Category Archives: Ground Forces

Counter-drone system

The AUDS counter-UAS defence system – field proven to detect, track and defeat malicious and errant Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) or drones – is the first fully integrated system worldwide to achieve Technology Readiness Level-9 (TRL-9) status. This follows the successful mission deployment of the Anti-UAV Defence Systems (AUDS) system with United States Forces.

AUDS Counter-drone System First to Achieve TRL-9 Status Following Successful Deployment with U.S. Forces
AUDS Counter-drone System First to Achieve TRL-9 Status Following Successful Deployment with U.S. Forces

TRL-9 is the very highest technology readiness level or maturity that a technology system can attain. According to the United States Department of Defense (DoD) and NASA definitions, TRL-9 signifies that a technology system or product is in its final form and that the actual system is proven through successful mission operations.

Mark Radford, speaking for the AUDS team, said: «Achieving TRL-9 status is an important milestone for AUDS in the embryonic counter-drone market. The sale and deployment of multiple AUDS systems to the U.S. military to protect critical assets and personnel makes AUDS, we believe, the only TRL-9 rated fully integrated strategic counter-UAS system on the market».

Over the last 18 months, the AUDS system has been heavily evaluated and tested by military and government organizations. Through this process, AUDS consistently exceeded the mission requirements, simultaneously providing ground and air surveillance against possible threats.

The AUDS system – developed by Blighter Surveillance Systems, Chess Dynamics and Enterprise Control Systems – can detect a drone six miles (10 km) away using electronic scanning radar, track it using precision infrared and daylight cameras and advanced video tracking software before disrupting the flight using a non-kinetic inhibitor to block the radio signals that control it.

This detect, track, defeat process is very quick and typically takes 8-15 secs. Using AUDS, the operator can effectively take control of a drone and force a safe landing. The AUDS system works in all weather, day or night and the disruption is flexible, proportional and operator controlled.

AUDS is positioned at the strategic end of the UAS countermeasures market for use by government agencies, the police and military to protect high value critical national infrastructure or strategically important sites/events. These include nuclear power stations, borders, political, sporting or VIP events, airports and airbases.

AUDS is also currently being evaluated by the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) for use at major U.S. airports as part of its Pathfinder Programme. The FAA has signed a Co-operative Research and Development Agreement (CRDA) with Liteye Systems, the AUDS team’s manufacturing and integration partner in North America, to test AUDS at US airports selected by the FAA.

To further consolidate its market leading position, the AUDS team has developed a range of new platforms – fixed, semi-permanent and temporary – to better meet the needs of customers in different markets. These include a platform for the deployment of AUDS to the roof of a building; a field mast system for the protection of semi-permanent sites such as Forward Operating Bases (FOB), air bases or army camps; and a system for rapid deployment purposes.

AUDS will be showcasing its counter-UAS solutions at The International Defence Exhibition and Conference (IDEX 2017), at the Abu Dhabi National Exhibition Centre (ADNEC), Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates (UAE), from 19 to 23 February 2017. AUDS will be represented at IDEX by its local UAE partner Trust International in Hall 11/Stand C05.

Hoverbike prototype

The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) and industry partners demonstrated the flying capabilities of a unique rectangular-shaped quadcopter during a visit from Department of Defense (DoD) officials January 10. Doctor William Roper, director of the Strategic Capabilities Office at the Office of the Secretary of Defense and members of his staff visited the Aberdeen Proving Ground laboratory to see the Joint Tactical Aerial Resupply Vehicle, or JTARV.

Army researchers and industry partners fly a prototype rectangular-shaped quadcopter during a visit from DOD officials to Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, January 10, 2017 (Photo Credit: Jhi Scott, ARL)
Army researchers and industry partners fly a prototype rectangular-shaped quadcopter during a visit from DOD officials to Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, January 10, 2017 (Photo Credit: Jhi Scott, ARL)

Also known as the «hoverbike», the vehicle may one day make it possible for Soldiers on the battlefield to order resupply and then receive those supplies rapidly.

During the visit, Roper told laboratory officials that he is concerned about adapting future technology advances. He said he wants to figure out how to get people to «see something that’s coming on the shelf, immediately identify the use, determine if it’s good enough for rock and roll, get it into the field, but in a way that allows us to keep one-upping it».

Researchers envision a future JTARV flying low to the ground or at thousands of feet at speeds of 60 miles per hour/96 kilometers per hour or more. «Anywhere on the battlefield, Soldiers can potentially get resupplied in less than 30 minutes», said Tim Vong, associate chief of ARL’s Protection Division. He likened the concept to «Amazon on the battlefield». «We want to have options like that», Vong said.

While the current prototype is electric, researchers are looking at a hybrid propulsion system that could dramatically increase range. «We’re exploring increasing payload capacity to 800 pounds/363 kg and extending the range up to 125 miles/201 km», Vong said. «We’re also looking to integrate advanced intelligent navigation and mission planning. We’re looking to end up with a modular, stable platform that can be used for even more dynamic and challenging missions».

The laboratory began exploring the JTARV concept in the summer of 2014. They identified a manufacturer, Malloy Aeronautics, and a systems integrator, SURVICE, entered into a contract and moved quickly from concept to full-scale prototypes.

The JTARV is now a joint effort with the Marine Corps, led by Army researchers, at the Army Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center (ARDEC) at Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey; however, the ARL researchers still serve as subject matter experts on aeromechanics, assessment, analysis, propulsion, intelligence and controls and materials and structures.

«The project is successful because we went from concept development to engineering evaluation in collaboration with all various government agencies and industry», explained Ernesto Garcia Lopez, ARDEC. «The demo we saw was a unique opportunity for us to show a seamless transition between one Army organization and another Army organization and having the industry along the whole time», he said.

In addition to other industry, government and academic partners, the JTARV project is teaming with the Office of Naval Research. «Researchers hope to demonstrate full autonomy in the near future», Vong said.

«I think the visit was a great success», Vong said. «It gave us an opportunity to showcase to Dr. Roper ideas and also the progress we’ve been making in exploiting commercial UAS technologies».

The U.S. Army Research Laboratory is part of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command (RDECOM), which has the mission to provide innovative research, development and engineering to produce capabilities that provide decisive overmatch to the Army against the complexities of the current and future operating environments in support of the joint warfighter and the nation. RDECOM is a major subordinate command of the U.S. Army Materiel Command.

Army flies hoverbike prototype

New assault rifle

Two of Europe’s most respected defence companies, Rheinmetall and Steyr Mannlicher, have joined forces to manufacture and market the RS556 modular assault rifle. This German-Austrian cooperation project adds a key item to Rheinmetall’s growing array of infantry products.

Highly ergonomic and easy to handle, the RS556 can be readily adapted to individual equipment profiles (Photo: Rheinmetall/Steyr Mannlicher)
Highly ergonomic and easy to handle, the RS556 can be readily adapted to individual equipment profiles (Photo: Rheinmetall/Steyr Mannlicher)

The RS556 is based on the highly regarded STM556, which Steyr Mannlicher first unveiled in 2012. Outstanding modularity characterizes this easy-to-use, future-proof 5.56-mm × 45 cal. weapon.

Rheinmetall and Steyr Mannlicher are offering the RS556 assault rifle as a jointly produced product, made in Germany, with a German valued added share of 60%. Among other things, the two partners thus have their sights set on the German market. This innovative weapon is a possible candidate for the new «System Sturmgewehr Bundeswehr»: the German armed forces intend to replace their standard G36 assault rifle with a more advanced system starting in 2019.

Rheinmetall and Steyr Mannlicher each have well over a century of experience in developing and manufacturing infantry weapons. The RS556 project underscores both companies’ commitment to supplying military and security services around the globe with reliable, future-proof, state-of-the-art systems and equipment.

Featuring an adjustable short-stroke gas piston system and rotating bolt, the gas-operated RS556 is based on the tried-and-tested Steyr Mannlicher AUG, or Universal Army Rifle, a design concept that has proven itself in decades of service on every continent.

With a 16″ barrel (406 mm) and a fully loaded, 30-round magazine, the RS556 weighs around 4.2 kilograms, just over 9 pounds. The adjustable-length light-weight stock clicks into seven different positions, meaning that operators can adjust the RS556 to match their individual equipment profile in optimum fashion.

In a matter of seconds and without tools, the hammer-forged barrel can be easily exchanged. This means that the RS556 can be readily modified for various missions.

A number of standard barrel lengths are available (14.5″, 16″, 18″ and 20″); however, customer-specific barrel and rifling lengths can be easily created.

The RS556 features several standard and optional NATO accessory rails with receiver systems designed in accordance with MIL-STD-1913, STANAG 2324 and STANAG 4694. This means that the weapon can be fitted with various optics and night observation devices or laser light modules. A 40mm grenade launcher can also be mounted on the new assault rifle. Moreover, the RS556 is compatible with Rheinmetall’s modular «Future Soldier – Expanded System» (IdZ-ES), and can also be connected to other soldier systems.

A special breech system with an emergency operation feature ensures that the weapon always functions reliably even in extreme operating conditions, e.g. in severely hot and cold environments.

Atlantic Resolve

Tanks, trucks and other equipment are scheduled to arrive in Europe January 6 through 9, beginning a nine-month rotation of U.S. Army forces supporting Atlantic Resolve.

M1A2 Abrams tanks and other military vehicles from 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, are unloaded off the ship ARC Resolve at the port in Bremerhaven, Germany, January 6, 2017. 3-4 ABCT’s arrival marks the start of back-to-back rotations of armored brigades in Europe as part of Atlantic Resolve. The vehicles and equipment, totaling more than 2,700 pieces, will be shipped to Poland for certification before deploying across Europe for use in training with partner nations. This rotation will enhance deterrence capabilities in the region, improve the U.S. ability to respond to potential crises and defend allies and partners in the European community. U.S. forces will focus on strengthening capabilities and sustaining readiness through bilateral and multinational training and exercises (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sergeant Micah VanDyke, 4th ID MCE Public Affairs/Released)
M1A2 Abrams tanks and other military vehicles from 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, are unloaded off the ship ARC Resolve at the port in Bremerhaven, Germany, January 6, 2017. 3-4 ABCT’s arrival marks the start of back-to-back rotations of armored brigades in Europe as part of Atlantic Resolve. The vehicles and equipment, totaling more than 2,700 pieces, will be shipped to Poland for certification before deploying across Europe for use in training with partner nations. This rotation will enhance deterrence capabilities in the region, improve the U.S. ability to respond to potential crises and defend allies and partners in the European community. U.S. forces will focus on strengthening capabilities and sustaining readiness through bilateral and multinational training and exercises (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sergeant Micah VanDyke, 4th ID MCE Public Affairs/Released)

Atlantic Resolve demonstrates the U.S. commitment to the security of NATO allies on air, land and at sea. To ensure its own security, NATO must have strong, committed and capable allies, which is why the United States has fought, exercised and trained with our European allies for the past 70 years. The U.S.-European strategic partnership is built on a foundation of shared values, experiences and commitment to a Europe that is stable and prosperous.

The arrival of troops and equipment from 3rd Armored Brigade Combat Team (ABCT), 4th Infantry Division, out of Fort Carson, Colorado, marks the beginning of the continuous presence of an ABCT and back-to-back rotations of U.S. troops and equipment in Europe.

After the equipment arrives at Bremerhaven, Germany, it will move by rail, commercial line haul and military convoy to Poland consolidating near Drawsko Pomorskie and Zagan training areas. The personnel and equipment will later be relocated throughout the region for training and exercises with European allies.

The 21st Theater Sustainment Command (TSC) is U.S. Army in Europe’s lead organization for all sustainment activities including logistics support, transportation, combat sustainment, human resources, medical, finance, contracting and other areas in the field of sustainment. The 21st TSC also serves as the responsible headquarters for USAREUR’s Military Police and Engineer brigades, providing combat engineers and military police to partnership training and other operations in support of USAREUR, US Africa Command and US Central Command.

Headquartered in Kaiserslautern, Germany, with units throughout the USAREUR Area of Operations, the 21st TSC is truly positioned to be USAREUR’s key enabler, where it is needed, when it is needed.

An Army M109A6 Paladin is the first military vehicle from 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, based in Fort Carson, Colorado, to be loaded onto a railcar for shipment to Poland at the port in Bremerhaven, Germany, January 7, 2017
An Army M109A6 Paladin is the first military vehicle from 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, based in Fort Carson, Colorado, to be loaded onto a railcar for shipment to Poland at the port in Bremerhaven, Germany, January 7, 2017

3-D-printed ODSUAS

In December, engineers from the Army Research Laboratory flight tested 3-D-printed unmanned aircraft created with a new on-demand system. The demonstration, which was part of the Army Expeditionary Warrior Experiments, or AEWE, at Fort Benning, Georgia, showcased new technology designed to provide Soldiers in the field with rapid unmanned aerial vehicle support.

The 3-D printed On-Demand Small Unmanned Aircraft System, or ODSUAS, flies at speeds of up to 55 miles per hour/88 kilometers per hour. Although the lightweight shell and propeller arms are printed using additive manufacturing, the motors and propellers will be assembled using off-the-shelf equipment (Photo Credit: Angie DePuydt)
The 3-D printed On-Demand Small Unmanned Aircraft System, or ODSUAS, flies at speeds of up to 55 miles per hour/88 kilometers per hour. Although the lightweight shell and propeller arms are printed using additive manufacturing, the motors and propellers will be assembled using off-the-shelf equipment (Photo Credit: Angie DePuydt)

«We’ve created a process for converting Soldier mission needs into a 3-D printed On-Demand Small Unmanned Aircraft System, or ODSUAS, as we’ve been calling it», explained Eric Spero, team leader and project manager. The system allows Soldiers requiring unmanned aerial vehicle support to input their requirements into mission planning software and then receive a 3-D-printed aerial vehicle within 24 hours.

«We thought they’re not going to think that’s fast enough», Spero added. «But the timeline … fits right in line with the way they plan and execute their missions». The engineers said they felt the combination of 3-D printing and unmanned aerial vehicles made for a natural technology solution.

«Everybody knows all the great things that can be done with 3-D printers», said John Gerdes, an engineer on the project. «So, we figured let’s assemble these two new technologies and provide a solution to Soldiers that need something right now». In the days leading up to the demonstration, the team spent many hours flight testing and verifying the designs to ensure everything would work the way they expected.

«It was good that we didn’t have any mistakes on game day», observed fellow engineer Nathan Beals. «The day before we did some test flights and worked out some kinks. I think we had the quad up to 55 miles per hour/88 kilometers per hour». Based on the feedback engineers received from Army leaders, Spero said, his team plans to work on improving noise reduction, standoff distance, and agility, as well as increasing the 3-D-printed drone’s payload capacity.

Although the system has the capability of autonomous pre-planned flights, Soldiers can also fly the system manually with an off-the-shelf controller (Photo Credit: Angie DePuydt)
Although the system has the capability of autonomous pre-planned flights, Soldiers can also fly the system manually with an off-the-shelf controller (Photo Credit: Angie DePuydt)

«I’m very optimistic that most of those are achievable», Spero said. «I think the hardest one … is the heavy payload». At the event, the engineers discovered that the Soldiers were fascinated by the 3-D printing technology, Spero said.

«Before we even started the briefing, we set up the 3-D printer in the conference room and started a print job», Spero said. The researchers printed a Picatinny rail, which is a bracket used to mount accessories on a small arms weapon, such as an M4 carbine. In about two and a half hours, they had a rail that fit the Soldiers’ weapons perfectly.

They asked the group of Soldiers what other kinds of 3-D printed items they could use. In a matter of hours, the team presented a variety of functional printed parts that impressed the Soldiers.

«This isn’t just about unmanned aerial systems», Spero said. «It’s about forward-deployed, 3-D printing to help the Soldier». The Army engineers say they will continue to collaborate with partners at the Georgia Tech’s Aerospace Systems Design Lab as they refine technologies for future Soldiers.

The U.S. Army Research Laboratory is part of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command (RDECOM), which has the mission to provide innovative research, development and engineering to produce capabilities that provide decisive overmatch to the Army against the complexities of the current and future operating environments in support of the joint warfighter and the nation. RDECOM is a major subordinate command of the U.S. Army Materiel Command.

The United States Army Training and Doctrine Command invited engineers from the U.S. Army Research Laboratory to Fort Benning, Georgia, to showcase two hot technologies in one: 3-D printing and unmanned aircraft systems

Another order for JLTV

Oshkosh Defense, LLC, an Oshkosh Corporation company, announced today that the U.S. Army has placed another order for the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) program including 409 vehicles, 1,984 installed kits, 82 packaged kits and related services and support. The order valued at more than $176 million, is the fourth order for JLTVs since the contract was awarded in August 2015.

The Oshkosh JLTV is equipped with the EOS (Electro Optic Systems) R-400S-MK2 remote weapons system and the Orbital ATK M230 LF 30-mm gun
The Oshkosh JLTV is equipped with the EOS (Electro Optic Systems) R-400S-MK2 remote weapons system and the Orbital ATK M230 LF 30-mm gun

«The JLTV program is providing our Soldiers and Marines with the world’s most capable light tactical vehicle», said Dave Diersen, Oshkosh Defense vice president and general manager of Joint Programs. «We have begun delivering low rate production vehicles to the Army and Marine Corps for government testing in environments around the country and we have been pleased with its performance thus far». The vehicles and kits for this order will begin delivery in late 2017.

 

U.S. Soldiers and Marines can expect:

  • A vehicle 1/3 smaller and 1/3 lighter than the Oshkosh Mine-Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) All-Terrain Vehicle, or M-ATV
  • Off-road speeds 70 percent faster than today’s gold standard, the Oshkosh M-ATV
  • A modular design that can be quickly and efficiently outfitted for a full range of missions
  • Banks 866T, 6.6 Liter Turbo Diesel Engine, based on GM Duramax architecture
  • Fully transportable by air or sea, such as Lockheed C-130 Hercules, Sikorsky CH-53 Stallion and Boeing CH-47 Chinook
  • Network ready and VICTORY compliant – Vehicular Integration for Command, Control, Communications, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (C4ISR)/Electronic Warfare (EW) Interoperability
  • Superior ride quality

 

Active Protection Systems

BAE Systems has received a contract from the Netherlands for the testing and verification of Active Protection Systems (APS) on its CV90 Infantry Fighting Vehicles (IFVs).

Dutch CV90s to become first NATO combat vehicles to receive active protection
Dutch CV90s to become first NATO combat vehicles to receive active protection

Active Protection is an advanced solution consisting of countermeasures that can intercept incoming rocket-propelled grenades, anti-tank missiles, and other threats to increase crew and vehicle survivability.

BAE Systems, the manufacturer of the Dutch CV9035 variant vehicles, will lead the APS integration. BAE Systems will also carry out the future installation of the system, called Iron Fist, developed by Israeli supplier IMI Systems. Iron Fist is an automated system that uses a radar to detect and track threats and then takes action to eliminate the threat.

«Iron Fist will give the Dutch Army a highly sophisticated defensive tool on its CV90s to counter threats and improve the safety of the vehicle and its crew», said Tommy Gustafsson-Rask, managing director of Sweden-based BAE Systems Hägglunds. «Iron Fist is yet another example of the advanced technology BAE Systems and its partners can deliver to our customers».

The integration of this advanced APS solution onto the Dutch CV90s demonstrates the vehicle’s adaptability to new and evolving technologies to meet customer-specific requirements.

«During this test phase, we will pre-qualify the active system against our threat specification, and together with our partners analyze system safety and prepare for its integration onto our CV9035NL vehicles», said Hans de Goeij, project manager at the Netherlands Defence Materiel Organisation, Ministry of Defence. «We expect to make a decision on the next phase by early 2018. With Iron Fist, the Netherlands is expected to become the first NATO country with an Active Protection System of its kind on combat vehicles».

BAE Systems is a leader in the development of survivability technologies for combat vehicles. The company has, for example, developed a system called ADAPTIV, which uses cloaking technology to alter the appearance of a vehicle, making it harder to identify. BAE Systems has also developed a situational awareness tool called BattleView 360. BattleView 360 employs sensors outside the vehicle that feed a 360-degree image to a helmet-mounted monocle, allowing soldiers inside the vehicle to essentially «see through» armor and better detect threats.

Vehicle mounted mortar

BAE Systems has received a 575 million SEK ($68 million) contract for the installation of vehicle mounted mortar systems on Swedish Army CV90 Infantry Fighting Vehicles (IFVs).

BAE Systems to deliver vehicle mounted mortar systems to Swedish Army
BAE Systems to deliver vehicle mounted mortar systems to Swedish Army

The installation of the company’s mortar system, known as Mjölner, on 40 CV90s will considerably increase the indirect fire capability of the vehicles to support mechanized battalions.

«The delivery of the Mjölner solution to the Swedish Army allows it to field a capability well adapted for the CV90 while enhancing the fleet’s firepower», said Tommy Gustafsson-Rask, managing director of BAE Systems Hägglunds.

Mjölner is the hammer of Thor in Norse mythology. The contract was issued by the Swedish Defence Materiel Administration (FMV, Försvarets materielverk), with first deliveries scheduled to take place in the first quarter of 2019.

CV90 is a family of Swedish tracked combat vehicles designed for FMV by BAE Systems Hägglunds and BAE Systems Bofors, which provides the vehicle’s turrets. More than 4.5 million engineering hours has contributed to the development of this advanced vehicle. The Swedish version is outfitted with a turret equipped with a 40-mm autocannon.

The Swedish Army has more than 500 CV90s. Earlier this year, BAE Systems was awarded a contract to refurbish 262 of the vehicles, including survivability, turret, and combat system performance upgrades. Adding the mounted mortar systems addresses another priority that helps increase the vehicles’ lifespan in support of Army capabilities.

Denmark, Estonia, Finland, the Netherlands, Norway, and Switzerland also operate CV90s.

Enforcer development

MBDA has successfully tested the lightweight missile, known as Enforcer, as part of its ongoing development programme. The multinational Enforcer team scored several highly accurate hits during guided firings carried out at the trials facility of the German Bundeswehr’s Technical Center for Weapons and Ammunition 91 in November 2016.

MBDA is positioning Enforcer (KFK) as a complimentary multipurpose munition to existing shoulder-fired infantry weapon systems
MBDA is positioning Enforcer (KFK) as a complimentary multipurpose munition to existing shoulder-fired infantry weapon systems

The firings with the Enforcer development prototype were conducted at ranges of between 3,281 feet/1,000 m to 6,562 feet/2,000 m and confirmed expectations with regard to the weapon’s homing head, which guided the missile directly to the center of each of the intended targets. One of the missiles used the new lightweight, carbon-fiber launching tube developed by MBDA in Italy.

«These tests have topped off a successful year of Enforcer development, a year we can look back on and recognise numerous successful firings and other tests», said Peter Heilmeier, MBDA Deutschland’s Vice President Sales and Business Development. «The direct hits demonstrate that we have made an important step forward in the development programme».

MBDA plans to begin qualification of this very compact missile over the next few years, followed by preparations for series production. One of the areas MBDA is currently working on is the Bundeswehr’s night fighting capability requirement. In this respect, more guided firings are planned for 2017.

It enables dismounted infantry to engage lightly protected battlefield/urban targets at relevant combat ranges, with high precision and minimal exposure to the operator
It enables dismounted infantry to engage lightly protected battlefield/urban targets at relevant combat ranges, with high precision and minimal exposure to the operator

The Enforcer concept is a new lightweight, disposable shoulder-launched guided munition in the 2-km class. Modular design offers prospect of a future family of Enforcer munitions.

Key features of Enforcer at a glance:

  • Fire-and-forget missile system;
  • Range up to 6,562 feet/2,000 m;
  • High precision over full range;
  • Lock-On Before Launch (LOBL);
  • Capability against lightly armored and soft skinned targets;
  • Effect against targets behind cover through airburst capability;
  • Multi-effects warhead;
  • Enclosed space firing capability;
  • Lightweight (missile + launch tube < 20 lbs/9kg);
  • Day and night operation;
  • System weight (sight and two munitions) < 44 lbs/20kg;
  • Missile weight < 15.4 lbs/7kg;
  • Modular architecture.
Enforcer provides major advantages for infantry and special forces bringing valued benefits
Enforcer provides major advantages for infantry and special forces bringing valued benefits

Multi-Purpose Vehicle

BAE Systems on 15 December 2016 rolled out the first prototype Armored Multi-Purpose Vehicle (AMPV) to the U.S. Army during a ceremony at the company’s York, Pennsylvania facility. The AMPV provides the Army with enhanced mobility, survivability, force protection, and combat superiority.

BAE Systems rolls out first Armored Multi-Purpose Vehicle
BAE Systems rolls out first Armored Multi-Purpose Vehicle

«The AMPV prototype vehicles are the result of a highly collaborative relationship between the Army and our industry team», said Beach Day, program director for AMPV at BAE Systems Combat Vehicles. «Through this relationship, we have been able to design a vehicle that provides a modern, robust solution that meets the needs of today’s soldier and of the future force».

The AMPV is a fully modern, highly flexible vehicle that includes five variants and is designed to replace the Vietnam War-era M113 family of vehicles. It is a mature, cost-effective solution that leverages proven Bradley Infantry Fighting Vehicle (IFV) and Paladin M109A7 Self-Propelled Howitzer designs. It meets the Army’s force protection and all-terrain mobility requirements that enable the AMPV to maneuver with the rest of the Armored Brigade Combat Team (ABCT). Maximizing commonality within the ABCT reduces developmental risk and provides significant cost savings to the Army.

In December 2014, BAE Systems was awarded a contract worth up to $1.2 billion from the Army for the Engineering, Manufacturing, and Development (EMD) and Low-Rate Initial Production (LRIP) phases of the AMPV program. The initial award of $383 million, under the EMD phase, is for development and production of 29 vehicles across all of the variants:

  • general purpose,
  • mission command,
  • mortar carrier,
  • medical evacuation,
  • medical treatment.

Today’s ceremony commemorated the rollout of the first of the general purpose variant. Deliveries of the prototype vehicles will continue into 2017, and developmental testing will run through 2018.