The first Extenda

On June 07, 2018, UK Special Forces vehicle designer and manufacturer, Supacat (part of SC Group), has announced the recent delivery of the first production HMT Extenda vehicle to the Norwegian Armed Forces. The handover took place at Supacat’s Devon facility on 30 May 2018.

The Supacat HMT Extenda is a convertible to 4×4 or 6×6 configuration by inserting or removing a self-contained third axle unit to meet different operational requirements (Supacat photo)
The Supacat HMT Extenda is a convertible to 4×4 or 6×6 configuration by inserting or removing a self-contained third axle unit to meet different operational requirements (Supacat photo)

Supacat signed a £23 million contract with The Norwegian Defence Material Agency (NDMA) to supply a new fleet of High Mobility Vehicles in May 2015. The award includes the provision of a comprehensive through-life support package. The first «pre-series» vehicle was delivered in early 2017 followed by full fleet delivery taking place during 2018 and 2019.

The HMT Extenda is unique as it is convertible to a 4×4 or a 6×6 configuration by inserting or removing a self-contained third axle unit to meet different operational requirements. Like other HMT series platforms, such as the UK’s «Jackal», the HMT Extenda can be supplied with optional mine blast and ballistic protection kits and with a variety of mission hampers, weapons, communications, ISTAR and force protection equipment to suit a wide range of operational roles.

Major Arild Stangenes, NDMA Programme Manager said «the delivery of our first production vehicle is a major milestone in a long-term programme that has been ongoing since 2011. We are very pleased with the quality of our first production vehicle and with a product that fully meets the needs of our user».

Nick Ames, Chief Executive of SC Group, of which Supacat is a part, said «this project milestone is a great achievement for Supacat and for our Norwegian customer. I am proud of what the team has achieved in delivering a fantastic product and we are looking forward to following this first production delivery with the rest of the order». He added, «yet again, the Supacat HMT has proven itself to be the vehicle of choice for specialist users across the globe».

Coyote Training

Payload Module

BAE Systems has received a contract to produce payload tubes for two of the U.S. Navy’s new Virginia-class (SSN-774) submarines to support increased firepower on the Block V version of the attack subs.

BAE Systems to provide additional payload tubes for new Virginia-class subs
BAE Systems to provide additional payload tubes for new Virginia-class subs

Under the contract with General Dynamics Electric Boat, a builder of the Virginia class, BAE Systems will deliver two sets, each consisting of four tubes, for the Virginia Payload Modules on the SSN-804 and SSN-805.

The Virginia Payload Module (VPM) extends the length of the Block V submarines over previous versions of the Virginia-class by adding an additional mid-body section to create more payload space for greater firepower. Each large-diameter payload tube can store and launch up to seven Tomahawk cruise missiles. The VPM offers exceptional flexibility as well for the integration of future payload types, such as unmanned systems or next-generation weapons.

«The Virginia Payload Module is critical to the Navy’s undersea presence», said Joe Senftle, vice president and general manager of Weapon Systems at BAE Systems. «With the VPM, the Navy is adding significant capability to the Virginia-class by increasing the firepower of these subs and tripling their payload capacity».

BAE Systems, which is also providing payload tubes for the SSN-803 under a previously awarded VPM contract, has a long history of supporting the Navy’s submarine fleet as the leading provider of propulsors and other submarine systems. The company was selected to provide propulsors, spare hardware, and tailcones for Block IV Virginia-class vessels and stands ready to provide the same support for the Block V subs.

Under this most recent contract, BAE Systems will also develop the processes and tooling necessary for the Block V payload tube production. Work will be performed at the company’s facility in Louisville, Kentucky, with deliveries scheduled to begin in 2020.

Special Forces

The «Angelo Cabrini» Ship launched in Messina, is the first of the two High Speed Multifunctional Naval Units, commissioned by the Navy to the Italian shipbuilding company Intermarine Ltd.

Messina, the «Angelo Cabrini» ship launch
Messina, the «Angelo Cabrini» ship launch

The event took place in the presence of the Chief of Staff of the Navy Admiral of Squad Valter Girardelli, the management of Intermarine Ltd., civil and religious authorities.

The UNPAV (Unità Navale Polivalente Alta Velocità – high-speed multi-purpose units) is a versatile and modern vessel that will provide a high added value to the peculiar capabilities of the Navy. In this case, the Cabrini class naval units will provide support for the operations of the Navy Special Forces.

The ship was given the name of «Angelo Cabrini», Admiral and raider of the Royal Navy, decorated with the Gold Medal at the Military Valor for the sinking of the English heavy cruiser York, March 26, 1941 in the bay of Suda, in Crete.

Godmother of the launch is Anna Accardo, mother of the Second Head Nicola Fele, raider of the Navy awarded with the gold Medal at the Navy Military Valor, who died in service in the waters of the southern Adriatic in February 1992.

The UNPAV is a versatile and modern vessel that will provide a high added value to the peculiar capabilities of the Navy.

In this case, the Cabrini class naval units will provide support for the operations of the Navy Special Forces (Raiders Operational Group – G.O.I.), both in the training phase and in the conduct of the same.

In addition, they will compete in the control of maritime traffic, the contrast of illicit traffic, and security in environments with presence of asymmetric threat and the evacuation of personnel from crisis areas.

The «Cabrini» Ship is a further example of the remarkable skills and the very high professionalism of our national industry, as a whole of larger industrial groups and small and medium-sized enterprises. It is the fruit of the productivity of the «System Country», a product that, like others, characterizes the so-called «Made in Italy», famous and appreciated all over the world” declared Team Admiral Valter Girardelli, Chief of Staff of the Navy.

«Intermarine Ltd. has gained over the years a solid experience and knowledge of issues related to the design and construction of special military vessels with very stringent operational requirements», said Doctor Livio Corghi, Intermarine Ltd. CEO – «We have a prominent position in the international market thanks to the excellent reputation gained with the supply of very special vessels, including the UNPAV and mine hunters, to the most prestigious world military marines. Working with the Italian Navy is certainly a source of great pride and satisfaction».

Intermarine Ltd. will continue to build the «Angelo Cabrini» Ship at the Messina shipyard, and the delivery is scheduled for the first months of 2020.

Flight Operations

Northrop Grumman Corp. joined the U.S. Navy in officially welcoming the MQ-4C Triton unmanned aircraft system to the fleet with a ceremony on May 31 to celebrate the commencement of flight operations.

The first two operational MQ-4C Triton aircraft at home in their newly refurbished hangar at Naval Base Ventura County, Point Mugu. The insignia of Unmanned Patrol Squadron (VUP)-19, the Navy’s first unmanned patrol squadron, can be seen behind them
The first two operational MQ-4C Triton aircraft at home in their newly refurbished hangar at Naval Base Ventura County, Point Mugu. The insignia of Unmanned Patrol Squadron (VUP)-19, the Navy’s first unmanned patrol squadron, can be seen behind them

Naval Base Ventura County (NBVC) Point Mugu is home to the maintenance detachment of Unmanned Patrol Squadron (VUP)-19 DET Point Mugu, the Navy’s first unmanned patrol squadron. Maintainers are conducting training and tests on the Triton aircraft before it deploys to Guam later this year.

Point Mugu has also completely refurbished an existing hangar that will accommodate up to four Triton aircraft with its 130.9-foot/40-meter wingspan. The first two Triton aircraft are located at Point Mugu.

Brian Chappel, sector vice president and general manager, Autonomous Systems, Northrop Grumman, joined Doug Shaffer, vice president, Triton programs, Northrop Grumman, and Rear Admiral William Wheeler III in cutting the ribbon on the refurbished hangar.

«With each new part of the Triton infrastructure that the Navy stands up, we move closer to making Triton operational and showing the fleet what this remarkable aircraft system can do», Shaffer said. «I look forward to the day when this hangar is full of activity leading up to the Guam employment».

«As Naval Base Ventura County’s representative in Congress, I am proud to support the MQ-4C Triton aircraft system», said U.S. Representative Julia Brownley, Ventura County. «The Triton is an essential component of the Navy’s future intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance capabilities, and a critical program for the continued strength of Naval Base Ventura County and our national security. I have made funding for research, development, and procurement of the Triton a top priority. When fully developed, this program will bring jobs and an economic boost to Ventura County».

Built by Northrop Grumman, the MQ-4C Triton is an unmanned intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance aircraft system with an autonomous capability that is piloted from a ground station. Triton can fly for up to 24 hours and reach altitudes of up to 55,000 feet/16,764 m. Flying high above the battle space, Triton provides a critical common operating picture, disseminating images and near-real time video to commanders around the world.

 

Key Features

  • Provides persistent maritime ISR at a mission radius of 2,000 NM/2,302 miles/3,704 km; 24 hours/7 days per week with 80% Effective Time On Station (ETOS)
  • Land-based air vehicle and sensor command and control
  • Afloat Level II payload sensor data via line-of-sight
  • Dual redundant flight controls and surfaces
  • 51,000-hour airframe life
  • Due Regard Radar for safe separation
  • Anti/de-ice, bird strike, and lightning protection
  • Communications bandwidth management
  • Commercial off-the-shelf open architecture mission control system
  • Net-ready interoperability solution

 

Payload (360-degree Field of Regard)

Multi-Function Active Sensor Active Electronically Steered Array (MFAS AESA) radar:

  • 2D AESA;
  • Maritime and air-to-ground modes;
  • Long-range detection and classification of targets.

MTS-B multi-spectral targeting system:

  • Electro-optical/infrared;
  • Auto-target tracking;
  • High resolution at multiple field-of-views;
  • Full motion video.

AN/ZLQ-1 Electronic Support Measures:

  • All digital;
  • Specific Emitter Identification.

Automatic Identification System:

  • Provides information received from VHF broadcasts on maritime vessel movements.

 

Specifications

Wingspan 130.9 feet/39.9 m
Length 47.6 feet/14.5 m
Height 15.4 feet/4.6 m
Gross Take-Off Weight (GTOW) 32,250 lbs/14,628 kg
Maximum Internal Payload 3,200 lbs/1,452 kg
Maximum External Payload 2,400 lbs/1,089 kg
Self-Deploy 8,200 NM/9,436 miles/15,186 km
Maximum Altitude 56,500 feet/17,220 m
Maximum Velocity, TAS (True Air Speed) 331 knots/381 mph/613 km/h
Maximum Endurance 24 hours

 

Sea Venom

MBDA’s Sea Venom/ANL (Anti-Navire Léger) missile has successfully completed its second development firing from a French Defence Procurement Agency (DGA – Direction Générale de l’Armement) Panther test helicopter at Ile Du Levant in southeast France.

Sea Venom/ANL is part of an Anglo-French programme linked to the Lancaster House treaty
Sea Venom/ANL is part of an Anglo-French programme linked to the Lancaster House treaty

The firing, which took place on 18 April 2018, highlighted Sea Venom/ANL’s Lock On After Launch (LOAL) capabilities. It also validated its aptitude for low-altitude, sea-skimming flight, the effectiveness of the data link between the missile and helicopter and Sea Venom/ANL’s autonomous guidance capability, using images from its infrared seeker.

Guto Bebb, UK Minister for Defence Procurement, said: «Sea Venom is yet another weapon that will help our Royal Navy keep the United Kingdom safe amid intensifying global threats. The lightweight subsonic sea-skimming missile, which will equip our Wildcat helicopters, will add to our Navy’s impressive capabilities while at sea and ensure they remain equipped to face every eventuality. The test firing partnership between France and the United Kingdom is also another fantastic display of the two nations working together to protect global waters».

Frank Bastart, head of the Sea Venom/ANL programme at MBDA said: «We’re delighted that the second development firing of Sea Venom/ANL was a complete success. We have now tested a range of the missile’s capabilities and it has performed to the very edge of its operational envelope, which is testament to the hard work and skills of our development and production teams in conjunction with DGA. This is a significant milestone in the development of the missile and when it enters service Sea Venom/ANL will provide a major increase in capability to the UK and French navies».

Sea Venom/ANL is part of an Anglo-French programme linked to the Lancaster House treaty agreed between the UK and France in November 2010 and possesses a «fire and forget» mode along with ‘operator above the loop’ capability to maintain control over the entire missile trajectory. It has been designed for use from the widest range of platforms; in UK service the missile will be used from the AW159 Wildcat helicopter, while France will operate the missile from its future Light Joint Helicopter (HIL – Hélicoptère Interarmées Léger). The missile is designed to enable the helicopters of both countries’ navies to deal with a range of threats including fast moving patrol boats, corvettes and coastal targets.

MBDA was awarded the production contract for Sea Venom/ANL in March 2014. The joint programme is the first to take full advantage of mutual dependency arrangements agreed under the ‘One Complex Weapons’ initiative designed to consolidate the Anglo-French missile industry around MBDA.

 

CHARACTERISTICS

Weight 110 kg/242.5 lbs.
Length 2.5 m/8.2 feet
Diameter 200 mm/7.87 inches
Speed High subsonic
Range over 20 km/12.4 miles/10.8 NM
Warhead 30 kg/66 lbs. class anti-ship

 

Over-the-Horizon

Raytheon Co., Missile Systems, Tucson, Arizona, is awarded a $14,856,016 firm-fixed-price contract for Over-the-Horizon Weapon Systems.

Ten years after the first LCS ship was commissioned, the U.S. Navy has finally ordered a long-range missile for these vessels, whose only other weapon is a 57-mm turret. The Naval Strike Missile is made by Norway’s Kongsberg group (Kongsberg photo)
Ten years after the first LCS ship was commissioned, the U.S. Navy has finally ordered a long-range missile for these vessels, whose only other weapon is a 57-mm turret. The Naval Strike Missile is made by Norway’s Kongsberg group (Kongsberg photo)

This contract will manufacture and deliver Over-the-Horizon Weapon Systems, which consists of:

  • Encanistered Missiles (EM) loaded into Launching Mechanisms (LM);
  • a single Fire Control Suite (FCS).

This contract consists of:

  • EMs (tactical, telemetered and inert operational);
  • FCSs;
  • LMs;
  • mission support equipment, training equipment and courses;
  • engineering services;
  • travel and other direct costs.

This contract includes options which, if exercised, would bring the cumulative value of this contract to $847,611,857.

Work will be performed in:

  • Kongsberg, Norway (75 percent);
  • Tucson, Arizona (15 percent);
  • Schrobenhausen, Germany (4 percent);
  • Raufoss, Norway (3 percent);
  • McKinney, Texas (2 percent);
  • Louisville, Kentucky (1 percent),

and is expected to be completed by May 2020.

Fiscal 2018 research, development, test and evaluation (Navy) funding; and fiscal 2018 other procurement (Navy) funding in the amount of $14,856,016 will be obligated at time of award and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year.

This contract was competitively procured via the Federal Business Opportunities website, with one offer received.

The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, District of Columbia, is the contracting activity (N00024-18-C-5432).

Acceptance Trials

Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) 11, the future USS Sioux City (LCS-11), completed Acceptance Trials in the waters of Lake Michigan. LCS-11 is the sixth Freedom-variant LCS designed and built by the Lockheed Martin-led industry team and is slated for delivery to the U.S. Navy later this summer.

LCS-11 (Sioux City) completed Acceptance Trials in Lake Michigan
LCS-11 (Sioux City) completed Acceptance Trials in Lake Michigan

«LCS-11’s completion of Acceptance Trials means this ship is one step closer to joining the fleet and conducting critical maritime operations for the Navy», said Joe DePietro, vice president, Small Combatants and Ship Systems at Lockheed Martin. «This ship is agile, powerful and lethal, and the industry team and I are looking forward to her delivery, commissioning and deployment».

The trials, conducted May 20-24, included surface and air detect-to-engage demonstrations of the ship’s combat system. Major systems and features were demonstrated, including aviation support, small boat launch handling and recovery and ride control.

«I am extremely proud of our LCS team including our shipbuilders at Fincantieri Marinette Marine», said Jan Allman, Fincantieri Marinette Marine President and CEO. «These are complex vessels, and it takes a strong team effort to design, build and test these American warships».

The future USS Sioux City (LCS-11) is one of eight ships in various stages of production and test at Fincantieri Marinette Marine, with one more in long-lead production.

The next Freedom-variant in the class is LCS-13, the future USS Wichita. LCS-13 is slated to complete Acceptance Trials in early summer with delivery this year.

Lockheed Martin’s Freedom-variant LCS is a highly maneuverable, lethal and adaptable ship, designed to support focused-missions in the areas of mine countermeasures, anti-submarine warfare and surface warfare. The Freedom-variant LCS integrates new technology and capability to affordably support current and future mission capability from deep water to the littorals.

 

Ship Design Specifications

Hull Advanced semiplaning steel monohull
Length Overall 389 feet/118.6 m
Beam Overall 57 feet/17.5 m
Draft 13.5 feet/4.1 m
Full Load Displacement Approximately 3,200 metric tons
Top Speed Greater than 40 knots/46 mph/74 km/h
Range at top speed 1,000 NM/1,151 miles/1,852 km
Range at cruise speed 4,000 NM/4,603 miles/7,408 km
Watercraft Launch and Recovery Up to Sea State 4
Aircraft Launch and Recovery Up to Sea State 5
Propulsion Combined diesel and gas turbine with steerable water jet propulsion
Power 85 MW/113,600 horsepower
Hangar Space Two MH-60 Romeo Helicopters
One MH-60 Romeo Helicopter and three Vertical Take-off and Land Tactical Unmanned Air Vehicles (VTUAVs)
Core Crew Less than 50
Accommodations for 75 sailors provide higher sailor quality of life than current fleet
Integrated Bridge System Fully digital nautical charts are interfaced to ship sensors to support safe ship operation
Core Self-Defense Suite Includes 3D air search radar
Electro-Optical/Infrared (EO/IR) gunfire control system
Rolling-Airframe Missile Launching System
57-mm Main Gun
Mine, Torpedo Detection
Decoy Launching System

 

Freedom-class

Ship Laid down Launched Commissioned Homeport
USS Freedom (LCS-1) 06-02-2005 09-23-2006 11-08-2008 San Diego, California
USS Fort Worth (LCS-3) 07-11-2009 12-07-2010 09-22-2012 San Diego, California
USS Milwaukee (LCS-5) 10-27-2011 12-18-2013 11-21-2015 San Diego, California
USS Detroit (LCS-7) 08-11-2012 10-18-2014 10-22-2016 San Diego, California
USS Little Rock (LCS-9) 06-27-2013 07-18-2015 12-16-2017 San Diego, California
USS Sioux City (LCS-11) 02-19-2014 01-30-2016
USS Wichita (LCS-13) 02-09-2015 09-17-2016
USS Billings (LCS-15) 11-02-2015 07-01-2017
USS Indianapolis (LCS-17) 07-18-2016 04-14-2018
USS St. Louis (LCS-19) 05-17-2017
USS Minneapolis/St. Paul (LCS-21) 02-22-2018
USS Cooperstown (LCS-23)
USS Marinette LCS-25
USS Nantucket (LCS-27)

 

LCS11AT_Social from RMS Videography on Vimeo.

CAT 5 trials

HMAS Brisbane (DDG-41) has recently completed her Category 5 (CAT 5) Sea Trials off the coast of Adelaide. During CAT 5 Sea Trials, the functional performance of the Mission System as a whole is verified. This verification is a pre-requisite to enable the Air Warfare Destroyer Alliance to deliver Brisbane to the Department of Defence for provisional acceptance.

HMAS Brisbane (DDG-41) at sea conducting CAT 5 trials assisted by HMAS Hobart (DDG-39)
HMAS Brisbane (DDG-41) at sea conducting CAT 5 trials assisted by HMAS Hobart (DDG-39)

During this phase of trials, testing of key components of both the platform and combat systems occurred. Achieving this key milestone represents an important step closer to becoming the RAN’s newest DDG.

During this period some of Brisbane’s crew were fortunate enough to participate and support the trial process and played a crucial role in assisting the civilian contractors through this process to achieve the desired outcome.

Brisbane’s first catering team, led by POML-C Nicholas Pearce, provided an impressive level of catering support to the 220 Navy and contracted personnel onboard throughout the trial.

Maritime Logistics Officer HMAS Brisbane (DDG-41), Lieutenant Commander (LCDR) Warren Lynch, said through careful planning and liaison with uniformed and civilian stakeholders, Brisbane’s chefs were able to provide a high quality of service for the entire period that the ship was at sea.

«The food and service provided by Brisbane’s chefs was consumed with hearty enthusiasm, and thoroughly enjoyed by all», he said. «With introducing a new capability into service, there are always some teething issues and challenges associated with setting to work a new ship and finding your ‘zen’ within a new work space; however, the team performed exceptionally well and were able to adapt quickly and professionally to the new environment».

One of the main challenges encountered by the team was the distance between the main servery line and the galley, which is physically separated by two watertight bulkheads.

After close liaising with the team on HMAS Hobart (DDG-39), the HMAS Brisbane (DDG-41) catering team was able to implement the same measures to ensure that an effective mitigation could be implemented to support a high quality of service throughout the trial.

The successful completion of NUSHIP Brisbane’s CAT 5 trials is another critical milestone that places HMAS Brisbane (DDG-41) within firing distance of her October commissioning date.

 

Characteristics

Length 481.3 feet/146.7 m
Beam 61 feet/18.6 m
Draft 23.6 feet/7.2 m
Full load displacement 7,000 tonnes
Main Engine 36 MW/48,276 hp
Top speed 28+ knots/32 mph/52 km/h
Range at 18+ knots/21 mph/33 km/h 5,000+ NM/5,779 miles/9,300 km
Crew 186
Accommodation 234
Combat System Aegis Weapon System Baseline 7.1
AN/SPY-1D(V) Phased Array Radar (81 NM/93 miles/150 km)
AN/SPQ-9B Horizon Search Radar
Mk-41 Vertical Launch System (48 VLS cells: RIM-162 Evolved SeaSparrow Missile (ESSM)/Standard Missile-2 (SM-2)/SM-6)
Mk-45 Mod.4 5” (127-mm) 62 Calibre Gun (Range: 20 NM/23 miles/37 km)
Advanced Harpoon Weapon Control (2 × 4 launchers)
Electronic Warfare (EW) Suite
Very Short-Range Air and Surface Defence
Nulka Active Missile Decoy system
Integrated Sonar System incorporating a hull mounted and towed array sonar
Communications Suite
Aviation Flightdeck and hangar for one helicopter
Boats Two Rigid Hulled Inflatable Boats (RHIBs)

 

The first Guardian

The first vessel from the Turnbull Government’s $90 billion continuous shipbuilding program has been launched.

The first of a new class of 21 Pacific Patrol Boats that Australia is building to reinforce its Pacific allies was launched yesterday. This program is the first element of Australia’s financially-ambitious $90-billion shipbuilding plan (AUS DoD photo)
The first of a new class of 21 Pacific Patrol Boats that Australia is building to reinforce its Pacific allies was launched yesterday. This program is the first element of Australia’s financially-ambitious $90-billion shipbuilding plan (AUS DoD photo)

Minister for Defence Industry, the Hon Christopher Pyne MP, said Austal launched the first of 21 new Pacific Patrol Boats – named the Guardian Class – at Henderson in Western Australia.

«The launch is a further demonstration the Turnbull Government is delivering on its ambitious naval shipbuilding agenda», Minister Pyne said. «The project, which is worth around $335 million, is on time and on budget. This particular boat will be gifted to Papua New Guinea in late October 2018 and is the first of 21 boats to be gifted to 12 Pacific Island countries and East Timor as part of the Pacific Maritime Security Program. Austal has advised the Guardian Class Patrol Boat Project supports around 400 jobs either directly or through the supply chain».

The boats will be used to conduct maritime surveillance and enforcement operations, such as combating illegal fishing.

Construction of the second and third boats is underway, with new boats scheduled to be delivered at approximately three-month intervals from late 2018 until 2023.

The 39.5 metre/129.6 feet steel-hulled patrol boats are being built at Austal’s dedicated production facility in the suburb of Naval Base, near Henderson.

CAMM interceptor

MBDA’s Land Ceptor air defence system has successfully destroyed its target during an end-to-end system demonstration firing at the Vidsel Test Range in Sweden, an important milestone for the project prior to entry to service with the British Army.

Land Ceptor on target in latest success for MBDA’s CAMM interceptor
Land Ceptor on target in latest success for MBDA’s CAMM interceptor

Land Ceptor utilises the proven Common Anti-air Modular Missile (CAMM) currently in production and delivering a common stockpile to meet the air defence needs of both the British Army and the Royal Navy (as Sea Ceptor). In British Army service Land Ceptor will replace the current Rapier air defence system and provides a step-change in capability, including over triple the range and the ability to intercept a much more challenging target set.

The system demonstration trial showcased the maturity of the Land Ceptor system across a full engagement sequence. This included launcher deployment; munition loading; receipt of air tracks from a Giraffe-AMB radar; air track processing by Land Ceptor’s onboard Command and Control (C2) system; and execution of a full engagement chain, with two-way data exchange with the missile during its mid-course fly-out phase, and successful interception and destruction of a target using the missile’s seeker in the terminal phase.

Land Ceptor with CAMM is the latest generation of air defence system, providing exceptional capability from very short ranges (VSHORAD) below 1 km/3,281 feet into the Medium Range Air Defence (MRAD) tier beyond 25 km/15.5 miles. Key features of CAMM are its next generation solid-state active radar seeker, two-way data-link, low-signature rocket motor and its 360° soft-vertical launch system. These combine to enable the missile to rapidly intercept the most challenging and dangerous of threats including saturation attacks from precision guided munitions and manoeuvring high-speed missiles emerging late from low altitude and from multiple directions simultaneously.

The demonstration in Vidsel coincides with the transition into production of the Land Ceptor weapon system, which will now undergo system-of-system integration and test as part of the British Army’s Sky Sabre air defence architecture. It is the latest in a series of highly successful trials of CAMM and its related systems over several years that have consistently proven its maturity and game changing performance.

 

About CAMM family of missile systems

The Royal Navy has recently conducted a large set of service acceptance trials of its related Sea Ceptor system. Sea Ceptor, which uses the same CAMM interceptor, has been introduced into service to replace the Vertical Launch Seawolf system on the Royal Navy’s Type 23 frigates. The Sea Ceptor system provides a major step-change in capability for the Royal Navy’s frigates, as they will

gain the ability to protect other ships within their local area, in addition to having an excellent self-defense capability. Sea Ceptor will also be fitted to the Royal Navy’s future Type 26 and Type 31e frigates.

Land Ceptor is the UK launch configuration of the Enhanced Modular Air Defence Solutions (EMADS) product family. EMADS brings together best-of-breed systems and technologies from across MBDA’s European base to save time, development costs and provide a flexible system for air defence provision. EMADS has been designed for ease of integration with existing equipment and infrastructure through modular design and use of standard interfaces. CAMM is a family of missiles that includes CAMM-ER (Extended Range) which shares all the same components as CAMM other than a larger rocket motor to extend its range out to beyond 40 km/25 miles.