Category Archives: Ground Forces

D-series turret

BAE Systems is showcasing its latest CV90 with the new D-series turret at Defence and Security Equipment International (DSEI) on September 14-17.

CV90
BAE Systems’ CV90 with new D-series turret unveiled at DSEI

This is the first time the upgraded digital turret has been unveiled and represents a leap forward in design and functionality.

Recently selected by the Royal Netherlands Army as part of an extensive $500 million mid-life upgrade program for the CV9035NL, the new turret configuration is also included in the CV90 Mk-IV offer for the Czech Republic.

Developed by BAE Systems Hägglunds in Örnsköldsvik, Sweden, the turret on display at DSEI is a 50-mm gun. The main weapon position is changed to provide even better vehicle balance and enable new ways to introduce a variety of weaponry for increased lethality. It also offers significant ergonomic improvements to benefit the vehicle’s crew. The enhanced turret design is built on years of combat-proven experience, continuous vehicle improvements, and data analysis from the CV90 User Club – the seven nations currently operating CV90 fleets.

«We are extremely proud to display the new D-series turret at DSEI to demonstrate the latest technology on the combat-proven CV90 platform», said Tommy Gustafsson-Rask, managing director of BAE Systems Hägglunds. «The new turret configuration provides CV90 crews with improved protection and increased combat efficiency. It represents our continued commitment to delivering the most modern, advanced Infantry Fighting Vehicle that meets our customers’ requirements now and in the future».

The CV90 is also equipped with Elbit Systems’ Iron Fist Active Protection System solution and an integrated, Rafael Advanced Defense Systems’ SPIKE-LR long-range anti-tank guided missile. Other significant improvements include the latest generation of sensors, Artificial Intelligence and Augmented Reality software to increase the CV90s multi-domain capabilities on the battlefield.

BAE Systems’ DSEI exhibit also features the armoured, articulated, all-terrain BvS10, operated today by Austria, France, the Netherlands, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. The platform builds on BAE Systems’ legacy Bv206 vehicles, of which more than 10,000 have been sold to over 40 countries.

The BvS10 can traverse rock, mountain, snow, swamp, and operate in Arctic environments. Its amphibious capability allows it to seamlessly transition to swimming. The vehicle’s flexible and modular design accommodates changing mission requirements, including advanced battle management. Earlier this year, the Swedish Army ordered an additional 127 new BvS10s to add to its existing fleet for command and control as well as logistics vehicles.

50kW-class laser

Raytheon Intelligence & Space (RI&S), a Raytheon Technologies business, has been awarded a $123 million contract to build and deliver three additional combat-capable 50kW-class high-energy laser weapon systems as part of the U.S. Army’s Directed Energy Maneuver-Short Range Air Defense, or DE M-SHORAD, program. RI&S is a subcontractor in an Other Transaction Authority (OTA) agreement between the Army and Kord, a wholly owned subsidiary of KBR based in Huntsville, Alabama. The systems will be mounted on Stryker combat vehicles that the Army plans to deploy for field operations in 2022.

DE M-SHORAD
Raytheon Intelligence & Space to build mobile 50kW-class laser for U.S. Army

«The U.S. Army is leading the charge to give soldiers the first-ever operational capability of a mobile high-energy laser weapon», said Annabel Flores, vice president for Electronic Warfare Systems at RI&S. «Two years ago, the Army set a goal to deliver a powerful, maneuverable and proven laser system that was ready for operators to use in the field right away, and our team demonstrated that capability».

The award follows a U.S. Army DE M-SHORAD Combat Shoot-Off at Fort Sill, Oklahoma, this summer. RI&S’ solution was employed in a series of realistic scenarios designed to evaluate the performance of the system, establish threshold requirements for the laser and demonstrate its technical maturity and readiness. At the shoot-off, soldiers operated the system and effectively tracked, identified and engaged a variety of targets.

«In just a few days, soldiers went from training to operating the system and engaging targets to providing valuable feedback to our team that will help improve future systems», added Flores.

DE M-SHORAD will offer protection to maneuvering ground forces and equipment from threats such as Unmanned Aircraft Systems, or UAS, rotary-wing aircraft, and rockets, artillery and mortars.

RI&S’ weapons system for DE M-SHORAD combines a 50kW-class High-Energy Laser, a beam director, an Electro-Optical and InfraRed (EO/IR) target acquisition and tracking system, and a Ku720 multi-mission radar. This gives soldiers an effective counter-UAS solution as well as providing counterintelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities.

Work for DE M-SHORAD will be performed in McKinney, Texas.

Defensive laser weapon systems can complement kinetic weapons during field missions by providing a low cost per kill, speed-of-light delivery and a deep magazine limited only by vehicle fuel.

Previously, RI&S also delivered three high-energy laser systems to the U.S. Air Force. The systems have accrued more than 9,000 hours during operator training and operational assessment. Raytheon Technologies’ counter-UAS solutions include sensors, and kinetic and non-kinetic effectors that, when networked into a command-and-control system, provide layers of air defense and force protection designed to meet a variety of threats.

GPS receiver

BAE Systems, Inc. unveiled its ultra-small MicroGRAM-M Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver compatible with next-generation M-Code military GPS signals that are resistant to jamming and spoofing. About the size of a postage stamp, MicroGRAM-M is the world’s smallest, lightest, and most power-efficient M-Code embedded GPS receiver – delivering assured Positioning, Navigation, and Timing (PNT) for size-constrained and other micro-applications.

MicroGRAM-M
World’s smallest M-Code military GPS receiver

«We’re delivering reliable PNT where our customers need it – from soldiers’ handheld devices to small unmanned aerial vehicles», said Greg Wild, director of Navigation and Sensor Systems at BAE Systems. «MicroGRAM-M provides our armed forces and allies with a low-SWAP M-Code GPS solution that’s resistant to adversaries’ disruption efforts in highly contested environments».

MicroGRAM-M features rapid secure GPS signal acquisition, enhanced security and resiliency, anti-jamming and anti-spoofing capabilities, and the industry’s lowest power consumption for an M-Code device. The 1.0” × 1.25” × 0.275” MicroGRAM-M has the same physical dimensions as its predecessor, enabling quick upgradability to M-Code and reduced system integration costs. At its core is a proven, tamper-proof M-Code Common GPS Module that encapsulates classified data and signal processing.

«MicroGRAM-M is the latest BAE Systems M-Code military GPS product, joining MPE-M and NavStrike-M, which deliver enhanced awareness in highly contested environments and precision munitions guidance», said John Watkins, vice president and general manager of Precision Strike & Sensing Solutions at BAE Systems. «Qualification of MicroGRAM-M is underway, with full-rate production expected in 2022».

Hybrid Antenna

Lockheed Martin has invented a new type of satellite dish technology with a wide range of use on satellites and ground terminals, including space-based 5G. The Wide Angle ESA Fed Reflector (WAEFR) antenna is a hybrid of a phased array Electronically Steerable Antenna (ESA) and a parabolic dish, and increases coverage area by 190% compared to traditional phased array antennas at a much lower cost.

WAEFR
Lockheed Martin Develops High-Performance, Low Cost Hybrid Antenna For 5G, Radar and Remote Sensing Applications

This antenna is part of a larger research and development investment in 5G.MIL technologies that will optimize and securely connect warfighting platforms to enable Joint All-Domain Command and Control (JADC2). Lockheed Martin is uniquely positioned, leveraging commercial best practices, strong partnerships, a broad supply chain and leadership expertise, to bring 5G connectivity and capabilities to the defense community rapidly and affordably.

«We adopted a commercial mindset to quickly mature this technology and discovered there were multiple use cases and applications that could benefit from this new hybrid antenna», said Chris Herring, vice president of advanced program development at Lockheed Martin Space. «5G.MIL technologies like this will bring greater connectivity, faster and more reliable networks, and new data capabilities to support our customers as they navigate the complexity of 21st century battlefields».

The team rapidly prototyped, tested and validated this system in a matter of months compared to what previously took years. WAEFR also features:

  • High performance gain of a dish with the beam agility of an ESA;
  • Low Size Weight and Power (SWAP) common product solution to accommodate any orbital altitude or ground terminal application;
  • Advances in 3D-printing technology and accelerated parts production.

This type of antenna will also benefit the broader communications and ISR communities by providing a more reliable scanning solution compared to gimbaled designs.

«The primary benefit of the WAEFR approach is accomplishing more mission with fewer resources», said Thomas Hand, Ph.D., associate technical fellow at Lockheed Martin Space. «While state of the art ESA solutions can address more demanding link performance, capacity, and data rates using multiple agile analog beams, they do so at a premium».

Directed Energy System

The Army recently conducted a successful evaluation of a new directed-energy capability, moving the service one step closer to fielding a platoon of four laser-equipped Stryker combat vehicle prototypes next fiscal year, program leads said Wednesday.

DE M-SHORAD
The Army recently conducted a successful evaluation of a new Directed Energy-Maneuver Short-Range Air Defense system, or DE M-SHORAD, aboard a Stryker combat vehicle, moving the service one step closer to fielding a platoon of four laser-equipped Stryker prototypes next fiscal year (Jim Kendall)

The Directed Energy Maneuver-Short Range Air Defense system, or DE M-SHORAD, is a 50-kW-class laser designed to protect divisions and brigade combat teams against unmanned aircraft systems, rotary and fixed-wing threats, rockets, artillery, and mortars, said Marcia Holmes, the deputy director of hypersonics, directed energy, space and rapid acquisition.

«Our goal is to deliver prototypes that Soldiers can use as the mission requires and that the Army can leverage as a baseline for a program of record», Holmes said. «A Soldier-centered design is a key part to reduce risk and to ensure an operationally effective weapon system».

A strong partnership between the Army Rapid Capabilities and Critical Technologies Office and science and technology industry leaders led to the development and implementation of the first prototype in 24 months, Holmes said.

The addition of the DE M-SHORAD and other directed-energy capabilities like the Indirect Fire Protection Capability-High Energy Laser, or IFPC-HEL, and IFPC-High Power Microwave are all designed to complement the Army’s kinetic air defense capabilities, said Craig Robin, deputy director of the RCCTO’s directed energy project office.

The unique design of the DE M-SHORAD leverages the Stryker’s gas-powered engine to energize its batteries, cooling system, and laser. The self-contained system has enough electricity to address multiple threats at a time before needing a period to recharge, he said.

«There are places where directed energy can provide a significant advantage», he added. «All the bullets are built into the system, so the logistics associated with moving a platform and supplying it requires just gas and parts».

IFPC-HEL
The prototype proved its abilities during a combat shoot-off in July 2021 at Fort Sill, Okla (Jim Kendall)

Robin added that directed-energy systems are also more cost-effective from a life cycle perspective, making them a strategic tool to take out low-cost threats like an UAS to save the Army’s kinetic capabilities.

The Army plans to demonstrate the DE M-SHORAD capabilities during Project Convergence 21 (PC 21), where it will participate in a joint and coalition exercise later this year, said Col. Scott McLeod, the program’s manager.

«PC 21 will be a big opportunity for us to show how we can integrate with our systems and demonstrate the capability against other threats», McLeod said.

In July, the prototype proved its abilities during a combat shoot-off at Fort Sill, Oklahoma. During the event, Soldiers faced several realistic scenarios intended to refine future DE M-SHORAD characteristics, as program leads collected extensive data and user feedback to refine the system, McLeod said.

In addition to Project Convergence 21, the DE M-SHORAD development team will make minor adjustments to improve the device’s performance in the coming months, followed by several internal system verifications, he added.

«We are delivering a brand new capability – it is not a modification or an upgrade. It is unlike any other system the Army has fielded to date», McLeod said. «This event was a major step in the prototyping process and an informative waypoint as we move forward with building and delivering a prototype platoon in fiscal year 2022».

Stryker
Army to field laser-equipped Stryker prototypes in fiscal year 2022 (Jim Kendall)

Thor’s hammer

The Air Force Research Laboratory’s (AFRL) Directed Energy Directorate is seeking partners to build a new counter electronics weapon system, to defend against the ever increasing threat of adversarial drone activity.

THOR
An artist’s rendering of the Air Force Research Laboratory’s THOR, a drone killer, capable of downing many adversarial drones in fractions of a second. A follow-on system named Mjolnir, the hammer belonging to the mythical Norse God, Thor will soon be under development at AFRL (Courtesy illustration)

Building upon the success of the Tactical High-Power Operational Responder (THOR) technology demonstrator, AFRL is building an advanced High-Power Microwave (HPM) weapon system to bring their newest technology to bear against the growing threat from unmanned aircraft.

«The new prototype will be called Mjolnir, after the mythical Norse god, Thor’s hammer», said Amber Anderson, THOR program manager. «Because THOR was so successful, we wanted to keep the new system’s name in the THOR family».

The AFRL team working from Kirtland Air Force Base are experts in High-Power Electromagnetics technology. The THOR demonstrator used bursts of intense radio waves to disable small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (sUAS) instantly.

«After a successful 2-year testing campaign, the AFRL team has learned a lot about the benefits of the technology and how it can be improved», Anderson said.

The Mjolnir prototype will use the same technology, but will add important advances in capability, reliability, and manufacturing readiness.

«We are releasing an opportunity for businesses in the directed energy field, to help us build the follow-on system», said Adrian Lucero, THOR deputy program manager. «AFRL’s goal is to create a blueprint for our partners so these systems can be economically produced in large quantities, and to grow a fledgling industry that will become critically important as the U.S. strives to maintain our electromagnetic spectrum superiority».

AFRL is working closely with cross-service partners in the Joint Counter sUAS Office and the Army’s Rapid Capability and Critical Technologies Office.

«As the danger from drone swarms evolves, all services are working closely to ensure emerging technologies like Mjolnir, will be ready to support the needs of warfighters already engaged against these threats. The program will begin this fall with a delivery of the prototype weapon in 2023», said Lucero.

A request for proposal from companies interested in working with AFRL to develop this prototype will be posted on SAM.gov, an official site for companies seeking federal contract opportunities.

Reconnaissance Vehicle

Textron Systems Corporation, a Textron Inc. company, on July 19, 2021 announced that it has been pre-awarded the United States Marine Corps Advanced Reconnaissance Vehicle (ARV) prototype agreement for its purpose-built Cottonmouth vehicle. Through the 22-month period of performance, Textron Systems will produce a Cottonmouth vehicle for the Marine Corps that will go through rigorous testing and evaluation. The data gained from the ARV competitive prototyping efforts will be used to inform a USMC decision point in fiscal year 2023.

Advanced Reconnaissance Vehicle (ARV)
Textron Systems selected for U.S. Marine Corps Advanced Reconnaissance Vehicle pre-award

Built from a clean-sheet design, Cottonmouth is a 6×6 wheeled amphibious reconnaissance vehicle designed to operate within the Marine Corps’ Expeditionary Advanced Base Operations (EABO) construct. Designed to swim in the open ocean and navigate through surf zones, this vehicle possesses the advanced maneuverability critical to enhanced reconnaissance operations.

As a next-generation naval sensor node, Cottonmouth has the ability to strengthen communication to operate and employ a mix of reconnaissance, surveillance, target acquisition and command, control, communications networking, and computing (C4) systems. Equipped with cutting-edge technology, such as teammate Elbit Systems of America’s IronVision, a «see-through» technology that provides advance visibility and 3600 situational awareness, this vehicle allows the Marine Corps to see beyond line of sight.

«Built from the ground up in less than nine months, the Cottonmouth is a low-risk, mission-oriented solution backed with over 750 miles of data using scenarios representative to the Marine Corps’ mission profile and requirements», said Senior Vice President David Phillips of Textron Systems. «The Cottonmouth is a testament to Textron Systems’ commitment to the Marine Corps’ vision and needs. We are proud to support the service in this next phase of the competition and look forward to working together».

Textron Systems responded to the requirement released by the Government through the National Advanced Mobility Consortium (NAMC) and the prototype award will be executed under their Ground Vehicle Systems (GVS) Other Transaction Agreement (OTA). Textron Systems expects to begin these activities in fall 2021, with the prototype delivery expected in the first quarter of fiscal year 2023. Per the requirement, a six-month government evaluation period will follow.

Multi-Purpose Vehicle

The U.S. Army has awarded BAE Systems a contract worth up to $600 million for the sustainment and support of the Armored Multi-Purpose Vehicle (AMPV) over the next five years. The AMPV comes in five variants designed to execute a broad set of missions while operating on the front lines.

AMPV
BAE Systems receives sustainment contract worth up to $600 million for AMPV program

BAE Systems is currently in low-rate production for the AMPV program, and has delivered at least one of each of the five variants designed for the family of vehicles. This sustainment contract allows for adding new capabilities and technologies on AMPVs throughout their time in service.

«The AMPV family of vehicles will bring unmatched capability to the battlefield and has demonstrated outstanding survivability and force protection as well as flexibility and growth for the future», said Bill Sheehy, the AMPV program director at BAE Systems. «This contract award will not only support production, but it will also allow for future upgrades through the development and integration of new capability sets onto existing variants».

The system technical support contract establishes BAE Systems as the sole source provider for sustainment system and technical support, as well as post-production sustainment and support for the AMPV program.

The all-new AMPV is the first tracked combat vehicle built from the ground up for the U.S. Army in more than two decades. The highly-survivable and mobile family of vehicles addresses the critical need to replace the Vietnam War-era M113s, and provides significant improvements in power, mobility, interoperability, and survivability for the Armored Brigade Combat Team over the legacy family of vehicles.

The U.S. Army received the first Medical Treatment AMPV in December, marking the delivery of at least one of each variant to the Army. The first production AMPV was a Mission Command variant delivered last year. The other variants in the AMPV family include:

  • The General Purpose vehicle, which operates throughout the battle space to conduct resupply, maintenance, and alternate casualty evacuation from point of injury;
  • The Mortar Carrier, which provides immediate, and responsive, heavy mortar fire support to the Armored Brigade Combat Team (ABCT) in the conduct of fast-paced offensive operations; and,
  • The Medical Evacuation (MedEvac) vehicle, which enables immediate treatment or evacuation at the point of injury to either ambulatory or litter casualties.

The AMPV is poised to execute today’s mission while adapting technologies as they evolve for the future battlefield through its built-in growth space design. This includes the ability to enhance power generation capability to enable future electronic and network connectivity upgrades.

Work on the AMPV program takes place across BAE Systems’ industrial network, which includes facilities in Aiken, South Carolina, Anniston, Alabama, Phoenix, Arizona, Sterling Heights, Michigan, and York, Pennsylvania.

Joint Light Tactical

The U.S. Army Contracting Command – Detroit Arsenal (ACC-DTA) announced that it has awarded Oshkosh Defense, a wholly owned subsidiary of Oshkosh Corporation, a $152 Million order for Joint Light Tactical Wheeled Vehicles (JLTV), companion trailers, and associated kits.

JLTV
Oshkosh Defense receives $152 million order to supply JLTVs to U.S. military and NATO allies

The order includes Oshkosh JLTVs, trailers and kits for the U.S. Army, U.S. Marine Corps, U.S. Air Force, and U.S. Navy, as well as NATO allies Lithuania, North Macedonia, Slovenia, and Romania.

Since winning the competitive JLTV contract in 2015, Oshkosh has built over 12,500 JLTVs, fielded vehicles to over 40 U.S. and international military installations, and received commitments from 8 NATO, Allied, and Coalition partners.

«We’ve spent over 10 years developing our vehicle, followed by nearly six years of manufacturing the vehicle in both low rate and full rate production», said George Mansfield, Vice President and General Manager of Joint Programs, Oshkosh Defense. «We’ve refined the manufacturing process, matured our robust supply chain, and fulfilled the light tactical vehicle capability gap in 8 additional countries with our proven platform. No one else can say that. And we have no plans to stop building the Oshkosh JLTV anytime soon».

The U.S. Army recently increased Oshkosh’s option ceiling under the current contract from 18,170 to 23,163 vehicles to support critical missions worldwide.

«Oshkosh Defense is incredibly pleased with the reception the JLTV continues to receive around the world», said John Lazar, Vice President and General Manager of International Programs, Oshkosh Defense. «The JLTV provides unprecedented levels of off-road mobility, survivability, and hosted firepower on a light tactical vehicle platform. We had a busy Spring and the momentum surrounding the platform continues to grow».

In May, the North Macedonia Minister of Defense, Radmila Sekerinska, was able to ride in the JLTV for the first time. Sekerinska later tweeted, «These new American-made light armored vehicles will become part of the Army facilities. Today at Krivolak, we were convinced of their exceptional performance. This is what our Army looks like in NATO».

Later in June, the Slovenian Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Defense Matej Tonin remarked at a JLTV acceptance ceremony, «Modernization of the Slovenian Army has finally begun. With the new light armored vehicles Oshkosh 4×4, our Soldiers will be more successful and safer in tasks at home and abroad».

To date, Oshkosh has received orders or commitments from the following NATO, Allied, and Coalition partners including the United Kingdom, Belgium, Montenegro, Slovenia, Lithuania, Brazil, Romania, and North Macedonia.

C-sUAS strategy

To prepare for Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) threats they may see on the battlefield, Soldiers from the 4th Infantry Division participated in the Army’s first Counter-Small UAS (C-sUAS) home-station training session at Fort Carson, Colorado, from April 19-May 7 in advance of an upcoming deployment to the U.S. Central Command region.

Counter-Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems
Soldiers huddle during Counter-Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems home-station training at Fort Carson, Colorado. The Soldiers were preparing for a deployment to the U.S. Central Command region (Courtesy photo)

Soldiers simulated using the Mobile-Low, Slow, Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Integrated Defeat System, or M-LIDS, which is a system of sensors and shooters mounted on a Mine-Resistant Ambush Protected vehicle.

The Army will also deploy five-person, C-sUAS mobile training teams that will remain stationed in the CENTCOM area of responsibility to train other deployed units.

At Fort Carson, 4th ID Soldiers learned skills that included power-up procedures and connecting different systems and components, said Chief Warrant Officer 2 Randy Jones, the systems integrator for the 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team. The training will help counter UAS threats, which provide enemies with assets capable of collecting intelligence and performing reconnaissance and lethal attacks at low cost, such as drones.

«There are lots of enemy UAS threats that are out there on a pretty regular basis and that’s likely what we’re going to be faced with», Jones said during an interview in May. «It’s really great to be able to have that opportunity to execute the training, and have the time to digest that information, because once we do get downrange, we don’t always have a lot of time to learn a new system».

The training included classroom lessons, hands-on interaction with the C-sUAS systems and a live-fire training session. The class, which consisted mostly of infantry Soldiers, was designed in accordance with the Defense Department’s recently approved C-sUAS strategy that focuses on the posturing of mission-ready forces capable of deterring UAS threats.

The mobile training teams will be comprised of a team lead and about four system trainers with expertise in a range of disciplines, including threat systems, UAS pilots and air defense artillery. The curriculum will be tailored to each unit’s needs and will cover topics from basic threat identification and tracking to joint service primary UAS operations.

In 2019, then-Secretary of Defense Mark Esper assigned the Army as the DOD’s executive agent for C-sUAS activities and former Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy then established the Joint C-sUAS Office, or JCO, under director Maj. Gen. Sean Gainey.

Through the JCO, the Army will develop integrated plans, technologies, training concepts, and doctrine, while focusing resources on efficiently countering the UAS threat. As part of the effort, the DOD released its C-sUAS Strategy providing the framework for addressing sUAS across the spectrum from hazards to threats in the homeland, host nations, and contingency locations.

M-LIDS
Soldiers from the 4th Infantry Division took part in the first home-station training for the Counter-Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems from April 19-May 7, 2021, prior to a deployment. Soldiers used a system of sensors and shooters called the Mobile-Low, Slow, Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Integrated Defeat System, or M-LIDS (Courtesy photo)

The strategy outlines three efforts: ready the force by developing innovative solutions, defend the force with the provision of mission-ready forces that are able to deter and defeat UAS threats, and building the team by leveraging partnerships.

Jones said that the Soldiers may face such threats during their deployment and the training presented the first opportunity of its kind to train at home. Jones added that the training will help ready them for what they may encounter in a forward operating location by teaching C-sUAS skills to Soldiers who don’t typically see these threats.

«Many of these Soldiers in the class are your typical infantry Soldiers who don’t deal with a complex system of systems like this on a regular basis as well as enemy UAS threats», Jones said. «They’re focused on a lot more of your standard infantry tasks. This is a really eye-opening experience for a lot of them to understand the threat that’s out there, and understand this system, how we can use it to counter these threats».

DOD contractors and representatives from each original equipment manufacturer participated as Soldiers learned how to identify enemy threats from friendly forces. Those representatives included experts on the radar systems, electronic warfare and the gunner systems.

Instructors broke down the course into separate training blocks, including sections on command and control, radar, and network, said Gary Cathcart, who works as the M-LIDS logistics lead for the Logistics Management Directorate, Army Rapid Capabilities Office.

«The training definitely enhanced unit readiness by giving the Soldiers familiarization on the operations of the system», Jones said. «This is a new system that none of us have ever seen before and none of us have ever used before … It’s a complex system of systems, that each of these individual components on these trucks need to integrate and work together».

Cathcart said that the Army currently has been gathering feedback from Soldiers and will use student input to build the next iteration of the course. He added that as more Army units train with the C-sUAS software they will look to incorporate the other branches.

«The biggest thing is that we’re getting this threat awareness spread out there to the warfighter … making sure that people are aware of the threat, and then aware of what systems and what capabilities we have to defeat that threat», Jones said.

C-sUAS
Soldiers take part in classroom sessions during Counter-Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems training at Fort Carson, Colorado (Courtesy photo)