Category Archives: Air Force

Fully Autonomous

Aurora Flight Sciences conducted a successful demonstration of the company’s autonomous helicopter system developed under the Office of Naval Research’s (ONR) Autonomous Aerial Cargo Utility System (AACUS) program. Held at Marine Corps Base Quantico’s Urban Training Center, the AACUS-Enabled UH-1H (AEH-1) conducted multiple flights, showcasing its ability to autonomously execute re-supply missions in relevant and austere settings.

Autonomous UH-1H successfully demonstrates flight and operational capabilities at Marine Corps Base Quantico
Autonomous UH-1H successfully demonstrates flight and operational capabilities at Marine Corps Base Quantico

AACUS is an aircraft-agnostic hardware and software suite which enables a Marine on the ground to request a supply delivery via helicopter from a handheld tablet, requiring no advanced training to operate the system. AEH-1 is fitted with onboard lidar and camera sensors that enable it to detect and avoid obstacles and evaluate the landing zone. The system processes this information to perform onboard mission, route, and path planning to enable autonomous mission execution.

While previous demonstrations have showcased the system’s autonomy capabilities and interactions with trained operators, this is the first demonstration in which the aircraft performed cargo and utility missions in an operationally-relevant training environment with Marine interaction. As part of the demonstration, Marines loaded supplies for the aircraft before clearing the autonomy system for autonomous takeoff.

«The Marines’ vision for the future of vertical lift operation and support is optionally-piloted aircraft», said AACUS Program Manager Stephen Chisarik. «Aurora’s system enables any rotary-wing aircraft to detect and react to hazards in the flight path, and make appropriate adjustments to keep the aircraft safe».

«We’ve developed this great capability ahead of requirements and it’s up to us to determine how to use it», said Lieutenant General Robert Walsh, commanding general, Marine Corps Combat Development Command. «The young marines today have grown up in a tech-savvy society, which is an advantage. We’ve got to keep pushing and moving this technology forward».

Aurora has developed multiple technologies under the AACUS program: the digital flight control system which enables the UH-1 to fly autonomously; and the Tactical Autonomous aerial LOgistics System (TALOS) autonomy technology. The AEH-1 was granted a Special Airworthiness Certificate by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) in October, allowing the aircraft to operate autonomous with only a safety pilot onboard to monitor the controls.

Today’s flights served as the final demonstration to ONR, Department of Defense representatives and other senior officials, the culmination of a highly successful five-year Innovative Naval Prototype (INP) program. Having completed the third and final phase of the program, AACUS will now transition to the Marine Corps for experimentation and potential acquisition.

Test event

The U.S. Navy is closer to delivering its new Long Range Anti-Ship Missile (LRASM) after completing another milestone test flight from an Air Force B-1B Lancer December 8 over Point Mugu Sea Test Range in California.

A U.S. Air Force B-1B Lancer releases the Navy's Long Range Anti-Ship Missile (LRASM) during a test event December 8 off the coast of California (U.S. Navy photo)
A U.S. Air Force B-1B Lancer releases the Navy’s Long Range Anti-Ship Missile (LRASM) during a test event December 8 off the coast of California (U.S. Navy photo)

During the test, aircrew aboard the B-1B Lancer simultaneously launched two missiles against multiple moving maritime targets for the first time.

«The completion of this test marks another significant accomplishment for the innovative team of government and industry professionals committed to fielding dominant surface warfare capability on an accelerated timeline», said Captain Todd Huber, LRASM program manager.

When operational, LRASM will provide flexible, long-range, advanced, anti-surface capability against high-threat maritime targets. It will play a significant role in ensuring military access to operate in open ocean and the littorals due to its enhanced ability to discriminate and conduct tactical engagements from extended ranges.

Early operational capability for the LRASM is slated for 2018 on the U.S. Air Force B-1 Lancer and 2019 on the U.S. Navy F/A-18E/F Super Hornet.

Navy completes LRASM milestone test event (U.S. Navy photo)
Navy completes LRASM milestone test event (U.S. Navy photo)

Border Patrol

Leonardo announced on December 11 further orders for its AW139 intermediate twin engine helicopter for public service and security operations in Italy, with contracts for eight aircraft valued at approximately 112 million euro.

Eight more AW139s to strengthen rescue and border patrol services in Italy
Eight more AW139s to strengthen rescue and border patrol services in Italy

The Italian Coast Guard has signed a contract for two AW139s to perform search and rescue missions, with deliveries to be completed by the end of 2018, while the Italian Customs and Border Protection Service (Guardia di Finanza) has ordered six to perform patrol operations, with deliveries to be completed by 2020.

With these aircraft deliveries both operators will have a fleet of 14 AW139s each, allowing a further enhancement in mission capability and simplified logistics as they replace ageing AB412 aircraft. The Italian Coast Guard recently passed the 10,000 flight hours milestone with its AW139 fleet, having saved many lives in operation and providing evidence of the outstanding effectiveness, reliability of the aircraft and successful partnership with Leonardo. Italian Customs and Border Protection Service has been using its AW139s for a range of roles across the nation including mountain and maritime patrol and reconnaissance, law enforcement, Search and Rescue (SAR) and homeland security.

 

Characteristics

Dimensions
Overall length* 16.66 m/54 feet 8 inch
Overall height* 4.98 m/16 feet 4 inch
Rotor diameter 13.8 m/45 feet 3 inch
Propulsion
Powerplant 2 × Pratt & Whitney PT6C-67C Turboshafts with FADEC
Engine Rating
All Engines Operative (AEO) Take off power 2 × 1,252 kW/2 × 1,679 shp
OEI 2.5 min contingency power 1,396 kW/1,872 shp
Maximum Take-Off Weight (MTOW)
Internal load** 6,400 kg/14,110 lbs
External Load 6,800 kg/14,991 lbs
Capacity
Crew 1-2
Passenger seating Up to 15 in light order, or 8 deployable troops in combat order and 2 armed cabin crew for aircraft protection
Stretchers Up to 4 (with 5 attendants)
Baggage compartment 3.4 m3/120 feet3
Performance: International Standard Atmosphere (ISA); Sea Level (S.L.); Maximum Gross Weight (MGW)
Velocity Never Exceed (VNE); Indicated Air Speed (IAS) 167 knots/192 mph/310 km/h
Cruise Speed 165 knots/190 mph/306 km/h
Rate of Climb 2,145 feet/min/10.9 m/s
Hovering Out of Ground Effect (HOGE) 8,130 feet/2,478 m
Service Ceiling 20,000 feet/6,096 m
OEI service ceiling 11,600 feet/3,536 m
Maximum range*** 573 NM/659 miles/1,061 km
Maximum endurance*** 5 h 13 min

* Rotors turning

** An optional MTOW (internal) of 6,800 kg/14,991 lbs is available as kit

*** No reserve, with Auxiliary fuel

Laser on UAV

The Boeing Co., Huntington Beach, California is being awarded an $8,966,976 competitive, cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for the Low Power Laser Demonstrator (LPLD) Phase 1 effort. No options are contemplated.

Boeing to Demonstrate Low-Power Laser on UAV
Boeing to Demonstrate Low-Power Laser on UAV

Under this new contract, the contractor will perform the next step for the LPLD effort that addresses laser power and aperture size by integrating and testing a low power laser on an unmanned aerial vehicle.

The work will be performed in Huntington Beach, California; and Albuquerque, New Mexico, with an estimated completion date of September 3, 2018.

The period of performance is nine months from December 6, 2017, through September 3, 2018. This contract was competitively procured via publication on the Federal Business Opportunities website through an Advanced Technology Innovation Broad Agency Announcement HQ0147-15-ATI-BAA.

Fiscal 2018 research, development, test and engineering funds in the amount of $2,000,000 are being obligated at the time of award.

The Missile Defense Agency, Albuquerque, New Mexico, is the contracting activity (HQ0277-18-C-0003).

Qatar Agrees Contract

BAE Systems and the Government of the State of Qatar have entered into a contract, valued at approximately £5bn, for the supply of Typhoon aircraft to the Qatar Emiri Air Force along with a bespoke support and training package.

Qatar agrees contract for Typhoon aircraft
Qatar agrees contract for Typhoon aircraft

The contract is subject to financing conditions and receipt by the Company of first payment, which are expected to be fulfilled no later than mid-2018.

The contract provides for 24 Typhoon aircraft with delivery expected to commence in late 2022.

BAE Systems is the prime contractor for both the provision of the aircraft and the agreed arrangements for the in-service support and initial training.

Charles Woodburn, BAE Systems Chief Executive said: «We are delighted to begin a new chapter in the development of a long-term relationship with the State of Qatar and the Qatar Armed Forces, and we look forward to working alongside our customer as they continue to develop their military capability».

Eurofighter Typhoon Statistics
Eurofighter Typhoon Statistics

 

General characteristics

DIMENSIONS
Wingspan 35 feet 11 inch/10.95 m
Length overall 52 feet 4 inch/15.96 m
Height 17 feet 4 inch/5.28 m
Wing Area 551.1 feet2/51.2 m2
MASS
Basic Mass Empty 24,250 lbs/11,000 kg
Maximum Take-Off >51,809 lbs/23,500 kg
Maximum External Load >16,535 lbs/7,500 kg
DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS
Single seat twin-engine, with a two-seat variant
Weapon Carriage 13 Hardpoints
G’ limits +9/-3 ‘g’
Engines Two Eurojet EJ200 reheated turbofans
Maximum dry thrust class 13,500 lbs/6,124 kgf/60 kN
Maximum reheat thrust class 20,000 lbs/9,072 kgf/90 kN
GENERAL PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS
Ceiling >55,000 feet/16,764 m
Brakes off to 35,000 feet(10,668 m)/Mach 1.5 <2.5 minutes
Brakes off to lift off <8 seconds
At low level, 200 knots/230 mph/370 km/h to Mach 1.0 in 30 seconds
Maximum Speed Mach 2.0
Operational Runway Length <2,297 feet/700 m
MATERIALS
Carbon Fibre Composites (CFC) 70%
Glass Reinforced Plastic (GRP) 12%
Aluminium Alloy, Titanium Alloy 15%
Acrylic (Röhm 249) 3%
OPERATORS
United Kingdom 232 Aircraft
Germany 180 Aircraft
Italy 121 Aircraft
Spain 87 Aircraft
Kingdom of Saudi Arabia 72 Aircraft
Austria 15 Aircraft
Sultanate of Oman 12 Aircraft
Kuwait 28 Aircraft
Total 747 Aircraft

 

A New Era

December 6, 2017, the F-35A Lightning II «Adir» aircraft were qualified for operational use after a year-long training period.

A New Era in the Israeli Air Force
A New Era in the Israeli Air Force

The process began in December 2016 when the first aircraft arrived and the «Golden Eagle» (140) Squadron was created. Specially trained dedicated crews, who received nine aircraft over the past year operated the F-35A Lightning II «Adir» aircraft throughout the trial period.

The Israeli Air Force (IAF) is the only air force, other than the United States Armed Forces (USAF), that operates the F-35A Lightning II «Adir». This is another example of the cooperation and the special strategic relationship between the State of Israel and the United States.

The F-35A Lightning II «Adir» enhances the Israel Defense Forces (IDF’s) strategic and operational capabilities, and improves the IDF’s readiness in several scenarios and its ability to combat a wide range of threats in all arenas, as stipulated in the IDF’s multi-year «Gideon» plan.

In a letter from the Commander of the IAF, Major General Amikam Norkin, to the men and women of the IAF he wrote: «The announcement of the operationalization of the «Adir» aircraft comes at a time in which the IAF is operating on a large scale on a number of fronts in a dynamic Middle East. The constantly evolving and complex challenges are met with a high-quality and professional aerial response. The operationalization of the «Adir» aircraft adds another level to the IAF’s capabilities at this time».

Having built up an F-35 squadron with nine aircraft it has received since the first one was delivered in December 2016, the Israeli Air Force announced that the aircraft had reached Initial Operational Capability (IAF file photo)
Having built up an F-35 squadron with nine aircraft it has received since the first one was delivered in December 2016, the Israeli Air Force announced that the aircraft had reached Initial Operational Capability (IAF file photo)

 

Specifications

Length 51.4 feet/15.7 m
Height 14.4 feet/4.38 m
Wingspan 35 feet/10.7 m
Wing area 460 feet2/42.7 m2
Horizontal tail span 22.5 feet/6.86 m
Weight empty 29,300 lbs/13,290 kg
Internal fuel capacity 18,250 lbs/8,278 kg
Weapons payload 18,000 lbs/8,160 kg
Maximum weight 70,000 lbs class/31,751 kg
Standard internal weapons load Two AIM-120C air-to-air missiles
Two 2,000-pound/907 kg GBU-31 JDAM (Joint Direct Attack Munition) guided bombs
Propulsion (uninstalled thrust ratings) F135-PW-100
Maximum Power (with afterburner) 43,000 lbs/191,3 kN/19,507 kgf
Military Power (without afterburner) 28,000 lbs/128,1 kN/13,063 kgf
Engine Length 220 in/5.59 m
Engine Inlet Diameter 46 in/1.17 m
Engine Maximum Diameter 51 in/1.30 m
Bypass Ratio 0.57
Overall Pressure Ratio 28
Speed (full internal weapons load) Mach 1.6 (~1,043 knots/1,200 mph/1,931 km/h)
Combat radius (internal fuel) >590 NM/679 miles/1,093 km
Range (internal fuel) >1,200 NM/1,367 miles/2,200 km
Maximum g-rating 9.0
The Israeli Air Force (IAF) is the only air force, other than the United States Armed Forces (USAF), that operates the F-35A Lightning II «Adir»
The Israeli Air Force (IAF) is the only air force, other than the United States Armed Forces (USAF), that operates the F-35A Lightning II «Adir»

First Tanker

The first Boeing KC-46A Pegasus tanker that will be delivered to the U.S. Air Force next year successfully completed its first flight and airborne tests on December 5, 2017, taking off from Paine Field at 10:32 a.m. PST and landing approximately three-and-one-half hours later.

The first KC-46A Pegasus tanker for the U.S. Air Force takes off from Paine Field in Everett, Washington, on its maiden flight. During the three and one-half hour flight, pilots took the aircraft to 39,000 feet/11,887 meters and performed operational checks on engines, flight controls and environmental systems. The KC-46 is a multirole tanker than can refuel all allied and coalition aircraft compatible with international aerial refueling procedures and can carry passengers, cargo and patients (Photo by Marian Lockhart)
The first KC-46A Pegasus tanker for the U.S. Air Force takes off from Paine Field in Everett, Washington, on its maiden flight. During the three and one-half hour flight, pilots took the aircraft to 39,000 feet/11,887 meters and performed operational checks on engines, flight controls and environmental systems. The KC-46 is a multirole tanker than can refuel all allied and coalition aircraft compatible with international aerial refueling procedures and can carry passengers, cargo and patients (Photo by Marian Lockhart)

«Today’s flight is another milestone for the Air Force/Boeing team and helps move us closer to delivering operational aircraft to the warfighter», said Colonel John Newberry, U.S. Air Force KC-46 System program manager.

During the flight, Boeing test pilots took the tanker to a maximum altitude of 39,000 feet/11,887 meters and performed operational checks on engines, flight controls and environmental systems as part of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)-approved flight profile. Prior to subsequent flights, the team will conduct a post-flight inspection and calibrate instrumentation.

«We’re very proud of this aircraft and the state-of-the-art capabilities it will bring to the Air Force», said Mike Gibbons, Boeing KC-46A tanker vice president and program manager. «We still have some tough work ahead of us, including completing our FAA certification activities, but the team is committed to ensure that upon delivery, this tanker will be everything our customer expects and more».

The newest tanker is the KC-46 program’s seventh aircraft to fly to date. The previous six are being used for testing and certification and to date have completed 2,200 flight hours and more than 1,600 «contacts» during refueling flights with F-16 Fighting Falcon, F/A-18 Super Hornet, AV-8B Harrier II, C-17 Globemaster III, A-10 Thunderbolt II, KC-10 Extender and KC-46A Pegasus aircraft.

The KC-46A Pegasus, derived from Boeing’s commercial 767 airframe, is built in the company’s Everett facility. Boeing is currently on contract for the first 34 of an expected 179 tankers for the U.S. Air Force.

The KC-46A Pegasus is a multirole tanker that can refuel all allied and coalition military aircraft compatible with international aerial refueling procedures and can carry passengers, cargo and patients.

 

General Characteristics

Primary Function Aerial refueling and airlift
Prime Contractor The Boeing Company
Power Plant 2 × Pratt & Whitney 4062
Thrust 62,000 lbs/275.790 kN/28,123 kgf – Thrust per High-Bypass engine (sea-level standard day)
Wingspan 157 feet, 8 inches/48.1 m
Length 165 feet, 6 inches/50.5 m
Height 52 feet, 10 inches/15.9 m
Maximum Take-Off Weight (MTOW) 415,000 lbs/188,240 kg
Maximum Landing Weight 310,000 lbs/140,614 kg
Fuel Capacity 212,299 lbs/96,297 kg
Maximum Transfer Fuel Load 207,672 lbs/94,198 kg
Maximum Cargo Capacity 65,000 lbs/29,484 kg
Maximum Airspeed 360 KCAS (Knots Calibrated AirSpeed)/0.86 M/414 mph/667 km/h
Service Ceiling 43,100 feet/13,137 m
Maximum Distance 7,299 NM/8,400 miles/13,518 km
Pallet Positions 18 pallet positions
Air Crew 15 permanent seats for aircrew, including aeromedical evacuation aircrew
Passengers 58 total (normal operations); up to 114 total (contingency operations)
Aeromedical Evacuation 58 patients (24 litters/34 ambulatory) with the AE Patient Support Pallet configuration; 6 integral litters carried as part of normal aircraft configuration equipment

 

The 12th Atlas

The Directorate General of Armament (DGA) on November 22, 2017 took delivery of the twelfth A400M Atlas military transport aircraft for the French Air Force. The aircraft carries the serial number MSN62.

The French air force’s twelfth Airbus A400M airlifter on the ramp at Sevilla shortly before its handover (DGA photo)
The French air force’s twelfth Airbus A400M airlifter on the ramp at Sevilla shortly before its handover (DGA photo)

Beyond the tactical and logistical capabilities of its predecessors, this aircraft is the first to be equipped with 2 pods for refueling aircraft in flight. Other aircraft in the fleet will be progressively equipped with this capability during retrofit campaigns. The MSN 62 will fly to its home base at Orléans-Bricy airbase in the coming days.

A tactical military transport aircraft with a strategic reach, the A400M, produced by Airbus Defense and Space, is unmatched in the global market. Equipped with four turboprops, it is designed to carry up to 37 tons of equipment and carry out all missions related to transport, including inter- and intra-theater links, assault landings on rough terrain, the personnel and equipment delivery by parachute – including from very high altitudes – air refueling and medical evacuations.

The Ministry of the Armed Forces will have received 15 A400Ms by 2019, in accordance with the Military Programming Law 2014-2019.

France now expects to have caught up with delivery delays as it will have 15 of the aircraft in service by 2019, as stated in its 2015-19 program law (DGA photo)
France now expects to have caught up with delivery delays as it will have 15 of the aircraft in service by 2019, as stated in its 2015-19 program law (DGA photo)

 

Specifications

DIMENSIONS
Overall Length 45.10 m/148 feet
Overall Height 14.70 m/48 feet
Wing Span 42.40 m/139 feet
Cargo Hold Length (ramp excluded) 17.71 m/58 feet
Cargo Hold Height 3.85-4.00 m/12 feet 7 inch-13 feet
Cargo Hold Width 4.00 m/13 feet
Cargo Hold Volume 340 m3/12,000 feet3
WEIGHTS
Maximum Take Off Weight 141,000 kg/310,850 lbs
Maximum Landing Weight 123,000 kg/271,200 lbs
Internal Fuel Weight 50,500 kg/111,300 lbs
Maximum Payload 37,000 kg/81,600 lbs
ENGINE (×4)
EuroProp International TP400-D6 11,000 shp/8,200 kW
PERFORMANCE
Maximum Operating Altitude 12,200 m/40,000 feet
Maximum Cruise Speed (TAS) 300 knots/345 mph/555 km/h
Cruise Speed Range 0.68-0.72 M
RANGE
Range with Maximum Payload (37,000 kg/81,600 lbs) 1,780 NM/2,050 miles/3,300 km
Range with 30,000 kg/66,000 lbs Payload 2,450 NM/2,796 miles/4,500 km
Range with 20,000 kg/44,000 lbs Payload 3,450 NM/3,977 miles/6,400 km
Maximum Range (Ferry) 4,700 NM/5,406 miles/8,700 km

 

Norwegian Helicopters

Leonardo is pleased to announce that the first of 16 AW101 all-weather search and rescue helicopters has been delivered to the Norwegian Ministry of Justice & Public Security. The aircraft departed Leonardo’s Yeovil facility on November 17th for Sola Air Base in southern Norway where the aircraft will enter a period of Operational Test & Evaluation (OT&E) before entering service with the Royal Norwegian Air Force in 2018. Aircraft deliveries will continue through to 2020 with Search and Rescue (SAR) operations being established with the aircraft deployed across each of the six main operating bases.

Leonardo starts delivery of 16 AW101 Norwegian All-Weather SAR Helicopters
Leonardo starts delivery of 16 AW101 Norwegian All-Weather SAR Helicopters

Bjørn Ivar Aarseth Norwegian All-Weather Search and Rescue Helicopter (NAWSARH) Project Manager, Ministry of Justice & Public Security said: «The delivery of the first aircraft marks a major milestone for the Norwegian All-Weather Search and Rescue Helicopter programme and everyone is delighted to see the first AW101 in Norway. I would like to congratulate my team in the Ministry of Justice, key contributors within the Norwegian Defence sector, Leonardo and all other industry partners on achieving this milestone».

Jon Clark, Leonardo’s Programme Manager said: «The AW101 we have developed for Norway is undoubtedly the world’s most capable SAR helicopter and it is with great pride that we have delivered the first aircraft that will serve the people of Norway for decades to come. This contract is very much a long-term partnership, consisting of industry, the Ministry of Justice & Public Security, the Royal Norwegian Air Force and the Norwegian Defence Materiel Agency, which has a common goal to deliver a SAR service second to none – we are all looking forward to the aircraft entering operational service in 2018».

The AW101 benefits from three-engine safety, a full ice protection system for flight in known icing conditions, long range and endurance, a proven 30-minute «run dry» gearbox as well as multiple redundancy features in the avionic and mission systems. The large cabin doors and rear ramp provide easy access for personnel, survivors and equipment into the 27 m3 cabin which has stand-up head room throughout.

The aircraft is equipped with an advanced SAR equipment package including a multi-panel Osprey Active Electronically Scanned Array (AESA) surveillance radar system from Leonardo that provides 360° coverage, 4-axis digital Automatic Flight Control System (AFCS), two rescue hoists, searchlight, electro optical device and a fully integrated avionics and mission system. Other systems and equipment include a mobile telephone detection system, obstacle proximity warning system, weather radar, complete medical station and mission console.

Leonardo is providing initial support and training services, including spares at each of the operating bases and has recently completed the aircrew training for the initial group of aircrew. It will then provide performance based logistic support to deliver approximately 90,000 flying hours across the fleet of 16 helicopters over the initial 15-year period.

Leonardo has partnered with Norwegian companies AIM Aviation to provide maintenance services at the Royal Norwegian Air Force’s six operating bases and with Kongsberg Defence Systems to provide helicopter transmission repair and overhaul services in Norway.

An AW101 full flight simulator was commissioned in June 2017 at Sola Airport to provide in country training for aircrew in advance of aircraft deliveries and will be used by Norwegian aircrew and third parties to provide training that will both reduce training costs and improve safety by allowing crews to practice the full range of emergency procedures.

New Engine for Fury

Fury, the expeditionary, runway-independent Unmanned Air Vehicle (UAV) now has engine updates that will further increase its flight endurance, Lockheed Martin announced on November 15, 2017.

Engineering tests performed by Lockheed Martin indicate that Fury will be able to stay in the air for 15 continuous hours, making it one of the highest endurance unmanned systems in its class
Engineering tests performed by Lockheed Martin indicate that Fury will be able to stay in the air for 15 continuous hours, making it one of the highest endurance unmanned systems in its class

With the integration of the 1803 engine into the platform, engineering tests performed by the company indicate that Fury will be able to stay in the air for 15 continuous hours, making it one of the highest endurance unmanned systems in its class.

«We’ve engineered Fury to bring the flight endurance and other advantages of much larger unmanned aircraft into a compact, effective, category three system», said Kevin Westfall, director of Unmanned Systems at Lockheed Martin. «Lockheed Martin has invested heavily to mature the incredible capabilities Fury can deliver, and we’re excited to bring this system to customers around the world».

Fury is a long-endurance, expeditionary aircraft that leverages its advanced fuel propulsion system, power generation and low signature design to deliver capabilities to Class 3 UAV that were previously only available in larger and more complex systems. It has no landing gear, making it the most advanced truly runway-independent UAV in its class on the market today. The complete Fury launch and recovery element can be set up on unimproved ground, in areas a small as 200 feet/18.58 meters square.

Leveraging open architecture design, Fury is both adaptable and reconfigurable to serve a multitude of military missions – including intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance, and cyber-electronic warfare.

 

FEATURES

  • Runway independent – catapult launch and expeditionary recovery system
  • Blended 17-foot/5.18-meter wingspan for minimal visual signature
  • Endurance proven above 15 hours
  • Altitude up to 15,000 feet/4,572 meters
  • Engine successfully tested to FAR33.49 Accelerated Life Testing standard
  • Tested with Command, Control, Communications, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (C4ISR) and Electronic Warfare (EW) payloads
  • Can carry a combination of over 200 lbs/90.72 kg of payload and fuel
  • Open, IP Based Architecture
  • Adaptable and reconfigurable