Category Archives: Ground Forces

Overmatch capabilities

Raytheon Missile Systems has presented its offering for the U.S. Army’s Long-Range Precision Fires (LRPF) program, a precision-guided missile aptly named DeepStrike. Raytheon Company to flight test DeepStrike missile in 2019.

Raytheon is developing the DeepStrike missile for the U.S. Army's Long-Range Precision Fires (LRPF) program
Raytheon is developing the DeepStrike missile for the U.S. Army’s Long-Range Precision Fires (LRPF) program

Preserving peace and stability around the world calls for an «overmatch», an affordable solution that offers greater range, precision and combat power than that of potential adversaries. Raytheon is answering the call with the new DeepStrike missile, a longer-range weapon based on advanced technologies that will allow the U.S. Army to field twice as many missiles on its existing launch vehicles.

The new DeepStrike missile was developed for the Army’s Long-Range Precision Fires requirement. The launcher will fire two missiles from a single weapons pod, an innovative and differentiated design that slashes the cost to the customer and doubles the combat power. The missile flies farther, packs more punch and incorporates a more superior guidance system than the current weapon, which is rapidly becoming obsolete.

Raytheon’s DeepStrike missile will integrate with the M270 Multiple Launch Rocket System (MLRS) and M142 High Mobility Artillery Rocket System (HIMARS) rocket launchers. The range and speed of the new missile will enable Army combat units to engage targets over vast geographic areas in high-threat environments.

As the next generation of surface-to-surface weapon for the Army, the DeepStrike missile will:

  • offer a low-cost solution;
  • double the firepower;
  • defeat fixed land targets at 186-310 miles/300-499 kilometers;
  • improve lethality and target set over current systems.

Raytheon is a preferred provider of overmatch solutions for both U.S. and international ground forces. The company is also building partnerships with international firms to offer new combat solutions based on existing technologies and future innovations.

Armed JLTV

Oshkosh Defense, LLC, an Oshkosh Corporation company, showcased two variants of its Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) with next generation lethality and networking capabilities at the AUSA Conference 2017. The vehicles were on display at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C. from October 9-11, 2017.

Oshkosh Defense showcases JLTV vehicles with next generation weapon integration capabilities at AUSA 2017
Oshkosh Defense showcases JLTV vehicles with next generation weapon integration capabilities at AUSA 2017

«The Oshkosh JLTV is engineered to support a wide range of mission kits and weapon systems required for the modern battlefield», said John Bryant, Senior Vice President of Oshkosh Corporation and President of Oshkosh Defense. «Our JLTV will replace existing light tactical vehicles with a platform that is flexible, scalable, and customizable for specific missions ‘outside the wire’. We are proud to be demonstrating this JLTV capability».

The JLTV Family of Vehicles was designed with room for growth to provide Warfighters with next-generation protected mobility in the light vehicle class, while supporting advanced networking and increased fire power. The JLTV General Purpose vehicle on display in the Oshkosh booth is equipped with a Boeing Compact Laser Weapon System (CLWS), a Kongsberg Protector LW 30 Remote Weapon System (RWS) with a M230LF cannon, and a communications suite that includes a Thales VRC-111 and Thales VRC-121 VIPER.

The JLTV Utility vehicle on display (shown above) is equipped with the Boeing Maneuver Short Range Air Defense (SHORAD) Launcher including a M3P .50 cal/12.7-mm machine gun, M299 launcher with four Longbow Hellfire missiles, sensor suite, and a communications suite including a Thales VRC-111.

A third Oshkosh JLTV, a General-Purpose vehicle, will be on the show floor in the Rafael Advanced Defense Systems booth #1911, showcasing Rafael’s Samson RWS Dual Stabilized Remote Weapon Systems (RWS) with M230 LF, and the Trophy Light Active Protection System (APS).

«The JLTV program continues to be run as a model program», said Dave Diersen, Vice President and General Manager of Joint Programs, Oshkosh Defense. «Working closely with our government customer, we have completed Reliability Qualification Testing, accumulating over 100,000 miles/160,934 km and exceeding reliability requirements. Production ramp up is on track and Oshkosh has delivered over 600 vehicles. We are very pleased with program progress and look forward to a successful Full Rate Production (FRP) decision in Fiscal Year 2019».

Stryker-mounted Stinger

Responding to the U.S. Army’s urgent need for mobile air defense to protect ground troops, Raytheon Company integrated and demonstrated a Stinger air defense missile mounted on a Stryker armored fighting vehicle.

Raytheon offers Stryker-mounted Stinger missile for U.S. Army mobile air defense
Raytheon offers Stryker-mounted Stinger missile for U.S. Army mobile air defense

Raytheon incorporated the Stinger missile into a Common Remotely Operated Weapon Station, or CROWS, and mounted it on a Stryker. During a late September demonstration at White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico, the Army fired Stinger missiles from a Stryker vehicle and successfully intercepted airborne targets.

«With so many airborne threats in the battlespace, our ground forces need the protection of additional mobile air defense systems», said Kim Ernzen, Raytheon Land Warfare Systems vice president. «Combining these two proven systems gives the Army an immediate, low risk, high-value solution».

The Army is now evaluating the Stinger missile/Stryker vehicle solution.

The Stinger weapon system is a lightweight, self-contained air defense system that can be rapidly deployed by ground troops and on military platforms. It’s combat proven in four major conflicts and in use by more than 20 nations as well as all four U.S. military services.

Andros line

Northrop Grumman Corporation’s subsidiary Remotec Inc. is unveiling the newest member of the Andros line of proven Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGVs), the Interoperability Profile (IOP)-compliant Nomad.

Northrop Grumman’s next-generation multifunction, multimission Andros Nomad is a mid-sized Interoperability Profile-compliant unmanned ground vehicle that offers affordability and versatility with extraordinary mobility
Northrop Grumman’s next-generation multifunction, multimission Andros Nomad is a mid-sized Interoperability Profile-compliant unmanned ground vehicle that offers affordability and versatility with extraordinary mobility

IOP is a U.S. Department of Defense initiative to organize and maintain interoperability standards for UGVs. With IOP-compliant software messaging and hardware interfaces, Nomad can easily integrate the best available capabilities, sensors and payloads for multiple functions and missions.

«Building on our 30-year heritage, Nomad represents another exciting chapter of Andros innovation, performance and value in render-safe operations», said Dan Verwiel, vice president and general manager, missile defense and protective systems division, Northrop Grumman. «Future upgrades can be spiraled via IOP compliance and its next-generation track pods allow Nomad to go where others cannot. We continue to improve affordability. Over the past few months, working with supply chain, advanced materials and manufacturing availability, we have cut even more costs to make the Nomad available to a greater range of users», said Verwiel.

Nomad was designed using a proven concurrent engineering process to develop a superior product at an affordable price. Like other robots in the Northrop Grumman Andros fleet, Nomad incorporates the feedback from decades working with first responder and military customers to offer advanced technology, ease of use and reliability.

The mid-size Nomad weighs 164 pounds/74.4 kg and measures 35.5 inches/90.2 cm long, 23 inches/58.4 cm wide and 26 inches/66 cm high when its mast is horizontal or 42 inches/106.7 cm high when the mast is fully vertical. Nomad’s manipulator arm has a lift capacity of 15 pounds/6.8 kg when fully extended and impressive dexterity through extensive shoulder pitch, shoulder rotation, elbow pitch and wrist roll abilities. Its four independent track pods provide extreme mobility with stability climbing uneven terrain, complex obstacles and inclines as steep as 60 degrees.

Northrop Grumman is the largest provider of ground robots to the first responder market in the U.S. In addition, the company’s UGVs are fielded across all U.S. military services and bomb squads in 36 countries.

With more than 75 years of experience in advanced autonomy, Northrop Grumman’s autonomous systems expand the boundaries of human potential to deliver end-to-end solutions that meet evolving mission requirements for a rapidly changing world.

Northrop Grumman’s newest UGV, the Andros Nomad, has four independent track pods that provide extreme mobility with stability climbing uneven terrain, complex obstacles and inclines as steep as 60 degrees
Northrop Grumman’s newest UGV, the Andros Nomad, has four independent track pods that provide extreme mobility with stability climbing uneven terrain, complex obstacles and inclines as steep as 60 degrees

Dagger Brigade

Troopers from 5th Squadron, 4th Cavalry Regiment, 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division engaged in a demonstration of readiness, Presidenski Range, Trzebian, Poland, September 25, 2017.

Apache helicopters from the 1st Attack Reconnaissance Battalion, 501st Aviation Regiment, Combat Aviation Brigade, regroup at a new battle position with Bradley Fighting Vehicles and Abrams tanks from the 5th Squadron, 4th Cavalry Regiment, 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, during a readiness demonstration, Presidenski Range, Trzebian, Poland, September 25. The combined arms live-fire is a demonstration of the unit's capability and to ensure equipment is still in working conditions. The unit is in Poland to support Atlantic Resolve, a U.S. endeavor to fulfill NATO commitments by rotating U.S.-based units throughout the European theater and training with NATO partners and Allies (U.S. Army photo by Sergeant Shiloh Capers)
Apache helicopters from the 1st Attack Reconnaissance Battalion, 501st Aviation Regiment, Combat Aviation Brigade, regroup at a new battle position with Bradley Fighting Vehicles and Abrams tanks from the 5th Squadron, 4th Cavalry Regiment, 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, during a readiness demonstration, Presidenski Range, Trzebian, Poland, September 25. The combined arms live-fire is a demonstration of the unit’s capability and to ensure equipment is still in working conditions. The unit is in Poland to support Atlantic Resolve, a U.S. endeavor to fulfill NATO commitments by rotating U.S.-based units throughout the European theater and training with NATO partners and Allies (U.S. Army photo by Sergeant Shiloh Capers)

The unit is in Poland to support Atlantic Resolve, a U.S. endeavor to fulfill NATO commitments by rotating U.S.-based units throughout the European theater and training with NATO Allies and partners.

The combined arms live-fire is a routine demonstration, said Lieutenant Colonel Dave Maxwell, squadron commander, 5th Squadron, 4th Cavalry Regiment, 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team. It is a validation of movement and to ensure equipment is in full working order.

Equipment utilized in the live fire was a team comprised of Bradley Fighting Vehicles, Abrams tanks and Apache helicopters. The air support element was provided by 1st Attack Reconnaissance Battalion, 501st Aviation Regiment, Combat Aviation Brigade.

Abrams tanks provided rear screening with Bradley Fighting Vehicles progressing in bounding movements to engage targets at phase lines.

The demonstration also displays the ability to control the troop-size element as it moves onto the field and executes its live fire, Maxwell said. It also displays the ability to transport equipment, personnel, and supplies to execute the mission.

«We’re excited, as an organization, to be able to come over here with all of our military equipment and train and operate as a fully capable armored cavalry squadron», Maxwell said.

The unit prepared for the rotation with months of planning and training. Weeks were dedicated to living in field environments and utilizing the Advanced Gunnery Training System. The tank simulator enhances the foundation of gunnery skills like target recognition and fire control.

Although simulation is an excellent method for education and training, it is a controlled environment.

«Time and experience prepares the Soldier; the longer they’re in country, the more experienced they become», said Staff Sergeant Robert Garcia, 2nd platoon, Tomahawk Troop, 5th Squadron, 4th Cavalry Regiment, 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team. «A lot of things we do at home station is a baseline to get you to where you need to be but I don’t truly think you can ever be 100 percent ready until you’re actually there».

As it is only the first of many ranges for the unit, the opportunity for improvement and experience is plentiful.

Many of the Troopers are ready and eager to get out onto the field with the Polish Army, Garcia said.

Training with Allies and partners is a way to see each other’s equipment capabilities and how they might be combined on the battlefield, he said. It would be interesting to see what type of movement maneuvers the squadron and the Polish Army can do together.

Working closely with Allies is a training priority for the squadron, Maxwell said.

«We want to increase our ability to operate with our NATO Allies», Maxwell explained. «Increasing our interoperability and our ability to shoot, move and communicate is what, as a squadron, we’re looking to achieve».

Dagger Brigade conducts first exercise since arriving to Europe

Shootdown by Laser

A Lockheed Martin prototype laser weapon system proved that an advanced system of sensors, software and specialized optics can deliver decisive lethality against Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) threats.

In a live-fire demonstration at the Army’s White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico, a 30-kilowatt class laser weapon system developed by Lockheed Martin brought down five Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) with a 100 percent success rate
In a live-fire demonstration at the Army’s White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico, a 30-kilowatt class laser weapon system developed by Lockheed Martin brought down five Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) with a 100 percent success rate

In tests conducted with the U.S. Army’s Space and Missile Defense Command in August, the 30-kilowatt class ATHENA (Advanced Test High Energy Asset) system brought down five 10.8′ wingspan Outlaw unmanned aerial systems at the Army’s White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. ATHENA employed advanced beam control technology and an efficient fiber laser in this latest series of tests of the prototype system.

«The tests at White Sands against aerial targets validated our lethality models and replicated the results we’ve seen against static targets at our own test range», said Keoki Jackson, Lockheed Martin’s Chief Technology Officer. «As we mature the technology behind laser weapon systems, we’re making the entire system more effective and moving closer to a laser weapon that will provide greater protection to our warfighters by taking on more sophisticated threats from a longer range».

Lockheed Martin partnered with Army Space and Missile Defense Command on a cooperative research and development agreement to test ATHENA.

The system defeated airborne targets in flight by causing loss of control and structural failure. Lockheed Martin and the Army will conduct post mission reviews, and data collected will be used to further refine the system, improve model predictions and inform development of future laser systems.

ATHENA is a transportable, ground-based system that serves as a low-cost test bed for demonstrating technologies required for military use of laser weapon systems. Lockheed Martin funded ATHENA’s development with research and development investments. It uses the company’s 30-kilowatt Accelerated Laser Demonstration Initiative (ALADIN) that provides great efficiency and lethality in a design that scales to higher power levels. ATHENA is powered by a compact Rolls-Royce turbo generator.

Lockheed Martin is positioning laser weapon systems for success on the battlefield because of their speed, flexibility, precision and low cost per engagement.

ATHENA Laser Weapon System Defeats Unmanned Aerial Systems

Live firing phase

General Dynamics Land Systems – UK has begun the industry manned live firing phase of the AJAX programme, with the CTA International 40-mm (CT40) cannon.

General Dynamics Land Systems – UK begins AJAX manned live firing phase of programme, using CTAI 40-mm cannon
General Dynamics Land Systems – UK begins AJAX manned live firing phase of programme, using CTAI 40-mm cannon

The five-month trial, which started in early September and takes place at ranges in West Wales, will test the CT40 cannon, Chain Gun and Smoke Grenade Launchers.

AJAX is fitted with instrumentation to record all aspects of the firing of the CT40 cannon and Chain Gun, including lethality performance. Testing will progress from a static vehicle firing on a static target, to a moving vehicle firing on a moving target. The testing is being conducted by General Dynamics Land Systems – UK, the turret developer (Lockheed Martin UK), and with the Ministry of Defence observing.

Over the last 18 months, General Dynamics Land Systems–UK has completed significant unmanned firing of the CT40 cannon and Chain Gun, which provided the assurance needed to begin the manned firing phase of the programme.

Defence Minister Harriett Baldwin said: «The AJAX programme is sustaining hundreds of jobs in Wales, as well as thousands right across the UK, and a lot of hard work has gone into reaching this manned live firing phase».

Kevin Connell, Vice President of General Dynamics Land Systems – UK, said: «The start of the CT40 cannon manned industry firing phase is a significant milestone in the AJAX programme. This cutting-edge capability that enables AJAX to pack a significant punch, alongside its wide-range of best-in-class sensors that makes it an Information Age platform, ensures that the British Army has everything they need to do their job effectively».

In recent months, General Dynamics Land Systems – UK has successfully completed a broad spectrum of AJAX programme trials across its different prototype platforms. These include altitude-climatic trials, air deployability trials, littoral fording trials and driver training trials.

The range of AJAX variants will allow British Army ‘Strike Brigades’ to conduct sustained, expeditionary, full-spectrum and network-enabled operations with a reduced logistics footprint. They will operate in combined-arms and multinational situations across a wide-range of future operating environments.

The AJAX variant will be the medium-weight core of the British Army's deployable all-weather Intelligence, Surveillance, Target Acquisition, and Reconnaissance (ISTAR) capability
The AJAX variant will be the medium-weight core of the British Army’s deployable all-weather Intelligence, Surveillance, Target Acquisition, and Reconnaissance (ISTAR) capability

Land Ceptor Unveiled

MBDA’s Land Ceptor air defence system is making its show debut in the outside vehicle park at DSEI 2017 in London from 12-15 September.

Land Ceptor at DSEI 2017
Land Ceptor at DSEI 2017

Land Ceptor utilises the next-generation Common Anti-Air Modular Missile (CAMM) and is will be brought into service by the British Army as a replacement for the Rapier air defence system. Compared to Rapier, Land Ceptor has over triple the range (25+ km/15.5+ miles) and is able to intercept the most challenging targets in any weather conditions, including cruise missiles and precision guided munitions.

In total six nations have already chosen the CAMM family to provide their future air defence capabilities in both the maritime and land domains. In Royal Navy service the system is known as Sea Ceptor – which is also making its debut at DSEI 2017 off the back of successful first-of-class firings from the Type 23 frigate HMS Argyll (F231). By purchasing the same missile to meet the air defence needs of both the British Army and the Royal Navy, development costs are significantly reduced and both services are able to utilise a common stockpile that will significantly reduce procurement and support costs.

The Land Ceptor asset present at DSEI, which has been undertaking qualification trials for the British Army, features a substantially revised design to initial development prototypes and incorporates numerous new features. The decision to utilise the in-service HX-77 as the base vehicle for Land Ceptor enables the capabilities of the system to be expanded, whilst minimising the overall fleet size.

A key new feature of the new design is its modular launcher. It features a palletised loading module enabling rapid reload of a full ‘magazine’ of munitions, and a self-mounting/dismounting capability allowing for a wider range of air/sea/rail transport options and for dismounted operations in fixed/semi-fixed locations. A common interface module means the launcher can be easily integrated onto a wide range of vehicles.

The increased payload space provides greater flexibility in mission equipments carried, including – power generation, fire control electronics, on-board Command and Control (C2), missile datalink, radio communications and optional Electro-Optical/InfraRed (EO/IR) sensor modules all available for installation. These systems provide flexibility for the launcher to act as an independent fire unit, as well as in a networked battery configuration. This increased payload could also be used to carry the extended range CAMM-ER interceptor, providing air defence out to 40+ km/24.8+ miles for those customers that require greater range.

Land Ceptor is the launch configuration of the Enhanced Modular Air Defence Solutions (EMADS) stable. EMADS brings together best-of-breed systems and technologies from across MBDA’s European base to save time, development costs and provide a flexible system for air defence provision.

EMADS features a family of system components, including the common launcher developed for Land Ceptor. Also included are a flexible command and control system capable of being

Upgrade Abrams

General Dynamics Land Systems, a business unit of General Dynamics (GD), recently received two contract awards from the U.S. Army for Abrams main battle tank upgrades, which will boost the platform’s capabilities and help the Army lead the way into the future.

General Dynamics Receives Contracts to Upgrade Abrams Main Battle Tanks
General Dynamics Receives Contracts to Upgrade Abrams Main Battle Tanks

The company will design, develop and integrate multiple engineering changes into the Abrams M1A2 System Enhancement Package Version 3 (SEPv3), creating a SEPv4 and further modernizing the tanks. Abrams main battle tanks are produced at the Joint Systems Manufacturing Center in Lima, Ohio.

The first contract is for SEPv4 upgrades, which include the Commander’s Primary Sight (formerly known as the Commander’s Independent Thermal Viewer), an improved Gunner’s Primary Sight and enhancements to sensors, lethality and survivability. General Dynamics Land Systems will deliver seven prototype M1A2 SEPv4 tanks to the Army. The contract has an initial value of $311 million. Work will be performed in Sterling Heights, Michigan; Lima; Scranton, Pennsylvania; and Tallahassee, Florida.

The second award was a $270 million contract from the U.S. Army Tank Automotive Command to produce 45 Abrams M1A2 SEPv3 tanks. The first pilot vehicles, which feature technological advancements in communications, reliability, sustainment and fuel efficiency and upgraded armor, are expected to roll off the production line in fall 2017. Work will be performed in Lima, Scranton, Tallahassee and Anniston, Alabama.

General Dynamics Land Systems provides innovative design, engineering, technology, production and full life-cycle support for land combat vehicles around the globe. The company’s extensive experience, customer-first focus and seasoned supply chain network provide unmatched capabilities to the U.S. military and its allies.

Better Intelligence

The North Carolina National Guard’s Detachment 1, D Company 236th Brigade Engineer Battalion, recently completed six weeks of New Equipment Training (NET) near Fort Bragg, North Carolina, July 17 – August 25, 2017 after receiving the latest model of the RQ-7BV2 Shadow.

Fort Bragg, North Carolina – A RQ-7BV2 Shadow Unmanned Aerial System belonging the Detachment 1, D Company, 236 Brigade Engineer Battalion propels off its launcher at about 80 mph at an airfield near Fort Bragg, August 18, 2017. The flight is one of many conducted by Detachment 1. Soldiers during their six-week-long New Equipment Training, which was required after the unit received the newest version of the Shadow (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Mary Junell)
Fort Bragg, North Carolina – A RQ-7BV2 Shadow Unmanned Aerial System belonging the Detachment 1, D Company, 236 Brigade Engineer Battalion propels off its launcher at about 80 mph at an airfield near Fort Bragg, August 18, 2017. The flight is one of many conducted by Detachment 1. Soldiers during their six-week-long New Equipment Training, which was required after the unit received the newest version of the Shadow (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Mary Junell)

This newest version of Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) is visually similar to the previous model, but with several upgrades including longer flight durations.

«The Shadow as a platform brings reconnaissance, surveillance and target acquisition, which gives us capabilities for our military intelligence company in support of the 30th Brigade», said Chief Warrant Officer 2 Stephen Isaacs, the Detachment 1 commander. «The V2 gives us a much larger range. It gives us a longer flight time, which also gives us more time to be on target».

In addition to the increased range, the new version of the Shadow also meets the requirements of a new NATO regulation that requires all unmanned aircraft to have a certain level of interoperability and communications security.

Sergeant Joseph Patton, a unit trainer and operator with Detachment 1, is happy about the improvements to the aircraft.

«It’s absolutely better», said Patton. «From flying unmanned aircraft down-range and in combat, there have been instances of other people being able to see our feed and our video and this is going to completely mitigate that. This will keep our capabilities to us».

Although Detachment 1 only has the Shadow, it is part of a new universal system that gives operators the ability to control more than one type of UAS.

«It’s a part of NATO’s system to have that universality so we will be able to help our fellow NATO forces in the future», Isaacs said.

The NET gave the Soldiers a chance to learn about the new aircraft without the limitation of time they face on most drill weekends, where it takes three-quarters of a day to set up the airfield.

«There are guys who have gotten more training during this NET than they’ve had all year», said Patton.

The additional training was not easy. The Soldiers had to battle a hot North Carolina summer with afternoon thunderstorms that kept them from flying, and they had to re-learn the new system.

«The hardest part was definitely changing the way we’ve been doing something for eight, sometimes 12 years for some of the operators», Patton said. «When you do this for so long you have a flow and you do the same flow every time and you get the aircraft in the air, and now it’s changed».

Patton said all the troubles were worth the effort.

«There’s been growth not just in our flying capabilities but also in our operations», he said. «It’s always exciting to get that first bird up, every time. Whether it’s a drill weekend or annual training. There’s a lot of work getting it set up, but every time that bird leaves the rails for the first time, that means everything you just did was validated».

Fort Bragg, North Carolina – Specialist Oliver Westmoreland, an Unmanned Aerial System maintainer with Detachment 1, D Company, 236 Brigade Engineer Battalion, radios across the airfield near Fort Bragg to the operators of the RQ-7BV2 Shadow he is standing next to, August 18, 2017, during the unit's six-week-long New Equipment Training. Detachment 1 recently received the newest Shadow system and spent July 17 – August 25 becoming proficient on the upgrades (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Mary Junell)
Fort Bragg, North Carolina – Specialist Oliver Westmoreland, an Unmanned Aerial System maintainer with Detachment 1, D Company, 236 Brigade Engineer Battalion, radios across the airfield near Fort Bragg to the operators of the RQ-7BV2 Shadow he is standing next to, August 18, 2017, during the unit’s six-week-long New Equipment Training. Detachment 1 recently received the newest Shadow system and spent July 17 – August 25 becoming proficient on the upgrades (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Mary Junell)