All posts by Dmitry Shulgin

American Paladin

According to Daniel Wasserbly, Jane’s Defence Weekly correspondent, the U.S. Army has begun receiving its first production-model M109A7 Paladin Integrated Management (called PIM) Self-Propelled Howitzers (SPHs) and held a ceremony on 9 April to mark the new system’s arrival.

Extended range: 30 km/18.6 miles with High Explosive – Rocket Assisted Projectile (HE RAP) and M203 propellant
Extended range: 30 km/18.6 miles with High Explosive – Rocket Assisted Projectile (HE RAP) and M203 propellant

The army and prime contractor BAE Systems are in the process of finalising a Low-Rate Initial Production (LRIP) plan that is expected to include 66 vehicle sets (a set is one SPH and one M992A3 CAT, Carrier, Ammunition, Tracked vehicle) plus an extra SPH for testing, Mark Signorelli, BAE Systems’ vice-president and general manager of combat vehicles, told IHS Jane’s on 8 April. The army could buy as many as 580 sets, but the actual procurement quantity could be slightly lower and depends on funding.

For fiscal year 2016 (FY 2016) the service requested Paladin PIM programme funding to support final developmental testing with $152.3 million and to buy 30 PIM LRIP systems with $273.9 million. Mark Signorelli said a full-rate production decision is expected in February 2017 after qualification and reliability testing is completed, and following an operational test slated for the second half of 2016.

PIM is to replace the legacy M109A6 Paladin howitzers and M992A2 ammunition carriers with a more advanced system, while incorporating drive train and suspension components common to the M2 Bradley Infantry Fighting Vehicle (IFV). The programme was approved to begin initial production in October 2014 following an extended testing period after the first seven prototypes were delivered in 2011.

Mark Signorelli described those prototypes as «generation one» and noted that several upgrades and capabilities were added to change the configuration over time, including new armour designs for heightened protection and design changes around the gun drives and rammer. «Very few of them were individually significant», Signorelli said, although the changes took time and added testing qualifications.

The PIM retains the legacy 155-mm Paladin’s cannon, but it is fitted on a new chassis based on the Bradley. The two vehicles share a 600 hp Cummins V903 diesel engine, a suspension, and other components.

Aside from the chassis, the PIM models also have a new electric ramming system and a 600 V on-board power system that builds on technologies developed during the Non-Line-of-Sight Cannon (NLOS-C) programme and is intended to ensure the PIM will have enough space, weight, and power-cooling growth potential for future upgrades.

Max rate of fire: 4 rounds/minute for three minutes
Max rate of fire: 4 rounds/minute for three minutes

 

Paladin Integrated Management

M109A7 Self-Propelled Howitzer

The new M109A7 Self-Propelled Howitzer and its associated M992A3 Carrier, Ammunition, Tracked (CAT) vehicle enhance their combat-proven successors’ – the M109A6 Paladin and M992A2 Field Artillery Ammunition Support Vehicle’s (FAASV) – reliability, maintainability, performance, responsiveness, and lethality. Additionally, they provide increased commonality with the Bradley Fighting Vehicle (BFV) of the Armored Brigade Combat Team (ABCT) with significant built-in growth potential in terms of available space, weight and electrical power.

 

Commonality

The M109A7 chassis features a power pack, drive train, track, and suspension components common with the BFV, improving supportability and reducing the ABCT’s logistical footprint.

 

Responsiveness

The M109A7’s «shoot and scoot» capability protects the crew from counterbattery fire by means of an onboard position navigation system and fire control system capable of executing missions digitally and via secure voice command. With an upgraded, 675 hp/503 kW electronically controlled version of the BFV standard V903 engine, coupled with an improved HMPT-800 transmission, the M109A7 has faster acceleration for rapid displacement, and the ability to keep pace with the maneuver forces it supports.

From the move, the M109A7 can receive a fire mission, compute firing data, select and occupy a firing position, transition from traveling configuration to firing configuration, and point its cannon, and fire within 60 seconds – all with first round fire-for-effect accuracy. The M109A7 operates day or night, in all weather conditions, providing timely and accurate fires with a range in excess of 30 km/18.6 miles.

 

Survivability

The M109A7 offers increased survivability, because the crew remains inside the vehicle throughout the mission. Along with the «shoot and scoot» capability, the M109A7 features an Automatic Fire Extinguishing System (AFES), Common Remote Operated Weapons System (CROWS), and enhanced applique armor.

 

Operational Availability

Hull, turret, suspension, and automotive system upgrades increase system reliability. The M109A7 incorporates an onboard computer with comprehensive diagnostics programs that rapidly pinpoint equipment issues early for ease of maintenance while improving system availability.

Sustained rate of fire: 1 round/minute (dependent on thermal warning devices)
Sustained rate of fire: 1 round/minute (dependent on thermal warning devices)

 

Specifications

Gross vehicle weight 80,000 lbs/36,288 kg
Crew 4
Engine 675 hp/503 kW
Fuel tank 143 gallons/541 liters
Speed 38 mph/61 km/h
Estimated cruising range 186 miles/300 km
Slope 60%
Side slope 40%
Trench crossing 72 inches/1.8 m
Maximum fording depth 42 inches/1.0 m
Overall length 382 inches/9.7 m
Width 154 inches/3.9 m
Height 129 inches/3.3 m
Howitzer/gun mount M284 cannon/M182A1 mount
Main generator 70 kW; 600 vdc/28 vdc
Reserve power >50%

 

Cummins VTA903

A key design consideration is the ability to operate with rapid, easy movement across almost any terrain, displaying much of the mobility of a main battle tank.

While the engine needs to be powerful and compact to meet this requirement, it also needs to offer exceptional reliability to ensure maximum availability of these high-value battlefield assets. The heavy-duty V903 engine is purpose developed by Cummins for these highly demanding applications – and during combat situations the outstanding abilities of this unique engine have been fully proven.

The V903 has also proved an ideal power solution for one of the most important elements on the battlefield – the tracked Infantry Fighting Vehicle (IFV), typified by the M2 Bradley together with derivatives such as the M3 Bradley Cavalry Fighting Vehicle (CVF).

Equipped with 600 hp (447 kW) of Cummins heavy-duty power, the Bradley can maintain progress with main battle tanks right at the forefront of the action. Very high power-toweight ratio enables these vehicles to incorporate heavier armour and more firepower, while the inherent reliability of the engine is a major advantage during high intensity operations.

 

Engine Specifications

Model V903
Cylinders V8
Capacity 14.8 L
Valves 32
Maximum Power 800 hp @ 2800 rpm/597 kW
Max Torque 2362 Nm @ 2200 rpm
Weight (dry) 1,271kg
Engine Cummins VTA903
Engine Cummins VTA903

Generation 3 HEL

General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc. (GA-ASI), a leading manufacturer of Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPA) systems, radars, and electro-optic and related mission systems solutions, announced (8 April, 2015) that an independent measurement team contracted by the U.S. Government has completed beam quality and power measurements of GA-ASI’s Generation 3 High Energy Laser System (HEL) using the Joint Technology Office (JTO) Government Diagnostic System (GDS).

The capability to shoot down tactical targets such as surface-to-air missiles and rockets will be demonstrated
The capability to shoot down tactical targets such as surface-to-air missiles and rockets will be demonstrated

«These measurements confirm the exceptional beam quality of the Generation 3 HEL, the next-generation leader in electrically-pumped lasers», said Claudio Pereida, executive vice president, Mission Systems, GA-ASI.

The new laser represents the third generation of technology originally developed under the High Energy Liquid Laser Area Defense System (HELLADS, Generation 1) program. The goal of the HELLADS program was to develop a high-energy laser weapon system (150 kW) with an order of magnitude reduction in weight compared to existing laser systems. The Generation 3 Laser employs a number of upgrades resulting in improved beam quality, increased electrical to optical efficiency, and reduced size and weight.

General Atomics’ third-generation tactical laser weapon module is sized to be carried on its Avenger unmanned aircraft
General Atomics’ third-generation tactical laser weapon module is sized to be carried on its Avenger unmanned aircraft

The recently certified Generation 3 laser assembly is very compact at only 1.3×0.4×0.5 meters. The system is powered by a compact Lithium-ion battery supply designed to demonstrate a deployable architecture for tactical platforms.

The Generation 3 HEL tested is a unit cell for the Tactical Laser Weapon Module (TLWM) currently under development. Featuring a flexible, deployable architecture, the TLWM is designed for use on land, sea, and airborne platforms and will be available in four versions at the 50, 75, 150, and 300-kilowatt laser output levels.

Enemy surface-to-air threats to manned and unmanned aircraft have become increasingly sophisticated, creating a need for rapid and effective response to this growing category of threats
Enemy surface-to-air threats to manned and unmanned aircraft have become increasingly sophisticated, creating a need for rapid and effective response to this growing category of threats

The GDS was employed by an independent measurement team to evaluate the beam quality of the Generation 3 system over a range of operating power and run time. According to JTO’s Jack Slater, «The system produced the best beam quality from a high energy laser that we have yet measured with the GDS. We were impressed to see that the beam quality remained constant with increasing output power and run-time».

With run time limited only by the magazine depth of the battery system, beam quality was constant throughout the entire run at greater than 30 seconds. These measurements confirm that the exceptional beam quality of this new generation of electrically pumped lasers is maintained above the 50-kilowatt level.

Following this evaluation, the independent team will use the GDS again to conduct beam quality measurements of the GA-ASI HELLADS Demonstrator Laser Weapon System (DLWS). The HELLADS DLWS includes a 150-kilowatt class laser with integrated power and thermal management.

Features/Benefits:

  • lightweight and compact;
  • increased engagement range;
  • counters tactical targets.
The HELLADS programme involves development of a 150 kW laser weapon system to counter ground threats such as RAM and surface-to-air missiles
The HELLADS programme involves development of a 150 kW laser weapon system to counter ground threats such as RAM and surface-to-air missiles

Futuristic Cockpit

At the U.S. Army Aviation Missions Solution Summit (29-31 March, 2015), Nashville, Tennessee, Bell Helicopter was previewing a technology demonstration of its integrated single screen cockpit concept for the Bell V-280 Valor, reported Andrew Drwiega from Quad-A, Nashville (Military Technology).

Bell Helicopter Unveiling V-280 Single Screen Cockpit Concept at U.S. Army Aviation Missions Solution Summit
Bell Helicopter Unveiling V-280 Single Screen Cockpit Concept at U.S. Army Aviation Missions Solution Summit

It is a futuristic – combining the usual flight symbology that would be expected from a digital display, together with interactive screens showing active Degraded Visual Environment (DVE) information, live video and imagery feeds, onboard weapons status (with interactive selection and firing on-screen) – all with a touch of «Iron Man» conceptualisation thrown in for good measure. Pilots would be able to finger-pass information box data across the screen from one to the other. The system’s data could also be displayed on the front windscreen and/or in the pilot’s visor – or a combination, which could be customisable.

The Bell V-280 Valor full-scale model is also demonstrating a weapons rail that could be deployed from under the wing and, potentially carry Hellfire missiles which could be fired forward without hitting or being affected by the large rotors.

Bell Helicopter has also brought a V-280 simulator to demonstrate at Quad-A. While this concept is just that – a concept – those responsible for the thinking behind it are envisaging taking mission management and situational awareness to a new level.

Bell Helicopter V-280 Single Screen Cockpit Concept
Bell Helicopter V-280 Single Screen Cockpit Concept

«The Army Aviation Summit provides us with a great opportunity to engage with current and future Army aviation leadership», said Mitch Snyder, executive vice president of Military Business at Bell Helicopter. «This unique event gives us the chance for precise, in-depth discussions on what the next generation of tiltrotor can deliver in support of the U.S. Army’s operating concepts and future doctrine». Throughout the show, the Bell V-280 Valor mockup was shown in both attack and utility configurations, demonstrating the aircraft’s versatility and multi-mission capability to attendees. The annual event was held at the Gaylord Opryland Hotel and convention center and hosted representatives from 22 countries.

The first flight of the next generation tiltrotor is scheduled for the second half of 2017. The Bell V-280 Valor tiltrotor will provide unmatched speed, range and payload, along with unmatched agility at the objective. The aircraft will provide the best value in operations and maintenance costs, and is being designed with sustainability, affordability, and ease of manufacturing in mind.

Full-size mockup of the Bell V-280 Valor next generation tiltrotor aircraft
Full-size mockup of the Bell V-280 Valor next generation tiltrotor aircraft

 

Bell V-280 Valor

With twice the speed and range of conventional helicopters, the Bell V-280 Valor will offer unmatched operational agility to self-deploy and perform a multitude of vertical lift missions unachievable with current aircraft. The V-280 Valor is a combat force multiplier with superior performance, survivability, and reliability to give the warfighter the decisive advantage.

Transformational agility and operational reach:

  • twice the speed and twice the range more than doubles operational reach;
  • highest productivity and range enables reduced deployed force structure;
  • significantly higher fuel efficiency reduces logistical and security footprint;
  • covers more than five times the area of current MEDEVAC helicopters.
In August 2014, the JMR-TD government team selected Bell Helicopter to build and fly the V-280 Valor as part of the demonstration program
In August 2014, the JMR-TD government team selected Bell Helicopter to build and fly the V-280 Valor as part of the demonstration program

 

Facts

Speed:                                                              280 KTAS/322 mph/518 km/h

Combat Range:                                           500-800 NM/926-1,481 km

Strategically Self-Deployable:           2,100+ NM/3,889 km Range

High/Hot 6k/95F Hover Out of Ground Effect (HOGE) Performance

Carries crew of four and 14 troops

Useful load of 12,000+ lbs/5,443+ kg

Triple redundant fly-by-wire flight control system

Conventional, retractable landing gear

Two 6’ wide large side doors for ease of rapid ingress/egress

Enhanced situational awareness and sensing technologies

 

Bell V-280 Valor – Future of Vertical Lift Takes Flight

 

Sea Trials

Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) announced (April 7, 2015) the successful completion of builder’s sea trials for the company’s fifth U.S. Coast Guard National Security Cutter (NSC), USCGC Joshua James (WMSL-754). The ship, built at HII’s Ingalls Shipbuilding division, spent three days in the Gulf of Mexico testing all of the ship’s systems.

The fifth Ingalls-built U.S. Coast Guard National Security Cutter, USCGC Joshua James (WMSL-754), sailed the Gulf of Mexico last week for her successful builder’s sea trials. Photo by Lance Davis/HII
The fifth Ingalls-built U.S. Coast Guard National Security Cutter, USCGC Joshua James (WMSL-754), sailed the Gulf of Mexico last week for her successful builder’s sea trials. Photo by Lance Davis/HII

«Any time we get the opportunity to take a new ship to sea, it is always something special, and this trip was no exception», said Jim French, Ingalls’ NSC program manager. «Our shipbuilding team continues to incorporate learning from ship to ship, making this a very stable program across the board. We’ve got a good NSC core team who work the same areas of each ship, and we are seeing the benefits associated with this serial production. It’s the most affordable way to build a class of ships».

Ingalls’ test and trials team led the sea trials and conducted extensive testing of the propulsion, electrical, damage control, anchor handling, small boat operations and combat systems. This culminated in the successful completion of a four-hour, full-power propulsion run on James.

«Our Ingalls/Coast Guard team worked tirelessly during the three days, and the ship performed well», said Richard Schenk, Ingalls’ vice president, program management and test and trials. «The Ingalls operating crew performed more than 180 events and handled each one with the utmost professionalism. It is obvious to all who sailed on builder’s trials that NSC 5 is ready for her acceptance trials at the end of April».

Ingalls has delivered four NSCs and has three more, including James, under construction. A construction contract was just awarded for an eighth NSC last week.

The ship is named to honor Captain Joshua James, one of the world’s most celebrated lifesavers. His lifesaving experience began at age 15 when he joined the Massachusetts Humane Society. Over the years, he was credited for saving more than 600 lives until the time of his death at age 75. He was on duty with the U.S. Life-Saving Service, which later merged into the U.S. Coast Guard. «The NSC team is extremely efficient in everything they do, and they proved it this week», said Jim McKinney, Ingalls’ NSC program director. «We start every ship with the goal for it to be better than the last one, and the men and women working in this program have not disappointed. The Coast Guard will be getting an awesome ship when we deliver James in June».

National Security Cutters (NSCs), the flagships of the Coast Guard’s cutter fleet, are designed to replace the 378-foot/115-m Hamilton-class high-endurance cutters, which entered service during the 1960s. NSCs are 418 feet/127 m long with a 54-foot/16-m beam and displace 4,500 long tons with a full load. They have a top speed of 28 knots/32 mph/52 km/h, a range of 12,000 nautical miles/22,224 km, an endurance of 60 days and a crew of 120.

The Legend-class NSC is capable of meeting all maritime security mission needs required of the high-endurance cutter. The cutter includes an aft launch and recovery area for two Rigid Hull Inflatable Boats (RHIBs) and a flight deck to accommodate a range of manned and unmanned rotary-wing aircraft. It is the largest and most technologically advanced class of cutter in the Coast Guard, with robust capabilities for maritime homeland security, law enforcement, marine safety, environmental protection and national defense missions. The Legend-class of cutters plays an important role in enhancing the Coast Guard’s operational readiness, capacity and effectiveness at a time when the demand for their services has never been greater.

 

 

Facts

Displacement:                                4,500 long tons

Length:                                                418 feet/127 m

Beam:                                                   54 feet/16 m

Speed:                                                  28 knots/32 mph/52 km/h

Range:                                                  12,000 NM/22,224 km

Endurance:                                         60 days

Crew:                                                     120

Equipped with:                                  Mk-110 57-mm turret mounted gun; 6 × 12.7-mm/.50 caliber machine guns; 3D air search radar; 2 level 1, class 1 aircraft hangers; A stern launch ramp for mission boats

 

Tiger Shark

It said in The Hindu that India launched its first indigenously built attack submarine on April 6, 2015 at Mazagaon Dock Limited in Mumbai. Defence Minister Manohar Parrikar was speaking to the press at the Mazagon Dock Limited (MDL) after commemorating the undocking of the first of class submarine of Project 75, named INS Kalvari, the Tiger Shark. The French-designed, Indian-built Scorpene-class is the first of six diesel-electric boats (SSK) set to join the fleet over the next few years as part of the Indian Navy’s Project 75 in collaboration with France (DCNS), according to India Today.

It is designed to operate in all theatres including the tropics
It is designed to operate in all theatres including the tropics

On the Scorpene submarines, Mr. Parrikar said, India will fulfil its requirement of submarines to protect its sea waters by 2022. «We expect the rest of the construction to be completed as per the schedule. Any delay in achieving the deadline will result in heavy penalty», he said.

Acknowledging the efforts of MDL in construction of this partially indigenous submarine, the Defence Minister said the government had an ambitious plan to fulfil the requirements of the armed forces as per which all Public Sector Undertakings would double their production in the next two years. «We want to build a ‘Blue Water Navy’ which can survive despite operating across the deep ocean waters without any problems. We will ensure that we become one such navy», he added, according to The Hindu.

Following the undocking of submarine on Monday, the launching of the Scorpene-class boat will take place in September 2015. Until September 2016, it will undergo rigorous trials and tests, both in harbour and at sea, while on surface and underwater. Thereafter it would be commissioned into the Navy as INS Kalvari.

According to BBC, the Scorpene-class attack submarines will be delivered every nine months, with the last of the six subs inducted into the Navy by 2018
According to BBC, the Scorpene-class attack submarines will be delivered every nine months, with the last of the six subs inducted into the Navy by 2018

 

Scorpene 2000

Scorpene 2000 submarines design takes into account the requirements of war time and of far and long deployments. This includes the large and varied underwater weapons payload, the unrivalled acoustic advantage, the hydrodynamic shape and detection means fitted for high speeds, the redundancy and reliability of main equipments. Scorpene 2000 submarines fulfil the entire scope of missions of modern multipurpose submarines:

  • anti-surface and anti-submarine warfare;
  • integration in a naval force;
  • special operations;
  • intelligence gathering;
  • offensive minelaying;
  • area surveillance and blockade;
  • strikes against land-based objectives.

The SUBTICS (Submarine Tactical Integrated Combat System) fully integrated combat system gathers all the information from the sensors or data links in order to build a comprehensive picture of the tactical situation and to deploy the appropriate weapons. Besides a high quality sonar suite and several above-water sensors, the combat system includes a fast, silent and safe weapon handling and launching system – enabling the loading of any launching tube with any weapon at any time. Scorpene 2000’s 18 heavy-weapon payload is the best on the market and able to launch torpedoes, missiles or mines.

Thanks to its pure hydrodynamic shapes, to the sensitivity and fine integration of the sonars, Scorpene has proven at sea its listening capacities up to maximum speed
Thanks to its pure hydrodynamic shapes, to the sensitivity and fine integration of the sonars, Scorpene has proven at sea its listening capacities up to maximum speed

 

Scorpene customers

Chile:                                      2 submarines at sea.

Building place:

Cherbourg (France), Cartagena (Spain).

Malaysia:                              2 submarines at sea.

Building place:

Cherbourg (France), Cartagena (Spain).

India:                                       6 submarines under construction.

Building place (by transfer of technology):

Mumbai (India).

Brazil:                                     4 submarines under construction.

Building place (by transfer of technology):

Itaguaí (Brazil).

 

General Characteristics

Length, overall 66-82 m/216.5-269 feet
Displacement surfaced 1,550-2,000 t
Displacement submerged 1,800-2,150 t
Submerged speed >20 knots/23 mph/37 km/h
Submerged endurance >3 weeks
Diving depth >350 m/1,148 feet
Autonomy >50 days
Crew 31: 6 officers and 25 enlisted sailors
Armament 6 × 533 mm torpedo tubes that can deploy the SM-39 Exocet Block 2 anti-ship missile

 

Rechargeable at sea, lithium-ion batteries allow more than one week submerged at low speed, and very good performance at high speed

 

Into Record Books

In the early morning hours of April 3, 2015 a C-5M Super Galaxy aircrew from Travis Air Force Base, California, put the aircraft’s capabilities to the test. The eight-person crew, with members of the 60th Air Mobility Wing’s 22nd Airlift Squadron and the 349th Air Mobility Wing’s 312th Airlift Squadron, accomplished their goal of establishing standards in 45 previously unset categories. The aircrew claimed records in the Class C-1.T jet category for altitude in horizontal flight, altitude with payload, time-to-climb, time-to-climb with payload and greatest payload to 9,000 meters/29,527.6 feet.

A C-5M Super Galaxy from the 22nd Airlift Squadron takes off from Travis Air Force Base, California, early April 3, 2015. The flight, which lasted approximately one hour, claimed 45 aeronautical records, positioning the U.S. military's largest airframe as the world's top aviation record holder with a total of 86 world records (U.S. Air Force photo/Ken Wright)
A C-5M Super Galaxy from the 22nd Airlift Squadron takes off from Travis Air Force Base, California, early April 3, 2015. The flight, which lasted approximately one hour, claimed 45 aeronautical records, positioning the U.S. military’s largest airframe as the world’s top aviation record holder with a total of 86 world records (U.S. Air Force photo/Ken Wright)

«The successful completion of this mission exemplifies both the great teamwork required by the whole team to keep Travis’ aircraft flying and the fabulous strategic mobility capabilities the C-5M Super Galaxy brings our combatant commanders around the world», said Colonel Joel Jackson, 60th Air Mobility Wing commander. «Thanks to everyone who contributed to this powerful showcase of Travis’ culture of excellence».

The C-5M Super Galaxy was loaded with pallets, fuel and the aircrew for a total of 731,220 pounds/331,676 kg, including the weight of the plane. «We took on approximately 265,000 pounds/120,202 kg of cargo and our goal was to climb as fast as we could at 3,000, 6,000 and 9,000 meters/9,842.52, 19,685 and 29,527.6 feet», said Major Jon Flowers, 22nd Airlift Squadron chief of standardization and evaluation and pilot for the flight. «We got up to an altitude of approximately 37,000 feet/11,277.6 meters before we ran out of performance». Among the records achieved were altitude in horizontal flight at 37,000 feet/11,277.6 meters, altitude with payload of 265,000 pounds/120,202 kg and time it takes to climb at 27.5 minutes (Source: US Air Force).

The C-5M Super Galaxy has now unofficially claimed a total of 86 world aeronautical records, surpassing the B-1B Lancer at 83 records. All records will be certified by the National Aeronautic Association, the nation’s oldest aviation organization. Formal certifications of the C-5M Super Galaxy records are expected to take several weeks.

The new ability of the C-5M Super Galaxy, when compared to the A, B and C models, to reach speeds at a faster rate, is critical for the Air Force mission. «The model before this was performance limited», Major Jon Flowers said. «It did not have the climb capability or the cargo capability. The C-5M Super Galaxy has been changing the game for the warfighter and tonight we made that point to put the capabilities in the record books».

From aerial porters to maintainers, active duty and reservists from Team Travis made a joint effort to effectively achieve this goal. «We’re honored to play a role in this historic demonstration», said Colonel Matthew Burger, 349th Air Mobility Wing commander. «The new capabilities of the C-5M Super Galaxy make America better equipped to the global challenges of the 21st Century».

Two M-1 Abrams tanks loaded into the cargo area of the C-5M Super Galaxy (U.S. Air Force photo by Lieutenant Colonel Chad Gibson)
Two M-1 Abrams tanks loaded into the cargo area of the C-5M Super Galaxy (U.S. Air Force photo by Lieutenant Colonel Chad Gibson)

 

C-5M Super Galaxy

The C-5M Super Galaxy aircraft is a game changer to the warfighter and America’s premier global direct delivery weapons system. It is also the Air Force’s only true strategic airlifter. While setting 86 world records in airlift, the C-5M Super Galaxy established new benchmarks in carrying more cargo faster and farther than any other airlifter.

A venerable workhorse, the recognized improvements in performance, efficiency and safety it provides validate the tremendous value to the taxpayer in modernizing proven and viable aircraft. As the only strategic airlifter with the capability of carrying 100 percent of certified air-transportable cargo, the C-5M Super Galaxy can carry twice the cargo of other strategic airlift systems. The C-5M Super Galaxy also has a dedicated passenger compartment, carrying troops and their supplies straight to the theater. It can be loaded from the front and back simultaneously, and vehicles can also be driven directly on or off the Galaxy. This means the C-5M Super Galaxy can be loaded quickly and efficiently.

The C-5M Super Galaxy has been a vital element of strategic airlift in every major contingency and humanitarian relief effort since it entered service. The C-5M Super Galaxy is the only strategic airlifter capable of linking America directly to the warfighter in all theatres of combat with mission capable rates excess of 80 percent. With more than half of its useful structural life remaining, the C-5M Super Galaxy will be a force multiplier through 2040 and beyond.

C-5M Super Galaxy Specifications
C-5M Super Galaxy Specifications

Current and future C-5M Wings include:
60th Air Mobility Wing, Travis AFB;
349th Air Mobility Wing, Travis AFB;
436th Airlift Wing, Dover AFB;
439th Airlift Wing, Westover AFB;
512th Airlift Wing, Dover AFB.

The C-5M flies during its First Flight ceremony at Lockheed Martin’s Marietta, Georgia plant
The C-5M flies during its First Flight ceremony at Lockheed Martin’s Marietta, Georgia plant

 

General Characteristics

Primary Function Outsize cargo transport
Prime Contractor Lockheed-Georgia Co.
Crew Seven: pilot, co-pilot, 2 flight engineers and 3 loadmasters
Length 247.8 feet/75.53 m
Height 65.1 feet/19.84 m
Wingspan 222.8 feet/67.91 m
Power Plant 4 × General Electric CF6-80C2 turbofans
Thrust 50,580 lbs/22,942.7 kgf/225 kN
Normal cruise speed Mach 0.77/518 mph/834 km/h
Unrefueled Range (with 120,000 lbs/54,431 kg) 5,250 NM/9,723 km
Max takeoff weight (2.2 g) 840,000 lbs/381,018 kg
Operating weight 400,000 lbs/181,437 kg
Fuel capacity 332,500 lbs/150,819 kg
Max payload (2.0 g) 285,000 lbs/129,274 kg
Cargo Compartment
Length 143.7 feet/43.8 m
Width 19 feet/5.79 m
Height 13.48 feet/4.11 m
Pallet Positions 36
Unit Cost $90 million (fiscal 2009 constant dollars)
Deployed 2009
Inventory
16 C-5Ms have been delivered through December 2013
52 C-5Ms are scheduled to be in the inventory by fiscal 2017

 

C-5M Strategic Airlift Redefined

 

Yet-to-be-named

The U.S. Navy has awarded funding for the construction of DDG-122, the Fiscal Year 2015 Arleigh Burke-class destroyer under contract at General Dynamics Bath Iron Works. This $610.4 million contract modification fully funds this ship, which was awarded in 2013 as part of a multi-ship competition for DDG-51 class destroyers. The total value of the five-ship contract is approximately $3.4 billion. General Dynamics Bath Iron Works is a business unit of General Dynamics (GD).

The Arleigh-Burke class guided-missile destroyer USS William P. Lawrence (DDG-110) transits the Pacific Ocean
The Arleigh-Burke class guided-missile destroyer USS William P. Lawrence (DDG-110) transits the Pacific Ocean

Fred Harris, president of Bath Iron Works (BIW), said, «This announcement allows us to continue efforts associated with planning and construction of DDG-122. We appreciate the leadership of Senators Collins and King and the strong support of our entire delegation in matters of national defense. We are grateful for their recognition of the contributions made by the people of BIW to the U.S. Navy’s important shipbuilding programs».

There are currently three DDG-51 destroyers in production at Bath Iron Works, Rafael Peralta (DDG-115), Thomas Hudner (DDG-116) and Daniel Inouye (DDG-118). The shipyard began fabrication on Rafael Peralta (DDG-115) in November 2011, and delivery to the Navy is scheduled for 2016. Fabrication on Thomas Hudner (DDG-116) began in November 2012, and that ship is scheduled to be delivered to the U.S. Navy in 2017. Fabrication has just begun on Daniel Inouye (DDG-118), the first ship of the 2013 multi-ship award.

Bath Iron Works is also building the three ships in the planned three-vessel Zumwalt-class of destroyers, USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000), Michael Monsoor (DDG-1001) and Lyndon Johnson (DDG-1002).

The Arleigh Burke-class destroyer is a multi-mission combatant that offers defense against a wide range of threats, including ballistic missiles. It operates in support of carrier battle groups, surface action groups, amphibious groups and replenishment groups, providing a complete array of Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW), Anti-Air Warfare (AAW) and Anti-SUrface Warfare (ASUW) capabilities. Designed for survivability, the ships incorporate all-steel construction and have gas turbine propulsion. The combination of the ships’ AEGIS combat system, the Vertical Launching System (VLS), an advanced ASW system, 2 embarked SH-60 helicopters, advanced anti-aircraft missiles and Tomahawk anti-ship and land-attack missiles make the Arleigh Burke class the most powerful surface combatant ever put to sea.

USS Nitze (DDG-94) - Flight IIA: 5"/62, one 20-mm CIWS variant
USS Nitze (DDG-94) – Flight IIA: 5″/62, one 20-mm CIWS variant

SGT Rafael Peralta (1979-2004) is the namesake of DDG-115. Born in Mexico City, he joined the United States Marine Corps as soon as he had a green card in 2000 and later became a U.S. Citizen. In 2008, SGT Rafael Peralta was deployed in Iraq with 1st Platoon, Company A, First Battalion, Third Marines, Regimental Combat Team 7, First Marine Division to participate in Operation Iraqi Freedom. SGT Peralta was killed on November 15, 2004 in house-to-house urban warfare in the second battle of Fallujah and was awarded the Navy Cross for his actions.

CAPT Thomas J. Hudner (Born August 31, 1924) is the living namesake of DDG-116 who currently resides in Concord, Massachusetts. As a former Naval aviator, he received the Medal of Honor for his actions while trying to save the life of his wingman, Ensign Jesse L. Brown, during the Battle of Chosin Reservoir in the Korean War on December 4, 1950. Hudner and Brown were among a group of pilots on patrol near the Chosin Reservoir when Brown’s Corsair was struck by ground fire from Chinese troops and crashed. In an attempt to save Brown from his burning aircraft, Hudner intentionally crash-landed his own aircraft on a snowy mountain in freezing temperatures to help him. Despite these efforts, Brown died of his injuries and Hudner was forced to evacuate, having also been injured in the landing.

The Arleigh Burk-class guided-missile destroyer USS Sampson (DDG-102) departs Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam to support Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2010 exercises
The Arleigh Burk-class guided-missile destroyer USS Sampson (DDG-102) departs Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam to support Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2010 exercises

 

Guided Missile Destroyers Lineup

Ship Yard Launched Commissioned Homeport
DDG-51 Arleigh Burke GDBIW 09-16-89 07-04-91 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-52 Barry HIIIS 06-08-91 12-12-92 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-53 John Paul Jones GDBIW 10-26-91 12-18-93 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-54 Curtis Wilbur GDBIW 05-16-92 03-19-94 Yokosuka, Japan
DDG-55 Stout HIIIS 10-16-92 08-13-94 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-56 John S. McCain GDBIW 09-26-92 07-02-94 Yokosuka, Japan
DDG-57 Mitscher HIIIS 05-07-93 12-10-94 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-58 Laboon GDBIW 02-20-93 03-18-95 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-59 Russell HIIIS 10-20-93 05-20-95 San Diego, California
DDG-60 Paul Hamilton GDBIW 07-24-93 05-27-95 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-61 Ramage HIIIS 02-11-94 07-22-95 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-62 Fitzgerald GDBIW 01-29-94 10-14-95 Yokosuka, Japan
DDG-63 Stethem HIIIS 07-17-94 10-21-95 Yokosuka, Japan
DDG-64 Carney GDBIW 07-23-94 04-13-96 Mayport, Florida
DDG-65 Benfold HIIIS 11-09-94 03-30-96 San Diego, California
DDG-66 Gonzalez GDBIW 02-18-95 10-12-96 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-67 Cole HIIIS 02-10-95 06-08-96 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-68 The Sullivans GDBIW 08-12-95 04-19-97 Mayport, Florida
DDG-69 Milius HIIIS 08-01-95 11-23-96 San Diego, California
DDG-70 Hopper GDBIW 01-06-96 09-06-97 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-71 Ross HIIIS 03-22-96 06-28-97 Rota, Spain
DDG-72 Mahan GDBIW 06-29-96 02-14-98 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-73 Decatur GDBIW 11-10-96 08-29-98 San Diego, California
DDG-74 McFaul HIIIS 01-18-97 04-25-98 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-75 Donald Cook GDBIW 05-03-97 12-04-98 Rota, Spain
DDG-76 Higgins GDBIW 10-04-97 04-24-99 San Diego, California
DDG-77 O’Kane GDBIW 03-28-98 10-23-99 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-78 Porter HIIIS 11-12-97 03-20-99 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-79 Oscar Austin GDBIW 11-07-98 08-19-00 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-80 Roosevelt HIIIS 01-10-99 10-14-00 Mayport, Florida
DDG-81 Winston S. Churchill GDBIW 04-17-99 03-10-01 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-82 Lassen HIIIS 10-16-99 04-21-01 Yokosuka, Japan
DDG-83 Howard GDBIW 11-20-99 10-20-01 San Diego, California
DDG-84 Bulkeley HIIIS 06-21-00 12-08-01 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-85 McCampbell GDBIW 07-02-00 08-17-02 Yokosuka, Japan
DDG-86 Shoup HIIIS 11-22-00 06-22-02 Everett, Washington
DDG-87 Mason GDBIW 06-23-01 04-12-03 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-88 Preble HIIIS 06-01-01 11-09-02 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-89 Mustin HIIIS 12-12-01 07-26-03 Yokosuka, Japan
DDG-90 Chafee GDBIW 11-02-02 10-18-03 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-91 Pinckney HIIIS 06-26-02 05-29-04 San Diego, California
DDG-92 Momsen GDBIW 07-19-03 08-28-04 Everett, Washington
DDG-93 Chung-Hoon HIIIS 12-15-02 09-18-04 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-94 Nitze GDBIW 04-03-04 03-05-05 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-95 James E. Williams HIIIS 06-25-03 12-11-04 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-96 Bainbridge GDBIW 11-13-04 11-12-05 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-97 Halsey HIIIS 01-09-04 07-30-05 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-98 Forrest Sherman HIIIS 10-02-04 01-28-06 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-99 Farragut GDBIW 07-23-05 06-10-06 Mayport, Florida
DDG-100 Kidd HIIIS 01-22-05 06-09-07 San Diego, California
DDG-101 Gridley GDBIW 12-28-05 02-10-07 San Diego, California
DDG-102 Sampson GDBIW 09-16-06 11-03-07 San Diego, California
DDG-103 Truxtun HIIIS 06-02-07 04-25-09 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-104 Sterett GDBIW 05-19-07 08-09-08 San Diego, California
DDG-105 Dewey HIIIS 01-26-08 03-06-10 San Diego, California
DDG-106 Stockdale GDBIW 05-10-08 04-18-09 San Diego, California
DDG-107 Gravely HIIIS 03-30-09 11-20-10 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-108 Wayne E. Meyer GDBIW 10-18-08 10-10-09 San Diego, California
DDG-109 Jason Dunham GDBIW 08-01-09 11-13-10 Norfolk, Virginia
DDG-110 William P. Lawrence HIIIS 12-15-09 06-04-11 San Diego, California
DDG-111 Spruance GDBIW 06-06-10 10-01-11 San Diego, California
DDG-112 Michael Murphy GDBIW 05-08-11 10-06-12 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
DDG-113 John Finn HIIIS 03-28-15
DDG-114 Ralph Johnson HIIIS
DDG-115 Rafael Peralta GDBIW
DDG-116 Thomas Hudner GDBIW
DDG-117 Paul Ignatius HIIIS
DDG-118 Daniel Inouye GDBIW
DDG-119 Delbert D. Black HIIIS
DDG-120 GDBIW
DDG-121 HIIIS
DDG-122 GDBIW
DDG-123 HIIIS
DDG-124 GDBIW
DDG-125 HIIIS
DDG-126 GDBIW

GDBIW – General Dynamics Bath Iron Works

HIIIS – Huntington Ingalls Industries Ingalls Shipbuilding

Trainer mission

Airbus Group delivered to the U.S. Army the first UH-72A Lakota helicopter (a militarized version of the Eurocopter EC145) to come off the Airbus Helicopters Inc. production line configured for the Lakota’s latest mission, as the service’s initial-entry training helicopter.

Airbus Group delivers first new UH-72A Lakota for Army initial-entry trainer mission
Airbus Group delivers first new UH-72A Lakota for Army initial-entry trainer mission

The aircraft will join seven Lakotas previously in the Army inventory that have already been modified to the training configuration and fielded to Fort Rucker, in preparation for the Lakota’s formal introduction into the training curriculum in early fiscal 2016. Ultimately, Army plans call for an initial-entry rotary wing training fleet of 187 Lakotas, made up of a mix of new deliveries and already in-service aircraft reconfigured for the training mission.

To date, the Department of Defense has ordered 411 Lakotas, 400 helicopters for the U.S. Army. With today’s delivery, 332 completed aircraft have been delivered – all on time and on budget – from the Airbus Helicopters Inc. production facility in Columbus, Mississippi.

«For a program to succeed in the current budget environment, affordability and reliable program performance must accompany mission flexibility», said Allan McArtor, Airbus Group Chairman and CEO. «Since awarding the contract in 2006, the Army has managed this program unfailingly on cost and on schedule, and we’re proud to see that record continue as we deliver the latest configuration of this versatile, multi-mission aircraft».

«We’re making the necessary important investments to ensure a successful transition of the Lakota into training operations at Fort Rucker», said Marc Paganini, President and CEO of Airbus Helicopters Inc. «We’re honored that future Army aviators will begin their flying careers at the controls of the Lakota».

This helicopter’s agility and handling qualities are exceptional, even in high winds, while the cockpit design provides an unmatched field of view in all directions
This helicopter’s agility and handling qualities are exceptional, even in high winds, while the cockpit design provides an unmatched field of view in all directions

The Lakota was competitively selected in 2006 to fill a wide variety of roles for the Active Army and Army National Guard, including search and rescue, medical evacuation, border security, command and control, VIP transport, general utility and training. Army National Guard units, operating UH-72As equipped with the Security & Support Mission Equipment Package, are deployed supporting Customs and Border Protection missions along the U.S.-Mexico border. The Lakota is also operated in a training role by the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School.

The Royal Thai Army has ordered UH-72As through the U.S. government’s Foreign Military Sales program. These Lakotas are scheduled to be fielded to Thailand within the coming months. Airbus Helicopters is marketing the UH-72A to other allied nations with requirements for a modern, low cost multi-mission helicopter.

A modern, twin-engine aircraft, the UH-72A is a powerful, stable, and agile platform with a glass cockpit that is compatible with night vision goggles. The Lakota is single-pilot Instrument Flight Rules certified. It has the lowest cost to buy, own and operate of any U.S. military helicopter in production, and is built in Columbus, Mississippi, by a workforce that is 43 percent U.S. military veterans.

The Eurocopter EC145 is at the top of its class in the medium-sized. The EC145 is equipped with two Turbomeca Arriel 1E2 engines that deliver outstanding performance and vital power reserves – even in One-Engine-Inoperative (OEI) scenarios. Its reliability is further enhanced by a completely separate fuel system, a tandem hydraulic system, a dual electrical system and redundant lubrication for the main transmission. It is certified for single pilot Visual Flight Rules (VFR) day and night operation.

The EC145’s integrated glass cockpit includes Airbus Helicopters’ Vehicle and Engine Multifunction Display (VEMD) and a Caution and Advisory Display (CAD) to enhance pilot efficiency – thereby reducing pilot fatigue and enhancing flight safety
The EC145’s integrated glass cockpit includes Airbus Helicopters’ Vehicle and Engine Multifunction Display (VEMD) and a Caution and Advisory Display (CAD) to enhance pilot efficiency – thereby reducing pilot fatigue and enhancing flight safety

 

Airbus EC145

Maximum Take-Off Weight:    3,585 kg/7,903 lbs (All configurations)

Useful load:                                                     1,810 kg/3,990 lbs

Capacity:

   1 pilot + up to 11 passengers

   2 pilots + 10 passengers

Maximum cargo sling load:                     1,500 kg/3,307 lbs

Engine:                                 2 Turbomeca ARRIEL 1E2, turboshaft engines

Maximum emergency power (OEI):  574 kW/770 shp

Fast cruise speed:                                         133 knots/153 mph/246 km/h

Range:                                                                  855 km/461 NM

Endurance:                                                        4 h 30 min

Compared to other rotorcraft in its range, the EC145 offers a significantly larger cabin that features excellent outside visibility for pilots, crew and passengers
Compared to other rotorcraft in its range, the EC145 offers a significantly larger cabin that features excellent outside visibility for pilots, crew and passengers

American Legend

Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division has received a $499.8 million fixed-price incentive contract from the U.S. Coast Guard to build an eighth National Security Cutter, USCGC Midgett (WMSL-757).

The National Security Cutter is the first new design for the service in 20 years, and features enhanced capabilities that will allow the eight-ship class to replace 12 aging high-endurance cutters that have been in service for 40 years
The National Security Cutter is the first new design for the service in 20 years, and features enhanced capabilities that will allow the eight-ship class to replace 12 aging high-endurance cutters that have been in service for 40 years

«We are performing extremely well in this program, proving the point that serial production is the most efficient and effective way to build complex military ships», said Jim French, Ingalls’ National Security Cutter program manager. «We continue to fold in learning for each ship we build, and the three under construction right now are tracking well because of this knowledge».

Ingalls has delivered four National Security Cutters to the Coast Guard and currently has three more under construction: USCGC James (WMSL-754), USCGC Munro (WMSL-755) and USCGC Kimball (WMSL-756). These ships will be delivered in 2015, 2016 and 2018, respectively. Midgett is scheduled to deliver in 2019.

National Security Cutters (NSCs), the flagships of the Coast Guard’s cutter fleet, are designed to replace the 378-foot/115-m Hamilton-class high-endurance cutters, which entered service during the 1960s. NSCs are 418 feet/127 m long with a 54-foot/16-m beam and displace 4,500 long tons with a full load. They have a top speed of 28 knots/32 mph/52 km/h, a range of 12,000 nautical miles/22,224 km, an endurance of 60 days and a crew of 120.

The Legend-class NSC is capable of meeting all maritime security mission needs required of the high-endurance cutter. The cutter includes an aft launch and recovery area for two Rigid Hull Inflatable Boats (RHIBs) and a flight deck to accommodate a range of manned and unmanned rotary-wing aircraft.

It is the largest and most technologically advanced class of cutter in the Coast Guard, with robust capabilities for maritime homeland security, law enforcement, marine safety, environmental protection and national defense missions. The Legend-class of cutters plays an important role in enhancing the Coast Guard’s operational readiness, capacity and effectiveness at a time when the demand for their services has never been greater.

NSCs have several features that enhance overall mission performance, including, CODAG propulsion for faster speeds, stern ramp launch and recovery for a combination of small boats 7 – 11 meters in length, and a very large flight deck with two hangars to accommodate helicopters or VUAVs
NSCs have several features that enhance overall mission performance, including, CODAG propulsion for faster speeds, stern ramp launch and recovery for a combination of small boats 7 – 11 meters in length, and a very large flight deck with two hangars to accommodate helicopters or VUAVs

 

Facts

Displacement:                                4,500 long tons

Length:                                                418 feet/127 m

Beam:                                                   54 feet/16 m

Speed:                                                  28 knots/32 mph/52 km/h

Range:                                                  12,000 NM/22,224 km

Endurance:                                         60 days

Crew:                                                     120

Equipped with:                                  Mk-110 57-mm turret mounted gun; 6 × 12.7-mm/.50 caliber machine guns; 3D air search radar; 2 level 1, class 1 aircraft hangers; A stern launch ramp for mission boats

USCG National Security Cutter Hamilton (WMSL-753) on sea trials, July 18, 2014

Versatile Transport

Mexico becomes launch customer for new Airbas C295W. Thanks to the winglets, the C295W tactical airlifter will be able to transport more payload to a longer distance with around a 4% fuel savings, even in hot and high conditions. The Mexican Navy has specified the winglets for two C295s, for which the order was already announced, and winglets will be standard for all new C295s ordered from now on.

The C295 is fitted with the Highly Integrated Avionics System (HIAS), an advanced integrated avionics system based on the Thales Topdeck Avionics suite
The C295 is fitted with the Highly Integrated Avionics System (HIAS), an advanced integrated avionics system based on the Thales Topdeck Avionics suite

«The advantage of the winglets in hot and high conditions means that the development of the C295W is a key step for our highly successful light and medium transport family. And it is a particular pleasure to deliver this first aircraft to Mexico, which already has the biggest Airbus Defence and Space transport fleet in Latin America», said Antonio Rodríguez Barberán, Head of Commercial for Airbus Defence and Space in Latin America.

«The C295 has served us well for many years. We had some concerns about operating a mixed fleet of aircraft with and without winglets, but when we studied the enhanced performance of this new version it was clear that it would bring very significant operating benefits for us that could not be ignored», said Rear Admiral from Mexican Navy, José María García Macedo.

The C295 is ideal for any kind of «civic»/humanitarian mission for the benefit of society
The C295 is ideal for any kind of «civic»/humanitarian mission for the benefit of society

 

Airbas C295

The Airbus Military C295 is a new generation, very robust and reliable, highly versatile tactical airlifter able to carry up to nine tonnes of payload or up to 71 personnel, at a maximum cruise speed of 260 knots/299 mph/480 km/h. Fitted with a retractable landing gear and a pressurised cabin, it can cruise at altitudes up to 25,000 feet/7,620 m, while retaining remarkable Short Take-Off & Landing (STOL) performance from unprepared short, soft and rough airstrips, as well as low level flight characteristics.

Being 12.7 m/41 feet 8 inch long, the C295 has the longest unobstructed cabin in its class. It can accommodate up to 71 seats, offering a much higher personnel carrying capability than its competitors in this segment. For the same reason, the C295 can carry much more palletised cargo (up to five 88 inch/2.23 m × 108 inch/2.74 m standard HCU-6E pallets) with direct off-loading through its rear ramp door.

Powered by two Pratt & Whitney Canada PW127G turboprop engines, the C295 provides an excellent manoeuvrability, outstanding hot and high performance, low fuel consumption and consequently a very long endurance of up to eleven hours in the air.

First delivered in 2001, the C295 is a developed version of the well-known CN235, offering greater capacity and range. Its simple systems design and robustness, its proven in service reliability, its excellent flying qualities and great versatility, as well as its remarkable transport capabilities make it the most efficient «workhorse» with the lowest fuel burn, as well as the best operating and maintenance costs in its category. A key to C295 unique patrol and surveillance capabilities is its Fully Integrated Tactical System (FITS) which integrates, controls and displays the mission sensors, enhancing the mission awareness and facilitating the decision making.

The civil and military certification of the C295 ensures compliance with the international airworthiness regulations and safety standards, including the stringent Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) 25 requirements.

The C295 glass cockpit with digital avionics includes four large active matrix liquid crystal displays (6’’ × 8’’), fully compatible with night vision goggles
The C295 glass cockpit with digital avionics includes four large active matrix liquid crystal displays (6’’ × 8’’), fully compatible with night vision goggles

 

Specifications

Dimensions
Overall Length 24.50 m/80 feet 3 inch
Overall Height 8.65 m/28 feet 5 inch
Wing Span 25.81 m/84 feet 8 inch
Cargo Hold Length (ramp excluded) 12.70 m/41 feet 8 inch
Cargo Hold Height 1.90 m/6 feet 3 inch
Cargo Hold Width 2.70 m/8 feet 10 inch
Cargo Hold Volume 64 m3/2,260 feet3
Weights
Maximum Take Off Weight 23,200 kg/51,000 lbs
Maximum Landing Weight 23,200 kg/51,000 lbs
Internal Fuel Weight 6,150 kg/13,600 lbs
Maximum Payload 9,250 kg/20,400 lbs
Engine (×2)
Pratt & Whitney PW-127G 2,645 shp (up to 2,920 shp with Auxiliary Power Reserve, APR) /1,970 kW
Performance
Maximum Operating Altitude 9,100 m/30,000 feet
Maximum Cruise Speed (TAS*) 260 knots/299 mph/480 km/h
Range
Range with Maximum Payload (9,250 kg/20,400 lbs) 700 NM/1,300 km
Range with 6,000 kg/13,200 lbs Payload 2,000 NM/3,700 km
Range with 3,000 kg/6,600 lbs Payload 2,500 NM/4,600 km
Maximum Range (Ferry) 2,900 NM/5,400 km

* The true airspeed (TAS; also KTAS, for Knots True AirSpeed) of an aircraft is the speed of the aircraft relative to the airmass in which it is flying

The left engine is fitted with a propeller brake: while on the ground the engine gas generator can function in Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) mode with the propeller stopped to deliver electrical power and bleed air for the aircraft systems
The left engine is fitted with a propeller brake: while on the ground the engine gas generator can function in Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) mode with the propeller stopped to deliver electrical power and bleed air for the aircraft systems