments

New modular family

At Eurosatory 2016 Rheinmetall presented its new Lynx Infantry Fighting Vehicle (IFV) on June 14 to the international public for the first time. Agile, hard-hitting and highly protected, this state-of-the-art tracked armoured vehicle is destined to dominate the modern battlefield, lending itself to operations from peace enforcement to high-intensity combat.

The powerpacks for the KF31 and KF41 Lynx variants are said by Rheinmetall to develop 563 kW/755 hp and 700+ kW/940 hp respectively, giving top speeds greater than 40 mph/65 km/h and 43 mph/70 km/h
The powerpacks for the KF31 and KF41 Lynx variants are said by Rheinmetall to develop 563 kW/755 hp and 700+ kW/940 hp respectively, giving top speeds greater than 40 mph/65 km/h and 43 mph/70 km/h

Ben Hudson, Head of Rheinmetall’s Vehicle Systems Division, said «Lynx is an advanced new modular family of vehicles that offers our customers the highest levels of survivability, mobility, lethality and capacity while utilising proven technologies to deliver a compelling value proposition for our global customers. Lynx delivers the capabilities that will allow our customers to fight, survive and win on the battlefields of today and tomorrow».

 

Cutting edge capabilities

Four core capabilities characterize the Lynx infantry fighting vehicle: firepower, force protection, situational awareness and mobility.

Firepower: Lynx features a Rheinmetall LANCE turret armed with a stabilized, externally powered, airburst-capable automatic cannon (either 30-mm or 35-mm). This enables Lynx to effectively engage targets with high precision at ranges of up to 3,000 meters/9,843 feet – even on the move. Lynx can also be equipped with an antitank guided missile launcher and a secondary weapon station linked to the main optics (main sensor slaved armament). Not only does Lynx have hunter-killer capability, it can operate in killer-killer mode, since the commander and gunner can observe and engage targets independently of each other.

Force protection: With the diesel engine mounted in the forward section and a modular armour concept, the vehicle architecture offers a high degree of protection. The vehicle’s ballistic armour shields Lynx from antitank weapons, medium-caliber ammunition, artillery shrapnel, Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs) and bomblets. In addition, a spall liner in the vehicle interior protects the entire crew. Mine and IED protection packages, decoupled seats and the optional hard kill Active Defence System (ADS) significantly boost the vehicle’s survivability.

Situational awareness: The commander and gunner both have access to the Stabilized Electro Optical Sight System/SEOSS, a digital TV – IR optical system with an integrated laser range finder and fire control computer. In the fighting compartment, displays provide the crew with a seamless 360° panoramic view. Rheinmetall’s Situational Awareness System (SAS), featuring automatic target detection and tracking, enhances the hunter-killer capability and minimizes crew reaction time. Emerging threats can be swiftly engaged with Lynx’s main or secondary armament. Laser warning sensors and the Acoustic Sniper Locating System (ASLS) likewise form part of the sensor suite. A combat management system and intercom for tactical communication round out the array of on-board equipment.

Owing to the manned turret, the commander can still lead from the hatch. The gunner and driver each have hatches, too, while two soldiers in the rear of the fighting compartment can also observe the area around the vehicle from an open hatch.

Mobility: Lynx features an excellent power-to-weight ratio and can handle gradients of up to 60 degrees and lateral inclines of more than 30 degrees. It can cross ditches up to 2.5 meters/8.2 feet wide and ford bodies of water up to 1.50 meters/4.9 feet deep. Furthermore, it can climb over one-meter-high/3.3-foot-high obstacles. The vehicle can run on either rubber or light metal tracks.

With the LANCE turret system the art of engineering reaches new heights
With the LANCE turret system the art of engineering reaches new heights

 

One vehicle family – one logistics system – one supplier: Rheinmetall

Another characteristic of Lynx is its versatility. For example, the new IFV comes in two versions: the KF31 and KF41 (KF stands for «Kettenfahrzeug», or tracked vehicle in German). Weighing up to 38 tonnes, Lynx KF31 on display at Eurosatory and can seat 3+6 soldiers. Lynx KF41 is slightly larger (44 tonnes) and can carry 3+8 soldiers.

Both vehicle classes – Lynx KF31 and Lynx KF41 – can be configured for other roles include a command & control, an armoured reconnaissance, repair & recovery and an ambulance.

A high degree of commonality in parts and components is another prominent feature of the Lynx family of vehicles. This simplifies logistic support and has a positive impact on training. Furthermore, customized service support is available worldwide – ranging from training and logistics to in-theatre repairs and technology transfer.

The Lynx family of vehicles highlights once again Rheinmetall’s role as a high-tech enterprise for security and mobility.